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Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper

The

Milwaukee’s Only “Blue Chip” Community Newspaper

“Journalistic Excellence, Service, Integrity and Objectivity Always”

Vol. 33 No. 08 •

Thur., Feb. 27, 2014 – Wed., March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication Serving The Milwaukee Area

65¢

The 29 th Annual Black Excellence Awards

Barry Applewhite

Ofc. Aleia Avant

Candice R. Dillon

Bishop Clayton Duckworth, Sr.

Rev. Marilyn Miller

Clover Barnes

Regina Flippin, DPM

Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr.

Jerome Bethea, LPN

Rosha Hamilton

Rev. Willie Brisco

Linda Bonds

The Honorable Nancy Joseph

Patrick-Awuori Cynthia Mutsune Stokes-Murray

Atty. Milton Childs

Ofc. Charles Leach

Mattie Payne

Portia Cobb

Shawon LeFlore-Turnch

Linda Presberry

Diane Stowers

Michael Cockroft

Tracey Dent

Monte Mabra

Tim McMurtry, II

Geri L. Lyday

Russell Thomas

Daphne Wilson

2014 Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients

Brianna Christian

Hamilton High School

Henry Eruchalu

Morse Marshall H.S.

Kayla Madlock

Milwaukee Lutheran H.S.

Collins McClain

Riverside University High School

Maasio Mohamed

Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Keynote Speaker

Darian Perkins

Rufus King IB High School

Avrianne Seals

Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Quinton Thomas

Shorewood High School

Aaron Wilder

Riverside University High School

Deondre Wright

Bradley Technology and Trade High School

Special Honorees: “Young Influencers and Game Changers”

Jamila Hunter Vice President of Comedy Development for ABC (American Broadcasting Company)

Friday, February 28, 2014 At The Italian Conference Center 631 E. Chicago St. Milwaukee, WI 6:00 P.M. Hosted By WISN 12 News Anchors PATRICK PAOLANTONIO & MARIANNE LYLES

Christopher Boston

Erickajoy Daniels

Melissa Goins

Cory Nettles

Dr. Ramel Smith

“Saluting The Best In Our Community”


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

The Milwaukee Times Founders

The Late Louvenia Johnson

The Late Luther Golden

Nathan Conyers

I n 1985, a group of Milwaukee citizens initiated the Black Excellence Awards ceremony. With unwavering tenacity and vision, our

group saw the good deeds of people and wanted to praise living unsung heroes and heroines. Today, 29 years later, their vision continues, staunch and steadfast. “Saluting the Best” is what these individuals are all about. Over the past 29 years, the Black Excellence Awards have honored nearly 800 individuals who would have gone unnoticed for their outstanding contributions and their great leadership. Still today we often hear that they have flourished to an even higher level of excellence in their personal endeavors and professional careers. The success of the Awards ceremony is due to a dedicated committee who have worked diligently and persistently to spotlight our honorees. We most graciously thank our 29th annual awards Partners in Excellence: Reid’s New Golden Gate Funeral Home, WISN-Channel 12, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Milwaukee Urban League, Guaranty Bank, Hupy and Abraham, S.C., Johnson Controls, Inc., Columbia Savings and Loan, Gruber Law Offices, WE Energies, Mc Donald’s and Robert W. Baird and Co. We also thank our volunteers, supporters, and The Milwaukee Times Printing and Publishing Company staff for keeping the Awards ceremony at the forefront of Black History throughout the years. As we continue to infuse our efforts and commitment in cultivating a new leadership, let us look forward to a future filled with the excellence of those who have striven to persevere. Special thanks to the Black Excellence Committee: Shirley Sharp, Brenda Sheppard-Nelson, Pam Clark and project manager Jacquelyn Heath.

Statement from the Publisher treatment and stereotyping of their race. More importantly, it is abundantly clear from the myriad of individuals being honored, they did not allow events of their past or present circumstance in life to curtail their achievements. They

did not allow the earlier cancers in their lives to kill their motivation, thus robbing them of ambition, determination and the perseverance to make a difference, not only in their lives, but in the lives of countless others.

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Lynda J. Jackson-Conyers T he Milwaukee Times Black Excellence Awards Program has aged and grown in stature through the years. Many individuals, organizations and businesses have contributed to the popularity and success of this event, which is observed this year on the last Friday of February. The Black Excellence Awards Program is one of the city’s premiere events, which celebrates, honors and pays tribute to scores of African Americans to whom this community owes a heartfelt thanks. These honorees have worked to create an environment which makes this city the wonderful place it

is to live, work, raise families and be productive citizens. The Black Excellence Awards, for 29 years, has been fascinated with the desire to comprehend what compels African Americans, who have been faced with extreme social injustice, unfairness and abuse, to rise above these conditions and succeed beyond anyone’s expectations. The lives of past honorees and this year’s recipients have been chronicled on the pages of The Milwaukee Times. One commonality these honorees share is that not a single one is a stranger to abuse, injustice, mis-

NCON Publications welcomes letters to the editor, as a response to subjects reported or analyzed in the newspaper or on other issues of interest to the community. All letters must be legible, and contain a signature and a phone number. Submissions must be received by Friday to be considered for the following Thursday’s publication.

Publisher/President Lynda J. Jackson-Conyers

Founders Louvenia Johnson Nathan Conyers Luther Golden

Marketing Manager & Assistant to the President George Neal Graphic Artists William Gooden Michelle Anibas

A little reminder about life insurance. A curious little reminder. Why life insurance? Because people depend on you. How much and what type? That depends on you too. American Family offers a variety of protection, from term to permanent. Call today for a free, no-obligation Life Insurance Needs Analysis. So you can check it off your list, and off your mind.

Accounting Terry Taylor Printing Manager Angel Reyes

Staff Writer/ Proofreader Jacquelyn Heath The Milwaukee Times email address: miltimes@gmail.com The Milwaukee Times Weekly newspaper is published each Thursday at 1936 N. MLK Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212 Telephone: 414-263-5088 • Fax: 414-263-4445 Email: miltimes@gmail.com

Lamar E Dismuke Insurance Agency 8201 W Capitol Dr Milwaukee, WI 53222-1948 www.lamardismukeagency.com (414) 527-1925 Bus

American Family Life Insurance Company Home Office – Madison, WI 53783 www.amfam.com © 2006

002030 – 1/06


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

3

Thank You To Our Partners in Excellence

The Milwaukee Urban League

The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Presents

The 29 Annual th

Friday, February 28, 2014


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

29th Annual Black Excellence Awards

In Memoriam...

Mrs. Louvenia Johnson, Milwaukee Times Founder L ouvenia Johnson, one of the founders

of The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper and the benefactor of the journalism college scholarship fund that bears her name, passed away on Wednesday, February 27, 2008, due to complications following a stroke. She had been a resident of the Millway Healthcare Center on West Mill Road for two years. She was 96 years old. Mrs. Johnson was known in the community as a woman of faith, strength and integrity, always willing and available to offer a kind word of hope and sound advice. She was an astute businesswoman, communicator and grassroots activist who lived her belief of helping others less fortunate than herself. Trained as a licensed practical nurse, she moved to Milwaukee in 1939 with her husband, the late Paul Johnson, from her hometown of Dermott, Arkansas. In addition to working in healthcare, she also worked in the social service arena, serving as executive director of Project Focal Point, an agency serving both youth and elder adults on Milwaukee’s north side. In 1981 as a retiree, she and three other Milwaukeeans – Nathan Conyers, Lynda JacksonConyers, and the late Luther Golden – estab-

lished a weekly newspaper devoted to church news within the city’s African American faith community dubbed, “The Christian Times.” Within its first year of publication, the paper grew in appeal to cover more general community news and was renamed The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper, with The Christian Times remaining as a standing feature section to this day. In 1985, Mrs. Johnson and her publishing

team launched the Black Excellence Awards program, as a way to pay tribute to the good works of ordinary people from Milwaukee’s black community who were accomplishing extraordinary things, yet going unnoticed. The awards program observes its 29th year on February 28, 2014 and has honored more than 800 local citizens engaged in various endeavors that have benefited all of Milwaukee. At the third Black Excellence Awards program on February 27, 1988, Mrs. Johnson established The Louvenia Johnson Journalism Scholarship Fund, initially started with her retirement funds from Social Security, to assist college-bound high school graduates who wished to pursue careers in print and broadcast journalism. To date, more than $500,000 has been awarded to area students by the scholarship, which is now a 501-c-3, nonprofit, charitable organization under the IRS. Scholarship recipients include Jamal Abdul-Alim, former urban affairs reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; and Silvia Acevedo, former news reporter for WTMJ-TV/Channel 4 in Milwaukee. Mrs. Johnson is survived by her sister, Mrs. Algenora Davenport, as well as a host of nieces, nephews and other loved ones.

Our Hosts

Patrick Paolantonio

News Anchor, WISN 12 News This Morning Patrick joined the WISN 12 News team in March 2002 as a news reporter, and is currently the anchor of the weekday edition of WISN "12 News This Morning." During his tenure at WISN 12, Patrick has traveled extensively, providing live reports from the funeral of President Ronald Reagan and the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Patrick interviewed numerous candidates, including Howard Dean and John Kerry, as well political activists like actress Meg Ryan and Robert Kennedy, Jr. He made a national appearance on ABC's "Good Morning America," while taping a behind-the-scenes news series with hosts Charlie Gibson, Diane Sawyer, Robin Roberts and Tony Perkins.

Patrick came from WOLO-TV, the ABC affiliate in Columbia, S.C., where he was a news anchor and reporter. He has received several awards from The Associated Press and the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association (WBA) for spot news, education and feature reporting. Patrick graduated with honors in journalism from Northeastern University in Boston, MA. Patrick enjoys making public appearances and has emceed such notable events as the American Red Cross Braveheart Awards and the Small Business Times Health Care Hero Awards. He is an avid sports fan and currently lives in Milwaukee.

Marianne Lyles

News Anchor, WISN 12 News This Morning Marianne anchors and reports for "12 News This Morning" and also reports for evening newscasts during the week. She has covered many important stories, from the 14 state senators who fled to Illinois during the Madison budget battle and the 2011 blizzard, to the local students who were missing after the 2010 Haiti earthquake and the devastating fire at the Patrick Cudahy meatpacking plant in 2009. As a journalist, she has interviewed newsmakers such as Michelle Obama and Presidential Candidate Ron Paul, however she is most proud of her reports on a substance called salvia divinorum. Although legal in the most states, young people smoke it like marijuana and get a hallucinogenic effect like LSD. Marianne's cov-

erage resulted in an Indiana state representative introducing a bill to ban salvia. Marianne worked as a weekend anchor/ reporter for WFIETV in Evansville, IN, before coming to WISN in October 2008. She previously worked as a news reporter and fill-in anchor at KAVU-TV in Victoria, TX, and served an internship at WBBM-TV in Chicago. Marianne graduated from Columbia College in Chicago with a degree in journalism and a concentration in television. Marianne enjoys serving in the community and was actively involved in mentoring middle school girls for Big Brothers/Big Sisters in Indiana. Born in the Philippines, Marianne grew up in Chicago. She currently lives in Wauwatosa with her Shih-poo, Benny.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

5

29th Annual Black Excellence Awards

Keynote Speaker Jamila Hunter

Vice President of Comedy Development for ABC (American Broadcasting Company)

J

amila Hunter was named Vice President of ABC Network Comedy in October of 2011. In this position, she is charged with overseeing the production and development of new comedy series. In her first year at the Disney owned network, Jamila supervised Tim Allen’s return to network television, “Last Man Standing,” which is now in its third season. New series under her supervision include comedian Rebel Wilson’s first US series “Super Fun Night,” “Back in the Game” starring James Caan and Maggie Lawson and “Mixology,” a groundbreaking new comedy from the creators of “The Hangover” which chronicles the dating exploits of ten people over one night for the entire season. Prior to this position, Jamila was a key member of the creative team that launched OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network and Senior Vice President of Alternative and Digital Programming at NBC Entertainment. With an emphasis on developing unscripted comedies at NBC, Jamila shepherded projects that marked the return to network television of two high-profile comedians, Jerry Seinfeld (“The Marriage Ref ”) and Rosie O’Donnell (“Rosie Live!”). In addition to her primetime development duties, Jamila worked closely with NBC’s digital studio to target writers, directors and talent for their original internet series. Before she was appointed to her position at NBC, Jamila served as Vice President of Comedy Development for 20th Century Fox Television. During her time at the prolific studio, Hunter was responsible for developing and overseeing new comedies (live-action and animation) for network television. She joined the comedy team as they launched two successful series, “My Name is Earl” at NBC and “How I Met Your Mother” at CBS. In this

capacity, she worked with well-renowned producers, directors and talent ranging from Liz Meriwether (“New Girl”), Steve Levitan (“Modern Family”), Dan Harmon (“Community”), Darren Star (“Sex and the City”) and Robert Smigel (“Saturday Night Live”) to Ashton Kutcher, Shawn Levy (“Date Night”) and Marlon Wayans. In addition to maintaining relationships with established talent, Hunter was also instrumental in identifying and fostering relationships with promising new comedians, writers, directors and animators both in the United States and abroad.

Jamila served as Vice President of Development and Production at Bravo preceding her time at 20th Century Fox. She joined Bravo shortly after it was acquired by NBC and was an integral part of the creative team that rebranded the channel and launched seminal shows such as “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,” “Project Runway,” “Celebrity Poker Showdown” and “Blow Out.” As the head of Bravo’s west coast development team, Hunter was charged with building a Los Angeles-based staff while targeting and shepherding new programming ventures at the expanding

cable channel. A sampling of the variety of projects under her watch includes Kathy Griffin’s infamous Laugh Factory show “The D-List,” the improvisational comedy series “Significant Others,” Ben Affleck and Matt Damon’s “Project Greenlight,” Ewan McGregor’s reality series “Long Way Round” and “The Dan Band” music special which was directed by McG (“Charlie’s Angels”) and produced by DreamWorks Television. Hunter served as Vice President of Alternative Programming for NBC Entertainment prior to her post at Bravo. She was the second executive to join the network’s nascent alternative department and was responsible for supervising all aspects of development, production and post-production in the rapidly growing area of alternative programming. During her tenure at the network, the alternative team launched iconic reality series like “Fear Factor” and “The Apprentice.” Projects under her watch ranged from “Last Comic Standing” and “The Rerun Show” to “TV’s Most Outrageous Gameshow Moments” and “The Cosby Show: A Look Back.” Before donning her VP stripes, Hunter served as Director of Alternative Programs at NBC, a po-

sition she held from July of 2001 to December of 2002. From July 2000 to July 2001, Hunter was Director of Movies and Miniseries at NBC. In this role she oversaw the development and production of various longform projects. She was promoted to that position after serving as Manager of Movies and Miniseries from August 1999 to July 2000. Jamila briefly left NBC from June 1998 to August 1999 and worked at Robert Greenwald Productions acting as the Manager of Development for the independent production company. Ms. Hunter started her career at NBC as an assistant in the Movies and Miniseries department in May of 1997. A native of San Diego, California, Hunter earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. She currently resides in Studio City, California.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients

Brianna Christian Hamilton High School

Brianna Christian is a senior at Hamilton High School. She is held in high regard by her teachers for her tenacity and devotion to contributing her talents to the school and community. She hones her leadership skills through her involvement with Milwaukee’s Pearls for Teen Girls afterschool program and serves on the Hamilton High School Student Council. Also, she has worked as an intern at the Milwaukee Art Museum. In light of her dedication to education Brianna participates in College Possible—a program that promotes higher education through college visits and college preparation courses. She has a 3.5 G.P.A and aspires to have a career in education and attend Lawrence University or Alverno College.

Henry Eruchalu is a senior at Morse Marshall High School. He is a member of the National Honor Society and Marshall’s Link Crew—a student initiative that allows upperclassmen to mentor incoming freshmen and help them navigate the transition to high school. Described by his teachers as a model student, Henry is part of the National Honor Society and participates in College Possible—a program that promotes higher education through college visits and college preparation courses. He has a penchant for science and was a runner up in the 2012 Milwaukee County Science Fair. Henry has a 3.7 G.P.A and has his eye set on a career as a doctor. His intent is to pursue biomedical Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison or Florida Technological University.

Kayla Madlock Milwaukee Lutheran H.S.

Kayla Madlock is an honor student at Milwaukee Lutheran High School with a 3.9 GPA. Kayla aspires to graduate from high school in the top 10 percent of her class; and to attend Mount Mary University to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Kayla had the honor of being presented as one of the 2013 debutantes of Epsilon Kappa Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Her passion for serving the community is demonstrated through her volunteerism with the Milwaukee Rescue Mission and The Hungry Task Force of Greater Milwaukee. Kayla is the recipient of the 2010 African American Educator’s Committee Award, 2012 First Place Winner of Black History Writing Contest and a three-time award winner of Excellence from the Department of Public Instruction. Kayla is involved in several clubs and organizations which include the Yearbook club, Prom Committee, Women’s Choir, EIP Student, and is a youth member of the NAACP.

Collins McClain is a senior at Riverside University High School. His teachers praise him as diligent and dependable student who is a great asset to the school community. He displays his leadership skills through his involvement with the Top Teens of America program and as a member of Riverside’s Link Crew, responsible for assisting incoming freshmen navigate the transition to high school. Also, on account of his passion for sports, Collins is a dedicated member of Riverside’s Cross Country Team. He has a 3.0 G.P.A and has plans for a career in journalism or business administration and hopes to study at either Clark Atlanta University or Tennessee State University.

Maasio Mohamed Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Henry Eruchalu Morse Marshall High School

Collins McClain Riverside University High School

Maasio Mohamed is a senior at Washington High School of Information Technology. From serving the community as a volunteer with the Milwaukee Rescue Mission to his role as one of Washington’s Leadership Ambassadors, Maasio has embraced opportunities to lead and set an example for his peers. His drive to succeed has led him to apply and gain acceptance into the State of Wisconsin Youth Apprentice Program and now works as an Information Technology Youth Apprentice in the Technology Department of Milwaukee Public Schools. Coming to the U.S. as a refugee from war-torn Somalia, Maasio has had to begin a new life without his family and friends who remain in Somalia. In spite of the odds, Maasio balances his work and extracurricular activities and maintains a 3.8 G.P.A. He is determined to make his family proud and has his mind set on pursuing studies in electrical engineering and computer science at Marquette or the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

7

2014 Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients Darian Perkins is a senior at Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School. Described as a devoted student, Darian has a vast amount of abilities beyond academics and is involved with many extracurricular activities and clubs at her school as well as in the community. Whether it is volunteering at Milwaukee’s AIDS Resource Center or serving as a member of King’s varsity volleyball team, Darian proves to be a committed leader. She is also a member of the National Honor Society, Science National Honor Society and the Youth Health Service Corps and maintains a 3.8 G.P.A. Her intent is to study either pre-medicine or biomedical engineering at the University of Chicago or the Milwaukee School of Engineering.

Avrianne Seals Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Darian Perkins Rufus King IB High School

Avrianne Seals is a senior at Washington High School of Information Technology. Regarded as an exemplary student, Avrianne is a top athlete at Washington who has made meaningful contributions as captain of the Girls Soccer and Tennis teams and through her community involvement with the S.T.O.P (Students Talking It Over With Police) program. She has also spent many summers as a volunteer for various summer festivals in Milwaukee. With a 3.2 G.P.A. Avrianne hopes to pursue a career in law and plans to attend the University of Evansville or Butler University.

