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FALL–WINTER 2007


From the President

Whether you are an armchair traveler or a frequent flyer, this issue of Millsaps Magazine will appeal to your sense of adventure on just about every level. Our international studies program continues to expand and excite, and it is one of the more inspiring projects we have at Millsaps College. We’ve included recent travelogues written this summer by our globe-trotting students. An important part of our international offering is the multidisciplinary initiative on the Yucatán Peninsula at Kiuic. I’ve had the privilege of visiting our Yucatán field site five times, and each time I am astounded by the active learning taking place in archaeology, anthropology, culture, the arts, literature, and business.These are some of the more life-transforming experiences a student can have. This summer, I was invited to accompany a group of students on their tour of Munich. We were able to observe firsthand the impact that discovering a new culture had on those bright young people.They came away with a fresh perspective on German culture and the interconnectedness of our global society. Another kind of journey is tucked into this issue of Millsaps Magazine. Journey Partners is a spiritual-direction initiative of The Center for Ministry, Millsaps College, and the Methodist Conference of the United Methodist Church. Spiritual direction is defined as “the art of walking beside others as they listen for the voice of God in their lives.” Open to laity and clergy alike, Journey Partners teaches its participants the arts of discernment and active listening, which will enable them to guide others as individuals or in group settings. Whether you are focused on travel abroad or on a journey within, you will surely find inspiration in these pages. As a not-so-casual observer, I have learned that the Millsaps experience is not only unique and rewarding, but that it lasts a lifetime.

Warmly,


In This Issue f e a t u r e

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MILLSAPS MAGAZINE f a l l -w i n t e r 2 0 0 7

Millsaps puts its stamp on the world In the last two years, the College has focused increasing attention on its commitment to providing exciting study-abroad and international opportunities to students and faculty.

d e p a r t m e n t s

Design Kelley Matthews Contributing Editors John Webb Margaret Cahoon Lisa Purdie Rebecca Day Jason Bronson Kevin Maloney Major Notes Editor Tanya Newkirk a s s o c i at e d i r e c t or o f a l u m n i r e l at i on s

On Campus From Afghanistan, with hope 2 16 Sessums’s Mississippi memoir

Editorial Assistant Sophia Halkias, 2009

Faculty & Staff 22 Hopkins, Bey, and Galaty 24 Campus Community

Contributing Photographers Greg Campbell Frank Ezelle Shannon Fagan © 2006 Sami Samiliah Melanie Thaw Paul White © 2006

Legacy 36 A campaign update

Administrative Officers Dr. Frances Lucas president Dr. Richard A. Smith s e n i or v i c e p r e s i d e n t a n d d e a n o f t h e c ol l e g e Louise Burney v i c e p r e s i d e n t f or f i na n c e Dr. R. Brit Katz v i c e p r e s i d e n t f or s t u d e n t l i f e and dean of students Dr. Charles R. Lewis vice president f or i n s t i t u t i on a l a dva n c e m e n t Todd Rose v i c e p r e s i d e n t f or c a m p u s p ro g r a m s and alumni

Athletics 39 Major upset at Homecoming Major Notes 43 Hailman on Jefferson and wine 46 Classnotes 53 In Memoriam Parting Word 93 ‘Plain Living and High Thinking’

40 c ov e r: t h e c h u rc h o f s t. joh n, v i l l ag e o f t h e t h , s h a l a va l l e y, nort h e r n a l b a n i a © ann christine eek and the s h a l a va l l e y p roj e c t, 2 0 0 7

Executive Editor Patti Wade d i r e c t or o f c om m u n i c at i on s and marketing

m i l l s a p s m ag a z i n e i s p u b l i s h e d b y m i l l s a p s c ol l e g e, 1 7 0 1 nort h s tat e s t r e e t, j ac k s on, m s 3 9 2 1 0 - 0 0 0 1 , f or d i s t r i b u t i on t o a l u m n i , pa r e n t s o f s t u d e n t s, a n d f r i e n d s o f t h e c ol l e g e. p l e a s e s e n d a l u m n i u p d at e s a n d a d d r e s s c or r e c t i on s t o m i l l s a p s m ag a z i n e, c a r e o f t h e a b ov e a d d r e s s. you c a n r e ac h u s at 6 0 1 - 9 7 4 - 1 0 3 3 , b y f a x at 6 0 1 - 9 7 4 - 1 4 5 6 , or b y e m a i l at c o m m u n i c at i on s @ m i l l s a p s. e du. v i s i t w w w. m i l l s a p s. e du f or t h e on l i n e m ag a z i n e.


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OnCampus Afghan student aims to practice medicine in her native land “I am the girl who belongs to a family whose only hope is me,” said Sabira Ebaady in a written statement regarding why

Dr. Michael Reinhard, professor of political science, was instrumental in bringing Sabira Ebaady, right, to Millsaps College.

“She wanted to be a doctor because the people around her needed a doctor more than they needed a mathematician.”

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she wants to study medicine. Ebaady is a 20-year-old native of Ghazni, Afghanistan, and she is also a Millsaps student, thanks to the efforts of Dr. Michael Reinhard, assistant professor of political science, and other members of the Millsaps community. Ebaady’s path to Millsaps—and to education in general—has been arduous, and at times dangerous. She has no brothers and three younger sisters and said that Afghans generally “think that girls are for housework, bringing up the children, and are not to speak of taking an active part in society.” This cultural bias became a policy of extreme brutality with the Taliban’s rise to power in the political vacuum that existed in Afghanistan after nine years of war with the Soviets. Ebaady’s father, however, refused to accept this and other traditional lines of thinking in Afghanistan and instilled

in his daughters a sense of equality and self-worth, encouraging them to seek out knowledge and overcome the cultural prejudices that had long forced Afghan women to live in the shadows. He understood that education would be the cornerstone of a better life for his four daughters, but he also understood that even allowing the girls to read in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan meant putting the entire family in mortal jeopardy. He decided the family should leave Afghanistan for Pakistan, where Ebaady and her sisters could at least get a rudimentary education. Ebaady was 12 years old when her family left Afghanistan to escape the harsh rule of the Taliban, crossing the Pakistani border on foot and under the cover of darkness. Sabira carried her youngest sister on her back; it would be nearly a decade before the family would return to Afghanistan. In Pakistan, Ebaady was able to attend classes, eventually earning her high school diploma. Her favorite subject was math, and she wanted to study engineering, but that changed when she began working in a Pakistani hospital under an educational program established by the Japanese. Ebaady went through three months of intensive medical training, then took a job in the hospital’s maternity ward. She excelled in this difficult work and soon became the de facto doctor for the entire camp in which her family lived. The experience at the hospital made Ebaady reconsider her educational aspirations. In her statement, she recalled the words of her father: “He says never to get an education for earning money, but that your aim has to be extending your knowledge. By knowledge and education we can do everything.” Ebaady had decided that she wanted to study medicine so that she could return to Afghanistan and provide much-needed medical care to its people—her people. “I was remembering Afghan women,” she said, “especially those living in villages who never contact a doctor while in delivery; many of them lose their lives in


Sabira Ebaady and members of her extended family in their two-room home in Kabul. Ebaady says she likes her Millsaps classes and professors, although English remains a challenge.

childbirth. And many of them face different problems after delivery.” She said those experiences had convinced her to become a doctor who could work with the needy in Afghanistan. “This is what my people really need,” she said. “She wanted to be a doctor because the people around her needed a doctor more than they needed a mathematician,” said Reinhard, who met with Ebaady in Afghanistan’s capital of Kabul in June. Reinhard went to Afghanistan “as a representative of the Fulbright program and as a visiting professor at the American University of Central Asia (AUCA) in Kyrgyzstan,” he said. “The Soros Foundation had funded a number of scholarships, aimed mainly at young women from Afghanistan, to study at the American University.” Reinhard interviewed several scholarship candidates from Afghanistan. “I heard some terrible things,” he recalled. “Most of the girls had been forced to study in secret as the Taliban had a policy of beating and sometimes beheading any parents that allowed their daughters to read. Inside Kabul, education was severely retarded; in the provinces it was completely halted.” This is one reason why Ebaady made

such an outstanding impression on Reinhard during the interview process. “Sabira stood out among all the other candidates for being very poised and selfassured,” he recalled. “The thing about Afghans that you always hear remarked on is how dignified they are. Sabira stood out even among Afghans as having a very calm and self-possessed manner. Unlike almost all the other young women from outside the capital, she was able to speak English without using the translator.” Ebaady aced the interview and was essentially offered the Soros scholarship to attend AUCA on the spot. Reinhard said that at the interview’s end she had but one question: Could the American University in Kyrgyzstan help her to become a doctor? He explained to her that while AUCA did not have a medical program, it did have several other programs that could land her a spot in a graduate school in the United States where she would be able to study medicine. “She was polite—the Afghans are always polite—but made no effort to hide her disappointment,” he said. “She smiled a little half smile with one side of her mouth while looking down and said, ‘Then what is the point of going there?’” Ebaady declined the scholarship offer,

