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Charity Profile

Audited Financial Statements

2017-18

Minhaj

We l f a r e F o u n d a t i o n


CONTENTS

About Us

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MWF Wordwide

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Orphan Care Home

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Our Girls Our Future

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Education For All

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Minhaj University

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Raise a Family

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Water For All

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Healthcare

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Help Feed - Qurbani

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Emergency Relief

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Hope for Rohingya

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Awareness and Campaigning

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Volunteering & Fundraising

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Local Projects

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Audited Financial Statements 2017-18

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Inspired by our faith and guided by our values, we envisage a peaceful world where communities are empowered, social obligations are fulfilled and people respond to the needs and suffering of others. Minhaj Welfare Foundation takes the principle view that there is no greater priority in life than to lift the poor out of poverty.


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ABOUT US Minhaj Welfare Foundation was founded in 1989 as a compassionate response to the rise of inequaliy and poverty in Pakistan. Since then it has been serving and striving to make the world a better and fairer place. One of the key and foremost reasons for the establishment of Minhaj Welfare Foundation was to establish a network of schools that will provide a quality education that is accessible to the economically deprived communities of Pakistan. MWF strongly believes that education is the most crucial foundation stone of any society; without which the development and progress of any nation is not achievable. Since our establishment, we have built 640 educational institutions including schools, colleges, libraries and a University catering for well over 150,000 students and through this we are contributing to the livelihoods of over 7000 families hrough the employment of our academic and administrative staff. MWF strongly adheres to the philosophy that education should be supplemented with rigorous moral and ethical training so that the students make a positive contribution to the development of their communities. Based on this our Education program provides a holistic education that empowers children to lead productive and successful lives. Today, through its worldwide network Minhaj Welfare Foundation is growing as a leading international grassrootled organisation. We are proud of the achievements made by MWF so far and know that there is still much to do. We thank all of our supporters, volunteers and MWF staff for their continuous support and endevours in saving lives around the world.

Dr Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri Founder Minhaj Welfare Foundation

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ORPHAN CARE HOME Supporting

THOUSANDS OF ORPHAN and needy children providing

Accomodation

Healthcare

Daily Meals

Education

Entertainment

Sports

The AGHOSH (Orphan Care Home) project builds a loving, stable family for orphaned, abandoned and other vulnerable children around the world.

Our comprehensive approach offers long-term care for children in need and empowers young people with the resources to reach their full potential; transforming the lives of thousands of children each year. Through AGHOSH FAMILY, smaller children (from 5 years of age) are raised by a MOTHER who cares for the children as her very own. Each Aghosh family consists of about 8 children (and their Aghosh mom) who grow up together as siblings. The Orphan Care HoThe 8


Aghosh ORPHAN CARE HOMES

ES

The Orphan Care Home provides each child with their material needs (food, water and shelter), developmental needs (school, medical care, vocational training, and life-skills), and their emotional needs (the opportunity to be a part of a family again, to work through the grief of losing their parents in a secure and caring environment). 9


130 MILLION girls are not in education

15 MILLION

are expected to never enrol at all

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In developing countries, millions of girls are denied the chance to develop skills that will help them take charge in their homes, careers, communities and countries. Minhaj Welfare Foundation builds an environment with safe, quality and transformative education for girls so they may find their voice and learn to lead.

Aysha lost her father at the age of 10, she has been living at the girls orphan care home for the past four years. Aysha wants to be a teacher, so she can support her family.

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Through the “Our Girls Our Future� initiative, MWF is directly supporting thousands of girls to get the education they need to transform their lives and secure their futures. This means working to ensure quality and safe education for all girls, including in remote and marginalised areas. MWF has built girl-only schools and colleges, and orphan care homes in which young girls are now able to access quality education, boarding facilities, and vocational training centres.

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----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- OurGirlsOurFuture Minhaj Welfare Foundation through the help of its local community network provides the expertise and experience to construct and develop schools, colleges, orphan care homes and vocational centres for girls and women around the world. MWF provides an update of the impact the project has made and the differences it is making in the life of the girls, women, their families and the community.

Construction of the orphan village (Khanewal, South punjab) for girls.

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640+ EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES

The Education Village located in Lahore, Pakistan which includes a primary and secondry school, a college & university (recognised by the higher education commission of Pakistan)

EDUCATION FOR ALL 14


In 1995, Minhaj Welfare Foundation launched its ‘Mass Education Programme’ targeting communities from remote and marginalised areas of Pakistan. Through its inception, MWF was driven by the notion that education is for all and the only means which can lift communities out of extreme poverty is education. Through a community led model, MWF opened its very first school in the drawing room of a home belonging to a local volunteer in Pakistan. MWF has built 640 educational institutes (including primary and secondary schools) in Asia and Africa alone.

150,000 Students

8,000 Teachers

Through Minhaj Education Society, MWF is supporting: to build bigger and modern classrooms providing quality education

to provide scholarships to students to advance in their studies

to ensure every child receives the best form of both secular and religious education 15


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FROM PRIMARY TO GRADUATION Zaid Ahmed was among the first children that came into the AGHOSH project in Lahore, Pakistan in 2003. Through his ongoing commitment and dedication, he decided to join the undergraduate program at the Minhaj University Lahore. He was part of the scholarship and sponsorship program by Minhaj Welfare Foundation. He graduated top of his class in his degree. Zaid is now undergoing training for a promising career committed to public service.

Students supported by MWF’s scholarship program receiving their degrees.