Mrs. Johnson’s legacy has awarded more than $500,000 to Milwaukee area students to assist them in their pursuit of college careers. Quinton Thomas, is a senior at Shorewood High School. He is a diligent student who has used his voice to inspire both his peers in better understanding and taking actions to improve the community. Since 2011 he has been part of the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Youth Prevent Violence Initiative Leadership and has championed the importance of putting an end to bullying as well as ending gun violence in the Milwaukee. Quinton has a 3.1 G.P.A. and plans to study engineering at the University of Notre Dame or Rochester Technical University.

Aaron Wilder Riverside University High School

Quinton Thomas Shorewood High School

Aaron Wilder is a senior at Riverside High School. A self-described leader, Aaron hones his community leadership skills through the myriad of volunteer opportunities he takes on, including work with Milwaukee’s Urban Underground youth program and serving as a mentor to incoming freshmen through Riverside’s Link Crew . Recognized as a student who gives his best effort in his school work, Aaron is a member of the National Honor Society and has a 3.8 G.P.A. He hopes to study business or geographical science at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater or the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Deondre Wright is a senior at Bradley Technology and Trade High School. He is regarded by his teachers as a caring student who is not only dedicated to his studies, but also one who works hard in the community. From working as an usher at the Tripoli Shrine Center in Milwaukee, to participating in public discussion of the breakdown of communication and lack of trust among youth and older adults through his involvement Chain of Dreams Intergenerational Symposium, Deondre is on track to be a stellar leader. He has a 3.9 G.P.A. and intends to pursue a career in chemical or mechanical engineering and attend Marquette University or the Milwaukee School of Engineering.

Deondre Wright Bradley Technology and Trade High School


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients 1988 - 2014

Jamaal Abdul-Alim Silvia I. Acevedo Sequoya Allen Priscilla Avant Jonathan O. Babalola Shaneika Baldwin Jennifer Ball-Sharpe Lauren Barber Darren Barton Chez Bass Aris Battiste Marita Benvenue Risharda Bond Jevita D. Brister Sharvon Montgomery Brown Jaslyn Brown Qiana Burns Louis Burrell Raetricia Byrd-Townsell Qiana Christian Mindee Cohen Jacqueline Gail Crymes Trenton Daniels Jamal Davis Carla Dew Sa’Sha Nicole Edwards Quina Elzie Kurtez Ellis Kaiyla Farrington Shaun Flanagan Chelsey French Jessica Gathing Deanna Gauthier Donald Grace Pamanisha Gross Denean P. Hall Timothy Hall Megan Harmon Gary Harvey Ebony Haynes Michaiah Hinds Cynthia M. Hodnett Malik Holt Sade Hood Kiera Hudson Autherine Ikanih

26

th th

Monique Ingram Wendy Isom Kiara Jackson Marcell Lanell Jackson Camille Johnson Torey Jobe Fred Jones-Rosa Demond Jude Kendall Keith Kathryn Lanier Camille Lester Justin Lester Robyn Lockett Raven Major Nandi Mallett Tre’Quan Martin Billie Jo Mason-Saffold Alice McCoy Trevonte McClain Kharma McGee Kara McKinney Kara Macon James Miller Treba Mitchell

Na Mia Moore Crystal Morgan Wendmy Nida Moyenga Nathan Nelson Ikenna Obiora Melissa Pettis Clifton Phelps Levar Pickens Robert Pickens Carter Piggee Denise Pitchford Amber Polk Eva Porter Dominique Portis Lawrence Rabon Knjya Reed Briana Roberts Corbin Robinson DeArquise Robinson Tammy Robinson Angellic Ross Ismel Sahid Shakura Salahaladyn Josephine Scott Tanzania Sewell Justine Shorter Donald Singleton Nicole Singleton Alexandria SmithRichard Lonnie R. Smith Rhonda Stingley Sonia Summers Alyssa Sylvester Courtney Teague Lori Lynn Tharps Verla Thibou Devon Thomas Olivia Thomas Nikki Denise Thompson Dalyn Ward Nicole White Tabithas Williams Yaaji Williamson Jonathan Woods Khamaria Wright

Over $500,000 has been provided to area youths to pursue a higher education.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

9

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Arts

Portia Cobb University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

U

niversity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee filmmaking tenured associate professor and digital media artist Portia Cobb’s noteworthy journey led her to “third coast” Milwaukee. She has made her home here for the past twenty-two years. She was born on the east coast in Bronx, New York. At five years old, she moved with her brother and mother to California and graduated from the Los Angeles High School of The Arts after majoring in art and drawing. Encouraged by her friend Terry Mc-

Millan, now a renowned author, she relocated to Oakland in Northern California at nineteen years old. Of her intentions surrounding her relocation, Portia says, “I wanted to become a poet. My first poem, A Poem for Barbara, was published in an annual Bay Area Poetry Anthology through New Day Book Store, selected and edited by Amiri Baraka. Poetry led me to radio somehow, because I could write in short form and was hired as a copywriter for the air, writing scripts for commercials recorded by the stations DJs. I eventually became a radio host. Radio led me to pursue my degree because I thought I would want to own a station, but realized while in school at Mills College in Oakland, that I was passionate about visual storytelling and film.” Graduating in 1987, she later entered San Francisco State University’s graduate film program, receiving a master of arts degree in 1991. Following graduation, after an invitation to teach a summer class at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, she stayed on, thus beginning her UWM film department career in 1992.  Her chosen career path constantly pays off through honors, awards, artist residencies, lectures, and fellowships. She received the coveted Creative Capital Foundation Fellowship to develop new work. Film and video projects documenting traditional music in three West African countries resulted from several UWM Travel Awards supporting research trips in 1994, 1999, and 2001. Portia’s class work encompasses development of media arts literacy for teachers, children and young adults in underserved communities. She seeks places where stories are shared and encourages younger people to pursue their dreams,

tell their stories and learn about radical black films – films produced by black directors and others considered risqué in the presentation of black culture. Portia’s primary tool, the camera, and her medium, the documentary, both aid her as an interdisciplinary artist in telling her story through installations, collaborations, images and music. Her remarkable achievement of university tenure as a black woman must be celebrated. Her intelligence, artistic skills and a vast international support network provide comforting support when challenging personal and professional situations occasionally cause self-doubt. Also direction comes from her practice as a Nichiren Buddhist. “I follow my heart and listen to the ancestors when they guide me. It hasn’t always been easy, but having experienced many blessings over these years in Milwaukee, I am thankful for all of my experiences,” she says. Nationally, family and research interests facilitate her service on the Board of Directors for the South Carolina Humanities Council. The considerable time she spends in Low Country, South Carolina has inspired a new series of digital portraits of life within South Carolina’s unincorporated towns and villages. In Milwaukee, her many interests include work on selection committees for public art. Now training for a marathon distance run later this year, she participates in a Milwaukee chapter of Black Girls Run, a national African American women’s fitness and running club. Portia is divorced with two grown daughters, Nirvana Cobb and Amaker Lee Johnson, who now make their homes in New York City and Florida, respectively.

POWER UP “Moving to Milwaukee was a great

Your Future

choice—I couldn’t be happier here. UWM and the city embrace diversity and equality. You are going to feel like this is your home.

DANA SHANNON Chemistry Major, sophomore Hazel Crest, Ill.

See you soon!

UWM.EDU

Milwaukee Tim 9-19-2013 7 7/8 x 5


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Community Leadership

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ssociate minister Willie E. Brisco says, “If I have to choose a title or a name, it would be that of servant.” In 2010, the non-profit organization Milwaukee Inner-City Congregations Allied for Hope (MICAH) elected Minister Brisco its president. His second two-year term continues through November of 2015. MICAH, a multi-racial interfaith nonprofit organization, focuses on social justice issues in education, jobs and economics, prisons, and immigration. Affiliated with WISDOM, a statewide organization and Gamaliel, a nationwide foundation, MICAH organizes people of many traditions to work together to empower themselves for justice. A WISDOM representative to The African American Leadership Commission, of the Gamaliel Foundation, Minister Brisco also serves with the Milwaukee Transitional Jobs Collaborative. His steadfast love of God now provides a foundation for his commitment to create change backed by the religious faith instilled in him as a youngster by his mother and grandmother. He firmly trusts that God led him to a 25-year Milwaukee County corrections career as an on-site witness in order to effectively minister and advocate for re-entry programs that dissuaded people from continuously returning to prison. After attaining the rank of assistant superintendent, he retired in 2009 to begin a new career as a full-time minister. Working in the prison system provided eye-opening experiences. These experiences and living in varied environments shaped his strong commitment to help others better their lives. Born in the small town of Sardis, MS, Willie’s early years with his family were spent on a self-sustaining farm during imposed segregation’s waning years. When Willie was a teenager, his family moved briefly to Detroit, MI before finally settling in Milwaukee. He observed middle class black people doing well.

Associate Minister Willie E. Brisco MICAH Graduating from North Division High School in 1972, he witnessed Milwaukee’s gradual decline. Good jobs dried up as prejudices, injustices, and Jim Crow practices resurfaced. Community safety deteriorated. Incarceration percentages increased for African Americans and more people lived in desperation. Originally interested in journalism, Willie attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison, but left in his sophomore year. He then attended Milwaukee Area Technical College and held various jobs leading to a prison system career. During his career in corrections he completed courses in management and leadership at the

Tracey Dent Voices Against Violence Coalition and Peace for Change Alliance

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racey Dent is dedicated to building a safe, prosperous, and educated Milwaukee as CEO and founder of Peace for Change Alliance (PCA). Through PCA, Tracey introduces initiatives promoting better education, wellness, and peace within Milwaukee communities. Creating positive energy for his wife Tamika, his daughter Azaria, and others fuels his desire to generate solutions to community problems. Tracey refers to himself as an ordinary person who wants to make a difference in his city. Far from ordinary, his achievements, commitment and extensive collaboration skills stand out.

United States Justice Department’s National Institute of Corrections in Longmont, CO, and graduated in 1997 from the Northwestern University Traffic Institute School of Police Staff and Command. As he worked in the secular world, he also worked on his religious growth. Minister Brisco was a long time member of The Way of The Cross Missionary Baptist Church where he served as deacon, male chorus president, and the men’s ministry president. In 2007 Minister Brisco assisted in the formation of Abiding Fellowship Church under the leadership of Pastor Anthony Olliphant, where he held the same offices as at The Way of The Cross until he joined New Covenant Baptist Church as a full-time minister under the leadership of Dr. F.L Crouthers. By promoting alternatives to incarceration, The 11 x 15 Campaign, addresses decreasing Wisconsin’s incarceration rate - one of the highest in the nation. Minister Brisco explains, “Locked up for alcohol and drugs, 11,000 Wisconsin prisoners, by 2015, must be freed for treatment instead of staying imprisoned. Young men and women over and over return to the correctional system and must get out of their own way to stay out. Successful prosperous people almost always had someone to steer them in the right direction.” By traveling the “road to excellence,” Minister Brisco committed to change as an important guiding force and selflessly serves. Married to Sandra Brisco in 1991, they are the parents of two boys and three girls and have nine grandchildren.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Tracey attended Pierce Elementary and Hartford Avenue schools before graduating from North Division High School in 1986. He began pursuing a degree at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and recently transferred to Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA. Majoring in accounting, he plans to graduate in December 2014. Tracey’s numerous accomplishments, recognized by awards and nominations, include his most recent 2013 Community Service award from the Grover HeightsWilliamsburg Triangle neighborhood. His goal is to collaborate with youth agencies and reach as many impoverished youth as possible. They inspire him to assist in instilling hope, self-respect and positive productivity to move them beyond hopelessness. To date, along with PCA, he has founded Milwaukee Walk Toward Wellness; Getting it Together for a Brighter Future College Fair; Voices Against Violence

Coalition and its first annual community job and resource fair; and has been the force behind “Stop the Violence” rallies, Thanksgiving Turkey Give-Away, Christmas with the Children, annual blood drives, health fairs, Milwaukee Walk Toward Wellness, college fairs, Boys to Men and Girls to Women Workshops, Stop the Violence TownHall Meetings, Bridging the Gap, Stop the Violence Youth Summit, PCA & Milwaukee Public Schools P e a c e Rally, and candlelight vigils. A legislative assistant to former State Rep. Elizabeth Coggs, Tracey met even during his personal time with several block clubs and churches in a district of over 50,000 constituents. His memberships in community organizations include the NAACP, Aurora Sinai Thought Leaders (a think tank), (Continued on pg 14)


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

11

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Corporate Trailblazers

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Photo By: Cain Enterprise

lover L. Barnes displays a commitment to achievement, propelling her to unpredictable heights as a caring and exceptional corporate leader. A highly competent profile distinguishes her accomplishments, beginning as early as a pediatric nurse in 2001 through her present position as Chief Operating Officer (COO) at Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. As the COO, she oversees the operation of two health centers – Martin Luther King, Jr. Heritage Health Center and the Isaac Coggs Heritage Health Center – with responsibility for direct oversight of ten departments. Born and raised in Milwaukee, WI, Clover attended Alverno Campus Elementary School, Bell Middle School and graduated from Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School in 1992. Clover’s undergraduate education began as a pre-med student attending Bowie State University in Maryland. She later transferred to Howard University in Washington, DC, continuing with a pre-med/nursing major and simultaneously working at various times in banking, retail, bowling and research. Clover’s grandfather passed away, and she returned to Milwaukee to assist her grandmother in 1998. Clover decided to attend Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE), completing a bachelor of science in nursing degree in 2001. Shortly thereafter, she attained her first career position as a Pediatric Registered Nurse in Hartford, CT. Although she enjoyed life in Connecticut, her grandmother’s terminal illness diagnosis in 2003 prompted her return to Milwaukee to assist in her care. Clover’s grandmother encouraged her to garner her leadership potential and to continue to pursue her dreams of working with underserved populations. Using any spare time wisely, she earned an MBA from the University of Phoenix.

Michael Cockroft Habitat for Humanity

S

ince graduating from Milwaukee’s Lynde and Harry Bradley Technical and Trade High School, Michael Cockroft has been clear about how he would be successful – he would build homes. Michael is currently the Director of Construction for Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity, a worldwide homeownership nonprofit

Clover L. Barnes Milwaukee Health Services Now a seasoned management professional, Clover has held a myriad of leadership positions in clinical operations, managing nursing departments in as many as nine clinics at a given time. Fusing clinical knowledge with business savvy, she daily utilizes intricacies needed to ensure competency in the range between adequate health care and operational excellence. Clover’s expert written, verbal and presentation communication skills successfully engage staff and honor institutional culture. Concurrently, since 2011, she founded the Community Health Connection and serves as organization. Milwaukee Habitat is involved in a three- to five-year commitment to building and rebuilding homes, with first-time homeowners, in the Washington Park area of Milwaukee. Its Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative (NRI) plans to focus on the entirety of community development, in addition to new construction. Milwaukee Habitat now offers rehabilitation, critical repair, weatherization, preservation, and community development for the neighborhood, working with Washington Park Partners, 3rd District Police Station, ACTS Housing, Housing Resources Inc., LISC Milwaukee, Safe & Sound, Select Milwaukee, United Methodist Children’s Services, Urban Ecology Center and the Victory Garden Initiative. As a student in Bradley Tech’s construction and carpentry school, Michael participated in the NSI program, which allowed apprentices to strip an abandoned home to the studs and rehabilitate it for resale. He worked with general contractors in the program to improve schools as well, including 55th Street, Grantosa and Burbank schools, applying his learning to real life experience. “I’ve been doing this my whole life, taking things apart and then putting them back together. I knew I wanted to work with my hands, and I always wanted to build a house. I used to ride down Lake Drive and look at the mansions and think about building one some day, or even living in one. ” Michael graduated from MATC with a degree in architectural technology, and took a full time position with Cross Development Groups

senior principal consultant. Continually striving to make a positive impact, Clover says, “I truly feel that I have been blessed with a strong family support system, and they encouraged me to always believe in myself and work hard to achieve my goals and dreams. I know and understand that not everyone is as fortunate as I am, so I want to always use my knowledge, skills, talents and God-given abilities to make a positive change in our community. Also, it is very important to me that my sons see me working hard and working to make a difference for others.” To that end, Clover knows the importance of encouraging and investing time in others by being a mentor and role model for urban teens. She works with African American students at MSOE and serves as a Red Cross First Aid Service Team volunteer. She was named Champion Achiever of the Year for her service to the YMCA Black Achievers Program in 2010. Clover makes a difference, whether volunteering with youth or working with Milwaukee’s underserved in another capacity. She strives to ensure they receive quality cost-efficient healthcare in their community. Citing her mother as her hero, she is a member of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church and is the mother of two young sons. and was the supplier and head of Workforce Diversity, where his focus was in large-scale developers and municipalities, particularly in minority and women-owned businesses. He then moved to a subsidiary, Cross Development Group, and started designing residences and managing construction projects. He later moved to TL Reese where he worked as a project manager, entrusted with new construction, property rehabilitation, clinic, and grocery construction. He was among those saluted by the Milwaukee Business Journal as one of the “40 Under 40” for 2013, honoring Milwaukee’s upcoming leaders. “I’m really happy doing what I’m doing.” says Michael. “The NRI Initiative is in the same community that I grew up in, and I like to be able to give back.” He also mentions that, more than his initial desire to build houses, he now has the chance to build homes. “It’s refreshing to meet people who move in, to hand them the keys to their new home. It’s exciting to see a first time homebuyer, people who might not qualify for traditional home loans, get high-quality, comfortable housing.” He is married to Shawnie Cockroft, and they are parents to three daughters. “My kids need me for my leadership and my love. And that keeps me very motivated. I want to be the best person I can be.” He says, “I think we’re the architects of our future, and our fortune.”


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Corporate Trailblazers

R osha Hamilton, RN, MSW, is direc-

tor of community and patient health services for Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare. She directs community and patient health education strategies and programming for communities supported by Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare facilities in Southeast Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa. In her role, she assures that educational resources and strategies are patient/ family-centered while meeting the needs of diverse patient populations. Her focus is on health, wellness, prevention, discharge transition education, health disparities among populations, and health literacy. She also manages the Wheaton Direct physician referral service, community health class registration, and community health worker programs. Rosha is a graduate of Riverside University High School in Milwaukee; earned a bachelor of science degree in nursing from Carroll-Columbia College of Nursing; and a master of science degree in social work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She started working at Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare’s oncology and hospice unit in 1996. Her patients were dealing with difficult psychosocial aspects of health, which prompted her to want to become a psychotherapist. She counseled cancer patients, and helped them to cope with that life-changing diagnosis. She later transitioned into cancer prevention and detection, developing and managing cancer education, screening and prevention programs in southeastern Wisconsin. What began with cancer prevention morphed into community program

W

hen he came to the U.S. a little more than 20 years ago, Kenyan native Patrick-Awuori Mutsune aspired to expand his horizons in the field of technology. As often is the case, however, his collegiate experience instead helped broaden his horizons in another area of study: finance. Awuori, as he is familiarly known, graduated from Lawrence University in Appleton with a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1998. Shortly thereafter, he moved to Milwaukee to assume a position with Robert W. Baird after interning with the company in Appleton. Today, Awuori holds the title of portfolio and quantitative analyst with Baird. The position draws on his strengths in finance and technology. “I just sort of stumbled into it,” Awuori says of his role with Baird. “As I found out about the world of finance, I realized I found it interesting and figured I would like working in it.” More recently, Awuori has furthered his education, earning a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Chicago. During this period of time, he studied economics, organizational behavior and strategic management. “What I enjoy about my current role is how I’m able to blend finance and technology together,” Awuori says. “I’m building proprietary systems that help people make investment decisions.”