but Reinhard was determined to find a way to help facilitate the achievement of her goal to become a doctor. That very afternoon he asked his interpreter to contact Ebaady and invite her back for another meeting so that he could try to talk her into taking the AUCA offer. “That way,” he said, “she could at least be studying in English while I looked for a way to get her into the Millsaps premed program.” Reinhard was surprised when the translator informed him that Ebaady’s mother had invited them to the family’s home, a mud house on a hill overlooking Kabul. “This was surprising because foreign men are not invited into Afghan homes to meet women,” Reinhard said. But they made the difficult trek up the hillside—and because there is no official system of roads they had to be led there by Ebaady’s cousin—and met with Ebaady’s family. Ebaady talked of her father’s insistence on education for his daughters, and Reinhard assured her and her family that he would do everything he could to find the money to bring Ebaady to Millsaps College. In a final interview with Ted Achilles, the head of the American Education Council in Afghanistan, Ebaady was persuaded to take the Soros scholarship

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and attend AUCA, with the understanding that Reinhard would work toward finding the funding that would enable her to transfer to Millsaps. Reinhard immediately began making appeals to the Millsaps community—student organizations, alumni, and even President Frances Lucas— to help bring Ebaady to Millsaps. The effort was a success, and Ebaady arrived at the Millsaps campus on August 25: Move-In Day. Although her luggage was lost in transit, she settled into her new home in the dorms and was in classes by August 28. “I didn’t think anything would be done to get me to America,” said Ebaady. “Dr. Reinhard found a way, and I am so thankful. He did all he could, and now I am here getting an education.” She admits that the transition from life in Afghanistan and Pakistan to that in the United States has been difficult, but one wouldn’t know it to sit down and talk with her. Her demeanor is quiet and reserved, but her confidence and drive are immediately obvious, and she does not appear at all nervous or tense. “The culture and everything is just completely different,” said Ebaady, “and it takes time to get used to.” Despite her classes in English in Pakistan and at AUCA, the transition has been difficult. Ebaady said that she liked her classes and professors at Millsaps, but that the language gap was still a challenge. “In my old classes in my own language, I would speak often, and I did so well,” she said. “My biggest problem now is language.” While the language of any American college classroom can certainly be intimidating, Ebaady’s English is both articulate and eloquent. She agreed that in time the language gap would be sure to close. Although coming to Millsaps is an enormously significant and positive step toward achieving her goals, Ebaady admits to feeling very homesick. But she is never far from her father’s voice and the encouragement that comes with it, nor that of the rest of her family. “My father is in

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Saudi Arabia now, and he calls me—daily,” she said with a soft laugh. “And my mother is in Kabul, and we can talk once every week.”

—Jason Bronson

A grass-roots effort to recruit students in Wuhan, China

The overseas recruitment effort is no easy task. Tsui currently relies on personal contacts in her hometown of Wuhan to find prospective students. The first hurdle for many Chinese parents is the financial burden of sending their children to a private American college. In China, college costs only around $2,000, compared to the approximately $120,000 cost of American higher education. And trying to explain the costs of a liberal arts college to parents in a culture that is so outcome-minded is difficult. Most Chinese families spend their entire savings to send their children to college in the hopes that they will go on to a good career and eventually earn enough money to support their parents.

Dr. Ming Tsui was teaching English at Wuhan University of Technology in the People’s Republic of China when she decided to move to the United States. She began teaching at Millsaps College in 1992 and for the last 15 years has continued to influence students on both continents. Tsui, associate professor of sociology, is the driving force behind a new recruitment effort at Millsaps to Dr. Ming Tsui in Wuhan, where she relies on personal contacts to find prospective students. bring Chinese students to the College. And while her “Chinese parents want their children ultimate goal of attracting six or seven to go into business, engineering, or new students from China every year may medicine,” Tsui explains. “There is an not have a huge impact on enrollment obstacle in explaining that the liberal arts numbers, the influence of shared learning education is practical.” The second hurdle between the two cultures is crucial, is convincing the parents of prospective she said. According to Tsui, the recent students that their children will be safe. The development of a true global economy lack of a prominent Chinese community calls for an exchange of student input for in Jackson worries some parents, especially mutual understanding. because the city is so small by their “Because America is a superpower, standards. The city of Wuhan has eight China knows more about America than million people and is considered midsized America about China,” she claims. Chinese in China. Many of the families that Tsui students not only provide numbers and a has spoken with perceive the state of financial benefit to the College, but they Mississippi as a small town. also enrich the community and broaden Despite these difficulties, Tsui has students’ cultural understanding. managed to create a successful recruitment


program in China. Each summer, she takes a group of undergraduates to Wuhan for cultural study. While there, she is able to make contacts and continue to court prospective students. She finds that Chinese students and their families are attracted to the small class sizes that Millsaps offers. “In China, undergrad classes are huge, and professors don’t know their students well,” she says. “The student/faculty interaction at Millsaps is very impressive.” And while top Chinese students are lured to high-caliber American research institutions by significant scholarship money, Millsaps manages to attract an impressive group of students who are willing to work hard because their parents are willing to sacrifice a great deal for them to attend. Tsui notes that they tend to be very intelligent and outgoing, with a sense of wanderlust. They also enjoy interacting with others and are very independent. “It’s really the same as recruiting U.S. students,” she says. While Tsui is looking forward to developing new recruitment methods and accruing more scholarship money for Chinese students, she doesn’t see any need to exceed her goal of six or seven students per year. “If there were too many more, there would be no benefit,” she says. “They might form a subgroup, speak only Chinese, and not interact with American students.”

—Rebecca Day

Language lab gets conversant with new technology Just over a year ago, the Millsaps Modern Language Laboratory consisted of little more than two small rooms equipped with cassette tape decks for audio material, television-VCR combinations for viewing films, satellite television, and outdated computers. After all, for years students’

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Many language textbooks are now packaged with audio CDs, interactive CDs, and passwords to publishers’ websites.

textbooks were accompanied only by audiocassettes and written exercises. But today, many foreign language textbooks are packaged with audio compact discs, interactive CD-ROMs, and passwords for the publishers’ websites—which contain pronunciation guides, videos, links, audio, interactive exercises, and more. To accommodate these exciting new technologies, as well as television and radio, the College decided that a massive renovation of the language lab was not just an option but a necessity. In fall 2005, after much planning and organizing, the modern languages department submitted to the Charles A. Frueauff Foundation the first of three grant proposals for renovations. Since then, innumerable people have helped in the planning and construction of the new lab, including many members of the language department and the administration. Sarah Wamester, assistant professor of Spanish, joined the faculty in 2006 and became involved during the construction/ implementation phase, and, with her help, the College applied for and received the third and final grant for the completion of the planned renovations. Wamester, who is now director of the language lab, explains that the last grant allowed “the department to purchase the equipment necessary for students to be able to produce multimedia

content in the target language.” The outlined changes began in the summer of 2006 and were to be completed by December 2007. The two small rooms have been combined to make one large lab, and each of the 25 wooden computer stations is equipped with a new computer, headphones for audio exercises, a new desk chair, and an ultra-high-speed Internet connection. Satellite television can now be viewed on a retractable projector-screen, conveniently placed in an area of the lab with ample space for individual or group viewing. Today, when students enter the language laboratory they are greeted by a lab assistant who supervises the facility and is trained to help students use the programs and navigate the computers. Along with the other prerequisites and Core classes at Millsaps, students seeking a bachelor of arts in any available discipline must complete the foreign language requirement, which consists of three semesters of Spanish, German, or French. Within those courses, weekly time in the language lab is required. Wamester said the study of foreign languages prepares students for the competition of a global workforce, adding that “a liberal arts education—one that specifically seeks to develop students’ critical thinking abilities—is not complete without a critical evaluation of one’s

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own culture; in my view, it is difficult to understand one’s own culture without stepping outside of it. Language study is one way to do that.” Students’ comments on the changes have been positive, according to Wamester. Specifically, students and professors appreciate the ability to access multimedia capabilities that aid in pronunciation and practical applications. The reinforcement for class work that students receive in the lab also affords exposure to the language at the pace of the individual student. As Wamester says, students “need to experience language and culture in all formats in which it would be naturally found—film, TV, websites, music, magazines, newspapers, etc.—and the language lab, well-equipped, is the next best thing to being there in a country where the language is spoken.”