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RAISE A FAMILY

As part of its ‘stable family, secure future’ - family start up support programme - Minhaj Welfare Foundation provides couples (that come from deprived backgrounds) and their families with an amazing ‘gift of marrige’ by ensuring both the man and wife are better equipped to take part in the development of their society and help to restore their self-esteem.

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STABLE FAMILY SECURE FUTURE FAMILY START-UP SUPPORT

BUSINESS S TA R T- U P

M A R R I AG E S U P P O RT

MICRO FINANCING

VO C AT I O N A L TR AINING

HOUSING SUPPORT

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WATER FOR ALL

In the deserts of Thar, accessing clean and safe drinking water is one of the biggest challenges faced by communities. Similarly, there are communities in the North Eastern region of Kenya affected by contaminated salty water from the nearby river. Thanks to our donors worldwide, we have been working with communities to install fresh safe water facilities in the poorest regions around the world.

South Punjab Baluchistan Sindh East Africa

Saabra (pictured on the right) told us, “Thanks to Minhaj, we now have clean water. I can’t believe I will no longer have to worry about my family getting ill from cholera or the water running dry.” Her family now has enough clean water not just to drink, but also to wash and cook with too. Thus reducing the risk of them getting ill and improving the health and hygiene of his whole family. Instead of walking 4 km every day to fetch water, Saabra can now attend school and look foward to a brighter future.

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MWF has built more than

7300

Water Facilities

Providng more than

1 MILLION people with access to clean and safe drinking water

Saabra fetching water in her container at a MWF water well, water which will be used to help her family with cleaning and cooking.

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HEALTHCARE Minhaj Welfare Foundation through its dedicated team of doctors and trained medical experts provides access to basic health care to the poor and needy around the world. MWF has established free medical camps (providing free blood checkups, free medical advice, etc), small dispensaries, ambulance services and mobile surgeries.

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“

“

Minhaj Welfare Foundation believes that healthcare is a universal right for everyone.

MWF has eye camps in which trained surgeons carry out cataract surgery on thousands of patients. Through our intervention we have prevented many mothers from losing their children at birth, cured young children from diseases such as malaria and diarrhea and most importantly saved thousands of lives every year.

Mobile Medical Unit


An old man recieved full eye treatment in one of MWF’s free eye camp set up in Narrowal, Pakistan.

We believe that families should not suffer needlessly because they lack access to health services. Today many people are unable to access health services because of poverty, their rural locations, or marginalisation. 23


One of the most important aspects of faith is to help feed the poor and the hungry. This is why every year, MWF joins the world’s largest ‘helpfeed’ campaign to provide food security to communities in need. Qurbani is one of the many humanitarian steps taken by MWF in alleviating poverty in the developing world. Since 1989, more than 278,923 Qurbanis and 1,532,287 Qurbani meat packs have been distributed by Minhaj Welfare Foundation in the most poorest regions of the world reaching 5 million beneficiaries. Minhaj Welfare Foundation seasonal Qurbani campaign is carried out in Syria, Palestine, Kenya, Somalia, Nepal & Bangladesh (Rohingya refugees), India and Pakistan.

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01 EAST AFRICA

The Qurbani programme is implemented in the North East region of Sub-Baomo location in Kenya (bordering Somalia). In Somalia our teams help to distribute Qurbani meat in IDP camps in Mogadishu and southern regions of the country. 02

SOUTH ASIA

Our experience team travels to rural areas of Pakistan and India. With a large network of volunteers, we reach hundreds of thousands of households across the region ensuring that they too can share the joys of Eid. In Nepal and Bangladesh, we are working in hard-to-reach areas affected by natural disasters. Our focus is mainly on the Rohingya refugees who have fled their homes in Myanmar. We are providing Qurbani meat in make-shift homes and camps set up for the Rohingya refugees. MWF has a long term committment to help the Rohingya people. 03

MIDDLE EAST

The Syrian and Palestinian people have been facing severe persecution, leaving millions homeless and without basic essentials. The ongoing conflict has taken thousands of lives. Through our local teams, MWF reaches out to both Syrian and Palestinian refugees living on the Turkey and Jordan border.

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EMERGENC More than 65.6 MILLION people are left displaced worldwide

GAZA APPEAL Gaza is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Extreme poverty, ongoing conflict and blockade means that the Palestinian people do not have the necessary care and support. MWF has been supporting the people of Palestine by providing essential aid: including food parcels, access to clean drinking water and scholarships for orphan and needy students. Through our HelpFeed programme, we are also helping farmers to have the necessary tools to grow their own food, so that they can sustain themselves and their families in the long-term. 26

AFRICA APPEAL More than 22 million are affected by the drought in East Africa, and at least 13 million are experiencing severe food insecurity. The drought has caused crops to fail and cattle to die while the lack of clean water increases the threat of cholera and other diseases. Brutal war in South Sudan has driven more than 3 million people from their homes and left millions more in need of emergency food. MWF is providing life-saving aid to prevent the hunger crisis.


CY RELIEF SYRIA APPEAL The Syria conflict has been ongoing since 2011, with more than 13 million Syrians still in need of humanitarian assistance. Through your support MWF will continue its efforts to provide food, shelter, and vital services. We are also working to reach Syrian refugees living in nearby countries, increasing our aid to more than 20,000 families. We are helping Orphan and needy children in need. This support will allow children to stay in a safe environment and have access to quality education.

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Since August 2018, an estimated 671,000 Rohingya have crossed into Bangladesh fleeing violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, increasing the total Rohingya population in Cox’s Bazaar to over one million. New arrivals are living in make-shift settlements, with an increasing need of humanitarian assistance – including shelter, food, clean water and sanitation. •

MWF launched an appeal in August 2018 to assist Rohingya refugees. We received an overwhelming response from our donors.