Rosha Hamilton, RN, MSW Wheaton Franciscan development for health, wellness, and chronic disease management in Southeastern Wisconsin. Rosha led the award-winning Barbershop Men’s Health Initiative, an innovative partnership between Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare and barbers in the African American community to increase awareness of important health issues in Milwaukee’s central city. Since 2005, barbers have been having one-on-one conversations with their patrons about their health and giving them resources to help them access care and eliminate disparities. Rosha has been a trailblazer within Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare, educating the organization on effective strategies to meet the healthcare needs Awuori says he wanted to move into Milwaukee’s city limits in an effort to help make a more direct, positive difference in the community. He has been involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Milwaukee in the past. Awuori says his efforts are on hold at the moment, but he wants to resume his volunteer efforts in the future by tutoring students in need of academic assistance. “I want to give back to the community,” Awuori says. “There’s a big need in this city, particularly when it comes to male role models.” It’s no secret Milwaukee consistently ranks high in its figures for incarcerations and high school dropouts among African American men. “I feel there are a lot of causes I can be a part of to help stem the trajectory of these kinds of instances,” Awuori says. Awuori also serves on the board overseeing Marquette University’s Haggerty Museum of Art and has been involved with a college readiness organization that aims to assist high school students in advancing to higher education institutions. Additionally, Awuori frequently lends his support behind LGBT-based organizations. Awuori says he considers his co-workers at Baird as extended family – a scenario that perhaps was best demonstrated in 2005 when

of diverse patient populations utilizing Community Health Worker models. She is a leader in health equity and healthcare disparities, making sure quality outcomes are improved for all patients. She states that mistrust of the healthcare system by communities of color still exists; so it’s important to create avenues to support patients accessing care and working within the systems to understand and be creative in their response. She has served as a Health Equity Board member for the American Heart Association, and won their 2011 Advocacy Action Award. She has served the Marquette School of Nursing Advisory Board Mentorship Program, and was a charter member and first vice president of programming for the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. She has spoken nationwide on topics ranging from early disease detection, cancer prevention, diabetes management, quality healthcare for culturally diverse populations, and utilizing community health workers as part of the healthcare team. A member of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, Rosha and her husband, Milwaukee Alderman Ashanti Hamilton, are the parents of five daughters. “I love to be a role model,” Rosha says when she talks about her girls. “It’s important to achieve professional success, but also to improve the community. My goal isn’t to be ‘excellent’. It’s to do my best in everything I do. It’s important what the community says about you, but not because I want to be the best, but because the work I put in really makes a difference.”

Patrick-Awuori Mutsune Robert W. Baird & Co. Awuori was officially granted U.S. citizenship. Many of Awuori’s co-workers attended the ceremony. Awuori and his partner of five years, Brett Timmerman, recently relocated from River Hills to a home on Milwaukee’s east side. They have a boxer named Juma.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

13

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Education

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rowing up, music played a prominent role in Barry Applewhite’s early education experiences. As an adult professional, he is aiming to give students of a similar mindset a chance to use their talents and still attain a quality education. “Music helped me make it through school,” says Barry, who is principal of the Milwaukee High School of the Arts – one of Milwaukee Public Schools’ socalled magnet schools that offer specialized curriculum. Barry, a native of Waukegan, IL, came to Milwaukee in the early 1990s to begin his career in education. Initially, Barry worked at MPS’ North Division High School as a music teacher before transitioning to the High School of the Arts. Regardless of the venue, Barry’s role with the district has always revolved around music. Barry began his role as principal at High School of the Arts nine years ago. He holds an additional title with MPS, serving as its district music curriculum specialist. With budget cutting an annual ritual at many school districts, arts-related curriculum frequently winds up on the chopping block. Barry says he is grateful to work at a school where it still takes center stage. “The arts are an important form of engagement for every one of our students,” Barry says. “It was a launch pad for me, and it is for the students attending this school. There’s a

Linda Bonds Retired Fox Point Educator

A n educator for 36 years, Linda Bonds

served the Fox Point Maple Dale-Indian Hill School District caringly and adeptly for 25 years. Now retired, she co-owns Busy Hands Child Development Center (located on the northwest side) with her husband, Azie Bonds, Jr. Born in rural Jacksonville, IL, Linda is the oldest of five children. She attended MacMurray College, graduating in 1975, with a major

Barry Applewhite Milwaukee Public Schools reason I’m at this school.” Music continues to play an important role in Barry’s life outside the walls of education as well. Barry and his family attend New Testament Church on Milwaukee’s northwest side, where he serves as a drummer on the non-denominational church’s music ministry. “The music is such an integral part of the service itself,” Barry says of his worship experience at New Testament. Barry also performs professionally as a member of the Chicagobased band, State of Mind. Additionally, Barry has lent his expertise and passion toward a number of music-based causes, including the National Endowment for in elementary education and a minor in deaf and hard-of-hearing teacher education. Her career began at an elementary school in Murrayville, IL, where she once attended. The first African American female teacher from Jacksonville, she taught Title 1 reading. She met her husband when both worked for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s (NAACP) youth summer program in Jacksonville. They married in 1980 and moved to Kalamazoo, MI, where Linda taught as the first African American at a preschool and a high school for the hearing-impaired. Upon recruitment by civil rights and education leader Helen Barnhill to satisfy the Chapter 220 integration suit settlement, Linda and her family moved to Milwaukee in 1987. Interviewed by four school districts in one day, all offered her a contract to fulfill settlement requirements between Milwaukee Public Schools, the NAACP, and 24 suburban school districts. The desegregation settlement required not only that African American children be bussed into each school district, but required hiring an increased number of African American teachers, counselors, administrators and non-certified staff members. Attracted by the sincerity of principal Jeanne Morrow, the small class sizes and the financial compensation, Linda became the first African American teacher hired by the Maple Dale-Indian Hill School District. One of two teachers most requested by parents, Linda effectively engaged students in diverse subject matter, including understanding African American historical contributions. Parents intentionally influenced each sibling’s placement in her classes as they attained eligi-

the Arts, VH1’s Save the Music Foundation, the Milwaukee Youth Symphony Orchestra and the Wisconsin Music Education Association. His other credits include directing the Milwaukee Lake Band. Whenever possible, Barry says he will speak at conferences and similar events to shine a light on the importance of arts-themed education. While music has been the foundation of Barry’s professional and philanthropic pursuits, he readily admits a quality education is equally important. Barry is working toward his fourth higher-education degree at the moment. He earned a bachelor’s degree in music education and music merchandising and a master’s degree in music education, each from Western Illinois University. He also earned an additional master’s degree in leadership and supervision from Cardinal Stritch University. Barry currently is working toward his doctorate in leadership, learning and service at Stritch and is in the process of completing his dissertation. Barry his been married to wife Lorraine for 17 years. They have three children: Barry, Lorena and Brandon.

bility. She worked with a supportive team of teachers through several principals. She states, “We were like a family” and adds, “No one stands alone, but rather we are part of an intricately woven network of parents, teachers, community and businesses, forming a collective whole striving for excellence pertaining to the future of our youth.” She received recognition from state superintendent Tony Evers for years of commitment and service, recognition from the Wisconsin Education Association Council (WEAC) as an outstanding teacher, and has been featured on local billboards and commercials throughout Milwaukee supporting the strengthening of our schools and community. “Being first has its merits, but what’s more important is that when the door of opportunity knocks, don’t just walk through it. Kick it wide open so that others may follow,” Linda advises. To this end, the following community activities ground her as a mentor and a role model. She served two terms on Brown Deer’s Educational Curriculum School Board; participated in the planning, development and teaching of UW-Milwaukee’s Summer Tutorial Reading and Math Programs; tutored at Milwaukee Urban League and successfully coached their team of high school students to win consecutive citywide championship titles in both 2002 and 2003 Annual Financial Challenge Bowl Competitions. Linda teaches summer kindergarten and Sunday school at Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church and occasionally substitute teaches. An avid bowler, her other interests include serving as Top Ladies of Distinction – Milwaukee chapter’s correspondence secretary. Linda and Azie’s son, Justin, works as an MPS paraprofessional and their daughter, Kathryn lives and works in Minneapolis as a project specialist for United Health Group.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Education

Shawon LeFlore-Turnch Milwaukee Public Schools

E nergetic, committed, and dedicated all

describe Shawon LeFlore-Turnch. Presently a Milwaukee Public School System (MPS) fifth grade teacher, she has a classroom of 32 students at Neeskara Elementary School. She en-

joys her career choice and her students declaring, “It takes a village. These are OUR children. I want them to excel and understand that education is the key. They must go to college just as my parents, James and Mandy LeFlore, stressed to my siblings and to me, when we were young children. My parents taught us public education as a ‘civil right’ fought for by my family – my aunts, uncles and grandmothers during the sixties in Mississippi.” Embracing her family’s aspirations, Shawon produced a classroom motto, perfect for her students to repeat nearly every evening: “Do your homework! Why? So we can be smart! Why? So we can go to COLLEGE.” Born and raised in Milwaukee, Shawon attended Fifty-Third Street Elementary School, Wilbur Wright Middle School and graduated from Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School in 1992. After entering the University of Wisconsin-Madison, between her class and work schedules, she tutored students as a volunteer with the Madison Metropolitan School District and various community agencies such as Upward Bound. This led to her love of teaching and fueled the desire to become a teacher. She earned a bachelor of science in elementary education, with a Spanish minor from UW -Madison in 1997. Immediately returning to Milwaukee, Shawon’s MPS teaching career began at Fairview Elementary School. Placement in Townsend Elementary School gave her a real sense of giving back and completion when she returned to her own “neighborhood” school. Her education continued as she earned a mas-

ter of arts degree in reading/language arts at Cardinal Stritch University in 2000. A new connection made, she joined Cardinal Stritch University’s Urban Literacy Centers as an instructor assigned to different sites, such as Stritch’s City Center Campus, Townsend Street School, Hampton Elementary School, and Sherman Multicultural Arts School. Shawon determinedly manages the circumstances surrounding her chosen profession driven by her passion to do her part in the education of her students. Her 17-year MPS tenure abounds with optimism and selflessness prompting her to say, “The rewards are great. I am so proud of my students when I see them out in our community. Some have gone on to attend college at Milwaukee Area Technical College and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I may forget some names, but I never forget those smiling, positive faces. They are always excited to tell me that they are in school. That’s all the reward I ever need as a teacher.” Experience prompted this important wisdom from her: “Our city is full of the most intelligent and talented children. They may face tough situations and circumstances, but they have abilities. They can succeed when they have teachers who believe in their possibilities. New teachers must be better trained so they know what to honestly expect. Many times, teachers just have to show patience and compassion to reach these students. But we have to keep our expectations high.” Shawon and her husband Brent reside on Milwaukee’s northwest side.

Tracey Dent (Continued from pg. 9)

Milwaukee Public Schools Congratulates the 2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Start at MPS. Stay at MPS. Succeed at MPS.

Share your MPS success story at mpsmke.com/succeed

MPS is enrolling for Fall 2014. Visit mpsmke.com/EnrollMPS to discover the rich variety of schools and programs available. MPS is also seeking enthusiastic applicants for teacher and principal positions. Apply at milwaukee.k12.wi.us.

ENROLL

Online. Anytime. ©2014 Milwaukee Public Schools

100 Black Men of Greater Milwaukee (he is a past vice president) and the Advisory Council of Dominican Center for Women. He sits on the Advisory Council for The Blood Center of Wisconsin. Most recently, Tracey formed a partnership with the Milwaukee Police Department. This partnership, endorsed by Assistant Chief of Police James Harpole, aims to reduce crime in the community and build trust between law enforcement and Milwaukee residents. In honor of Vinencia Dawson and all City of

Milwaukee fallen riders, Tracey is working with Alderwoman Milele Coggs to establish Motorcycle Safety Awareness Week, May 4-10, 2014. Tracey’s additional accomplishments include chair of the 50th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream Speech and March, Champion Achiever by YMCA Black Achievers in 2003, and citations for making a difference in the Greater Milwaukee from State Senators Lena Taylor, Nikiya Harris and State Representative Mandela Barnes and LaTonya Johnson. He attends Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ and has a black belt in tae kwon do.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

15

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Extraordinary Achievement

She now teaches in the English De-

C ollege instructor Linda J. Presberry de-

scribes herself as a “down-to-earth hometown Milwaukee girl” whose true callings – adult education and writing – allow her golden teaching opportunities to make a difference. She also describes herself as competive and somewhat of a perfectionist. She prides herself in excelling and giving her all to every endeavor, volunteer opportunity and activity that she undertakes. Linda’s education includes attending several Milwaukee public schools, culminating with her graduation from Riverside University High School in 1965. Following graduation, she attended the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee briefly and transferred to Howard University, earning a bachelor of arts degree in 1972. Still living in Washington DC, after graduation she attempted to teach elementary and middle school, but in her words, “The students were too rambunctious for me.” She returned to Milwaukee and began working for the Social Development Commission where she became the first director of the North Side Youth Service Bureau, a juvenile divergence project. After two years, she enrolled at Marquette University Graduate School and earned a master of arts degree in New Editorial Journalism. After graduation she immediately secured employment as a public information officer for the State of Wisconsin, and worked there until that position terminated. She then moved to Chicago and worked as a communications coordinator, a public event planner and a public relations specialist for six years. Eventually returning to Milwaukee, she was hired to teach news reporting, public relations and publication design in the Department of Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. One student reflects on Linda’s impact while at UWM. According to an article written by Jamaal Abdul-Alim, “Dropouts Tell No Tale” in the September/October 2013 issue of Washington Monthly, “The second thing that led me to become a journalist was a visit from a black

partment at both institutions.

Linda J. Presberry MATC/WCTC journalism instructor at UWM. Her name was Linda Presberry.” She visited John Marshall High School for career day and inspired Jamaal to visit her at UWM. Career excellence is matched only by her perseverance and determination in overcoming adversity. At the peak of her career, Linda was diagnosed with lupus, a life-threatening autoimmune disease that causes inflammation, swelling and damage to joints, skin, kidneys, blood, the heart and lungs. Linda waged a 12year battle against the disease, which is now in remission. During that time, she did volunteer work and, despite her own illness, was a caregiver for two elderly relatives. She eventually was able to secure part-time instructor positions at both Milwaukee Area Technical College and Waukesha County Technical College.

Through Linda’s innate ability to communicate with and reach young people, she speaks their language, finding their idiomatic expressions extremely colorful. Importantly, she shares life lessons gleaned over her career. Thus, she makes every effort to challenge and inspire students to produce their best, and she in turn gives them her best. Linda is very demanding of her students. This is partly due to her belief in self-fulfilling prophecies and that students perform to the level of their teacher’s expectations. She sets the bar high to plant good seeds. Unfortunately, she still painfully recalls her fifth grade teacher planting a poisonous seed, when the teacher proclaimed that 60 percent of the class would not graduate from high school. Linda chooses instead to encourage students to broaden their horizons. This encouragement prevents her from short-circuiting their future accomplishments as she feels her fifth grade teacher did. Master of motivational one-liners, Linda’s mother Lucille Presberry set the bar of excellence high for her daughter. Her sayings still ring in Linda’s ears. “Anything worth doing is worth doing well! Give it your best and God will do the rest! Nothing beats a failure but a try! And, opportunity usually only knocks once, so be prepared to seize it when it comes!” Linda attends New Testament Church of Milwaukee, where she volunteers for the Education and Scholarship Committee and the Health Committee. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., and she serves as this year’s chairman of the Milwaukee Urban League Guild’s Health Committee.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Health

Jerome Bethea is a one-of-a-kind healthcare practitioner. That’s because he is the only African American male licensed practical nurse (LPN) working at Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. (MHSI). Milwaukee Health Services, Inc., is a federally qualified Community Health Center that operates two sites – one in the Harambee neighborhood on King Drive, and one on West Silver Spring Drive on the far northwest side. The clinics serve patients from all over Milwaukee County and seek to provide high quality primary medical care regardless of the client’s income, ability to pay, or insurance status. As an LPN, Jerome is usually one of the first healthcare providers patients meet when they visit the clinic. He measures and records vital signs, such as blood pressure, height, weight and temperature; reviews the patient’s symptoms and medications; tries to put the patient at ease; and prepares them for their visit with a physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner. Jerome clearly has a passion for his career and has been a part of the MHSI team for 17 years. He says, “I enjoy serving the underserved. Although challenging at times, it’s what I love and why I have stayed with it so long.” Jerome’s colleague, MHSI corporate communications specialist Pamela Clark, considers him a genuine asset to the organization stating, “Jerome takes it upon himself to provide quality access and caring customer service for MHSI patients. His presence provides a positive image as he continues to invest selflessly in the community.” Born and raised on Chicago’s West Side, Jerome attended Chicago public schools, graduating from the city’s John Marshall High School in 1969. He moved from Chicago to Indianapolis and raised a family of five children. He discovered nursing as a career path while serving in the U. S. Army. In 1974, he did well on a battery of tests and began training for field medic placement. Doing very well at that,

D

r. Regina Flippin is a remarkable asset to our community for many reasons. Born and raised in Memphis, TN, Dr. Flippin is a 1986 graduate of Memphis Central High School and completed undergraduate studies in natural science and respiratory therapy at Christian Brothers College in 1991. Regina grew up very poor with both parents in the home who wanted their children to have more than they had. They modeled excellence and required “two hundred percent effort.” Although Regina’s parents passed away in 1986, their training became the framework for her life. In 2000, Regina was awarded a Doctorate of Podiatric Medicine from Chicago’s Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine. She has been honored for her scholarship and academic tenacity, most notably being granted the Dr. George P. Geppner Minority Scholarship and Scholl Distinguished Scholar Award. Her medical training continued with medical and surgical residencies from 2002-2003, and as Chief Medical Resident at the Richmond, VA Department of Veteran Affairs. Regina’s innate love for people and interest in the human foot drew her to the field of podiatry. Her private practice, Urban Foot Care Center, was founded in 2006. She is also the Medical Director of the Urban Foot Care

Jerome Bethea, LPN Milwaukee Health Services, Inc. he chose to study surgical technology training next. He followed up by selecting respiratory therapy training and, finally, the Army chose him for Army Nurse Corps training. Jerome advanced to corporal then to sergeant and finally to staff sergeant E6, before receiving an honorable discharge to pursue his civilian career. With extensive medical background, he moved to Vincennes, IN and attended Vincennes University, earning an associate degree in nursing in 1983. Jerome then served in the 337 General Hospital Army Reserves from 1983 to 1987 as a surgical technician based at Fort Hood, TX. He eventually came to Milwaukee in 1994 seeking employment and worked at St Mary’s Hospital for three years as a respiratory therapist. A colleague there told him about MHSI

and he joined the staff in 1997. During the last twenty years in his spare time, Jerome has been a volunteer with an inner city youth group at Carver Park during the summer. He acts as a much-needed mentor and father figure for many young boys. His time spent this way assists in providing direction as to how to become responsible young men. He also helps with school problems and homework by helping the boys develop study skills. The youth get to go camping, learn social skills through sports activities, and other needed intervention. For years, Jerome has also been a career mentor and role model at North Division High School, exposing male and female students there to the opportunities and benefits of a career in nursing. His close association with his godmother, Leeann Gant, who lived in Milwaukee before passing, provided Jerome with inspiration. He remembers her fondly. “She was my prayer warrior. She kept me straight so that I could keep the boys that I work with straight. She treated me just like I was her own son.” Jerome has five adult children and a host of grandchildren. He works at MHSI three days a week in the Family Practice department during the day and in Urgent Care during the evening. Two days a week, he takes care of his five-year-old great-grandson, Jahari. Jerome attends Greater Mt. Sinai Church of God in Christ.