—Kathryn Buchan

Documenting the personal side of the civil rights era Students from Dr. Lola Williamson’s Religious Perspectives on Cultivating Peace class collaborated this past spring with students from Murrah High School to create a secondhand documentary of sorts. The film, a collection of monologues from Cerissa Neal’s ninth-grade Mississippi Studies class at the high school, grew out of a multifaceted learning project about the civil rights movement. The Murrah students were taught the background of the civil rights movement and were then assigned to interview family or community members who had lived through the movement. From the information they gathered in their interviews, the students wrote and performed dramatic monologues, assuming the role of either the person they interviewed or a third party in the story. Thomas Richardson and Woods Curry,

Millsaps College students who helped coordinate the project, did a similar project when they were students at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science. “We learned the value of preserving people’s stories,” Richardson said. In late April, the Millsaps College Faith & Work Initiative held a viewing of the film and invited the Murrah students and Dr. Williamson’s class to watch the video, eat dinner, and talk about the project. Richardson and Curry described the process of putting together the movie and how they worked with the students to make the civil rights movement more personal. “They pulled this together really beautifully,” Curry said. “The project is almost solely theirs.” But these students are not the only ones who will benefit from the video. “What we have here is going to serve as an important historical document,” Williamson said, for the next generation—who may not know anyone living who went through the civil rights movement. At the end of the evening, Frances Coker, emeritus professor of sociology, spoke about her experiences with segregation and integration in the 1960s, adding a firsthand perspective to the evening’s documentary accounts.

—Margaret Cahoon

Tomatoes as art: Exhibition works any way you slice it Students in Professor Michelle Acuff’s Advanced Studio Art course went from creating sculpture to raising vegetables this

past spring, and what began as research into the history of public art materialized into a meaningful public agriculture-as-art project for Millsaps and its neighbors. In partnership with the Millsaps College Faith & Work Initiative’s new 1 Campus, 1 Community program, Acuff’s students searched the North Midtown neighborhood for ideas. On one of their walks through the neighborhood, students noticed an abandoned lot littered with stacks of large plastic bins. The students’ creative energies then kicked into gear, and soon they had cleaned, painted, and wheel-fitted 18 of the bins. The artwork is largely conceptual: The materials used are found (the tubs themselves), alive (the tomato plants), and will grow. The sculptures themselves are interactive and require participation beyond the merely aesthetic. “They actively challenge the notion that an artwork should remain safely upon a pedestal and not respond to social needs and situations,” Acuff said. Dozens of bags of potting soil and baby tomato plants later, the class had a fleet of mobile tomato gardens—small tomato plots that could be wheeled home and moved to wherever the sun shone the longest in a North Midtown yard. The Millsaps Mobile ’Maters were given to children in the after-school program at the North Midtown Community Development Corporation. Acuff’s students explained proper watering and other ways to care for their new plants and answered questions from “How much water is too much?” to “Will it really grow more tomatoes if I sing to it?” The informational session was followed by a Mobile ’Maters parade, where the schoolchildren wheeled their new plant

Mobile ‘Maters, tomato plots that could be wheeled from place to place, were given to schoolchildren by Millsaps art students.

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Dr. Darby Ray sharing tomatoes with Midtown students.

bins around the schoolyard and then enjoyed ripe, juicy cherry tomatoes as they rested. “Overall, we think our project functions on so many different levels: aesthetically, environmentally, nutritionally, playfully, and socio-economically, as the children are taught to grow and eat natural foods,” Acuff said. “It was really fun to work on, and I am especially glad I got to do something in Midtown.”

—Dr. Darby Ray, R. D.

Software students design a learning package for tots Students from Dr. Don Schwartz’s Software Engineering class traveled in April to St. Richard Catholic School in northeast Jackson to install and test computer software that the Millsaps class had designed specifically for prekindergarten students at St. Richard. Shelia Foggo, who teaches computer classes to all grade levels at St. Richard, said she was especially grateful for the software because everything that was currently available was “not for this young an age.” Because pre-K students are not yet able to

read, their software has to be audio-based so that they can understand and participate. Schwartz and his class worked with Foggo to tailor the software specifically to her students’ needs and specifications. Given the success of this project, Schwartz was determined to make this software package available free of charge to all area schools interested in incorporating it into their classrooms and labs. During the summer, Schwartz met with technology directors in the Jackson Public Schools to show them the software program, now known as CLOWNS—colors, letters, objects, words, numbers, and symbols. “They really liked the demo,” Schwartz said. “It installed perfectly on the first try and worked wonderfully as they added students, tried each game, and checked on the progress indicators that are automatically generated as students complete the tasks.” JPS was ready to recommend the software for their pre-K, and eventually kindergarten, classes. CLOWNS includes games and activities to help students identify and learn letters, numbers, colors, and shapes. As students become more proficient in the activities, CLOWNS increases in difficulty and allows the teacher to track each student’s progress. For more advanced students, the software also begins to teach and test the spellings of the colors and shapes that students have already learned. There is also a catching game, which improves hand-eye coordination. The initial partnership between the classes is part of the Faith & Work Initiative’s service learning program, which, according to its website, seeks to “help students make connections between their academic development and their character development; put differently, it helps them bridge the gap between academic affairs and student affairs, offering them a holistic model of human development.”

—M. C.

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Mentoring program attracts nearly 100 medical professionals In 2001, Dr. Timothy Ward, a chemistry professor and associate dean of sciences, founded the Millsaps medical mentoring program to allow prehealth students the opportunity to obtain real-life experience in the field. Since the program’s inaugural banquet, the number of professional participants has grown from 20 physicians to nearly 100, with a diverse selection of mentors in such fields as dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, and optometry. The program was created to produce premedical graduates who, by starting with a working knowledge and observation of doctors in their practice, would have a greater probability of success in medical school and satisfaction in their future medical careers. “It was wonderful to provide our students this essential opportunity,” Ward said, “as well as to establish a formal medical internship course so that students could receive credit on their transcripts for their medical experiences.” Rikki Darcey, a senior biology major, hopes to attend the University of Mississippi Medical Center after graduation. She participated in the mentoring program this past spring at UMC, with a concentration in pediatrics, and had the opportunity to do rotations with a different doctor each week. “It is so helpful and convenient that Millsaps will make these connections for you,” said Darcey. The program is designed to provide students with experience in patient contact, as well as to establish a connection between the mentor and the student. Dr. Kristy Stensaas, chair of the chemistry department, took over the program in 2004 and has seen it grow tremendously with an ever-increasing student demand. When pairing students with mentors,

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chosen to apply to dental school. Definitely the program supplies students the patientcontact experience they need before applying to med school.” The program’s popularity and efficiency continues to grow. In the past year, 34 internships were successfully completed. To date, more than 150 medical-mentor pairings have taken place since the medical internship program’s commencement.

—Chelsea Lovitt

At Manship House, an unexpected find for archaeology students Dr. Timothy Ward, whose mentoring initiative has placed Millsaps students in real-life medical environments since 2001.

coordinators “consider the specialty the student is interested in,” Stensaas said, “as well as the importance of the physician to be able to serve as a mentor in guiding, encouraging, and exposing the student to the challenges and rewards of a healthrelated career.” Students are able to intern at several health-care facilities in the Jackson area. If attending UMC for mentorship, the student will be set up to rotate with different doctors each week. At other hospitals, they can shadow one doctor throughout the semester to build the relationship with their mentor and with the patients they see. Emily Stewart, a junior majoring in biochemistry, participated in the program last spring with an infectious-disease and internal-medicine physician. She described how this mentorship allowed her to see the business side of medicine, as well as the importance that personality plays into being a doctor— aspects of medical practice that can be difficult to understand through the premed curriculum and MCAT preparation. “One of the most difficult parts was

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seeing how expensive prescription drugs are,” said Stewart. “It is frustrating when patients can’t pay for their medicine and health care because their insurance won’t cover costs. There are more limitations than you would think preventing doctors from helping their patients, and that was something I definitely learned from this experience.” Stewart also described the advantage of shadowing just one doctor in a certain discipline, which allowed her to see repeat patients: “One of the most rewarding parts was to see follow-up patients and their progress. This was a constant reminder of why all the hard work and years of school is truly worthwhile.” Seven students inaugurated the program in the fall of 2002. According to Stensaas, four were accepted into medical school, and the remaining three are in either physical therapy school or another graduate school. “This trend is consistent in that most of our students choose medical school,” Stensaas said. “In the past few years, more of our students, specifically females, have