As part of our food initiative, thousands of Rohingya refugees received food parcels and make-shift kitchens were set-up in a number of camps. Daily hot food is helping the beneficiaries and their households.

MWF started building clean water facilities by boring of deep hand pumps for Rohingya refugees in several makeshift camps.

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Shelters have been built, increasing support for tens of thousands of beneficiaries living without shelter in rainy conditions.

MWF developed its own medical camp with the support of 6 medical experts and 20 volunteers. Free prescriptions are being provided daily.


AWARENESS AND CAMPAIGNING

A man holding his medical prescription after his free treatment at the Minhaj Medical camp (Tenkhali, Cox’s Bazaar)

Young men holding food cards ready for their daily ration

As part of its strategic approach to influence governments and law makers on the future of the Rohingya people in Bangladesh, the MWF team led by its Managing Director, Faisal Hussain attended a number of meetings in Brussels (organised by the UN and European parliament).The meetings included a number of a donor countries. Speaking about MWF’s recent visit to Bangladesh, Faisal Hussain emphasised that ‘more needs to be done to help the humanitarian needs of the Rohingya people’.

Make-shift homes being set up in the Tenkhali refugee camp, Cox’s Bazaar

Cooked meals being prepared for daily distribution.

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Minhaj Welfare Foundation is built upon the hard work and dedication of volunteers. Being a part of Minhaj Welfare Foundation is a great way to meet like-minded people in your community, and to make a huge difference to the lives of women and children living in poverty. At MWF, we provide an opportunity to our volunteers from all ages, backgrounds and interests, who love organising fundraising events and activities in their local area. All for a good cause. MWF believes volunteering can create a positive impact for the individual. As such, we are committed to investing in and supporting MWF volunteers. Ways to volunteer with MWF • • • • • • • • • •

Organise an event Participate in a challenge Volunteer at an event Distribute campaign material Hold a market stall Engage your neighbourhood Participate in deployment trips Bucket collections Build a network of money boxes Create your crowdfunding page

VOLUN FU


NTEERING & UNDRAISING

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LOCAL PROJECTS

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01 SEMINARS

Minhaj Welfare Foundation develops workshops and courses to deliver in seminars that educate students towards becoming constructively contributing participants of their society. These seminars are both practical and interactive.

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03 RESEARCH &

PUBLICATION

A dedicated department is engaged in research and translation work in different languages. The works produced by this department is in the form of books, courses and syllabi which is then used by educational institutions, seminaries, schools and universities as a vital reference and guide.

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AWARENESS

Minhaj Welfare Foundation awareness campaigns challenge public opinion in ways that have a positive impact on lives. Our awareness campaigns take place through local community engagement initiatives and include a variety of methods like media campaigns (radio and tv), social media content, workshops and debates.

MINHAJ COLLEGE MANCHESTER

Minhaj College Manchester (MCM) is a full-time independent college providing high-quality education in various academic disciplines (i.e. A-Levels) alongside accredited courses in Islamic studies. MCM takes pride in providing a holistic environment for all students offering personal, spiritual and academic learning, thus making its pastoral care system a central part of daily activities.

06 04 HOMELESS

According to reports there is now a growing number of people sleeping on the streets. MWF works with local groups and partners to provide hot meals at soup kitchens and ready packed meals to homeless people locally.

COMMUNITY RADIO

Community Radios have proven to be an excellent engagement platform. These initiatives provide community leaders and campaigners a louder voice as well as an array of activities for people of all ages to engage in. Our radio stations provide an inclusive opportuniy for the community to play their active role in saving lives.

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; Since 1989

We thank our supporters for their growing trust in our organisation: sharing peace, love and harmony with the less fortunate worldwide, regardless of race, relgion, language or sect.


BANK TRANSFER For UK (GBP - £)

For EUROPE (EURO - € )

For US (DOLLAR - $)

Bank Name: HSBC

Bank Name: Barclays Bank Plc

Bank Name: Barclays Bank Plc

Sort Code: 40-15-17

Sort Code: 20-82-14

Sort Code: 20-82-14

Account No.: 21 65 18 03

Account No.: 74 80 04 55

Account No.: 87 70 95 33

IBAN No.:

IBAN No.:

IBAN No.:

GB95 MIDL4015 1721 6518 03

GB32 BARC 208214 7480 0455

GB79 BARC 208214 8770 9533

SWIFT: MIDLGB211 4H

SWIFT: BARCGB22

SWIFT: BARCGB22

TELEPHONE DONATIONS To make a donation over the phone using your debit/credit card, please call us directly on: 0300 30 30 777 (UK) +44 20 3375 4730 (INT.) 1-888-9-646425 (US/CA)

CHEQUES BY POST

ONLINE DONATIONS

Please make cheques payable to MWF and post to

Visit our website minhajwelfare.org

Minhaj Welfare Foundation, 30 Brindley Road, Manchester, M16 9HQ

Registered Charity Numbers: England & Wales 1084057 Scotland SC043566

Implemented Projects on behalf of

“Think Locally, Act Globally”

“Think Locally, Act Globally”


REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

The trustees present their report with the financial statements of the charity for the year ended 31 March 2018. The trustees have adopted the provisions of Accounting and Reporting by Charities: Statement of Recommended Practice applicable to charities preparing their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland (FRS 102) (effective 1 January 2015).

REFERENCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS Registered Charity number 1084057 England & Wales SC043566 Scotland Principle Address 30 Brindley Road City Park Manchester M16 9HQ Trustees D Hussain M Naveed M Q Rauf R A Raza S Mursaleen Bankers Natwest Piccadilly Circus Branch PO Box 4QQ 19 Shaftesbury Avenue London W1A 4QQ Independent auditors Hadleys & Co. Ground Floor Import Building 2 Clove Crescent London E14 2BE

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES OBJECTIVES AND AIMS The organisation, Minhaj-Ul-Quran Welfare Foundation ‘MWF’ is a registered charity and was established by a Trust Deed made on the 10th May 2000 and amended on the 7th December 2000 and registered with the Charity Commission on the 11th December 2000. The charity is governed under the Trust Deed.

Minhaj Welfare Foundation (MWF) is a Worldwide Humanitarian Development organisation helping to support the poor and needy in marginalised communities working for their basic human rights, providing children the access to Education, providing the poor access to Basic Health Care and the means for Social Economic & Welfare support for the deprived within the developing world. It aims to work in removing short term difficulties and is committed to work to its long term and sustainable goals South Asia, Middle East, Africa and North America.

The core objectives of Minhaj Welfare Foundation can be summarised into the following:

a) The relief of poverty, sickness, distress and suffering of any persons who are in need irrespective of their nationality, race, ethnic origin and religious beliefs. b) The advancement of other charitable purposes for the benefit of the public to provide recreational facilities and activities in the interests of social welfare with the objective of providing the conditions of life for those persons in need of such facilities. c) The advancement of education for the public benefit concerning the teachings and religion of Islam; and d) The advancement of the faith and religious practices of Islam.

SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES The principal activity of the charity during the period was the advancement of the faith and religious practices of Islam. The advancement of education for the public benefit concerning the

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

teachings and religion of Islam. For the relief of poverty, sickness, distress and suffering of any persons who are in need irrespective of their nationality, race, ethnic origin and religious beliefs. The advancement of other charitable purposes for the benefit of the public, with a preference for Muslims, to provide recreational facilities and activities in the interests of social welfare with the object of improving the conditions of life for those persons in need of such facilities. VOLUNTEERS Volunteers are an important resource in both faith and community work. Volunteers are involved in most of our community activities, and we have volunteers regularly giving their time. All our t rustees also give their time freely. We encourage all members of our organisation to be involved in voluntary activities and to share their skills with others.

ACHIEVEMENT AND PERFORMANCE CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES Over the past year MWF has been extensively working to improve its administrative procedures and ensure a more efficient and effective aid/project delivery procedure.

Over the year new administrative and data management tools have been introduced which in turn are allowing us to develop a closer relationship with our donors.

Our media campaign was run through various Sky digital TV channels and radio stations across the UK to he lp promote all our campaigns including our seasonal Ramadan and Qurbani campaigns. CAMPAIGN OF PROJECTS DURING THE YEAR: WATER FOR ALL As part of its vision to provide clean and safe drinking water to the poor and needy in the third world, Minhaj Welfare Foundation further expanded its Water for All program Pakistan and Kenya. MWF built more than 1500 clean water facilities during the year in rural and marginalised areas of the world reaching out to the poorest communities and ensuring people in those regions have long term access to clean drinking water.

MWF believes that by providing access to clean drinking water via a safe water supply, health risks will be reduced, and it will be easier for people to engage in more productive activities like

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

securing an income for their families and growing food PAKISTAN PROJECTS: SUPPORTING A NUMBER OF PROJECTS IN THE YEAR Minhaj Welfare Foundation has been actively working in Pakistan since 1989. With donors’ help, MWF delivers a continual supply of life-saving emergency aid (which includes Zakat, Sadqah and General donations) as well as supporting families with education, healthcare and livelihoods. The key program sectors that Minhaj Welfare Foundation has covered over the year are: 1. CHILD SPONSORSHIP: Minhaj Welfare Foundation is aiding orphan and needy children through its child sponsorship program (which includes financial, educational and living support). 2. HELPFEED (FOOD SECURITY): providing food parcels, Iftar, hot meals during Ramadan, Rabi -ul-Awwal and other programs throughout the year. 3. EDUCATION FOR ALL: providing scholarships to students at schools and universities. 4. OUR FAMILIES (SHELTER): Rehabilitating and providing homes for poor and needy families. 5. EMERGENCY RELIEF: Minhaj Welfare Foundation is always responding to all major disasters and crisis in Pakistan 6. INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT (BUILDING): Establishing schools, dispensaries, halls, mosques, vocational training centres 7. HEALTHCARE: supporting dispensaries, carrying out mobile clinics, covering the surgical costs for needy patients KENYA: MINHAJ SECONDARY SCHOOL - APRIL 2017/DECEMBER 2017 The Minhaj Secondary School Kitere is located in one of the poorest regions in the country on the border of Kenya/Somalia in the North Eastern region of Africa. The people are farmers, who mainly rely on harvesting to ensure they can support their family. MWF has committed an annual educational bursary for the school to facilitate teachers’ wages, educational resources (including books, exam preparations, etc) and meals. LET’S REVIVE: UK PROJECTS Through the Let’s Revive project, MWF has been supporting various UK based educational, youth and research initiatives over the year. One of the main flagship projects include the Fareed-e-Millat Research Institute UK which is a team of UK based scholars who work on research and translation of both traditional and contemporary books written in Urdu, Arabic into English. The books are then used by schools, Islamic seminaries,

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

universities, students and teachers alike all over the world. We are a sponsor for Minhaj College Manchester (MCM). MCM is an accredited independent further education institution in Manchester providing access to formal college level qualifications alongside religious education. MWF has donated a member of their staff and provided facilities to MCM as well as donating towards the project. We are a sponsor for Minhaj Education Trust (MET) which is seeking to establish an academy trust. MET has been setup with the view to open primary and secondary schools as part of the Governments Free School scheme.