work also includes the administration of the practice, staff management, and credentialing. Regina also practices in Chicago and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Regina freely extends a giving heart. Her contributions to the community include donating podiatric services, and offering foot health education to the underserved. She is a triple negative breast cancer survivor whose service breathes life in to breast cancer awareness in the Milwaukee area. Her foundation, Flippin to a Cure®, was designed to raise awareness about triple negative cancer, an aggressive form of the disease which is more likely to impact African American, Latino, and white women under 40 with no familial history of breast cancer. Triple negative diagnoses affect the African American community most severely. Her most recent fundraising effort, Rock the Runway, was a success and Flippin to a Cure® raised $22,000 for breast cancer research at the Medical College of Wisconsin and Froedtert Hospital’s Breast Cancer Center. She is a member of the Wisconsin State Board of Podiatry, National Medical Podiatric Regina Flippin, DPM Association, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Her husband, Eric Bland, a retired therUrban Foot Care Clinic apist, is also active with Flippin to a Cure®. Surgical Center where her specialty is minimal Dr. Flippin belongs to Chicago Fellowship incision surgery. Regina meets the needs of Missionary Baptist Church and is an honorary her patients with an in-house surgical center member of Christian Faith Fellowship Church and a foot care center at the same site. Her in Milwaukee.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

17

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Law

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ne of ten children, Magistrate Judge Nancy Joseph was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Her parents immigrated to the United States and settled in New Jersey, bringing groups of their children to the States over several years. Young Nancy arrived in the United States at age eight. Some people know from a young age that they are interested in a particular profession. Nancy, however, had not felt that pull. She credits her career as a lawyer and subsequent role as judge, to teachers who pushed her in the direction of law and helped her make choices to pursue a career in the field. Nancy is a 1986 graduate of St. Michael’s High School in Elizabeth, NJ. She attended Howard University, in Washington, DC, and received a bachelor of arts in political science degree in1990. She was granted a Juris Doctor from Rutgers Law School in Camden, NJ in 1993. She is a member of the Wisconsin Bar Association, Eastern District Bar Association, 7th Circuit Bar Association, and the U.S. Supreme Court Bar Association. Called to meaningful work, Nancy’s career began as a state public defender for the juvenile courts. From 1993-2000, she worked on behalf of children in Milwaukee requiring Children in Need of Protection or Services (CHIPS) advocacy. It was “her opportunity to get to know a vast section of people and identify important adult social supports for children and youth.” From 2000-2010, Nancy worked in the federal public defender’s office, where she acted as public defender in federal crime cases, conducted trial and appeals, and argued 7th Circuit cases. In 2010, she was appointed to an 8-year-term as Magistrate Judge by a panel of sitting Magistrate Judges.

The Honorable Nancy Joseph US Magistrate Court Nancy’s heart is tied to the community. She serves as coordinator of the Kids, Courts and Citizenship Program, a community outreach segment of the Eastern District U.S. District Court and the Eastern District of the Wisconsin Bar Association. The program, hosted by Marquette University Law School, is multi-

layered and strives to expose middle and high school youth to the federal court system and introduce them to legal professions. The program also offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the legal profession, and teaches responsible use of social media. Nancy hopes that this program will help participants “make good choices in the present, so that they can take full advantage of life’s opportunities.” Another goal of the Kids, Courts and Citizenship Program is to teach citizenship. Nancy enjoys having a hand in creating engaged citizens who also understand the workings of court systems. This program also allows her room to reinforce the need for good decisionmaking, offers lessons about the naturalization process, and stresses the responsibilities of citizenship. Having experience with the immigration and naturalization processes, Judge Joseph has hosted a Civics Bowl since 2011. The Bowl gives local high school students an opportunity to compete in a game highlighting the United States Naturalization Test. Above all things related to her career, Nancy enjoys her work and feels fortunate to serve as Magistrate Judge in her community. Because she enjoys the work, she desires to give it 100 percent. She owes it to her parents, teachers, and mentors for placing her on the right path. Nancy believes that she is motivated toward excellence because she also owes it to her children and the next generation to be a model of excellence. She’s compelled to “do right by them.” Nancy has been married to James Duncan, a Milwaukee Public Schools educator, for twenty years. They are the parents of two children, Lauryn, 15 and Miles, 9.

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fter earning his high school diploma from Wauwatosa West High School, lifelong Milwaukee resident Tim McMurtry, II, aspired to study electrical engineering. Despite his high aptitude in math and science, however, Tim says he quickly learned it was not the right fit for him. “I actually hated it,” he says, reflecting on his early collegiate experience. “One day I was in the library studying, and I just thought to myself ‘I’m not feeling this’. I needed the passion to continue on, and it just wasn’t there.” What Tim did have a passion for was actively engaging with people. He eventually earned his bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. A short while later, he assumed the role as chief of staff with the Milwaukee Common Council’s president. “I found it interesting learning about city government and all of the behind-the-scenes decisions that go into crafting legislation,” Tim Tim McMurtry, II says. “I definitely wanted to continue in this path, but I didn’t have much of an interest in absorbing all of the bureaucracy.” Tim’s pro- Mueller Communications, Inc. fessional path eventually landed him his current job with Milwaukee-based public relations ecutive, Tim helps relay information about a firm Mueller Communications. As account ex- number of important issues, many pertaining to developments within Milwaukee and the role the city’s elected officials play in carrying out plans. More recently, Tim has helped convey information on the Harley-Davidson Museum’s lease renewal and the second phase of the North End apartment development. Tim

also frequently shares details about the Milwaukee Brewers. Tim and his wife of 16 years, Cheryl, attend the World Outreach and Bible Training Center, where they serve as associate pastors. From a young age, Tim says faith has played a very important role in his life. “It’s the central core of my being,” Tim intimates. “It’s the center of my success. It has infused itself into every area of my life, personally and professionally.” In recent years, Tim says he has witnessed a steady interest in supernatural and paranormal issues and believes mankind is as hungry as ever to enter into an authentic relationship with Jesus Christ. In addition to his professional and churchrelated pursuits, Tim finds time to volunteer with a number of other organizations. He is the assistant state director for Christians United for Israel and is board president of Serenity Inn, an organization that provised support for people struggling with homelessness and addiction. Tim also served on the board overseeing Milwaukee World Festival, Inc., the organization that handles activities on the Summerfest grounds, and has a role on the Forest County Potawatomi Foundation’s advisory committee. Additionally, Tim writes blogs on the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s website. “I look forward to continuing to work toward making Milwaukee a greater city,” Tim says. Tim and Cheryl have two children – a 13-year-old son, Joshua, and a 9-year-old daughter, Layla.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Annual Black Excellence Awards Media

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s a student at James Madison High School, Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr. was confident that he could write, took many English Composition courses, and focused on perfecting his craft. After graduating from high school in 1978, Thomas earned a bachelor of arts degree at Concordia University. He also earned a certification in journalism from Marquette University’s Excel Second Edition Program. Thomas’ career in journalism started in 1983 with an internship at the Milwaukee Courier where he explored the complexities and nuances of print journalism. His work at the Milwaukee Community Journal began in 1984 as a general assignment reporter, taking on varied writing assignments. This position eventually evolved into reporting and assisting the editor. These new experiences prepared him to take on roles of managing editor and reporter. Today, Thomas’ responsibilities as editor vary and include management, copy-editing, assigning freelance photo and story tasks, executing the newspaper layout, and contributing as an

editorial writer and photographer. For the past year, Thomas and his wife of 4 years, Clarene, have led a couple’s ministry at Brentwood Church of Christ where they are members. They are both active in the Christian Couples Ministry, which, in monthly meetings, “strives to encourage couples to discuss the joys and setbacks of marriage. They also gain encouragement and strength from one another.” Thomas firmly believes that Black marriage is on the decline, and adds that, “The group allows couples to put talk into action.” Thomas and his wife have been working on National Black Marriage Day events for the past four years, and are currently planning National Black Marriage Day events to commence March 22, 2014. Thomas is in a business where he sees how mainstream media negatively impacts the image of the Black American community. He says, “I feel obligated to set the record straight, plead our own cause, and try to plead our issues showing a positive image of the Black community, and of Milwaukee.” Thomas and Clarene, director of collaboration and communications at the Black

Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr. The Milwaukee Community Journal Health Coalition of Wisconsin, Inc., have 3 adult children, 1 grandchild, and another on the way.

Minority Business

Diane Stowers Atkinson BP® Gas Station

I n 1972, Diane Stowers made the decision

to move from her birthplace of Coahoma, MS, to reunite with her sister who earlier had relocated to Milwaukee. Since then, Diane’s perseverance in fulfilling her purpose has been continuous. The only African American owner of a BP gas station in Wisconsin, her journey has been both rewarding and challenging, even as her unwavering faith and determination opened many doors. Diane completed her interrupted schooling by attending Milwaukee Area Technical College, first earning her General Education Diploma, then going on to earn a Dental Assistant Certificate of Completion. She relentlessly searched for employment for an entire year before landing a position as a dental assis-

tant to Dr. Gliesner, located on 21st Street and North Avenue. Working in this capacity for nine years, she then moved on to secure a position at the North Point Dental Group for eight years. In 1988, Diane married Jimmy L. Stowers, the love of her life. Subsequently, she resigned from the dental business to co-manage the Amoco gas station they leased in 1990. Lucrative times complemented many demanding times. In the beginning, gas sales were up to 90,000 gallons a month and five years later BP bought out Amoco. The buyout caused unanticipated changes. However, one of the most unexpected changes affecting the business and complicating Diane’s emotional stability occurred when Jimmy, her husband of sixteen years, succumbed to a heart attack in January 2004. Her trust in God along with the support of her three “amazing” children and faithful employees assisted in sustaining the business. A welcome change occurred the next month, in February 2004, when Diane received approval for a loan to finally purchase the gas station property after she and Jimmy had been refused numerous times previously. Much like many businesses in the nation’s struggling economy, Diane experienced even more complications. Although the loan was

granted, the owners of the property refused to cooperate, which prolonged the purchasing process. Two years passed before Diane prevailed and triumphantly purchased the property in July 2006. There were more complications when scheduled remodeling began that year in September, but took an additional three months to complete. The reopening of the station launched the day before her mom’s funeral on March 29, 2007. Presently, Diane’s flexibility and deep convictions keep her grounded in the face of declining gas sales (from 90,000 gallons to approximately 50,000 gallons per month), overstated property values, a $24,000 tax bill, regulatory test costs, maintenance expenses, and the expanding cost of insurance. Conveying a spirit of jubilance when speaking of her family-oriented gas station located on the corner of 8th Street and Atkinson Avenue, she emphatically declares, “I am a servant. It is my gift. I am commissioned by God to serve others.” Diane is satisfied with not being in the limelight and elated when serving others. Though losing her husband was devastating, she experienced the comfort and connection of servanthood to the community and returned to work with ease. Accomplishing many goals in the face of adversity, Diane epitomizes resolve, clarity of vision, love of family and love of community, while continuing to serve in the capacity God intended. Two daughters, one son, three grandchildren and a great niece complete the Stowers family.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

19

2014 Black Excellence Awards Minority Business

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rom a young age, Daphne Wilson had a keen interest in figuring out how various gadgets and gizmos operated. When something malfunctioned, she wanted to figure out how it could be fixed. When she progressed into the gifted and talented program at Rufus King School in her middle school years, Daphne says her teachers encouraged her to consider a career in the engineering field – a lofty and uncommon goal for a woman, let alone a person of color. “I had very good teachers, and I loved school. I never wanted to miss a day of it,” Daphne says, reflecting on her education through Milwaukee Public Schools. “Some of my best teachers helped me realize how much I enjoyed engineering. When I found out I could get paid doing this, I was amazed.” Daphne graduated from Lynde & Harry Bradley Technology and Trade High School. After high school, she graduated from the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, Daphne worked at a series of different engineering positions throughout the 1990s. As the decade came to a close, she decided to take a leap of faith. After enduring a company downsizing, traveling extensively – “living out of a suitcase,” as she puts it – and putting in long hours, Daphne decided a change was necessary. On October 1, 1999, Daphne went into business for herself, and Zoe Engineering, LLC was born. The company, on Milwaukee’s northwest side, provides electrical power, instrumentation and controls and plant automation engineering services. “People kept encouraging me to do it,” Daphne says of forming Zoe Engineering. “I prayed about it a lot, and I talked to my pastor. Eventually, I said I’d try it for a year.” One year followed another, and today, Zoe Engi-

Daphne Wilson Zoe Engineering, LLC neering has endured, a shining testament of a minority-owned business that has remained in operation amid a changing technological and economic landscape. As rewarding as self-employment has been, Daphne readily admits operating a company is filled with challenges. She was recently faced with the unenviable task of downsizing her own staff as work slowed down within her facility. But Daphne says she and her employees maintain close contact with one another. “We all cried with one another as we said our goodbyes,” Daphne says of the day downsizing took hold. At the moment, Daphne is the only person working for the company, but she says she plans to press forward by growing her company and adding employees back into the fold. Faith has long been an important part of Daphne’s life. In fact, her strong belief in God

Congratulates

Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr. on his 2014 Black Excellence Award and on 30 Years with the Black Press

is best demonstrated in the name of her company. When asked about the meaning behind Zoe Engineering”, Daphne points to the Scriptures in John 10:10, where the word “zoe” reflects “an abundant life in Christ.” Today, Daphne is involved in ReJOYce in Jesus Ministries, a Los Angeles-based nondenominational congregation that is geared toward college students. Daphne attends a church branch at her alma mater MSOE and readily points out she enjoys offering encouragement to students who are in the same position she was in 25 years ago. “I always tell students ‘If you can get in, you can get out’,” says Daphne. “MSOE is a very tough school. They have very high standards, and you have to be extremely disciplined. I’m very blessed God got me through those years.” Daphne, who grew up near North 25th and West Cherry Streets in Milwaukee’s central city, readily points out she did not have a luxurious childhood. But Daphne pays special accolades to her parents, Thomas and Fannie Wilson, for the love and support they have given her over the years. In 2013, Thomas and Fannie celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. “We had some very tough times growing up,” Daphne says. “But there was also a strong sense of community throughout our neighborhood, and my family and I have continued to be very tight-knit. They’re amazing people.”


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Music

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Milton believes that adults can impact the lives of children and youth in remarkable ways when the community works together to teach children how to be in the world. Growing up, he understood the importance of knowing his neighbors and knew that community members were authorized and obligated to correct and teach. Milton had parents, particularly a father, who served as models for his life, by sharing their time and resources to those in need. The positive influence brought out Milton’s strengths and helped to shape him into the man that he has become. Because of the gifts of others, he says, “I have always felt a need to give back to my community.” Milton adds, “Regardless of someone’s past actions and mistakes, I always try and see the possibility and potential that each person has. As a teacher, I did not give up on my students just because the system labeled them or was willing to push them aside. As an attorney, I advocate vigorously for my young clients, while also trying to redirect them to a positive path. As a musician, I mentor young musicians, providing them with opportunities Atty. Milton L. Childs, Sr. to use their gifts. I do what I do because Tabernacle Community Baptist Church of my faith. I have been given second and third chances in my life and I have overcome many challenges because of the of Music, Milton also contributes his musical grace of God. I realize that I am still here for gifts on the organ, piano, and trumpet. a reason. As long as I am here, I will serve and Milton is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fragive back to those in my community.”  ternity, Inc. He is also an Executive Board Milton is married to Michelle Buie Childs. Member of the NAACP (Milwaukee chapter), They are the parents of four adult children, a Little League coach, a Boy Scout leader, and Mia, Melissa, Milton, Jr., and Myles; they are a mentor. also the grandparents of six.

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dorf. Performing selections of the classics by the age of 6, as a classical pianist, soloist, and chamber musician she specializes in the works of Scarlatti, J.S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, and Chopin. In grade school, Candice transferred to the Franklin School District. For part of middle school and high school, she played for the choir and participated in orchestra. She competed in state competitions, including the Wisconsin Piano Teachers Guild, and distinguished her talent as the first student in Wisconsin to win all trophy cups from the Federation of Music, receiving a final trophy in 1999 when she also graduated from high school. She performed with many musicians such as Johnny Euell, Alesia Miller, and Felix Ramsey Jr. Candice collaborated with symphony orchestras and performed classically for charity events for Teen Challenge of Milwaukee, Alpha Phi Alpha Beautillion, and Milwaukee Health Services. As a music teacher at YMCA Young Leaders Academy, she developed lesson plans and her students performed at the Performing Arts Center. Her greatest teaching and mentoring accomplishments include a student’s acceptance to Northwestern University on a $50,000 music scholarship, and another student performing for American Idol in Hollywood and later being selected to perform and record at the Grammy’s Music Camp. Children of elected officials, clergy, and pillars of the community make up Candi’s roster. Candi’s Piano Studio purchases instruments for students in need. She has donated over

ilwaukee native Attorney Milton L. Childs, Sr., is a man of faith who uses his gifts to contribute love and light to our community. Milton is a 1981 graduate of Bradley Trade and Technical High School. He served in the United States Marine Corps from 1984 to 1992 and received a bachelor of arts in business administration from New Orleans’ Xavier University in 1987. Continuing his interest in business, Milton also earned a master of business administration from Keller Graduate School of Business in 1998. After some time in the insurance industry, Milton felt an inner pull toward community service, and worked part-time at Messmer High School. It was there that he developed a keen interest in youth advocacy. His work with students offered opportunities to help them maneuver through high school. This experience opened his eyes to the possibility of using his advocacy skills within the juvenile court system. In 2003, Milton earned a juris doctorate from Marquette University, and he had clearly fallen in love with law. The Childs Law Practice opened in 2004. The next year, Milton pursued work as a public defender in Sheboygan, Racine, and Milwaukee where he became the “voice of the juvenile,” and provided defense for juveniles through Children in Need of Protection or Services (CHIPS) advocacy. In addition to his work as an attorney, Milton is an active lifelong member of Tabernacle Community Baptist Church and has been Minister of Music and Worship Arts since 2002. In this role, he develops weekly worship services with his Pastor and manages staff musicians. Trained at the Milwaukee Conservatory

ccomplished classical musician Candice R. Dillon is founder of Candi’s Piano Studio. On January 25, 2014, she proudly hosted a recital highlighting more than 30 of her young students of diverse nationalities, musical experiences and ages. Celebrating the studio’s fiveyear anniversary, performances showcased student talent and honored Candice’s drive, sense of purpose and undeniable passion for mentoring children. Teaching in a music store, she perceived a need and started her studio. The driving force became to create a venue for affordable music lessons. Central city children needed access to music education when their families faced financial challenges. An environment of quality time allowed students to avoid rushing. In her words, “I began teaching the love and art of making fine music and my studio’s mission statement became ‘Change the world, one note at time’!” Born in Milwaukee and growing up in King Solomon Missionary Baptist Church as a premature baby weighing barely 2½ pounds, Candice required therapy. When she turned three-years-old, her pastor, Rev. F.L. Harper, suggested that she learn to play the piano as an alternative development therapy. Pastor Harper’s testimony, attributed to God, was that “King Solomon Church would raise a great musician.” Embracing Candice as that musician, he assumed responsibility to train her musically and hired the best musicians, including Lee Hunt, Michael Lidell and Darrien Wilson. She also studied classical piano with Elizabeth Hilgen-

Candice R. Dillon Candi’s Piano Studio $1500, countless instruments and musical services to Milwaukee organizations and schools. Extended family, students and friends contribute to her success including her parents, Charles and Sydney Dillon; godparents Clinton Mallett and Rochelle Streeter; Pastor Ray Gill and family, the Henry family, and the King Solomon Baptist Church family. In between all of her commitments, she pursued a Piano Pedagogy and Performance degree under the leadership of Dr. James I. McKeever at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. Previously married, she has three girls – one 7-year-old and 1-year-old twins.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

21

2014 Annual Black Excellence Awards Public Service

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olice Officer Aleia Avant possesses keen analytical skills and compassionate character traits. She builds future successes by tapping into three beliefs: that excellence is something everyone possesses; excellence needs to be built upon; and that failure helps propel people to excellence. Her experience and insight into human character most certainly led her to a career with the Milwaukee Police Department (MPD). Born and raised in Milwaukee, Aleia credits her mother, Kamala Anderson, for doing an excellent job as a single parent raising her and her sister. Kamela began Aleia’s education in preschool at the Neighborhood House of Milwaukee, followed by attendance at Grantosa Drive Elementary School and Lincoln Center Middle School of the Arts. As a teenager she began associating with individuals possessing questionable character traits, while living in the same neighborhoods with them. She wisely changed course. Believing she was headed to becoming an “at-risk teen statistic,” she accessed her strength of mind to avoid that label and graduated from Riverside University High School in 2004. Her reasoning skills and commitment to hard work led to a Police Aide position with the MPD after high school graduation. More dedicated work and the desire to go further assisted her in following through with the Milwaukee Police Training Program.