Students in Dr. Michael Galaty’s Archaeological Method and Theory class were digging in the yard of the Manship House Museum on a sunny day last April when a freshman, Jordan Taylor, found an 1854 Liberty Head gold dollar. These coins, issued between 1849 and 1854, were made of 90 percent pure gold, and are therefore the smallest coins in U.S. history. “We were expecting to find various historic artifacts, but we weren’t expecting to find a gold coin,” Galaty said. “These are extremely rare in archaeological excavations. As you might imagine, people were very careful not to lose their gold coins!” “There was a lot of coal, pieces of brick, pottery, and lots of glass,” Taylor said of other findings at the site. “Some of it is even cut glass,” said his classmate, Caroline Meyers, a sophomore who, along with Elizabeth Albert, a junior, was excavating in the same unit as Taylor. The Manship House, located off Fortification Street in Jackson, was built in 1857 as the home of Charles Henry


Manship, the Civil War mayor of Jackson. Students bagged their artifacts to take back to campus after the dig. The next step, Taylor and Meyers explained, was to analyze the pieces they had found— writing reports on the procedures and discoveries. The coin will go into the permanent collection of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Archaeological Method and Theory, offered by the Millsaps Department of Sociology and Anthropology, is an introduction to the practice of archaeology and provides students a basic understanding of the ways in which archaeologists study and seek to understand past human behaviors.

In past groups, participants have been primarily Mississippians with a smattering of Alabama, Tennessee, and Louisiana residents, as well as one Iowan. Inquiries are increasing beyond this area, however. Both ecumenical in approach and intentional about diversity, Journey Partners has served both laity and clergy who come from Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian, Mennonite, Catholic, and United Methodist denominations.

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strengthens a participant as a leader but also becomes personal enrichment, says Youngblood, executive director of the Center for Ministry. “Journey Partners is a catalyst for tremendous spiritual growth,” she said. Such is the case for Raymond Clothier, associate director of the Millsaps College Faith & Work Initiative and a graduate of the first Journey Partners class. Clothier uses his training in spiritual direction as he

—M. C.

Journey Partners: Traveling companions on a spiritual path A conversation with the Reverend Becky Youngblood and the Reverend Sherry Johnson is quiet, reflective, and serene. Something about these two convinces you they could maintain this peaceful demeanor even in a traffic jam on a California freeway. Their dialogue is laced with terms such as lovely, enriching, rest, attuned, reflection, relationship, silence, space, and “still small voice.” Perhaps they use those words because they are speaking about Journey Partners, a spiritual-direction program. Or perhaps it is because of Journey Partners that they speak this way. Each has been a participant in Journey Partners, as well as a leader. In January, they will inaugurate the program’s third session, a collection of 24 to 30 people who covenant in a two-year journey to become spiritual directors. Journey Partners is part of the Center for Ministry, a venture of Millsaps College and the Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church.

The Reverend Becky Youngblood, left, and the Reverend Sherry Johnson have both led and participated in Journey Partners.

Leaders of Journey Partners define spiritual direction as “the art of walking beside others as they listen for the voice of God in their lives.” Spiritual directors use both God-given gifts and cultivated skills to aid the spiritual direction of individuals, groups, and congregations. Typically, participants of Journey Partners are already involved in some aspect of their church or church leadership or feel a call to the ministry of spiritual direction. “God has been working in them before they come,” said Johnson, associate director for the Center for Ministry, who is serving as a small-group leader in the class that concludes in 2007. The program not only

works with students who are discerning the call to ministry. “I wanted to have more resources to help them in their call to ministry,” he said of his role directing the C.A.L.L.S. program at Millsaps, described as a “multidenominational group of spiritual companions” who are exploring God’s call. Clothier also found Journey Partners a reminder of what it was about church that made him want to go in the first place. “It’s odd that this is what church is about—to bring people into an encounter with God. But we lose the center of what we are trying to do in church. We find ourselves spending significant time in committee

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Journey Partners participants on a prayer walk at St. Mary of the Pines Retreat Center in Chatawa. The labyrinth of paths is arranged to aid in prayer, meditation, and reflection.

meetings and spending little time in God’s presence. Spending time in God’s presence is the experience many people are hungering for.” The Reverend Dianne Harms, B.A. 1987, a participant in the second class of Journey Partners, was observing a similar dilemma from the perspective of a pastor. “I was seeing a need for more spiritual formation rather than more programming,” she said. Journey Partners helped her design a different pace that included listening, new ways of measuring individual worth, and seeing God in unlikely places, a benefit all participants mention. “God doesn’t just hang out at church,” Harms said. Clothier also acknowledged the serendipities of God’s presence. “God is present everywhere,” he said. “You don’t need to withdraw, but look around more.” Johnson noted, “Journey Partners gave

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me a vision of what great lengths God goes to to communicate with people,” including unforeseen events of running into people or conversations unexpectedly going in a certain direction. Another current participant, Becky Williams of Brandon, finds this practice of attentiveness to God’s presence a great help in interacting with others within the church. “After participating in Journey Partners, it is becoming second nature for me to intentionally remind myself that every encounter has the potential to be a holy encounter should I choose to quiet myself, stay open, and remember ‘where two or more are gathered together, I am with them,’” Williams said. Listening is brought into focus for participants through a two-night silent retreat. “For me it was a life-changing experience,” Johnson said. “I was

frightened going into it because I did not know what God would ask of me. I was held close by God where he could talk. I felt carried in the palm of his hand. When it was time to talk again, I would have rather stayed silent.” “When you institute a new rhythm and rule you realize prayer is not a one-way street,” Harms said. “It is about listening, about quiet, about not being afraid to see what is inside us.” Developing a countercultural view of measuring worth was another learning experience for Harms. “I am getting away from my worth being measured by a to-do list. I have not turned my back on excellence, but we get our worth tied up in that. In our culture, we tend not to value people who don’t contribute in a quantifiable way. “In the framework of knowing God, being is just as important as doing. I truly


did not know how to just be until Journey Partners.” Youngblood notes that participants make use of what they learn in ways that build upon their personal call. One group member is a hospice nurse who appears to have a special gift for helping the ill find beauty in their last moments, Harms observed. Youngblood and Johnson talked of two others who entered the ministry while participants in the two-year program. Johnson had originally entered the class believing she would use the skills for individual work, but during the process she discovered a call for the kind of group spiritual direction that she provides to Journey Partners participants. A Meridian pastor in the first class provided a hurricane shelter in her church for months following Katrina. “The Journey Partners community was especially helpful to everybody in the group after the storms,” Youngblood said. “Wendy Miller, our instructor, is very attentive to the particular makeup of a group and shapes her teaching to specific needs and issues.” Miller, a Mennonite minister on the faculty of Eastern Mennonite Seminary, is the author of Invitation to Presence and Jesus, Our Spiritual Director. In fact, one exciting outgrowth of Journey Partners is a plan to make spiritual directors available to pastors involved in

long-term recovery on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The Center for Ministry has just been awarded a Lilly Endowment grant to continue the Pastoral Excellence Project, an effort to strengthen the leadership abilities of Mississippi clergy by deepening and enriching their religious lives. The PEP grant, which includes several other program components, will also provide scholarships for pastors from the Gulf Coast to take part in a two-year Journey Partners session. Youngblood is pleased with the Center for Ministry’s development of a core group of spiritual directors in Mississippi who can be called upon for this very purpose and who also form a network of people who can support and sustain one another in this work. The Center for Ministry offers an additional program called “Seasons of Spiritual Direction” as a continuingeducation opportunity for those who have completed Journey Partners. Youngblood and Johnson are joined in this ministry by Jane Watts, who works part-time with Journey Partners and the center’s other Spiritual Formation programs. Each Journey Partners retreat is structured around teaching time with Wendy Miller and participation in a small group, which remains the same for two years. The experience includes homework, written logs of conversations, solitude, rest, and community, which is a combination of worship, meals, and fellowship.

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“The Journey Partners curriculum provides a structure of diverse reading and required practice of ‘holy listening,’ which must be documented and turned in at the end of each quarter. Each participant is expected to be receiving guidance from a spiritual director. We are encouraged to take even typical daily conversations and acknowledge the presence of the Holy Spirit,” said Williams. Johnson noted that some individuals do not realize these practices are available in the Christian tradition. Youngblood pointed out that personal accountability, holy conversation, and daily attention to the life of faith are all Wesleyan traditions. An application for the 2008–09 session, which begins February 18, is available at www.centerforministry.com, and information can be obtained by calling 601974-1488. Journey Partners is funded by participant fees and individual gifts. Persons interested in supporting the ministry of Journey Partners through gifts to Millsaps College can do so by contacting institutional advancement at 601-974-1023. Persons in the Millsaps community— students, staff, faculty, and alumni—who want to receive spiritual direction are welcome to contact Center for Ministry staff for an appointment.