HOPE FOR ROHINGYA - AUGUST 2017/JANUARY 2018 In August 2017, more than a million Rohingyans fled their homes to neighbouring Bangladesh. The refugees settled in world’s largest displacement camps in Cox’s Bazaar. The majority of the people, mainly women, children and elderly, were sleeping in the open air without shelter and basic essentials (such as food, water and sanitation).

MWF launched the Hope for Rohingya emergency campaign to provide emergency aid to the refugees living in the camps. Through our local MWF volunteers in Cox’s Bazaar, Bangladesh, MWF was able to initiate an immediate response and assess the situation on the ground. In October and November 2017, the MWF team visited the refugee camp and oversaw the distribution of food parcels, building of shelter homes, construction of water pumps, and established a long term medical camp.

In January 2018, the team once again visited Cox’s Bazaar in Bangladesh to oversee the progress made by the local team and impact of donations made by the donors of MWF. QURBANI - AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017 Minhaj Welfare Foundation’s team travelled to the poorest and deprived regions of the third world to distribute food to the less fortunate in Kenya, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal (Rohingya refugees) and India.

Qurbani is a constant reminder of our religious obligation to share the blessings of sacrifice with the less fortunate.

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

SUPPORTING THE PEOPLE OF SYRIA The MWF team visited the Turkey/Syria border to distribute food and non-food items to displaced Syrian refugees living in the Hatay Province in Turkey. More than 400 food parcels were distributed to families living in make-shift homes and camps. The food parcels are enough food security for an entire month.

EID GIFTS DISTRIBUTION (PAKISTAN) - JULY 2017 Tharparkar, Pakistan is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Climate change is posing further risks leading to droughts devastating the region, with reports of children dying due to malnutrition and waterborne diseases. Through MWF’s ongoing intervention in the region (including building clean and safe water facilities), MWF supported more than 200 families with Eid Gifts, this included food and non-food items with toys for young children NEPAL: REBUILDING LIVES AND OPENING THE NEW CLASSROOMS Due to the nature of poverty and recent disasters in Nepal, MWF’s focus in the region has been to provide access to quality education, improve food security and livelihood status of poor, socially excluded and vulnerable men and women. One of the most notable aspects that we found was that a number of children did not have access to education or were being forced to drop out of school due to lack of schools and classrooms. Minhaj Welfare Foundation believes that one of the main stepping stones to take people out of poverty is education and ensuring that children have access to quality education. This is one of the reasons why MWF initiated rebuilding of classrooms in a remote village outside Kathmandu. The school was built using standard government-approved model for building schools in Nepal.

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

Working with a local partner, the refurbished classrooms are equipped with an earthquake -proof structure. The classrooms would enable the school to provide facilities for more students to gain access to education.

FINANCIAL REVIEW RESERVES POLICY It is the policy of the charity to maintain unrestricted funds, which are the free reserves of the charity, at a level which equate to approximately three to five months unrestricted expenditure. This provides sufficient funds to cover management and administrative and other related costs. Unrestricted funds were maintained at approximately this level throughout the year.

STRUCTURE, GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT GOVERNING DOCUMENT The charity is controlled by its governing document, a deed of trust, and constitutes an unincorporated charity.

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

RELATED PARTIES The charity has a close relationship with its sister charity Minhaj-ul-Quran International, which is also a registered charity. Two of the charity’s trustees were also trustees of the Minhaj-ul-Quran International although both charities are independent in their activities and financial matters. STATEMENT OF TRUSTEES RESPONSIBILITIES The trustees are responsible for preparing the Report of the Trustees and the financial statements in accordance with applicable law and United Kingdom Accounting Standards (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice), including Financial Reporting Standard 102 “The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland”. The law applicable to charities in England and Wales, the Charities Act 2011, Charity (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008 and the provisions of the trust deed requires the trustees to prepare financial statements for each financial year which give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the charity and of the incoming resources and application of resources, including the income and expenditure, of the charity for that period. In preparing those financial statements, the trustees are required to EE select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently; EE observe the methods and principles in the Charity SORP; EE make judgements and estimates that are reasonable and prudent; EE state whether applicable accounting standards have been followed, subject to any material departures disclosed and explained in the financial statements; EE prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the charity will continue in business.

The trustees are responsible for keeping proper accounting records which disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the charity and to enable them to ensure that the financial statements comply with the Charities Act 2011, the Charity (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008 and the provisions of the trust deed. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the charity and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities.

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 - CONTINUED ______________________________________________________________

Approved by order of the board of trustees on 16 January 2019 and signed on its behalf by:

............................................. Dawood Hussain - Trustee

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REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS TO THE TRUSTEES OF MINHAJ-UL-QURAN WELFARE FOUNDATION ___________________________________________________________________________

OPINION We have audited the financial statements of Minhaj-Ul-Quran Welfare Foundation (the ‘charity’) for the year ended 31 March 2018 which comprise the Statement of Financial Activities, the Statement of Financial Position, the Statement of Cash Flows and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies. The financial reporting framework that has been applied in their preparation is applicable law and United Kingdom Accounting Standards (United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice), including Financial Reporting Standard 102 ‘The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland’. This report is made solely to the charity’s trustees, as a body, in accordance with Section 144 of the Charities Act 2011 and regulations made under Section 154 of that Act, and also the Charities and Trustee Investment (Scotland) Act 2005 and the Charities Accounts (Scotland) Regulations 2006. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the charity’s trustees those matters we are required to state to them in an auditors’ report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the charity and the charity’s trustees as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed.