Influenced by her mother’s bachelor’s degree in communication, Aleia enrolled at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to pursue a global management major after becoming a police officer, because she always wanted to go to college. Her belief that a college education increases her chances of succeeding in what she wants to do motivates her desire to attend college. Aleia said, “In my line of work I believe a person that is willing to take on the hurt and pain of others requires a mindset of excellence. You can’t help a person that is at the lowest point in their lives and you are on the same level as they are. I know that no one is perfect and I think that there is always something I can offer.” With this knowledge, she contributes outside of her daily work duties and strives to uplift the community by offering clothing to the homeless. She has given a bible to someone contemplating suicide and has sat side-by-side with a depressed woman speaking to her about the beauty of life and the beauty within herself. As a spiritual person, Aleia believes that food for the spirit, as Ofc. Aleia Avant a kind act, works powerfully. As a result, she Milwaukee Police Department loves to help build people’s spirits, because “I hope that what I say or do will help lead them to their path of excellence.” In 2007, she began serving the MPD. Now a Her hobbies include writing poetry, short Patrol Officer, she participates on the MPD’s stories, traveling and listening to music. recruiting team.

Ofc. Charles “Chuck” Leach Milwaukee Police Department

C harles “Chuck” Leach is a Milwaukee Po-

lice Officer who strives to protect, serve, and, connect with the community. Officer Leach grew up in Milwaukee and is a 1993 graduate of Bradley Technical High School. He earned an associate degree in criminal justice/law enforcement in 2005. Chuck was most recently honored with a Milwaukee Police Department Meritorious Service Award celebrating his exceptional courage in the line of duty. Chuck began his work with the Milwaukee Police Department in 2001 and is assigned to

Milwaukee Police District Four. In collaboration with the Wisconsin Department of Corrections, he is a member of the Community Prosecution Unit and is tasked with monitoring probation offenders. Understanding the importance of education, his position also includes facilitating meetings where he teaches District 4 community members about issues of criminality. He also works closely with the Domestic Violence Unit and the Department of Neighborhood Services to patrol and monitor the activity of the district’s parolees. Part of this role includes securing homes and ensuring

the safety of domestic violence survivors. All too often community members find that trust and law enforcement don’t quite mesh. Chuck makes it his goal to connect with the people he meets. He understands that it is his job to gain the community’s trust. He uses his experience as a black man to demonstrate his accessibility and ability to engage with the community in positive ways. Building community is Officer Leach’s gift. Aside from his position with the police department, he finds fulfillment in volunteerism and also enjoys event promoting. He volunteers on the catering side of Terry Lynn’s, a local African American owned restaurant, and other organizations. Putting his mother’s soul food recipes to work, Chuck has hosted and organized a Family and Friends Christmas Party for District 4 personnel since 2008. Other volunteer work includes fundraising for the American Cancer Society. Chuck is a member of New Apostolic Church and is married to Tanganika, a housing supervisor at Lutheran Social Services. The couple has two children, Alex, 12, and Katherine, 6. Officer Chuck Leach believes that the community drives him toward excellence. It’s a choice he makes each day that he helps others maneuver life’s varied paths. For him, giving back is a gift itself.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Religion

B orn in Clarksdale, MS, Dr. Bishop Clay-

ton Duckworth, Pastor of New Creation Missionary Praise Church, relocated to Chicago in 1966. His family settled in Milwaukee in 1969. Bishop Duckworth received his formal education at McKinley Elementary and Peckham Junior High School in Mississippi. Known as a bad kid in school, Bishop Duckworth sadly discovered that his unique name was the butt of jokes. He believed that fighting was his only recourse and defense. This trouble led young Clayton to frequent school suspensions and eventually to music, where he discovered his gift. In addition to his work in ministry, he is also a talented bass player. After graduating from Milwaukee’s Washington High School in 1979, Bishop Duckworth attended the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Milwaukee Area Technical College. He earned associate, baccalaureate, and doctoral degrees in divinity from Agape Love Bible College and ALBC School of Theology. Clayton’s parents were active in the church. His father was a deacon and a vocalist in a quartet. From a young child church was made an important part of his life. However, it took some time for Clayton to pursue life work in religion and spirituality. While in his youth, God offered Clayton a second chance to choose a path after a life-altering street fight. He knew that he “needed to get right with God” and he hasn’t looked back. The Bishop’s current responsibilities include pastoral leadership of New Creation Missionary Praise Church. He has also held posts as Sunday school superintendent, Sunday school

Rev. Marilyn Crump Miller Reformation Lutheran Church

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everend Marilyn Crump Miller is Pastor of Lutheran Church of the Reformation – ELCA and exemplifies a strong commitment to education for herself and others. Living in Milwaukee all of her life, she initially desired to become a K-12 special education teacher. Instead, her path took another direction. She began teaching a different population, which unpredictably led to the ministry and culmi-

teacher, associate minister, church musician, and street ministry leader. He is the founder of Praise the Lord Church Ministries and New Creation Missionary Praise Church II. He founded Lampley School of Theology in 2011. Bishop Duckworth also hosts The Anointed Man of God Praise Hour, a television ministry that airs every second Tuesday of each month on MATA, Channel 96. Clayton believes that community and ministry go hand in hand. His humble approach to ministry is evident when he witnesses to those in the most desperate parts of the city. The Bishop and his congregation have several other ministries with a community focus: feeding the homeless, ministering to the nursing home residents, and youth outreach are just a few. Bishop Duckworth has also coached youth sports. Clayton has used his past experiences to make an impact on his community. He is on a mission to encourage troubled African American youth and to help them recognize that they can be better than their poor choices. He believes that his motivation to choose excellence is aligned with the will of God. He simply wants to send the message that, “Being poor doesn’t mean you can’t contribute; you can be rich despite your circumstances.” Clayton has been married to Renee Duckworth for 10 years. The two share 12 children, and 24 grandchildren.

Dr. Bishop Clayton Duckworth, Sr. New Creation Missionary Praise Church

nated in her attaining the title of full-time pastor in 2013. “God had a different plan for my life. It did not unfold the way I thought it would. I am fascinated by how God took me places that I did not intend to go,” she said. Marilyn’s connection to the ministry started early, as a member of a Lutheran denomination. She remembers that there was great emphasis on education and on learning things that would be helpful, such as how to deliver effective speeches. She taught Sunday school as a teenager, where her joy of learning was evident. Her learning journey through Milwaukee public schools ended with honors, with her Riverside University High School graduation in 1973. Quite naturally, she immediately began her college education, earning an associate of arts degree in 1975 from Concordia University; a bachelor of arts degree in psychology and education from Cardinal Stritch University in 1977; followed by earning a master of arts in education in 1981. She even attended Harvard University in Cambridge, MA, and received a Certificate from Harvard Civics Institute in 1999. During that time, Marilyn was also employed. In June of 1976, Concordia University requested that she teach a class in the summer. She accepted, instructing students struggling with English and a variety of other courses through June 1984. After that she accepted a position for 16 years at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, as an advisor in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, eventually becoming director of the Multicultural Program and the Gateway to Science and Engineering and Technology Program where she interacted with high school

students to prepare them for college. Somewhere in between her spare time, she began striving to discern whether she should pursue a doctorate or look at the ministry for her future. “As I tried to unravel the answer, it popped out of my mouth that I was going back to school to become a pastor during a conversation with my daughter as I visited her out of town. It was between me and God. I am grateful because God took a boulder out of my way.” This transition was natural. Always around the ministry, Marilyn worked with pastors and had a continual passion for her faith journey, which allows her to serve out her call to love people. Marilyn’s commitment, purposeful vision, and faith in God, initiated her career transition to the ministry. She attended Wartburg Theological Seminary in Dubuque, IA to receive a Certificate in Youth and Family Ministry in 2007; she earned a Clinical Pastoral Education Certificate at Alexian Village-Milwaukee in 2011, and a Theological Education for Emerging Ministries (TEEM) Certification from Wartburg Theological Seminary in 2012. As she transitioned into the ministry, Lutheran Human Relations Association, a national non-profit organization focusing on anti-racism training and cross-cultural training, employed Marilyn. Working mostly with adults, she has been there for twelve years starting out as Director of Youth and Congregational Ministries in 2002. Serving as Executive Director for ten years, she presently serves as a consultant. Her hobbies are reading, dancing, singing and traveling when possible. Once married, Marilyn has a son, a married daughter, one grandson, and another grandchild on the way.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

23

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Social Services

Geri L. Lyday Milwaukee County Disabilities Services Division

A n internship at the Mil-

waukee Center fore Independence was a ray of light for Geri L. Lyday. The experience put in focus a desire to help people with disabilities. “I kind of felt I enjoyed doing this line of work. I wanted to be with people, and it just felt right to me,” says Geri, who worked

at the county’s Wil-O-Way Summer Camp during her formative experience. For more than 30 years, Geri has been able to fulfill this mission through her role as an administrator with Milwaukee County’s Disability Services Division. In her position, Geri brings the state’s community options program – aimed at helping people in need of long-term care stay in their homes – at the county level for local residents who benefit from such services. For several years, Geri has also served as interim director of the county’s department of health and human services, where she helped implement operational changes at the county’s Mental Health Complex. She was appointed the position by (then-County Executive) Scott Walker. “It was quite a journey,” Geri says of the appointment. “I got involved with quite a few issues during that period of time.” Regardless of a person’s age or disability, Geri says her goal is to help the recipient realize his or her

abilities – not their limitations. 3,000 people. “Working for the county has Practicing what she preaches, been such a great experience,” Geri Geri, a lifelong Milwaukee resisays. “The people I’ve worked with dent, cares for her 92-year-old father, Caspar W. Lyday. In recent years, the long-time owner of Caspar’s Lounge in the heart of Milwaukee has been living in Geri’s home. “I wouldn’t have it any other way,” Geri says. “Family is all about supporting each other and being together.” Geri, a graduate of Martin Luther High School, has earned a number of degrees, including a bachelor’s in behavioral science and a minor in psychology from Lakeland College in Plymouth, WI and a master’s in rehabilitation specialty at Minnesota State University-Mankato. have been wonderful. We’ve been Geri is also a lifelong member able to make a true impact on peo- of Calvary Baptist Church. Addiple with a range of ages.” tionally, she has served on the WisDespite ongoing budgetary chal- consin Long Term Care Advisory lenges at the county level, Geri Council and has been involved says she is working vigorously to with various functions of Special end a waiting list for the county’s Olympics Wisconsin. administration of the state’s community options program. At one point, the list swelled as high as

Part D for medications, and the Foodshare program. Payne is Manager of Attributable to her motivational training the Senior Companion Program at skills and her program’s dedicated staff, the the Social Development Commisaward-winning Senior Companion program sion (SDC), demonstrates commitgarners recognition from various elected ment with her sheer staying power public officials. Plaques, trophies and procand is a leader among her peers and lamations displayed on Mattie’s walls and the senior volunteers she supervises. shelves, include the 2004 Governors ComOn the job far beyond standard remunity Service Effective Practice Award, the tirement years, she shows no signs of 2006 Outstanding Program Award (presentstopping. One of her granddaughters ed by the Milwaukee Aging Consortium), the asked, “Are you ever going to retire SDC Board of Commissioners Chairperson’s or are you going to work forever?” To Award of Excellence for 2012 and proclamasuch inquiries, Mattie simply laughs tions from the offices of Senator Russ Feand responds, “I love my job and I ingold, Senator Herb Kohl, Governor Scott am grateful for my health that allows Walker and Mayor Tom Barrett. me to provide this service to others.” Mattie also volunteers in several capacities Mattie’s supervision of this program within the Milwaukee County Department fosters awareness of the various seron Aging. She is now in the last year of her vices available to seniors. With up to second three-year term serving as a commis74 senior volunteers, she makes a difsioner on the Milwaukee County Commission ference in the lives of often homeon Aging, where she has held the offices of bound individuals that her program’s both vice president and secretary. She attends volunteers are matched with. Grace Fellowship Church, under the pastoBorn in Ardmore, OK, education ral leadership of Dr. Andrew Calhoun and always mattered as Mattie consisBrenda Calhoun. Mattie also serves as church tently excelled as an honor student. treasurer on the Board of Directors. In 2013 Completing high school in 1955, she the church presented her with the “Service entered Philander Smith College in Excellence Award” in appreciation of her Little Rock, where her brother atMattie Payne outstanding service and leadership. tended. She left Arkansas and moved Social Development Commission Mattie married twice and both spouses to Milwaukee to be a caregiver for her passed. She has two sons, 5 grandsons, five sister. Wanting to continue her education, she entered Milwaukee Area Technical her first job with seniors began as a counselor granddaughters, and three great-grandchilCollege to study data entry. Eventually after for the Milwaukee Urban League’s Seniors in dren. obtaining a job, working for ten years as a data Community Service Program. In 1986, she entry lead clerk for J. C. Penney, she entered became a monitor for SDC’s food program, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and which segued into her present position, Mangraduated in 1976 with a bachelor of science ager for the Senior Companion Program in 1991. She additionally manages the Benefits degree in education. Mattie began her social service career with Enrollment Center established to enhance the the Opportunity Industrialization Center Senior Companion Program. Through this (OIC), instructing students of all ages in data center, qualified seniors receive benefits such entry from 1980 to 1982. From 1985 to 1991, as the Medicare Savings Program, Medicare

M attie


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Sports

R

ussell Thomas constructively influences and empowers Milwaukee’s youth and adults through athletics. Presently, in his 18th year as Recreation Supervisor for the Milwaukee Public School (MPS) Sports and Athletics Division, his professional leadership and ingenuity distinguish his career. His belief in the Bible verse “to whom much is given, much is required,” cultivates continual enthusiasm to “pass it on.” Russ thereby paves the way for many youth and adults to establish goals and dream possibilities. He said, “We have a population segment that knows only about their segment and therefore we have much work to do. Our charge is to help others enjoy their lives.” To that end, he innovatively addresses limitations to open minds. He established a good life for himself and desires the same for Milwaukee’s youth. Born in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Thomas promoted educational and cultural experiences. Russ’s mother, Marcia Thomas - Ballard, later remarried when Jesse passed, and remained supportive. He graduated from New Paltz High School in upstate New York and attended Springfield College in Massachusetts earning B.S. and M.Ed. degrees. He then began his years in sports management and recreation. His early career included administrative positions in athletics and student affairs at the Atlantic-10 Intercollegiate Conference, and while in New York, at Camp Victory Lake, the Culinary Institute of America, and Onondaga Community College. He then settled in after moving to Milwaukee to assume a position on the MPS Recreation Department’s staff. Russ has impacted and influenced major Milwaukee sports events. His industriousness in coalescing community factions attracted the 2010 U.S. Youth Games to Milwaukee, which he co-directed that year. The games featured six major U.S. cities and more than 600 participants competing in Olympic-styled sports. Also in 2010, Russ assumed the position of

Russell Thomas MPS Recreation general manager of the Fresh Coast Basketball Classic, originally a Running Rebels community organization brainchild started in 2007. His direction and initiatives in branding expanded the reach and profile of the project to worldclass status, attracting record numbers in attendance and increasing sponsorship development exponentially. Russ is also the founder and director of the Milwaukee Recreation Fall Youth Football Classic, which, in November 2013, showcased five youth football organizations in the greater Milwaukee area competing in the 10th an-

nual championship football and league playoff games at Custer Stadium. Russ serves as trainer, instructor and adviser for Safe Sports Zone, Inc. Called upon as a noted facilitator at sports management symposiums, conferences frequently request him as a featured speaker. Along with positions on various boards, memberships and affiliations with numerous professional and community service organizations, he currently serves as honorary chair of the Fellowship Open, a golf tournament and scholarship fundraiser. He has served as chairman emeritus of the Southeastern Wisconsin Commissioners Alliance and as past president of the Wisconsin Conference Commissioners Association. Russ serves on numerous steering committees, such as the 2008 McDonald’s High School All-American Game, the King Holiday Hoopfest Planning Committee, the Greater Milwaukee Special Olympics Advisory Council, the Police Athletic League, and the Neighborhood Children’s Sports League. He is a member of the Black Coaches Association and has officiated basketball games for more than 30 years. Additionally, he finds time to volunteer for Milwaukee Health Services and the Operation Dream organization. A history buff, he enjoys travel to Civil War sites and battlegrounds like Harpers Ferry, WV, where John Brown was captured; the Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg, MD and the Gettysburg, PA battlefield.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

25

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Volunteerism

M

onte Mabra, founder of Voice of the Fatherless Child Center for Intervention through Entertainment, has turned trial into triumph, not only for himself, but also for our community. Born and raised on the city’s north side, Monte earned his High School Equivalency Diploma from Oregon High School in 1996. Among his many talents, he also earned certifications in developmental and human relations psychology, anger management, cognitive thinking, building services, computer literacy, business application, domestic violence counseling, and alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA)counseling. Monte chose to turn his life around after a troubled youth. After much reflection and armed with a clear vision, he drafted a play that encompassed his mission to help fatherless children. He called the script Voice of the Fatherless Child and staged a performance for the prison community. He wasn’t certain that anyone would support his vision, but people came and Monte’s play reached hearts that had been clearly broken. After bearing witness to the power of God through artistic expression, Monte understood how his life work would evolve from that moment on. He founded The Voice of the Fatherless Child Center for Intervention through Entertainment in 2008.