—Patti Wade

Solidarity with Virginia Tech Millsaps College students, faculty, and staff gathered in April to show support for the Virginia Tech community following the shootings that killed 32 people on their campus last spring. Members of the Millsaps community dressed in orange and maroon,Virginia Tech’s official colors, and assembled in the Bowl, where a photo was taken to commemorate the event.The photo and a giant card signed by members of the Millsaps community were sent to Virginia Tech as a sign of the College’s support and solidarity.

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New majors created in biochemistry and public management Two new majors—biochemistry and public management—were added to the Millsaps College curriculum this academic year. The new programs bring the College’s offerings to 29 majors within the divisions of arts and letters, sciences, and the Else School of Management, plus the option for a selfdesigned major. Dr. Timothy Ward, a chemistry professor and associate dean of sciences, and Dr. Patrick Hopkins, a philosophy professor interested in biomedical ethics, introduced the biochemistry major to the faculty late last year. Both said that the major was added as a result of student interest. With the autumn 2003 hiring of Dr. Wolfgang Kramer, an assistant professor in the chemistry department, Ward said the co-requisite biochemistry lab coursework was added, thus enabling the College to offer the biochemistry major. “The biochemistry major was often requested by potential as well as current students,” Ward said. Hopkins said that many students who wanted to go on to medical school had inquired about a major in biochemistry. He agreed with Ward that the recently developed laboratory made this major a viable option. “Biochemistry is the basic background for biochemical engineering, which is increasingly more important in medical treatments and biotechnological enterprise,” Hopkins said. “Having such a major on campus ties us in more directly to what is going on in the world of new biotechnology, which generates some of the most important medical-ethics issues of our day.” “Students love the major because it

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incorporates many of the major principles of biology and chemistry into one,” Ward added. “The impact of biochemistry is especially relevant in the understanding and exploration of many diseases.” As of this fall, Millsaps had six students who had declared biochemistry as their major, and four or five more were planning to choose the field later in the year. The public management degree is designed to draw on the strengths of the College. Courses from the nationally ranked business school are combined with the public-policy expertise found in the political science department. Dr. Michael Reinhard, one of the major’s proponents, says the degree is for students who want to manage not-forprofit and governmental organizations. “Almost half of all Americans work for organizations that are in some sense public, meaning that they don’t retain profits for shareholders but operate in some way for the public good,” Reinhard said. “They have to measure their effectiveness in some way that is public and objective but can’t be reduced to dollars and cents.” Reinhard, assistant professor of political science, explained that even organizations that are essentially private, such as hospitals and educational institutions, are so heavily affected by the actions and decisions of government that they operate more like public bureaucracies than private businesses. “Managers of such organizations need a unique set of skills. This new program is able to impart those skills.” Dr. Richard A. Smith, senior vice president and dean of the College, said he believed that the addition of these two majors helped the College in its mission to develop a nationally competitive and regionally distinctive academic program. “The biochemistry major is particularly important for ensuring that our premedical education options compare favorably with what the best colleges in the South offer and help maintain our program as the best in the state and one of the best in the region,” he said. “The public management major draws

on the multidisciplinary strengths of the College to create a cutting-edge, distinctive program that cannot be found at any other liberal arts college in the region. The major also builds on our long-term commitment to educating students for lives of leadership and service, and will give a significant boost to those students who want to begin careers in the nonprofit and public sectors.”

—Lisa Purdie

Major Access site streamlines data for campus community The College is undergoing a multiyear enhancement of administrative software that will unite offices across campus into an integrated Datatel system. Datatel is a company that offers informationmanagement software services for higher education. The conversion involved upgrading existing Datatel software for financial services, general ledger and budget reports, human resources and payroll, academic records, accounts receivable, and residence life. Integrating the system also required converting from other systems to Datatel in admissions and financial aid. Datatel upgrades and financial-aid conversion were completed prior to the fall term of 2007, and admissions conversion was to be completed within this term. “We are very pleased that the College is moving to an integrated system,” said Lou Burney, vice president for finance. “A single system is naturally a more efficient use of our resources. For faculty, staff, and students, the convenient methods of accessing information will be a great enhancement.” One of the more anticipated features of the new system is Major Access, a website designed to streamline availability of existing information and to provide expedient new sources of information for faculty, staff, and students.


placement test results, and AP and CLEP tests. Their class schedules are also available in this section.In the section for communications, students can review documents pertinent to their status at Millsaps and use a link to email their advisers. They will be able to see if necessary documents are missing from their files. Additional services to assist faculty are scheduled to be phased Major Access is a website designed to streamline and integrate information. in by the close of 2007. “The next Major Access Scheduled to be phased in over a section scheduled to be implemented by period of 18 months, Major Access initially the end of this term will facilitate faculty gave students the capability to search for access by providing access to class rosters, classes and will eventually provide for lists of advisees, class schedules, and online registration. student profile information for students “In April 2007, current students in a faculty member’s classes,” said Gail gained access to search for class sections, Waldrop, special projects coordinator. view financial-aid information, email “Within the next calendar year we their advisers, and review their academic anticipate implementing online registration, profiles, all from one menu on Major e-advising, and online grading.” Access,” said Scott McNamee, network As phases of the system are implemented, other Datatel services, such as specialist. budgeting for faculty and staff, will become The “search for sections” function available. has increased the user-friendliness and flexibility of accessing class availability —P. W. and details. The student can search by course number, course level, day or time, professor, and subject. For instance, if a student wants to find all classes taught by a particular professor or all afternoon classes, the system can provide that information quickly. Available seats are noted in real time. In the financial aid section, students Five awarding organizations have can view and download any missing recognized Millsaps College material in information required to process their competitions during 2007. All projects financial aid. After financial aid award relate to helping audiences understand letters are sent, current students can view more about Millsaps College and its award status by year. programs or helping the College meet its In the academic profile section, strategic goals in recruitment and fundstudents can view and print their grades, raising. grade point average by term, unofficial The Millsaps College M.B.A. program transcripts, a summary of various tests, won a Silver Addy Award from the Jackson

Millsaps material wins recognition in awards competitions

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Advertising Federation as part of the 2007 American Advertising Awards. The winning entry was “Copier Jamz,” a television spot designed to communicate the superior quality of a Millsaps M.B.A. The spot was developed by The Ramey Agency, a Jackson advertising firm, in conjunction with members of the Else School of Management faculty and staff, and performing arts students and faculty, as well as the Office of Communications. Wes Williams, B.A. 1994, a Ramey Agency staff member, served as creative director for the project. The 2007 Digital Imaging Customer Exchange, or DICE, Grand Prize was awarded for the Driven recruitment campaign—recognizing its excellent use of digital media in combination with other personalized marketing technologies. This campaign, created in conjunction with The Ramey Agency and Weatherall Printing of Tupelo, made use of print, interactive applications, video, and music to drive home the Millsaps message to the marketing-resistant 16- to 17-year-old consumer. The College won an award for its magazine at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education District III Conference in Nashville. Millsaps Magazine, published by the Office of Communications, received a Special Merit Award in the category of alumni magazines among institutions with fewer than 5,000 in enrollment. Millsaps Magazine was among 1,100 entries submitted in 46 categories. CASE officials announced that 275 of the 1,100 entries received recognition in the awards ceremony. CASE District III is made up of educational institutions in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The Legacy capital campaign won a Silver Award in the Summit Creative Awards competition in the sales kit/folder category. This international competition included entries from 26 countries and was judged by professionals from top creative agencies. Shortly thereafter, the capital campaign material was again recognized with an

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Award of Distinction in The Communicator Awards 2007 Print Competition for the Identity Program category. The Award of Distinction is the second-highest award given in this international competition and recognizes entries that “exceed industry standards in production or communication skills.” The Legacy material was developed by the Office of Institutional Advancement and the Office of Communications. It was designed by Heidi Barnett of Flynn Design and written by Marlo Kirkpatrick. The Public Relations Association of Mississippi awarded Millsaps College in a number of areas in its annual PRism competition. The awards were presented at a luncheon held in conjunction with the annual PRAM Conference in April in Meridian. The competition typically receives 300 entries from across the state and awards in three categories: The PRism Award, given to “work deemed outstanding in its field and that surpasses all other entries in that category”; the Award of Excellence, given to “work worthy of recognition surpassed only by the PRism Award”; and the Certificate of Achievement, recognizing “notable work in the field of public relations.” Winning entries included the “Think Millsaps” T-shirt, Millsaps Magazine, the Legacy capital campaign, the 2006 Homecoming brochure, the public relations efforts related to the Saints’ training camp, the website, and the 2006 Family Weekend brochure. The website won an Award of Excellence, while the other entries won Certificates of Achievement.