In our opinion the financial statements: EE give a true and fair view of the state of the charity’s affairs as at 31 March 2018 and of its incoming resources and application of resources for the year then ended; EE have been properly prepared in accordance with United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice,including Financial Reporting Standard 102 ‘The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and the Republic of Ireland’; and EE have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Charities Act 2011. BASIS FOR OPINION We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK) (ISAs (UK)) and applicable law. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditors responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements section of our report. We are independent of the charity in accordance with the ethical requirements that are relevant to our audit of the financial statements in the UK, including the FRC’s Ethical Standard, and we have fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

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REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS TO THE TRUSTEES OF MINHAJ-UL-QURAN WELFARE FOUNDATION - CONTINUED ___________________________________________________________________________

CONCLUSIONS RELATING TO GOING CONCERN We have nothing to report in respect of the following matters in relation to which the ISAs (UK) require us to report to you where: EE the trustees’ use of the going concern basis of accounting in the preparation of the financial statements is not appropriate; or EE the trustees have not disclosed in the financial statements any identified material uncertainties that may cast significant doubt about the charity’s ability to continue to adopt the going concern basis of accounting for a period of at least twelve months from the date when the financial statements are authorised for issue. OTHER INFORMATION The trustees are responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the information included in the annual report, other than the financial statements and our Report of the Independent Auditors thereon. Our opinion on the financial statements does not cover the other information and, except to the extent otherwise explicitly stated in our report, we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial statements, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial statements or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If we identify such material inconsistencies or apparent material misstatements, we are required to determine whether there is a material misstatement in the financial statements or a material misstatement of the other information. If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard. MATTERS ON WHICH WE ARE REQUIRED TO REPORT BY EXCEPTION We have nothing to report in respect of the following matters where the Charities Act 2011 requires us to report to you if, in our opinion: EE the information given in the Report of the Trustees is inconsistent in any material respect with the financial statements ; or EE sufficient accounting records have not been kept; or EE the financial statements are not in agreement with the accounting records and returns; or EE we have not received all the information and explanations we require for our audit.

46


REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS TO THE TRUSTEES OF MINHAJ-UL-QURAN WELFARE FOUNDATION - CONTINUED ___________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSIBILITIES OF TRUSTEES As explained more fully in the Statement of Trustees Responsibilities, the trustees are responsible for the preparation of the financial statements which give a true and fair view, and for such internal control as the trustees determine is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial statements, the trustees are responsible for assessing the charity’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the trustees either intend to liquidate the charity or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. OUR RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE AUDIT OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue a Report of the Independent Auditors that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with ISAs (UK) will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these financial statements. A further description of our responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements is located on the Financial Reporting Council’s website at www.frc.org.uk/auditorsresponsibilities. This description forms part of our Report of the Independent Auditors USE OF OUR REPORT This report is made solely to the charity’s trustees, as a body, in accordance with Section 144 of the Charities Act 2011 and regulations made under Section 154 of that Act. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the charity’s trustees those matters we are required to state to them in an auditors’ report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the charity and the charity’s trustees as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed.

Hadleys & Co. Eligible to act as an auditor in terms of Section 1212 of the Companies Act 2006 Ground Floor, Import Building 2 Clove Crescent London, E14 2BE 16 January 2019

47


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

Notes

2018

2017

Restricted funds (£)

Total funds (£)

Total funds (£)

2,884,014

-

2,884,014

2,215,360

Unrestricted funds (£)

INCOME AND ENDOWMENTS FROM Donations and legacies

2

Investment income

3

104,763

-

104,763

88,313

2,988,777

-

2,988,777

2,303,673

274,839

-

274,839

290,087

Orphan Care Home

268,961

-

268,961

276,847

Donations

161,593

-

161,593

245,769

Zakat

175,012

-

175,012

141,729

Qurbani

357,872

-

357,872

337,876

Water pumps

186,478

-

186,478

157,085

Emergency relief

112,382

-

112,382

59,830

Education

271,850

-

271,850

154,376

Staff costs

227,907

-

227,907

57,852

Other

115,618

-

115,618

155,410

2,152,512

-

2,152,512

1,876,861

836,265

-

836,265

426,812

Total EXPENDITURE ON Raising funds

4

Charitable activities

5

Total Expenditure NET INCOME RECONCILIATION OF FUNDS Total funds brought forward

2,678,477

2,678,477

2,251,665

TOTAL FUNDS CARRIED FORWARD

3,514,742

3,514,742

2,678,477

48


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AT 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

Notes

Unrestricted funds (£)

Restricted funds (£)

2018

2017

Total funds (£)

Total funds (£)

FIXED ASSETS Tangible Assets

11

462,446

-

462,446

Investment property

12

1,460,164

-

1,460,164

1,649,979 -

1,922,610

-

1,922,610

1,649,979

131,200

-

131,200

136,786

1,612,238

-

1,612,238

956,057

1,743,438

-

1,743,438

1,092,843

(151,306)

-

(151,306)

(64,345)

NET CURRENT ASSETS

1,592,132

-

1,592,132

1,028,498

TOTAL ASSETS LESS CURRENT LIABILITIES

3,514,742

-

3,514,742

2,678,477

3,514,742

-

3,514,742

2,678,477

General funds

3,514,742

2,678,477

Total Funds

3,514,742

2,678,477

CURRENT ASSETS Debtors

13

Cash at bank and in Hand

CREDITORS Amount falling due within one year

14

NET ASSETS FUNDS

15

Unrestricted funds

The financial statements were approved by the Board of Trustees on 16 January 2019 and were signed on its behalf by:

______________ Dawood Hussain - Trustee

49


STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________

Notes

2018

2017

Total funds (£)

Total funds (£)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES: Cash generated from operations

1

Interest paid Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

949,964

571,739

(4,371)

(12,481)

945,593

559,258

(30,352)

(331,357)

(260,337)

-

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES: Purchase of tangible fixed assets Purchase of investment property Interest received

1,277

4,273)

(289,412)

(327,084)

Change in cash and cash equivalents in the reporting period

656,181

232,174

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period

956,057

723,883

1,612,238

956,057

Net cash provide d by (used in) investing activities

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period

50


NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 _____________________________________________________

1. RECONCILIATION OF NET INCOME TO NET CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Net income for the reporting period (as per the statement of financial activities)

2018

2017

Total funds (£)

Total funds (£)

836,265

426,812

Depreciation charges

18,058

15,217

Interest received

Adjustments for: (1,277)

(4,273)

Interest paid

4,371

12,481

Decrease in debtors

5,586

147,965

(Decrease)/increase in creditors Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

51

86,961

(26,463)

949,964

571,739


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 ___________________________________________

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES BASIS OF PREPARING THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The financial statements of the charity, which is a public benefit entity under FRS 102, have been prepared in accordance with the Charities SORP (FRS 102) ‘Accounting and Reporting by Charities: Statement of Recommended Practice applicable to charities preparing their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland (FRS 102) (effective 1 January 2015)’, Financial Reporting Standard 102 ‘The Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland’ and the Charities Act 2011. The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. INCOME All income is recognised in the Statement of Financial Activities once the charity has entitlement to the funds, it is probable that the income will be received and the amount can be measured reliably. EXPENDITURE Liabilities are recognised as expenditure as soon as there is a legal or constructive obligation committing the charity to that expenditure, it is probable that a transfer of economic benefits will be required in settlement and the amount of the obligation can be measured reliably. Expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all cost related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to particular headings they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with the use of resources. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS Depreciation is provided at the following annual rates in order to write off the cost less estimated residual value of each asset over its estimated useful life. Long leasehold Fixtures and fittings Computer equipment

- 2% on cost - 25% on reducing balance - 25% on reducing balance

TAXATION The charity is exempt from tax on its charitable activities.

52


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

INVESTMENT PROPERTY Investment properties, for which fair value can be measured reliably without undue cost or effort, are measured at intervals with changes in fair value recognised in ‘net gains/(losses) on investments in the SoFA. FUND ACCOUNTING Unrestricted funds can be used in accordance with the charitable objectives at the discretion of the trustees. Restricted funds can only be used for particular restricted purposes within the objects of the charity. Restrictions arise when specified by the donor or when funds are raised for particular restricted purposes. Further explanation of the nature and purpose of each fund is included in the notes to the financial statements.

FOREIGN CURRENCIES Assets and liabilities in foreign currencies are translated into sterling at the rates of exchange ruling at the statement of financial position date. Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into sterling at the rate of exchange ruling at the date of transaction. Exchange differences are taken into account in arriving at the operating result.

CREDITORS AND ACCRUALS Creditors payable within one year and /or more than one year are recognised at the transactional price. Accruals are valued at the net cost, less any discounts offered.

DEBTORS AND PREPAYMENTS Debtors are receivable within one year and/or more than one year recognised at the transactional price. Prepayments are valued at the amount prepaid net of any discounts due.

53


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

2. DONATIONS AND LEGACIES

Donations Gift Aid

2018 (£)

2017 (£)

2,796,052

2,113,891

87,962

101,469

2,884,014

2,215,360

3. INVESTMENT INCOME Rents received

2018 (£)

2017 (£)

103,486

84,040

44

3,034

Deposit account interest Gift Aid Interest

1,233

1,239

104,763

88,313

4. RAISING FUNDS RAISING DONATIONS AND LEGACIES Fundraising and events costs Advertising and postage costs Staff costs

2018 (£)

2017 (£)

74,865

122,345

167,318

143,376

32,656

24,366

274,839

290,087

5. CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES COSTS Direct Cost (£)

Support costs (See note 6)

Total (£)

Orphan Care Home

268,961

-

268,961

Donations

161,593

-

161,593

Zakat

175,012

-

175,012

Qurbani

357,872

-

357,872

Water pumps

186,478

-

186,478

Emergency relief

112,382

-

112,382

Education

271,850

-

271,850

146,747

81,160

227,907

1,680,895

81,160

1,762,055

Staff costs

54


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

6. SUPPORT COSTS Management (£)

Finance (£)

Other (£)

Governance costs (£)

Total (£)

Others resources expended

88,339

4,371

18,058

4,850

115,618

Staff costs

81,160

-

-

-

81,160

169,499

4,371

18,058

4,850

196,778

7. TRUSTEES’ REMUNERATION AND BENEFITS Except for those already disclosed in the related party note, there were no trustees’ remuneration or other benefits for the year ended 31 March 2018 nor for the year ended 31 March 2017. Trustees’ expenses There were no trustees’ expenses paid for the year ended 31 March 2018 nor for the year ended 31 March 2017.

8. STAFF COSTS 2018 (£)

2017 (£)

Wages and salaries

244,255

122,534

Social security costs

14,955

6,661

Other pension costs

1,353

444

260,563

129,639

THE AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES DURING THE YEAR WAS AS FOLLOWS 2018

2017

Direct charitable operations

9

7

Fundraising and advertising

5

3

Administration

Staff salaries are split into the categories as above. No employees received emoluments in excess of £60,000.