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Monte Mabra Voice of the Fatherless Child With a heart focused on service, Monte bridges the gap for Milwaukee’s fatherless youth. He has also come to understand that fatherless adults need his support as well. Monte and the hardworking Voice of the Fatherless Child staff fulfill this role without pay. They offer community services that include arts education, virtue seminars for young women, and workshops that teach young men how to be leaders in our community. Monte’s work is a labor of love: no salary, strictly volunteer staff, and no profit. His original play, Voice of the Fatherless Child, is performed regularly in the community and is

ynthia Stokes-Murray is no stranger to service. She currently serves as President of the National Counsel of Urban League Guilds where she is charged with advancing the fundraising, leadership development, community service, and public relations efforts of the National Urban League corps of volunteers. Cynthia has faithfully served as an Urban League National Board Trustee, YMCA Urban Campus Board member, which includes the John C. Cudahy, Northside, Parklawn, and Downtown branches, the BloodCenter of Wisconsin board member, Treasurer of the National Urban League Guilds, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee development officer, Junior Achievement of Wisconsin volunteer, and YMCA Parklawn Branch mentor. She has also been a member of Christ the King Baptist Church for the past eighteen years. Growing up the oldest of five on Chicago’s West Side proved an indelible lesson in sharing for Cynthia. From a young age, Cynthia experienced the gift of service, and has made it an unshakCynthia Stokes-Murray able part of her life. National Council of Urban League Cynthia is a 1973 graduate of Proviso East High School in Maywood, IL. Guilds/ Milwaukee Urban League She studied special education at Illinois State and Northeastern Illinois univerlead her to Milwaukee in 1989 to pursue a casities, with plans to become a special education teacher. However, her path would reer in retail business instead.

fueled by the organization’s youth and local actors, musicians, and choreographers. Most Voice of the Fatherless Child events are offered to the public free of charge. The Voice of the Fatherless Child Center is sponsored by businesses that support Monte’s role in building human possibility. He is grateful to have partnerships with Home Depot, Chase Bank, and the United States Postal Service. Monte is a member of the Fatherhood Initiative and Milwaukee Area Technical College Human Services Board. He also coordinates the Drama Ministry at Christian Faith Fellowship Church where he has been a member since 2001. Monte says, “Cake made without a lot of sugar may not be that sweet or rise like you want it to, but it’s still a cake. However, after tasting it, you know that something is missing. A child without a father is still a child. But as they grow, we can tell that something is missing.” Monte believes that, “Stronger children build strong families; and strong families make strong communities.” Monte Mabra is “not interested in fame or greatness;” he is simply motivated to demonstrate excellence so that he can “reach those in our community with unmet needs.” Monte has been married to Regina Slocum Mabra for 3 years. They have one daughter, Sha-Diamond, 11, a son, Darren, 22, and are the grandparents of three. Cynthia began a career in retail at Chicago’s Carson Pirie Scott in 1975. For more than 30 years she has served as both a buyer and manager at Bergner’s Corporation in Chicago, and Jos. A. Bank, a men’s apparel shop. She retired from Bon-Ton Stores (which include Boston Store, Carson’s and Bergner’s) in 2007. From 2011 to 2012, Cynthia managed Jos. A. Bank stores in Milwaukee and Racine, where she provided exceptional service, helped manage a $1.5 billion inventory, and directed store operations. She was also responsible for supervising a team of five sales associates and a tailor. Cynthia’s service to our community comes naturally and with ease. Growing up in Chicago, she recalls a life of intentional volunteerism and service. Her family home was the neighborhood meeting place, a place where neighbors came for love and support. “Why not volunteer,” she asks. “It’s just what we do. Everything that happens out here affects me,” Cynthia says. “Giving back means that I will always be able to say that I did my part.” Cynthia has three adult sons and eight grandchildren.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Special Honorees: Young Influencers and Game Changes

C hristopher Boston is director of sus-

tainable communities for Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Milwaukee. Chris leads the organization’s strategy for comprehensive community development and serves as its liaison to the Washington Park and Harambee neighborhoods. LISC transforms distressed urban neighborhoods into healthy communities of choice and opportunity – making them great places to work, do business, and raise children. Chris is also an ordained minister and serves as pastor of Lamb of God Missionary Baptist Church on Milwaukee’s northwest side. Chris was born and raised in Milwaukee. He earned a degree in International Business Management from the University of Wisconsin- Lacrosse, after graduating from Shorewood High School. Community organizing was neither a well understood, nor greatly appreciate career choice when Chris started his career; but after an early stint in international customer service, Chris began to appreciate that business might not be his passion. He was drawn more toward social activism, and he felt was called to be a community organizer. He was introduced to both community organizing, and an organization called Milwaukee Catalyst, which conducted research and organizing regarding education reform. Chris began to understand the politics and relationship

Erickajoy Daniels Brady Corp.

E rickajoy Daniels is global leader of tal-

ent management and organization development for Brady Corporation, a Milwaukeebased worldwide manufacturer and marketer of high-performance labels and signs, safety devices, printing systems and software, and precision die-cut materials. She is responsible for the design and delivery of processes and

Christopher Boston LISC Milwaukee building that would bring him to work at his vocation. He began to spend time with Milwaukee Inner City Churches Allied for Hope (MICAH) and soon became the group’s education organizer. Chris increased his knowledge in community organizing methodology by earning certifications from the Midwest Academy, The Center for Third World Organizing, and Gamaliel, a worldwide grassroots network. In the midst of increasing poverty and joblessness in the central city of Milwaukee, Chris became the youngest executive director in MICAH’s history, and continued seeking opportunities for inclusion for all Milwaukee residents- especially those who feel as if they have no place here. MICAH was able to rebuild its infrastructure under his leadership, and got institutions programming to support talent management for the company. She also works with Brady Corporation Foundation’s philanthropic and education support, and is founder and current vice president of Brady’s Women’s Leadership Alliance. A Baltimore native, Erickajoy graduated from the University of Maryland-Baltimore County with a bachelor’s degree in industrial psychology and business management. She also earned a masters in divinity from Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, and a masters in management science from Liberty University, Lynchburg, VA. Erickajoy relocated to Milwaukee after 12 years providing development and consulting services to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, ending her stint there as the agency’s learning management administrator. Erickajoy also began a consulting group called Body Builders in 2001 -- an entity established to serve the developmental needs of churches and non-profit organizations. She has been called upon to provide consulting and design work for many groups throughout the country in areas such as strategic planning, church planning, organizational design and skill development. Coming to Milwaukee also opened a new facet of Erickajoy’s life, as she met and married her husband here. Her most important role now, the one that is closest to her heart, is as the loving wife of Elder John Daniels, III, and proud mother of John Daniels, IV, tending to the needs of the two special men in her life. “I am motivat-

across the city involved in municipal affairs. His focus then began to shift to economic development, and seeking family supporting jobs in the area. Chris started meeting people in Milwaukee who were getting things done in original ways. He was impressed by small start ups, and clusters of neighbors who made sure that their neighborhoods were safe and peaceful. He also read President Obama’s book, The Audacity of Hope, and became convinced that the “fierce urgency of now” was the best personal policy for the trajectory of his career. He would use this notion to build bridges of understanding across communities. He left MICAH to become president of the Milwaukee Chapter of the Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO). While at BAEO, his resume was forwarded to LISC Milwaukee, a national organization committed to helping neighbors build communities. Their platform includes all aspects of healthy civic life: Supporting healthy environments and lifestyles, expanding real estate investment, increasing family income and wealth, stimulating economic activity, and improving access to education. Chris became an ordained minister in 2000, and believes that his faith is what grounds him in his secular work. “God has invested his spirit in all of us. We have to believe in one another even as we trust in God. I believe in Milwaukee, in the untapped and active potential of this place. If extraordinary things happen in ordinary places, then my call is to consider these places.” Chris is married to Tonnie Boston; they are the parents of Tarek and Caius, age two. The family resides on Milwaukee’s north side.

ed by looking at my five year old’s face every day. It’s been ingrained in me from childhood to believe that legacy and contribution are important, and I’d rather be a contributor than a critic.” Erickajoy and her family are members of Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ (COGIC), in Milwaukee, under the leadership of Bishop Sedgwick Daniels. As Holy Redeemer expands its reach eastward in the city, she supports her husband, as they also assist at Old Mt. Zion New Jerusalem Church, a Holy Redeemer mission project serving downtown Milwaukee. She extends her service as the Wisconsin’s state chair for the Youth Department for COGIC. In this role, Erickajoy strives to enhance the lives of young women with biblical standards, and supports her husband with his mentoring program, Administering Life In Vocational Experiences (ALIVE). Erickajoy also extends her reach into the broader community, serving on the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum Board, the Executive Committee of the Milwaukee Chapter of the Links, as a trustee for Mount Mary University, and a member of TEMPO, a women’s professional development organization. She was also named to The Milwaukee Business Journal’s “40 Under 40” leadership list in 2013.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

27

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Special Honorees: Young Influencers and Game Changes

M elissa Goins is the founder and presi-

dent of Maures Development Group, LLC, which has earned a reputation for being one of the premier real estate developers in the Milwaukee area. Born and raised in Milwaukee, Melissa graduated from the Milwaukee School of Entrepreneurship. Melissa takes working in Milwaukee seriously and is very deliberate about being here. “There are complexities in Milwaukee, but I don’t think the resolution to that complexity would be to leave. I take it personally.” She states that many of her fond memories are from growing up at 24th and Center, “so the growth and development of our city is key for me.” She earned a bachelor’s degree in criminology and broadcasting from Marquette University and earned an executive master’s in business administration, also from Marquette. Melissa became involved in commercial real estate after completing Marquette University’s Associates in Commercial Real Estate (ACRE) Program, which sought to create diversity in the industry through networking, training and placement. In 2006, Maures Development Group was selected by the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA), Wisconsin’s housing finance agency, to participate in its Mentor Protégé Program. The program paired emerging real estate development businesses owned by people of color and/or women with established developers with the intention of growing experienced and capable firms. The mentorship contributed to Wisconsin’s economic growth in 2007 when Maures became the first for-profit, female- and minority-owned firm to receive an allocation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) in the history of the program. The LIHTC were used to construct Teutonia Gardens, Maures’ first mixed-use apartment building. Teutonia Gardens has received local

Melissa Goins Maures Development Group and national awards for its design and positive impact. Melissa quickly earned a reputation for developing innovative projects targeted to historically neglected neighborhoods. Under her leadership, Maures has developed 162 units of apartments with an aggregate development total of $37 million. The firm’s newest developments are Century City Lofts, a 37unit apartment transaction along with a partnership with the City of Milwaukee to bring 40 foreclosed units back into productive use. “Sometimes, I think, ‘What next?’ And then I just wait. It’s all about getting new ideas for the use of spaces. I started with family apartments, and then moved to residential combined with

vate equity fund focused on buyouts and providing growth capital to small businesses and lower-middle market companies in the upper Midwest. The firm maintains offices in Milwaukee and Chicago. He also is Of Counsel at Quarles & Brady LLP in the corporate relations and government relations group. Cory recently served as secretary for the Wisconsin Department of Commerce under Gov. Jim Doyle. As Secretary of Commerce, Cory was the state’s “point man” for business and economic development. He managed a wide range of issues, including negotiating regulatory reform legislation, negotiating banking and commercial lending legislation, and negotiating a $500-million venture capital package. A Milwaukee native, Cory is a 1992 magna cum laude graduate of Lawrence University in Appleton, WI; and earned his law degree in 1996 from the University of WisconsinMadison Law School. He has received many awards and recognitions, including the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship to conduct post-graduate research in Africa and the former Soviet Union; North Milwaukee State Bank Trail Blazer Award; and Alpha Kappa Alpha Connection 2003 Trail Blazer Award. He is also a Cory Nettles Milwaukee Business Journal “40 Under Forty” Generation Growth Capital Award recipient and was named a “Wisconsin Super Lawyer Rising Star.” Since his law school days, Cory has been an enthusiastic supporter of the UW Law School ory L. Nettles is founder and managing director of General Growth Capital, Inc., a pri- Legal Education Opportunities (LEO) program. Established in 1967, LEO provides

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business. I’ve been working lately on creating teacher housing out of property that is currently owned by Milwaukee Public Schools. If we could help teachers stay in the classrooms longer and adapt to the city by having a higher quality of life, they might stay in the job longer,” she says. Because of her commitment to Milwaukee and its central city neighborhoods, Melissa makes time to participate on many committees and boards. Melissa was acknowledged as one of Milwaukee’s emerging generations of leaders when she received the Business Journal’s Forty Under 40 Award. She was also honored by Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network, Top 20 Under 40 Women in Commercial Real Estate. In 2011, Melissa was selected by the Milwaukee Business Journal to receive the Central City Business Awards for Small Firms and the Black Women’s Network named Melissa as an Honoree for “Women Who Build, Women Who Connect.” Melissa is the mother of two boys, D’Angell, 11, and Gabriel, 9, and serves on the boards of the Children’s Outing Association and the YMCA. Melissa has cut back on volunteering significantly in the past few years, but still believes strongly in philanthropy. She created a summer event, Jazz in the Hood, a free concert which is held at the Teutonia Gardens Campus each year as a means to stabilize and contribute to the area. She serves as an ambassador for the Black Girls Run chapter of the Milwaukee area, an organization which promotes health and wellness among Black women.

an informal academic and social network for enrolled minority students. LEO actively recruits and retains law students from historically disadvantaged groups across the country. The goal of LEO is to open up legal education to qualified students of all backgrounds and help diversify the legal profession in Wisconsin, the nation and worldwide. Cory currently serves on the boards of several corporations and nonprofit organizations, including Robert W. Baird’s Baird Funds, Inc.; Weyco Group, Inc.; United Way of Greater Milwaukee; Medical College of Wisconsin; Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee; Teach for America; the University of Wisconsin Foundation; Lawrence University board of trustees; and The Private Bank-Wisconsin. Cory is married to Michelle Nettles, an attorney with MillerCoors. The couple resides in Milwaukee and Chicago.


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The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

2014 Black Excellence Awards Honorees Special Honorees: Young Influencers and Game Changes

D r. Ramel Smith wanted to be a fireman

Dr. Ramel Smith Blaquesmith Psychological Consultative Services, LLC Adolescent Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Center, and is a consultant to Milwaukee Public Schools. He treats children who face trauma stemming from sexual assault, physical and emotional abuse, and the loss of physical safety.

The

when he was a child. Born and raised in Milwaukee, where he attended Milwaukee Public Schools, he wanted to save lives and help people in his community. “I always felt I had no other choice,” he said, adding, “My family raised me to be helpful. I was raised in New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, and so many people helped me, sometimes people I didn’t even know were helping me. They were mentors, teachers...just people who loved and cared about me. I’ve always tried to lift as I rise.” Ramel taught at Riverside University High School in 1995 and took a summer job selling cars to supplement his income. There he met a psychologist who inspired him to find another way to help people. After substitute teaching for a year, he began his advanced studies. He then took an internship at Ethan Allen Boys School, where he fell in love with the people they serve, and committed himself to serving in an entirely different way. Combining his love of education and psychology, Ramel has been able to reach hundreds of young people in trouble. Ramel earned a doctor of philosophy in urban education and school psychology after completing a masters in educational phychology both from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; and a bachelors degree in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. He currently is president of Blaquesmith Psychological Consultative Services, LLC. He also provides services through Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Child and

He is co-founder of the Rufus King/Riverside Charity Football game that began in 2010, with Dr. Demond Means, current superintendent of the Mequon-Thiensville school district. They have raised thousands of dollars for scholarship funds in the past four years for both Riverside and King. This year they are having a “Pink Out” game as they join forces with the American Cancer Society of Wisconsin to help bring awareness to breast cancer, while still raising money for the schools. The game is always held on the fourth Saturday of July, to coincide with King Alumni Fest. Ramel serves on the board of the YMCAUrban Campus, is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity (Kappa Phi Chapter), and is a member of The Hampton Avenue Church of Christ. Ramel and his sister, Dr. Alisia Moutry, host a weekly television program, Asque The Blaquesmith on MATA, Channel 14/96 which is designed to strengthen the mind, body and soul. Their mission is to help each individual grow in knowledge on subjects such as, but not limited to, physical fitness, financial literacy, spirituality and mental health. In addition, they introduce topics to increase social awareness and activism. He signs off every week with his favorite quote from their grandmother, Daisy May Cockerham, who was fondly known as Mama Daisy. “The best way to heal yourself is to help others.” Ramel Smith is hoping to make sure that everyone receives their second chance. He is married to Stacey Smith. They are the proud parents of Joie, 9, Jonah, 5, Noah, 5, and Skye, 3.

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Excellence Congratulations to all the award winners in our communities! The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is a proud sponsor of the Milwaukee Times Black Excellence Awards, as well as the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Writing Contest. Although Dr. King’s words were spoken to a different generation over 50 years ago, they are just as powerful today. Through the Writing Contest, today’s children and youth can continue to motivate a whole new generation to be moved by his dream of peace, equality, and dignity for everyone. To be inspired by their words, please visit jsonline.com/mlk.


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THE PUBLISHER'S BOOKSHELF Books for Black History (part 2) By Lynda Jackson Conyers again and again to liberate Publisher for the Milwaukee family and friends, tapping Times into the Underground Railroad. Our history is a rich one, Harriet Tubman, her life filled with individuals who and her work, remain an inwere pioneers, movers and spiration to all who value shakers, leaders, and rebels. freedom. Now, thanks to During the month of Black Larson’s breathtaking biogHistory we focus on those raphy, we can finally apprethat fought for civil rights or ciate Tubman as a complete were pioneers as black first human being—an American this or that. There are those hero, yes, but also a woman though with deep and rich who loved, suffered, and sacstories that help shaped black rificed. history and are influencers to this day. Here are two books Viewfinders: Black Womon amazing women for Black en Photographers History month or any time By Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe of the year. Writers & Readers Publishing, Incorporated, 1993 Photography 201 pages Although photography

Arthur and Jeanne Ashe is well along in its second century, until now virtually nothing has been written about the work of black women photographers. In this historical survey Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe presents an impressive selection of photographs, commenting on the careers of the professional and fine arts photographers, from the pioneers to the women of today. The

book is divided into six parts, each “Overview” describing the triumphs and struggles of various photographers of different eras. The careful attention to detail is illustrated in the photographs of early twentieth-century photographer Elnora Teal

and in the work of Eslanda (Mrs. Paul) Robeson from her travels throughout the world. It also offers glimpses of black Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s and of New York’s Harlem during the same period. The photographs of contemporary photographers, among them Coreen Simpson, with her flamboyant style, and Fern Logan, with her strong eye, demonstrate the talent and style black women continue to show in the,field of photography. This collection of photographs - meaningful, striking, handsome - will give pleasure to photo buffs, historians, and to anyone fascinated by this neglected but vital part of history. Continued Next Week

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Congratulations

Black Excellence Award Winners

Celebrating achievement within our community. Sometimes achievement cannot be measured through numbers and spreadsheets, but by the positive impact we have on others. At Guaranty Bank, we believe that our success is measured, in part, through our ability to help families in our community achieve their financial dreams. Achievement started for us in 1923 at one location on Walnut St. in Milwaukee, when we made home loans one at a time, working closely with our families and the community. Banking has changed a lot over the years, but one thing that has never changed is our commitment to delivering the same personal service we began four generations ago. We invite you to come and see why our bank is different, and how our original vision of helping hard working families is alive and well.