for the workplace but also for life. “May the Lord save us from colleges whose curriculum contains only conventional wisdom—designed to prepare students to make a good living, but failing to inculcate in them a vision to make living itself a good enterprise,” he said. “Millsaps is a great college because it meets these standards.” Olivier spoke to more than 2,000 graduates, family, and friends at the 113th Millsaps Commencement ceremony on May 12. His son Jon-Mark was among those receiving a Millsaps bachelor’s degree. “In great colleges, students meet dynamic, inspiring, living teachers, and when they

something back to others. “As you enter the greater world, I hope you’ll take with you the ability to see where the community needs you most and have the compassion to fill that need,” she said. “We have all been given a hand at some point in time, and now you’ll have the opportunity to offer a hand to the next generation.” Olivier, a native of South Africa who was on the front lines of the fight against Apartheid, emphasized the concept in that country of “ubuntu,” which, he said, means “we exist only because of others; we are interconnected; we need each other; we can only become fully human individually

The Reverend Ross Olivier, a minister known for his work opposing Apartheid, speaking at the 2007 Commencement.

—P. W.

‘Ubuntu’: Minister issues a challenge to the class of 2007 In his address to the Millsaps graduating class of 2007, the Reverend Ross Olivier, senior pastor at Galloway Memorial United Methodist Church in Jackson, praised the College for preparing students not only

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do, a spark leaps back and forth between teacher and student, connecting them in a relationship that leads to creativity, growth, and transformation,” he said. “That’s why great colleges like Millsaps produce great thinkers, great leaders, and students who change society for the better.” Although the threat of rain loomed on the days leading up to Commencement, skies were clear for the 251 students who took their places in the campus Bowl. In her introductory remarks, Millsaps President Frances Lucas urged graduates to give

as we acknowledge each other in the community.” Olivier challenged the graduates to serve humanity by becoming a generation that moves the world forward. “Our world and future require young people to intervene,” he said. “To do this, please don’t let evil or fear paralyze you. Goodness and hope are the winning solution. God continues to have a dream for our world: that young people will continue to answer the call, to show the way, to be the difference, and to make the difference.


When we answer the call and refuse to let evil or fear incapacitate us, God smiles.” During the ceremony, Olivier received an honorary doctorate of public service. Other honorary degree recipients were Dr. Helen Barnes, who was presented with a doctor of science for her pioneering work in social justice, obstetrics, and gynecology in Mississippi; Joe Frank Sanderson Jr., B.A. 1969, who received a doctor of laws for his entrepreneurship and commitment to renewing the Gulf Coast; and Dr. John D. Bower, who received a doctor of public service for his revolutionary work in nephrology and renal care. The Millsaps Founders Medal, awarded to the graduating senior with the highest grade point average for the entire college course of study and with a grade of excellent on the comprehensive examinations, went to Aprile Gilmore, a chemistry major. She will attend the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. Chris Spear, an English major, was honored with the Frank and Rachel Anne Laney Award for his essay on the value of a Millsaps liberal arts education. The Don Fortenberry Award, which recognizes the graduating senior who has demonstrated the most notable, meritorious, diligent, and devoted service to the College with no expectation of recognition, reward, or public remembrance, was given to John Forrest Douglas, who majored in religious studies. The winner of the Distinguished Professor Award was Dr. Kim Burke, professor of accounting and the Kelly Gene Cook Chair of Business Administration. Howard McMillan, dean of the Millsaps College Else School of Management, said that Burke’s teaching evaluations were consistently among the highest at Millsaps and that she had maintained these evaluations while being committed to the strongest academic standards.

—Lisa Purdie, M. C.

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College-bound seniors sample the Millsaps experience What’s the best way to get high school students interested in your college? Any school can bring them to campus. But not everyone can send them to Mexico. Millsaps College’s brand-new International Business Advantage Program’s first crop of rising high school seniors spent the week of June 4–8 on campus. Living in dorms—with access to the library, dining hall, and athletic facilities—and going to specially designed classes twice a day, these six students got a real taste of college life. The students then left for Mérida, Mexico, where the College’s Else School of Management has a new facility, the Center for Business and Culture in Yucatán. Said Heather Anderson, a Millsaps admissions counselor: “What I think the program does is give the students a familiarity with the campus and with life at a residential college. This is a home away from home; yes, it’s an academic experience, but it’s also a whole life experience. When they’re here on campus, they have access to that home environment, with access to the library and the gym and the dining hall, and then the abroad experience shows the expanse of Millsaps—how the school goes far beyond Jackson, Mississippi.”

—M. C.

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OnCampus Kevin Sessums: Portrait of the artist as a young man

“We have, as it turns out, been sorely missing a book by a writer who is equally at home with Flannery O’Connor and Jacqueline Susann. . . . Kevin Sessums is some sort of cockeyed national treasure.”

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In the book Mississippi Sissy (St. Martin’s Press, 2007), Millsaps alumnus Kevin Sessums writes candidly, often brutally so, of coming to terms with not only the emotional turmoil within himself but also the cultural turmoil surrounding him in the 1960s and ’70s, when both Sessums and the state of Mississippi were straddling a painful past and a promising future. The narrative, which follows Sessums from his childhood in Forest to Jackson, where he enrolled at Millsaps College Photo by Tom Ackerman in 1973, hinges on his profound and deeply affecting friendship with Frank Hains, a drama critic for the old Jackson Daily News and a well-known figure on the Jackson cultural scene. It is the macabre murder of Hains that provides the story’s dramatic climax, as well as a cue for the author’s early departure from Millsaps for The Juilliard School in New York. But the soul of the memoir emerges through its vividly detailed portrait of a precocious small-town boy who played basketball with the best while emulating (and dressing up as) Hollywood actresses, much to his father’s despair. A charismatic coach who seemed to oscillate between a powerful, abiding love for his son and a

bitter rejection of the boy’s more feminine side, Sessums’s father died young, as did his mother, a fun-loving, literate, and deeply empathetic woman who embraced the cultural changes of the 1960s. The loss of both parents while he was still a child seems to have fueled Sessums’s longing for love and connection—and his fearlessly honest embrace of homosexuality at a relatively early age. The book peaked at No. 27 on The New York Times best-seller list, and among the many writers and critics cheering Mississippi Sissy was Michael Cunningham, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Hours and A Home at the End of the World. “Mississippi Sissy is a book I’ve been waiting for most of my life, though I didn’t fully understand that fact until I read the book,” Cunningham writes. “We have, as it turns out, been sorely missing a book by a writer who is equally at home with Flannery O’Connor and Jacqueline Susann; who understands that Eudora Welty and Johnny Weissmuller are not only members of the same species but are intricately related; whose wit and insight are up to the highs, lows, and in-betweens that compose life as we know it. Kevin Sessums is some sort of cockeyed national treasure.” Sessums, who now lives in Manhattan, told Millsaps Magazine via email that he had tried to take a book that would be labeled a gay-coming-of-age story and extend its implications to “otherness in all its forms: The power of maternal love. And the place of race in this country—I don’t think growing up gay and growing up African American are the same thing at all or that the prejudices that each experiences are the same. They are not equal. But there are parallels, and I tried lyrically to point out those parallels.” A writer known for his celebrity profiles in Vanity Fair, Sessums came to Millsaps College by way of Jackson’s New Stage Theatre. Ivan Rider, a New Stage artistic director in the 1970s, had “almost given up on finding a boy with the right exotic quality” for his production of The Medium, Sessums writes in the book, until


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Kevin Sessums in the Millsaps Players productions of Robert and Elizabeth and Vivat! Vivat Regina! with Jennifer Ogden, class of 1976. Sessums left Millsaps College to attend The Juilliard School.

the enigmatic unknown from Forest turned heads at a New Stage cast party. Rider cast Sessums, whose grandparents allowed the orphaned boy to take the role, thus making possible his transition to Jackson and, eventually, Millsaps College. “They recognized how much I needed to take my first tentative steps away from them, from Old Highway 35 where we lived, from a Mississippi country life that could not keep me captive much longer,” Sessums writes. And thanks to that New Stage production, Sessums gained entree to a literary and intellectual circle that included Eudora Welty and encouraged intellectual sparring, liberal politics, and an awareness of “one’s own sensuality,” as Sessums puts it in the book. Those, he writes, were the “halcyon days of literate discussions and witty banter.” It was the late Millsaps theatre director Lance Goss—for whom a Millsaps theatre

“I loved being in the productions of the Millsaps Players—those were some of the happiest days and nights of my life.” endowment has been named—who convinced Sessums to enroll in the College and major in drama. Sessums recalls his first role under Goss’s direction, a small one in Vivat! Vivat Regina! “Lance loved his English plays,” Sessums told Millsaps Magazine. “He was such an anglophile. I think my biggest hit there was as Robert Browning in the musical of Robert and Elizabeth. I was also Horatio in Hamlet and Rolf in The Sound of Music. But I really loved doing the one-acts that Lance let the students direct and produce. Those were when we got to be edgy.”