55

4

4

18

14


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________ 9. COMPARATIVES FOR THE STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES Unrestricted Fund (£)

Restricted Funds (£)

Total Funds (£)

INCOME AND ENDOWMENTS FROM Donations and legacies Investment income

2,215,360

-

2,215,360

88,313

-

88,313

2,303,673

-

2,303,673

290,087

-

290,087

Orphan Care Home

276,847

-

276,847

Donations

245,769

-

245,769

Zakat

141,729

-

141,729

Qurbani

337,876

-

337,876

Water pumps

157,085

-

157,085

59,830

-

59,830

154,376

-

154,376

Total EXPENDITURE ON Raising funds CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES

Emergency relief Education Staff costs Other TOTAL EXPENDITURE NET INCOME

57,852

-

57,852

155,410

-

155,410

1,876,861

-

1,876,861

426,812

-

426,812

RECONCILIATION OF FUNDS Total funds brought forward

2,251,665

-

2,251,665

TOTAL FUNDS CARRIED FORWARD

2,678,477

-

2,678,477

10. DONATION DISCLOSURE BY PARTNER During the year, the charity received £15,633 from Minhaj Welfare Foundation Canada. The partner is a separate entity reporting locally in its respective country. The amount transmitted to the charity is to be applied to the charity’s projects. 11. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS COSTS At 1 April 2017 Additions At 31 March 2018

Long Leasehold (£) 1,639,505

Fixture & Sittings (£) -

Computer Equipment (£)

Total (£)

100,297

1,739,802

13,642

5,144

11,566

30,352

1,653,147

5,144

111,863

1,770,154

56


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

DEPRECIATION At 1 April 2017 Charge for year

8,794

-

9,066

81,029 1,283

-

7,709 -

89,823 18,058

Reclassification/transfer

1,199,827

1,199,827

At 31 March 2018

1,217,687

1,283

88,738

1,307,708

At 31 March 2018

435,460

3,861

23,125

462,446

At 31 March 2017

1,630,711

19,268

1,649,979

NET BOOK VALUE -

12. INVESTMENT PROPERTY MARKET VALUE Additions

260,337

Reclassification At

1,199,827

At 31 March 2018

1,460,164

NET BOOK VALUE At 31 March 2018

1,460,164

At 31 March 2017

-

Properties have been reclassified from land and buildings to long leasehold investment properties during the year.

13. DEBTORS: AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR 2018 (£)

2017 (£)

Trade debtors

29,503

15,774

Other debtors

101,697

121,012

131,200

136,786

14. CREDITORS: AMOUNTS FALLING DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR 2018 (£)

2017 (£)

Trade creditors

120,002

49,227

Other creditors

31,304

15,118

151,306

64,345

57


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

15. MOVEMENT IN FUNDS

At 1.4.17 (£)

Net movement in funds (£)

At 31.3.18 (£)

UNRESTRICTED FUNDS General Funds

2,678,477

836,265

3,514,742

TOTAL FUNDS

2,678,477

836,265

3,514,742

Incoming Resources (£)

Resources expended (£)

Movement in funds (£)

General Funds

2,988,777

(2,152,512)

836,265

TOTAL FUNDS

2,988,777

(2,152,512)

836,265

Net movement in funds (£)

At 31.3.17 (£)

Net movement in funds, included in the above are as follows: UNRESTRICTED FUNDS

COMPARATIVES FOR MOVEMENT IN FUNDS

At 1.4.16 (£)

UNRESTRICTED FUNDS General Funds

2,251,665

426,812

2,678,477

TOTAL FUNDS

2,251,665

426,812

2,678,477

Incoming Resources (£)

Resources expended (£)

Movement in funds (£)

General Funds

2,303,673

(1,876,861)

426,812

TOTAL FUNDS

2,303,673

(1,876,861)

426,812

Comparative net movement in funds, included in the above are as follows: : UNRESTRICTED FUNDS

16. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES The Charity had no contingent liabilities as at 31 March 2018 nor at 31 March 2017.

58


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - CONTINUED FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 March 2018 __________________________________________________________

17. RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES The charity has a close relationship with its sister charity Minhaj-ul-Quran International, which is also a registered charity. Two of the charity’s trustees were also trustees of the Minhaj-ul-Quran International although both charities are independent in their activities and financial matters. The Charity works in close co-operation with other Minhaj-ul Quran Welfare Foundation charities worldwide. The relationship of these charities to Minhaj-ul-Quran Welfare Foundation in the UK is described in Note 10. The charity in the UK has common trustees with Minhaj Welfare Foundation Canada. Grants received from these charities during the year are disclosed in note 10 of these accounts. There are no donations to/from related parties which are outside the normal course of business and no restricted donations from related parties. The trustee, Mr. D Hussain owns a property management company which manages one of the charity’s investment properties, During the year the charity paid the company £1,219 as management fee. Minhaj College Manchester is an Academy (Academy) which has been incorporated as a private company limited by guarantee. The charity is the foundation/sponsor for this Academy and has congruent objectives which assist in the educational charitable activities. During the year, the charity seconded 3 of their employees to the Academy as donations in kind and also donated £74,836 via their educational donations to the Academy. Minhaj Education Trust is an Academy (Academy) which has been incorporated as a private company limited by guarantee. The charity is the foundation/sponsor for this Academy and has congruent objectives which assist in the educational charitable activities. During the year, the charity donated £7,000 via their education donations to the Academy.

60


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