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Congratulations to the 2014

Black Excellence Honorees and this year’s

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s together. It’s also what sets u u s g n i r b n o i s apart ss . Our mi More than 130 years ago, the Wheaton Franciscan Sisters created an organization dedicated to the belief that every life is sacred and all people should be treated with compassion and dignity. We are committed to seeking out and supporting mature associates. It’s an essential part of building a healthy, diverse work force. These valuable associates help inspire younger members of our organization to build a brighter tomorrow—and we thank them.

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We’re helping build stronger communities and healthier families, one meal at a time.

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2/18/14 4:49 PM


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Congratulations to all of the 29 th Annual Black Excellence Awards 2014 Honorees

Barry Applewhite

Ofc. Aleia Avant

Candice R. Dillon

Bishop Clayton Duckworth, Sr.

Rev. Marilyn Miller

Clover Barnes

Regina Flippin, DPM

Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr.

Jerome Bethea, LPN

Rosha Hamilton

Cynthia Stokes-Murray

Linda Bonds

Nancy Joseph

Patrick Mutsune

Rev. Willie Brisco

Ofc. Charles Leach

Mattie Payne

Portia Cobb

Milton Childs

Shawon LeFlore-Turnch

Linda Presberry

Michael Cockroft

Tracey Dent

Monte Mabra

Tim McMurtry, II

Geri L. Lyday

Diane Stowers

Russell Thomas

Daphne Wilson

and our “Young Influencers and Game Changers”

Christopher Boston

Erickajoy Daniels

Melissa Goins

Cory Nettles

Dr. Ramel Smith

and our 2014 Louvenia Johnson Scholarship Recipients

Brianna Christian

Hamilton High School

Darian Perkins

Rufus King IB High School

Henry Eruchalu

Morse Marshall H.S.

Avrianne Seals

Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Kayla Madlock

Milwaukee Lutheran H.S.

Quinton Thomas

Shorewood High School

Collins McClain

Riverside University High School

Aaron Wilder

Riverside University High School

“Saluting The Best In Our Community”

Maasio Mohamed

Washington H.S. of Information Technology

Deondre Wright

Bradley Technology and Trade High School


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Cream City Medical Society (CCMS): The history of African Americans in medicine in Milwaukee (part 2) By: Rene’ Settle-Robinson, D.P.M., Cheryl R. Martin, M.D. (2002), Bernestine Jeffers and Sana Montgomery (2002), Additions and Revisions by: Mbili F. Waller (2007), Janine A. James, M.D. (2002 and 2007) As we celebrate Black History Month, let us take a moment to look back to those locally in the medical field and how they have helped shape medicine as we know it today. At the beginning of the 20th century, slavery had been over less than fifty years, legal segregation had become codified, and professional medical care was unavailable to African Americans. Primary medical options for the black community included the use of spirituality, indigenous medicines, home remedies, “root doctors,” and healing churches, among others. Also arriving in the 1920’s to Milwaukee was Dr. Ludie L. Gilmer* (no relation to Dr. Prather Gilmer), from Beloit, Wisconsin. He established a practice at 6th and Juneau. Dr. Ludie Gilmer aligned himself with the old “Black Elite” serving a largely Caucasian clientele initially. Eventually he established two separate practices—one serving whites and one serving Blacks. He assumed a major role in CCMS and attempted to bridge the gaps between the Old and New Elite philosophies. The first African American Podiatrist (then called Chiropodist) in the city was Dr. Richard Baylor*, who practiced from 1915 to 1929. In 1926, Dr. B. Nichols*, the second podiatrist arrived. These doctors may not have attended a professional school and did not have surgical training. The first African American Chiropractor was Dr. Williams Wims*. His practice was located at 4th and Galena Streets between 1915 and 1929. According to census reports, between 1930 and 1940, twelve African Americans were in practice in Milwaukee. A female dentist was listed for the first time between 1940 and 1950. According to 2000 census, African Americans in Milwaukee County made up 25 percent of the population. CCMS president, Dr. Rene’ SettleRobinson, estimates there are no more than 5 percent African American physicians out of the total number of physicians in Milwaukee County. Dr. George W. Hilliard*, born in Tupelo, Mississippi, moved to Milwaukee in 1951. He was a thoracic surgeon and Fellow of the American College of Surgery. He is listed in the Beloit Hall of Fame

for his clinical excellence. Dr. Hilliard completed a surgical residency at Howard University and thoracic surgery training at George Washington University in St. Louis. Typical of the day, he was not allowed surgical privileges when he arrived here. He built a practice at 4th and North Avenue. He made house calls during the great influenza epidemic of the 1950’s. He later joined the staff of Mercy Hospital, one of the few hospitals where African American physicians could practice. Located at 2319 North 2nd Street, the hospital also owned a building at 2nd and North Avenue, which housed the medical residents and nursing students and still stands today. It is the current home of the United Ushers. Located on the southeastern side of Beloit, WI is a 6.6-acre park bearing the name Dr. George Hilliard Park. Dr. Kenneth L. McIver*, born in 1906 in West Virginia, was a graduate of the Ohio College of Chiropody with surgical training. He set up a podiatric practice with physical therapy and radiology services in 1950, located at 707 West Walnut Street. He later moved his practice to 3rd Street (now Dr. M. L. King, Jr. Drive) and Garfield Ave. Dr. McIver served as vice president of CCMS under Dr. John Terry*. He had three sons, one, Dr. Warren McIver, would later follow in his father’s footsteps becoming the first African American Podiatric “family” on record. Between 1950 and 1960, Milwaukee had more than 35 practicing African American physicians, dentists and pharmacists. Dr. William Finlayson, born in Florida, was a graduate of Meharry Medical School in 1953. He was a Morehouse College classmate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King was invited to aid civil rights activities in 1964. Despite his training as an obstetrician, Dr. Finlayson was initially unable to gain hospital privileges. He later became the first African American Obstetrician–Gynecologist to practice in a Milwaukee hospital. St. Joseph first granted him hospital privileges. He operated a practice on 21st and Capital Drive from 1958 until 1997. He invited Dr. Wayman Parker, of Detroit and a graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School to join the practice in 1976. Dr. Finlayson is chairman and co-founder of North Milwaukee State Bank. He is also a past CCMS president and NMA obstetrics and gynecology section chair. Dr. Finlayson maintains an outstanding and enduring record of service to this organiza-

Pictured from left to right in 1965: Walter White, D.D.S. (deceased), Randle Pollard, M.D., George Hillard, M.D. (deceased), William Finlayson, M.D. OBGYN, and Gerald Poindexter, M.D. Internal Medicine (deceased). tion and many other organizations including Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and the Isaac Coggs Health Connection. He has received a host of awards throughout his career. His late wife, Edith Finlayson, RN, also contributed greatly to this community. She served as a University of Wisconsin regent for many years. The first African American urologit to practice in Milwaukee was Dr. Randle Pollard. Originally from Evanston, Illinois, he served as a combat medic during World War II while stationed in Italy. Dr. Pollard distinguished himself during the war and was awarded a Bronze Star and three Battle Stars. He graduated in 1951 from Meharry Medical School and was among the first African American residents at Marquette Medical College. Dr. Pollard became active in Milwaukee medical politics by representing Milwaukee physicians when he was elected as medical staff president in the 1980s of Good Samaritan Hospital (later Sinai Samaritan Medical Center, now Aurora Sinai Medical Center). Dr. Pollard, along with Dr. Finlayson is also one of the founding members of North Milwaukee State Bank. He has served as president of CCMS, has one of the longest memberships of the organization on record. While now retired, Dr. Pollard also remains active with the NMA representing Wisconsin as its delegate. Dr. Estil Strawn, Sr. (obstetrician-gynecologist) came to Milwaukee in the 1950’s and later became a founder of a multi-specialty clinic which became Northpoint Medical Clinic (later Columbia St. Mary’s Physician Group). Under the influence of this prestigious and growing African American medical community, hospitals such as the former St. Anthony, the former Mt. Sinai Hospital (Aurora Sinai Medical Center), the former Milwaukee

County General Hospital, the former Milwaukee Lutheran and the former Deaconess Hospitals became more open and inclusive to African American physicians. Dr. Lester Carter came to Milwaukee to work in the drug store of another pharmacist in 1968. He is a 1958 graduate of Creighton University School of Pharmacy. This pharmacy was located, in a then German neighborhood, at 24th and Burleigh. He later bought the pharmacy which became Carter Drug store. Carter Drug Store is the only drugstore owned by an African American in Milwaukee nearly forty years after opening its doors. He credits his longevity to the “good training” he received at Creighton where he learned traditional pharmacy as well as herbal medicine. His background in herbal medicine has placed him above his competitors. It has also led him to advocate natural and traditional medicines to his predominantly African American neighborhood. Another African American pharmacist, Dr. Thomas Walker owned a pharmacy but later closed it. Dr. Walker is a former CCMS president. The Misericordia Sisters moved from Misericordia Hospital at 22nd and Juneau in 1969. Dr. Louis T. Maxey Sr.*, an African American Plastic Surgeon, provided start-up funds to purchase and operate this empty hospital making it the first blackowned hospital in Milwaukee. It was renamed Misericordia Community Hospital. Dr. Louis T. Maxey Sr., held degrees in pharmaceutical sciences, dentistry and medicine. He became one of the first African Americans to be a resident physician at Chicago’s Cook County Hospital in plastic and maxillofacial surgery. He was the first black president and board chair of a hospital in Wisconsin in 1971 when the Wisconsin Hospital and Geriatric

Treatment Center opened. Dr. Maxey’s wife, Harneitha, assisted her husband with his Milwaukee practice. The couple moved from Milwaukee to Gulfport, MS over 25 years ago and remained there after Dr. Maxey’s retirement in 1993. They were resolute in their decision not to evacuate during Hurricane Katrina. Sadly, both were killed when the roof of their home collapsed. Marquette Medical College provided training for Dr. Pollard, Dr. James Christian* (otolaryngologist) and Dr. Roland Pattillo (gynecologic oncologist) in the 1950s. The 1960’s welcomed Dr. Arthur Howell* (plastic surgeon) and his wife Dr. Jacqueline Coates-Howell (pediatrician) from Indianapolis. Their daughter, Dr. Cecilia Howell-Canada would later join this family of physicians and she shared a practice with her mother. Dr. James Robinson* (gastroenterologist), Dr. Erskine Tucker (pathologist), and Dr. John Ridley (opthalmalogist) join the list of African American medical pioneers. Dr. Ridley became active in hospital leadership at St. Mary’s hospital in the early 1990’s. Dr. Perry Henderson (obstetrician-gynecologist) is the first African American maternal-fetal medicine specialist and worked for many years with the University of Wisconsin Medical School in Madison. He trained Dr. Phillip Hamilton, Sr.* (obstetrician-gynecologist and maternal fetal medicine specialist). Dr. Hamilton became the first academic chairman of a medical school department (1985) in Wisconsin for the University of WisconsinMilwaukee Campus at Mount Sinai Hospital. (Continued on pg. 40)


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Cream City Medical Society (Continued from pg. 38) The Cream City Neighborhood Health Center was established in 1972 to provide essential health care services to the central city. This was a result of a collaborative effort between Mr. Jay Gilmer (Dr. Prather J. Gilmer’s son), Dean Hirschboeck of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Blue Cross/Blue Shield Insurance and others. CCMS provided essential support for this crucial though shortlived effort. The Medical College of Wisconsin (formerly Marquette Medical College) provided training in the 1970’s for the following physicians who practiced in Milwaukee: Dr. Roy Troutman (psychiatrist), Cassandra Pollard-Welch (internist), and Dr. William Walker* (family medicine). Dr. Lauree Thomas trained at the University of Wisconsin and later began Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Thomas was a CCMS president for a number of years who was instrumental in providing a partnership with the Medical College that resulted in thousands of dollars being donated to defray the cost of training African American medical students. She created several programs that helped African American students perform academically at a high level. It was also during her tenure that the Dr. Terrance Thomas* Scholarship was started. Dr. Thomas was a obstetrics and gynecology resident training in Michigan when he suffered an untimely death. His parents, Patricia O’FlynnPattillo and Robert Thomas, owners and publishers of the Milwaukee Community Journal started the scholarship in the memory of their beloved son. Dr. Estil Strawn, Jr. (obstetrician-gynecologist) followed his father, Dr. Estil Strawn, Sr.* and became Wisconsin’s first African American Reproductive Endocrinologist and Infertility Specialist. Dr. Strawn, Jr. is an associate professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Alonzo Walker (general surgeon) is a past CCMS president. He is a nationally known breast cancer surgeon with the Medical College of Wisconsin. Harvard Medical School trained the following Milwaukee physicians: Dr. James Flowers (internist), Dr. M. Eugene Pruitt (internist), Dr. Earnestine Willis (pediatrician). Dr. Flowers was the first African American chief medical resident at Mount Sinai Hospital. He wrote a book used by students worldwide to prepare for admission to medical school.

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Dr. Willis is the current director of the Center for the Urban Child and was an associate dean for the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Sheri Johnson (child and adolescent psychologist) is our current state public health officer. The 1980’s saw further advances for Milwaukee’s African American physicians practicing Internal Medicine, Surgery, Gastroenterology, Pediatrics, and other specialties. At St. Luke’s Hospital in 1985, Dr. James Bass* (cardiovascular surgeon) became the first African American to perform open heart surgery. From the far reaches of Ghana West Africa came to train at the University of Wisconsin Medical School, Dr. Nana Grant-Acquah who became our first cardiac anesthesiologist. Dr. M. Eugene Pruitt is a past president of CCMS. He arrived in Milwaukee in 1980 to fulfill his requirements for the National Health Service Corps. He opened his first practice located at 12th and North Avenue. He was appointed full-time assistant professor of medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2001. Dr. Richard Evans, another Meharry Medical College graduate is our first peripheral vascular surgeon. Two well know African American women psychologists are members of CCMS, Dr. Juliette Martin-Thomas, and Dr. Lula F. Reams. Both are licensed psychologists and National Health Service providers. Dr. MartinThomas completed her doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Wisconsin and became one of the first female African Americans to practice psychology in Wisconsin. She has over twenty years experience in the Criminal Justice System, including working at Waupun State Prison for 14 years. She is currently a professor in the department of psychology at Alverno College and The Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology. She continues an active private psychotherapy practice. She has received many community awards for her volunteer work. The Wisconsin Correctional Association established the Dr. Juliette Martin-Thomas Award in her honor and Mount Mary College awarded her its prestigious Pro Urbe Award. Dr. Lula F. Reams completed her doctorate in clinical psychology at the Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, and the Milwaukee Clinicians of Color among other professional organizations. She is also a certified Marriage and Family Therapist. She specializes in psychological testing and has an independent practice. She has also been a community activist and received many community awards.

The Isaac Coggs Clinic, which started as a free public health center, was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It was supported by the Medical College of Wisconsin and UWM in the 1960s. During the 1990’s, Dr. Cassandra Welch, an Internist and past CCMS President, became the Medical Director of Isaac Coggs Health Connection, a federally qualified health center. The services of the clinic grew under her leadership. Physiatry became available when Dr. Carla Wright arrived from Detroit and joined the staff of the Isaac Coggs Health Connection along with Dr. Welch, Dr. Troutman. Dr. Wright, is the first African American physiatrist in the state and former Vice President of CCMS. Many CCMS members began their professional careers at the clinic. The clinic continues to expand and includes a dental clinic, WIC program, pediatrics, women’s health, urgent care, HIV treatment and prevention educational services, radiology and pharmacy. The 1990’s were not only important for the increase in the number of Af-

rican American doctors in Milwaukee but also for the broader spectrum of specialties represented for the first time such as cardiology (Dr. Cheryl Martin, dermatology, emergency medicine (Dr. Andrea Greene, pulmonary medicine (Dr. Jerry Jones), pediatric otolaryngology (Dr. Valerie Flanary), rheumatology (Dr. Alvin Wells), and pain management (Pamela Thomas-King and Dr. George King). Dr. Joan Prince, is a specialist in hematology and flow cytometry and is currently the Vice Chancellor for Partnerships and Innovation, clinical associate professor-College of Health Sciences, the Unversity of Wisconsin- Milwaukee. Our current president, Dr. Rene Settle-Robinson, came to Milwaukee in the 1990s and is our first board certified foot and ankle podiatric surgeon. She has taught podiatry for the Scholl’s Podiatric Medicine University, had a private solo practice and now works for Aurora Health Care. More than 100 years since the first African American physician arrived and 80

years since Cream City Medical Society was established, there are more than 100 African American medical professionals in Milwaukee. Through the efforts of many of these physicians, resolving health care disparities has become their priority now joined by participation of city, the state, the nation, and the world. The 21st century has found CCMS members engaged in a wide variety of political and social endeavors including local, state, and national committees, subcommittees, task forces, town hall meetings, and community brainstorming conferences. They have collaborated with UWM and other community agencies to address Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care: Closing the Gap. Another involvement is The Healthiest Wisconsin 2010: A Partnership Plan to Improve the Health of the Public, a framework for transforming the state health plan for the 21st century. Dr. Juliette Martin and Dr. Wayman Parker have been active in this initiative. A number of CCMS physicians have participated in The 4th Street Forum, a nonpartisan program for public discussion of political and social issues and the exploration of solutions. These are just a small sampling of their numerous professional and volunteer activities Dr. Wayman Parker and other CCMS physicians are currently involved in operating a free clinic, The C.H. Mason Clinic, on the campus of Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ, along with their parish nurse, Lisa Neal, RN. and Mbili Waller. Dr. Parker has assumed the leadership role in this initiative, getting it up and running as well as seeing patients. As the clinic patient load increases, more CCMS physicians will be involved on a rotating schedule. Current CCMS president, Dr. Rene’ Settle-Robinson has been extremely active proudly representing this organization locally and nationally. Her achievements are many. She recently spoke in front of the Senate Health & Human Services Committee to support “Healthy Wisconsin.” A few years ago, she ran for political office, seeking the State Assembly Seat in District 12. She obtain 44 percent of the vote in the primary. She is a lifetime member of the NAACP and continues to represent health professionals and presenting the health care needs of the people of color. Dr. Natasha Travis, current vice president of CCMS, is actively involved in community outreach. She is an advocate for persons living with HIV/ AIDS. She also supports early screening and treatment options for patients with any other disease. She has spearheaded the annual

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National HIV Testing Day Event, “Take the Test, Take Control.” The CCMS goals for this event are to facilitate increased community awareness of HIV/AIDS, provide free, rapid HIV testing and educational resources. Dr. Travis is an assistant professor, department of medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Kevin Izard (family medicine), assistant professor, Medical College of Wisconsin and Dr. Alicia N. Walker (Walgreen’s, Co.), our first doctor of pharmacy) serves on the Wisconsin Medicaid Pharmacy Prior Authorization Committee. They have received a commendation from Governor Doyle for their contributions. CCMS endowed the Dr. Terrance N. Thomas Scholarship Fund to provide support to African American students at the Medical College of Wisconsin. We are greatful to the contributions of the parents of Dr. Terrance Thomas, friends, CCMS members, MCW faculty and staff. Over $100,000 of this scholarship money has come from CCMS fundraising events and the meticulous administration of the Medical College of Wisconsin Foundation. According to Dr. Rene’ Settle-Robinson, “This scholarship fund is the largest single endowed scholarship fund for African American physicians built by an African American medical organization in the country.” The proceeds from the CCMS 75th anniversary celebration were used to establish the Legacy Scholarship Foundation. These scholarships are for the recognition of students from elementary through graduate school planning to attend medical school. The CCMS Undergraduate Chapter at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee offers students academic, social, moral, and cultural support. The Chapter is set up to make sure students continue to dream; establish and accomplish goals, and to mold their environment. Students are provided with tutoring, mentoring, career services, study sessions, academic accountability, and fellowship with CCMS members, shadowing and volunteer opportunities. There are also preparations for medical school admission, seminars, opportunities to mentor high school students, and various trips. Cream City Medical Society members, in the shadows of its founders, barriers and limitations not withstanding, continue to march forward in the vanguard of Milwaukee’s medical community, endlessly advocating for the disenfranchised, always striving for the best and looking up towards the unlimited future. (* = deceased CCMS member)