It was also Goss who motivated Sessums to aim high. “Lance was always encouraging of my acting talent and opened my eyes to other possibilities for me and was a big part of making me believe I could go on and study drama at The Juilliard School,” Sessums said. “I loved being in the productions of the Millsaps Players under Lance’s direction—those were some of the happiest days and nights of my life.” Another professor who made a significant impact on Sessums was Daniel Hise of the Department of English. “He made me believe that I was a real writer,” Sessums said. “I don’t think I ever missed a Dan Hise class—and, believe me, I missed a lot of other classes while I was at Millsaps.” Sessums was, in fact, perhaps better known for his social prowess than his academics, and he said his old friends from Millsaps had been supportive of a book that confronts its subject matter, including

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From left, Jan Dickson Hunter, Diane Wiltshire, Kevin Sessums, and MTV veejay Alan Hunter, all Millsaps alumni, at a “Way Up North in Mississippi” picnic in Central Park in the early ‘80s.

molestation at the hands of a clergyman, unapologetically and honestly. Diane Wiltshire, B.A. 1977, one of Sessums’s closest friends at Millsaps, arrived at the College at the same time as Sessums, a comrade in theatre. “The buzz around campus was that Kevin was really talented and very bright, although a bit shy in a charming kind of way,” said Wiltshire, who threw him a party at her home in Virginia after his book reading and signing this spring in Washington, D.C. “I think most of us knew that he and his siblings had been orphaned when they were quite young, so there was an element of tragedy and mystery that surrounded him.” Although he was known on campus for his talent as an actor and went on to study drama at Juilliard, Sessums eventually abandoned theatre for journalism because he wanted to be true to his nature. “I wanted to be ‘out,’ and at that point—I think it’s still the case to a great extent—one couldn’t be ‘out’ and be a

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successful actor,” he said. “I’ve always been competitive and wanted to be a star if I was going to be an actor. But I had to come to grips with this if I made the choice to be in the closet regarding my sexuality: I would have to live a lie in order to enable myself to pretend, which is finally the basis of acting. That was too much emotional subterfuge for me.” So, after keeping a job in the marketing department of Paramount for five years, Sessums became executive editor of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine for two years. Then Tina Brown hired him at Vanity Fair. His work has also appeared in Allure, Elle, Travel + Leisure, Playboy, POZ, Out, and Show People magazines. “I kind of made a name for myself as a celebrity journalist— if that’s not an oxymoron—since I don’t think of myself as a journalist,” Sessums said. “I’d have a real inferiority complex if I thought of myself as a journalist, in fact. I’m too lazy to be a real journalist. It’s just that everything I had done till that point

in my life combined to make sense for me to do that kind of job—I had majored in theatre at Millsaps and Juilliard, worked in the movie business at Paramount, and ever since Dan Hise’s classes I had been writing for my own enjoyment.” Sessums maintains that his instinct for “what forms a narrative arc” contributed to his aptitude for producing celebrity interviews. Furthermore, he said, he is “impertinent without being rude” and unintimidated by fame. “I think once I’d hung out with Eudora Welty as a teenager in Jackson who was accepted by New Stage Theatre, where she was kind of like the literary den mother, then hanging out with Madonna or Tom Cruise or Johnny Depp or Barbra Streisand or Angelina Jolie just doesn’t impress you. Welty was much more impressive than any movie star.” Besides, Sessums himself is no stranger to the footlights. Wiltshire said that when he was accepted into Juilliard at the end of his sophomore year, “We were all so


proud,” and when he was cast in a national touring company of Equus, in the role of the tormented adolescent Alan Strang, she and a group of the actor’s Millsaps friends drove to Atlanta to see him. But amid all the glamour and glitter Sessums has remained unaffected, Wiltshire said. “Kevin has always been like a brother/ best friend, and we have stayed in touch all these years, even when we were both living abroad. He is godfather to my oldest son, Kennedy, and has been a wonderful mentor. One of the things I love about Kevin is his extraordinary kindness and his deep loyalty to friends and family. He is also unpretentious and not impressed by fame or his access to the rich and famous.” Above all, Wiltshire said she was moved by Sessums’s ability to recreate the

experience of growing up in Mississippi, gay or otherwise. “I was amazed that he was able to write this book with such unflinching honesty,” she said. “And the dialogue is so rich and authentic that it transports me right back to my childhood in Mississippi; the audio version is especially brilliant.” For Sessums, writing Mississippi Sissy was liberating. “Being Southern is in one’s DNA,” he said. “One can never escape it no matter how far away one moves. I always say when you tell someone you’re from Mississippi it either starts or stops conversations. The ‘Southernness’ of my voice has always been a problem when writing my magazine profiles. It’s always flattened out. So writing this book was liberating in an incongruous way, since I

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indeed was writing about a time when I felt emotionally shackled.” Sessums hopes that the salvation he has found in the process of telling his own story will serve as a catharsis for others. “The writing of the book was as close to an extended act of prayer as I’ve ever experienced,” he said. “That’s the only way I can describe it. It was a healing experience. And I hope as others read about my specific story they can relate it to their own specific stories and find some healing for themselves, as well.”

—John Webb

The Chamber Singers take Manhattan The Millsaps Chamber Singers, under the direction of Dr. Timothy Coker, performed five concerts in New York City during the 2007 spring break. They are pictured at left in at the Interchurch Center at United Methodist headquarters on Riverside Drive (top). Lower photos are of Terrel Sugar and Grace Yueh, B.A. 1951; and Emily Stanfield, B.A. 2005, a former Chamber Singer, with Coker. The group of 22 singers, who are chosen by audition from the larger Millsaps Singers, also sang at Convent Street Baptist Church in Harlem; Trinity Episcopal Church and St. Paul’s Chapel, both located on Broadway near Wall Street and the former World Trade Center; and Park Avenue United Methodist Church. In addition to the concerts, Singers and New York alumni were entertained at the home of Janice Johnson, B.A. 1976, where they performed an impromptu concert and enjoyed meeting and visiting with Millsaps alumni. The schedule allowed time for Singers to shop, enjoy plays and operas, and experience firsthand the New York subway.

—Kay Barksdale

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Alumni pay tribute to a ‘dynamo of musical ambition’ Millsaps alumni and friends gathered from all over to honor C. Leland Byler, who died in 2003, and his wife of 52 years, Louise, at the Byler Singers Reunion. The tribute concert took place in April and comprised many of Byler’s favorite choral pieces, including Bach’s Toccata in E Major, Brahms’s “How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place,” and Karg-Elert’s “Now Thank We All Our God.” Byler joined the Millsaps community in 1959 as director of the Millsaps Singers, and he continues to be remembered today for his talent as a musician and the enduring love he had for his students. Lynne Pickett, B.A. 1965, one of Byler’s past students and a member of the steering committee for the reunion, was very much affected by Byler. “It was such an honor for me to direct the reunion choir,” she said. “Other than my parents, Mr. Byler influenced my life as a musician more than anyone else. He was certainly my mentor, and to be able to come back to Millsaps and make music with the people he nurtured musically over so many years was one of the most gratifying experiences I’ve ever had.” During Byler’s 20-year tenure at Millsaps, he directed 18 stage musicals, including The Sound of Music, Oklahoma!, and Camelot. He also directed many choral works by Fauré, Dubois, Bach, Handel, Charpentier, and countless others. In 1964, Byler organized the Troubadours, a group of Millsaps Singers who performed popular music around the world. His wife was also an integral part of the Millsaps community; she served as a