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A student job that helps the community Jasmine Woodley has discovered a way to help pay for her education while helping others. Woodley, a nursing student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, works as a tutor through the university’s America Reads/Partnership for America program. Since she was in her first year at UWM, Woodley has been helping elementary and high school students who need some individualized attention with reading and mathematics. Currently, she’s working at Clarke Street School, Maryland Avenue Montessori School and St. Joan Antida High School. She particularly enjoys working with the elementary students. “I like being with them and seeing how excited the children are when they get an assignment done or a problem solved. I like challenging them and showing the way,” says Woodley. In high school, she’d volunteered as a tutor through the National Honor Society and at the Children’s Health

Education Center. She learned about UWM’s program through an information session at the university’s Center for CommunityBased Learning, Leadership and Research (CBLLR). The center develops partnerships with off-campus nonprofit agencies to develop jobs in the community, according to Rachel Spaulding, director of communitybased learning for the center. Students can explore and learn about the community, helping others and earning money for their own education. Woodley’s work also counts toward 300 hours of service that she commits to as part of a yearly leadership scholarship she receives through AmeriCorps. “It’s a way of supplementing student loans and other financial aid,” she says. A graduate of Riverside University High School, Woodley had long been familiar with nearby UWM, so when it came time to pick a university, the choice was obvious. “It was close and I was

Jasmine Woodley familiar with it, and I’d heard that the nursing program was very good.” While she enjoys working with the students as a tutor, nursing is her passion. “I’ve always wanted to be a nurse since I was in grade school.” Her grandmother, who helped raise her, had some health issues, and Woodley helped care for her. “I like to work with people.” Her eventual goal is to earn a graduate degree in nursing and work with a community-

based clinic. In addition to the tutoring, Woodley was able to take part in CBLLR ’s Alternative Spring Break program last year, working on projects with community agencies in North Carolina. She enjoyed the opportunity to explore another part of the country, but was particularly impressed with the work being done by a veterans’ agency she volunteered with there. The group had remodeled an old motel into a center

for veterans, offering a training program and developing a garden. “We should have something like that here,” says Woodley. “I liked talking to the veterans about their experiences. The program there is really helping veterans get back on their feet.” She’s planning to take part in the Alternative Spring Break program again this year, but meanwhile is committed to her work as a tutor. “I see a lot of kids improving their reading levels, and that’s really important.” And, some of the students she works with at Clarke Street School are part of the “I Have a Dream” program, which will provide them with university tuition after they graduate, if they keep their grades up. As a university student, she provides a role model for them. “They’re really interested in college, and they’re always asking me a lot of questions about what it’s like to be in college.”

Questions remain about Walker’s emails By Urban Media News The release of more than 27,000 pages of emails turned state politics on its on ear last week, as individuals on both sides of the aisle, and journalists near and far pored over the documents for insight into the criminal corruption probe otherwise known as the 2010 John Doe investigation. Governor Scott Walker’s administrations, campaigns, and allies have been the target of not one, but two, criminal investigations since 2010 (one is ongoing). Walker’s campaign and government offices, as well as the homes of several top Walker aides, were raided by government officials the day before the gubernatorial election in 2010. To date, the investigation has resulted in six of Walker’s associates being jailed -- four of whom have been sentenced to prison for crimes ranging from felony theft from charities intended to benefit wounded veterans and the families of fallen soldiers, to misconduct in public office, to doing official campaign work on county time. Adding to what we already know, the emails provide new insight to the investigation. From the documents, we learned that Scott Walker himself sent and received emails on a secret email network set up in his county office just feet away from his

desk. Walker also requested his campaign and official staff coordinate by starting each day with a conference call, in violation of Wisconsin laws that specifically state that public employees may not conduct campaign activity on public time. If there was no wrongdoing at all on Scott Walker’s part, 27,000 pages of documents would surely put to rest any doubts about Walker’s involvement in the secret campaign operation going on right under his nose. Instead, the documents link him to the secret email network and raise more questions than answers about what Walker knew and when he knew it. Wisconsin deserves answers from Scott Walker. Emails confirm that he participated in a secret email network. Cindy Archer, a top aide to then-County Executive Walker, emailed Walker aide Kelly Rindfleisch welcoming her into the “inner circle,” an email account she used to communicate with Walker and campaign staff often. It’s difficult to believe that he didn’t know that his most trusted and long-serving campaign staffers were conducting illegal campaign behavior just feet from his office. Scott Walker still hasn’t answered the question of if and when he first instructed his taxpayer-funded staff to coordinate illegally with his

campaign staff. Not only do the emails confirm that Scott Walker knew of and participated in a secret email network to facilitate illegal campaign coordination; they show that once it became known to Walker that a staffer was involved in illegal campaign work on county taxpayer-funded time, he didn’t instruct his staff to end all illegal coordination. Facts suggest that campaign and county staff attempted to find an “alternative,” but were unsuccessful. One would think that Scott Walker would make it clear to his staff on both sides that the only alternative would be to shut down all illegal coordination. It’s what any reasonable, law-abiding person would expect. Even as all signs point to Scott Walker being not only knowledgeable of the secret email network, but the ringleader of the entire operation, Walker maintains a position that he did not know illegal activity was going on. However, much like the entire state and the nation,

Scott Walker knows about the activity now. Not only does Walker know about the illegal coordination, he knows about the despicable emails and jokes traded via email among his staff. Racist, sexist, homophobic, anti-semitic, and other disturbing emails were unearthed that put the character of Scott Walker and his staff into question. Including Walker’s then-chief of staff Tom Nardelli describing a “nightmare” where he turns into a black, Jewish, disabled gay man who is unemployed. And the demeaning comments from Walker’s deputy chief of staff Kelly Rindfleisch that “no one cares about crazy people” in response to a 33-year old woman dying of complications related to starvation while under the County’s care at the County Mental Health Facility. While not sent by Walker himself, these kinds of messages shed light on the company Walker keeps and a working environment where his close aides and associates felt comfortable, and even encouraged, to share offensive remarks. Scott Walker is clearly trying to distance himself from these messages, and the scandal as a whole, but several key players that used the secret email network and made awful comments still work for Walker or somewhere in the

infrastructure of Wisconsin’s Republican Party. Years after the first John Doe began, Scott Walker still hasn’t cleaned house or encouraged those implicated to turn over their emails. So what reassurance do Wisconsin voters have that history won’t repeat itself ? It’s concerning to Wisconsinites who now have reason to think the governor may not be as truthful as he lets on. Scott Walker can’t hide behind his moral Eagle Scout persona and refuse to address the facts. This time the questions are too important to ignore. Just because Scott Walker wasn’t found guilty of crimes in a court of law doesn’t mean that he is not guilty of unethical actions and violating the public trust. The governor can and should be held to a higher standard. We expect him to be honest, straightforward, and truthful. A trust has been broken between the public and Scott Walker and it cannot be repaired until the governor answers the tough questions. The opinions expressed in this editorial are those of the writer and not of the Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper or NCON Communication, its staff or management.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

45

Everyone Can See It But You. It’s the you-know-what in the room, obvious to everyone but you. Your gambling is out of control. You’re the one who runs out of cash and heads for the ATM. You’re always counting on Lady Luck to turn your way on the next hand, the next roll of the dice, the next lottery ticket. The urge to play is overpowering, and you lose more than you can afford. And we’re not talking peanuts. The good news is you can beat compulsive gambling, at any stage. And we’re here to help you do it. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, call the Problem Gambling Help Line at 1-800-GAMBLE-5 (1-800-426-2535) or visit wi-problemgamblers.org.

®

© 2013 Wisconsin Lottery


46

The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

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Shoes Can Be Dropped Off at: The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper Office 1936 North Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive Milwaukee, WI 53212 (414) 263-5088 for More Information


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Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

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47

The 2014 Black Excellence Awards would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of a great group of positive and motivated staff and volunteers. They are: 2014 Black Excellence Committee: Lynda Jackson Conyers Shirley Sharp Brenda Sheppard Nelson Dawn Jackson 2014 Black Excellence Project Manager: Jacquelyn Heath 2014 Black Excellence Staff Writers: Dave Fidlin Evelyn Patricia Terry Michelle Dobbs Jacquelyn Heath Caryl Davis Jaye Syc

The Milwaukee Times Staff: George Neal Terry Taylor William S. Gooden Michelle Anibas Angel Reyes Willie Mitchell Robert Bell Yvonne Kemp George W. Bryant A Special Thank-you to our Volunteers from the Milwaukee Urban League The entire 2014 Black Excellence Team would also like to extend our sincerest gratitude to the members of our community including the businesses, churches, media, and local leaders who have supported our event over the years.

Thank You!

Walgreens 2826 N. MLKing Dr. 2222 W. Capitol Dr. 2727 W. North Ave. 4808 N. Hopkins St. 7171 N. Teutonia 76th & Mill Rd.

BMO Harris Bank 2745 N. MLKing Dr.

LENA’S 4061 North 54th St. (Midtown) 4623 W. Burleigh Ave. 2322 W. Oak St. 4030 N. Teutonia Dr.

Pick’N Save 2355 N. 35th Street 5700 W. Capitol Dr. 7401 W. Good Hope Rd.

Libraries Washington Park Library Central Library (Downtown) Banks Columbia Savings 2000 W. Fond du Lac Ave. Seaway Bank 2102 W. Fond du Lac Ave.

North Milwaukee State Bank 5630 W. Fond du Lac Ave.

Other Locations Carter Drug Store 2400 W. Burleigh St. Dismuke Insurance Agency 8201 W. Capitol Dr. City Hall 200 E. Wells St. The Milwaukee Times Offices 1936 N. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr.

Also be sure to visit your local churches to get your copy of The Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper.

Being Frank

By Frank James IV

Is it the superintendent?

Once again Milwaukee Public Schools is looking for a superintendent. Gregory Thornton is leaving the Brew City for the greener pastures of Baltimore, Maryland. Looking for a superintendent of schools is a path MPS has been down all too often in the past. When Thornton came to town big things were expected; as he leaves the same problems exist. Is it possible that the problem is what walks through the doors of each school? As Thornton exits Milwaukee for a similar task in Baltimore, MPS has to look at itself. Things haven’t been exactly cheery in MPS in decades. The problems that plague many major cities, low-test scores, are in MPS. MPS has attempted various tactics to rejuvenate schools and raise test scores but as of this writing none have worked. There is no need to wonder about the 20 failing schools Thornton wanted to make charter schools because they are the same ones from 10 years ago. So is a brilliant new superintendent the answer to MPS’ problem? The students that come into any school determine the success or failure of the institution. The students are the ones who take the tests and whose scores either make the school a passing or failing entity. Many point out deficiencies of teachers as the blame for failing school, but is that the case? Is the reason a student performs badly the fault of administration in a school? The answer to both of these questions is

Dr. Gregory Thornton complex and a possible yes. But how much of the blame belongs to the student? You often hear the term classroom management when talking about teachers. Some teachers have great classroom management, others not so good. But what does the term mean? Should a teacher have to come in and constantly tell students to sit down and be quiet? The answer is no if the students want to learn. Having classroom management is a plus to being effective but doesn’t in itself make one a great teacher. If the students are all in their seats quiet but not paying attention, what good is classroom management? Lesson planning is another term used in describing teachers. Having good lesson plans are great but the students have to pay attention. Lesson plans are key to following charted guidelines for test preparation, but without student participation they are words on paper. Many say teachers need to make lessons more interest-

ing; this is true. There is a limit to what a teacher can do to make students buy into a lesson; posting the plan on Instagram isn’t one of them. This leads us back to the people who have the most to gain from a school, the students. Classroom management, good plans are all major factors in a student’s education. The main factor is the student. The student has to see the value of the education they are receiving and want it. The student has to take the time to study at night to grasp knowledge. The student has to have enough self-control to understand that there is a time to be quiet and listen in class without being told. There are badly run schools and inadequate teachers in MPS. In a district the size of MPS it would be amazing if there weren’t. To overlook the student piece of the equation is to continue in futility. Until the students begin to understand the value of education and want to acquire education, MPS will continue to have a vacancy at the top. Frank James IV © 2014 beingfrankwithfrank@ gmail.com The opinions expressed in this editorial are those of the writer and not of the Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper or NCON Communication, its staff or management. Being Frank is a bi-weekly column exclusive to the Milwaukee Times Weekly Newspaper.

Mt. Olive Baptist Church to host appreciation service for Sis. Viney J. Wilbon Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church, 5277 N .Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church, 5277 N.6th Street, will host an Appreciation Service for Sis. Viney J. Wilbon, who has been the church’s Minister of Music over 45 years. Sis. Wilbon will be honored on Saturday March 8, 2014 at 4:30 p.m. for sharing her spiritual gift with the saved and unsaved. The program will have various local spiritual groups participating - Long Way Around, Tabernacle Choir, Community Baptist Church and many others. Everyone is welcome. Rev. John K. Patterson is pastor.


48

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Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

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Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 20, 2014. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, P.E., Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid. PARKING LOT RECONSTRUCTION Survive Alive House 2059 South 20th Street Milwaukee, WI 53204 MPS Property No. 718 MPS Project No. 2317 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 300 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at A/E Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at A/E Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D, 10504901/2-20-27-3-6-13 Superintendent of Schools.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 20, 2014. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, P.E., Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid. PHASE 2 REMODELING Howard Avenue Montessori School 357 E. Howard Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53207 MPS Property No. 362 MPS Project No. 2705 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 300 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at A/E Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at A/E Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D, 10504576/2-20-27-3-6-13 Superintendent of Schools.


50

The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

NOTICE

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 20, 2014. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, P.E., Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid.

Milwaukee Public Schools is requesting quotations for Aluminum Roof Coating Material. Material specifications, proposal requirements and guidelines may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of proposal documents.

ABATEMENT AND DEMOLITION

All questions should be submitted in writing to John Linn of Milwaukee Public Schools’ Facilities and Maintenance Services, fax number (414) 283-4682. No questions will be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their response to the request for quotation. Only questions submitted in writing prior to 4:00 PM on Thursday, March 6, 2014 will be answered. No questions will be answered after that date and time. These responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Submit all quotations to Mr. John Linn, Manager of Design and Construction of Facilities and Maintenance Services, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 no later than 1:30 PM on Thursday, March 13, 2014. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D Superintendent of Schools 10504584/2-20-27-3-6

South Stadium 971 W. Windlake Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53204 MPS Property No. 447 MPS Project No. 2919 The HUB requirements for this project are 25% The COIN requirements for this project are 25% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 300 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at A/E Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at A/E Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D, 10504918/2-20-27-3-6-13 Superintendent of Schools.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 20, 2014. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, P.E., Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid. EXTERIOR STAIR REPLACEMENT Morse-Marshall School for the Gifted and Talented 4141 N. 64th Street Milwaukee, WI 53216 MPS Property No. 008 MPS Project No. 2212 The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 10% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 300 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours

The HUB requirements for this contract is 0% The COIN requirements for this contract is 0% The Student Employment/Participation requirements for this contract is 0%

NOTICE Milwaukee Public Schools is requesting proposals for Fire Alarm System Testing and Electric/Magnetic Release Fire Door Testing and Inspection. Project scope, proposal requirements and guidelines may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc.; 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics, Inc. for availability of proposal documents. The HUB requirements for this contract is 0% The Student Employment/Participation requirements for this contract is: 100 Hours of Paid Student Employment per contract year 10 hours of Student Career Education Activities per contract year All questions should be submitted in writing to John Linn of Milwaukee Public Schools’ Facilities and Maintenance Services, fax number (414) 283-4682. No questions will be answered verbally. No verbal information from any source is to be relied upon by any respondent in the development of their response to the RFP. Only questions submitted in writing prior to 4:00 PM on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 will be answered. No questions will be answered after that date and time. These responses will be documented by way of addenda, which will be forwarded to all bidders. Submit all proposals to Ms. Gina M. Spang, P.E., Director of Facilities and Maintenance Services, 1124 North 11th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 no later than 3:00 PM on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D Superintendent of Schools 10504588/2-20-25-3-4-11

Happy Birthday Salutes! Wishing You All The Best!

Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00 The bidding documents may be obtained 7:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from A/E Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call A/E Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to A/E Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at A/E Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at A/E Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. GREGORY E. THORNTON, Ed.D, 10504886/2-20-27-3-6-13 Superintendent of Schools.

February 14th Angel T. Fumbanks Vicki Chamberlain February 16th Tony Chamberlain Ice T LaVar Burton Jerome Bettis Hasheem Thabeet Ahman Green February 17th Tony J. Thompson Michael Jordan Mary Frances Berry Jim Brown February 18th Dr. Dre February 19th Andrew Green, Sr.

Gloria Hunt Ellen Fumbanks Jamera Ellis Smokey Robinson February 20th Mable Taylor Channing M. Williams February 21st Nia Fizpatrick

February 26th Geraldine Walker Sandrene Watts

March 11th Clarence E. Ingram Brandon Walls

February 27th Louis Davis, Jr.

March 15th Florine D. Ingram

February 28th Louis Taylor, Jr.

March 17th Denise R. Ingram

March 2nd Marcus Walls

March 23rd Tiffany S. Ingram Michael S. Celestine

February 23rd Chole Ann Taylor Bryanna Barnes

March 5th Geneda Johnson

February 24th Janice Williams

March 6th Monica Walls-Cox March 8th Victoria M. Ingram

Do you have a friend, family member, or colleague who has just celebrated or is about to celebrate a birthday? Stop by our office with their name on Monday to get them in that week’s edition of Happy Birthday Salutes! Visit us at 1936 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, call us at (414) 263-5088 or e-mail them to miltimes@gmail.com.


The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

51

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PEPSI, DIET PEPSI OR MOUNTAIN DEW And Other Selected 12 Pk. 12 Oz. Can, 6 Pk. 24 Oz Btl. or 8 Pk. 12 Oz. Btl. Varieties

LIMIT 3 WITH CARD ALL OTHER PURCHASES $3.99

3/$10.98 WHEN YOU BUY 3

SARGENTO SHREDDED CHEESE

FLORIDA’S NATURAL JUICE OR SMOOTHIE

Selected 5-8 Oz. Varieties

Selected 33.8-59 Oz. Varieties

SAVE UP TO $2.76 ON 2 WITH CARD

2/$5

SAVE UP TO $1.98 ON 2 WITH CARD

2/$5

DIGITAL COUPONS: PICK, CLICK & GO. DOWNLOAD SELECT MANUFACTURERS COUPONS AT PICKNSAVE.COM/SHOP/COUPONS.ASPX picknsave.com

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LB.

LIMIT 2 PKGS. WITH CARD

GREEN ASPARAGUS

4 Lb. Bag From California

SAVE UP TO $2.11 WITH CARD

99¢

ROUNDY'S FRESH JUMBO PACK CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS OR THIGHS

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52

The Milwaukee Times Weekly

Thursday, February 27, 2014 - Wednesday, March 5, 2014

An NCON Publication

Be paper 2 21 13  
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