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part-time teacher at the College for 20 years. Alec Valentine, B.A. 1968, a member of the Singers during Byler’s years, believes that “together the Bylers were a dynamo of musical ambition, energy, unswerving devotion to high standards, and love for their students. They made us see how much higher there was to go, believe we could get there if we worked hard enough, and finally enjoy the fruits of worthy Stanley Cowell spoke at a Friday Forum about his musically formative years. achievement.” The Bylers’ lives were a “testimony of a church choir by the time he was 15, what two people can do with considerable Cowell described the circumstances talent, a desire to achieve, unrelenting surrounding his early musical exposure. standards, and a clear devotion to loving Having performed and recorded with and serving the people around them,” such greats as Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, Valentine said. Jimmy Heath, Art Pepper, and Roy Haynes, Beth Byler Kennedy, a Millsaps alumna Cowell has established his reputation as a and the daughter of the honored couple, versatile and sensitive pianist/composer. agreed that her parents communicated a After his performance, Cowell also strong standard of academic excellence. She conducted a master class for the Millsaps believed that students were able to rise to and Jackson communities. this notion of excellence, not only in music The Bell Piano Series continued in but in all areas. October with Alon Goldstein, whose artistic vision, innovative programming, —Jackie Rezk and sensitive and insightful interpretations have brought him to the forefront of his generation. Anton Nel, who in a threeyear period was a prizewinner at the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, the Joanna Hodges International Piano Competition, and the Naumburg The legendary jazz pianist Stanley Cowell International Piano Competition, will came to campus in September as the first present a performance on February 8. The performer in the 2007–08 season of final concert of the season, on February 29, the Millsaps Bell Piano Series. Before his will be the 2007 winner of the prestigious performance, he was also the featured speaker at that day’s Millsaps Friday Forum. Wideman Piano Competition, held annually in Shreveport, Louisiana. “What does this little middle-class The Bell Piano Series is named for light-skinned man know about the blues?” Estelle Bell—grandmother of a former he asked self-effacingly during his lecture. Millsaps Trustee, John Palmer—for Quite a bit, as it turns out. Cowell spoke fostering an early love of music in young about his formative experiences growing children. During his tenure on the College up in Toledo, Ohio. Cowell’s father, a Board of Trustees, Palmer established the hotelier, would bring home from work Jonathan M. Sweat Music Endowment, various performers who were passing which helped launch the Bell Piano Series. through town. From meeting jazz legend Art Tatum when he was 6 to directing —Margaret Cahoon

Bell Piano Series features a jazz icon


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FacultyChat It started with a simple fungus. . .

Sarah Lea McGuire, Ph.D. Professor Department of Biology

As I watched Ryan Day accept the Founders Medal on the graduation stage, I remembered with a chuckle the first day he walked into my office as a lanky, unassuming freshman. “Ryan,” I asked, “What are you planning to do with your life, and why are you planning to do it?” The exact answer he gave escapes my memory; he said something about helping other people, wanting to go to medical school, and being interested in the workings of living things. “How do you feel about fungi?” was my next question; when he didn’t flee my office in fright or laughter, I knew I had my next victim—er, research student. I’m always searching for converts to the world of fungal genetics. I saw in Ryan a desire to learn how and why living systems function, not just a desire to memorize what they do. He had the hallmarks of a good researcher: He always asked questions and was great at solving problems. Ryan had no idea that he could merge his interest in helping others as a physician with his insatiable curiosity. My task was to help him discover that he could do this by working toward an M.D./Ph.D. after he finished at Millsaps, and I used those wonderful fungi as a lure. Three years later, he’d completed an honors thesis, constructed numerous fungal strains, and presented his work at a national meeting in Washington, D.C. When I received a phone call from the M.D./Ph.D. program at Washington University School of Medicine asking if we had any more students to send to their program, Ryan’s was the first name that came to mind. One of my former research students, Suzanne Wahrle, was midway through her M.D./Ph.D. at Washington University in St. Louis, and the school was so impressed with her work that the admissions recruiters were hoping for more Millsaps students. Washington University has one of the

best M.D./Ph.D. programs in the nation; admission is extremely competitive. When I asked what made the university so interested in Millsaps students, the answer was simple: Our students know how to ask questions, perform properly controlled experiments, and analyze the results. They know how to think, they work hard, and because they’ve had an intense undergraduate research experience, they have a good idea of what they’re undertaking. Ryan is just beginning the M.D./ Ph.D. program at Washington Univeristy, and Suzanne is nearly finished. Both are examples of how involvement in undergraduate research can enlighten a student and shape his or her future career. My first undergraduate research students are now completing their degrees and entering the workforce—from those who obtained their M.D.’s and are pediatricians, orthopedists, and family doctors, to those who obtained their Ph.D.’s and are doing research and grant-proposal writing, to the student who obtained a Ph.D. and J.D. and is a patent lawyer for a biotech firm. All are using their problem-solving skills; all constantly amaze me. Regardless of the division or department of the College, undergraduate research is a vital part of the Millsaps culture; it opens doors and illuminates paths. There are numerous opportunities in the sciences for field research and lab research. Our faculty members direct research programs that are nationally recognized, and our colleagues at larger institutions are often astounded by what undergraduate students can accomplish. More astounding, however, is what undergraduate students can comprehend and how they use their creativity to solve problems. Every Millsaps College faculty member who directs a research program has stories like Ryan’s and Suzanne’s, or they’ve just begun and will soon have such stories. Mentoring undergraduate research is one of the most rewarding experiences we have as teachers. If I can just find my next victim, the fun with fungi can continue. I hope it never ends.

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FacultyStaff & Humanities Council honors Hopkins with 2007 teacher award Dr. Patrick Hopkins, associate professor of philosophy, was awarded the 2007 Humanities Teacher Award by the Mississippi Humanities Council in October. As the Humanities Teacher Award recipient, Hopkins gave a public lecture, entitled “Unnatural Ethics,” on campus in October. “Any time someone tells you that you are good enough at what you do to win an award, you have to feel good,” Hopkins said. “Of course, as a proper self-effacing Southerner, I also have to pooh-pooh it as

nothing to get all excited about.” Hopkins received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Mississippi and his Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis. His courses cover material as diverse as ethics, biotechnology, gender studies, history of philosophy, and epistemology. He is working on several scholarly projects, including a book called “Nature, Culture and Technology in Moral and Political Discourse.” “Dr. Hopkins is widely respected at Millsaps for his intellect and incisive questions,” said Dr. Richard A. Smith, senior vice president and dean of the College. “He is a great teacher with a special gift for framing questions about ethics and other complex issues in ways that engage and excite students.” The Humanities Teacher Awards, given to one humanities faculty member at each institution of higher learning in Mississippi, are distributed in October to commemorate Arts and Humanities Month. The title carries a cash prize of $500, which is matched by the nominating institution, which provides promotional costs and a reception following the public presentation.

—Margaret Cahoon

New faculty: Oriented toward teaching

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New faculty orientation took place in August and included: (front, from left) Alexis Manheim, coordinator of library acquisitions and cataloguing; Jeannie-Marie Brown, assistant professor of theatre; Melissa Lea, assistant professor of psychology; Brent Fogt, assistant professor of art; Cory Conover, visiting instructor of history; Zachary Musselman, assistant professor of geology; (back) Richard A. Smith, senior vice president and dean of the College; Daniel Turkeltaub, assistant professor of classics; Nicholas Brown, visiting instructor of history; Markus Tellkamp, assistant professor of biology; and James Pfrehm, visiting assistant professor of German. Not pictured is Ledora Harris, assistant professor of education.


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Bey and Galaty win National Science Foundation awards Dr. George Bey and Dr. Michael Galaty, professors in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, have won prestigious awards from the National Science Foundation, an agency of the federal government. Bey received a senior archaeology research grant with his colleague William Ringle (Davidson College) for research to be conducted at the site of Kiuic in Yucatán, Mexico. Kiuic is a large, well-preserved Maya city that sits at the center of Millsaps College’s Helen Moyers Biocultural Reserve. Kiuic, which spans all phases of Maya civilization, is ideal for studying the early periods of Maya state formation (circa 800 B.C.). The grant included money from the Research

Experience for Undergraduates to support student participation. Galaty received a senior archaeology research grant from the National Science Foundation for research conducted in northern highland Albania during the summer of 2007. Galaty and a team of international collaborators have been studying the history of settlement in the Shala Valley, home to the Shala tribe. In 2005 they discovered a previously unknown BronzeIron Age fortified site called Grunas (circa 1000 B.C.). Galaty is excavating the site with the help of Millsaps students. The discovery of Grunas was featured in USA Today in September. In addition, Galaty received an International Collaborative Research Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, also an agency of the federal government. This grant will allow American and Albanian historians working with Galaty to do research in archives

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in Washington, D.C., London, Vienna, Istanbul, Venice, the Vatican, and Shkodër and Tirana, Albania, where they hope to gain access to documents related to the Shala Valley dating to the Medieval, Early Modern, and Modern periods. “NSF and NEH grants are extremely difficult to get,” said Dr. Richard A. Smith, senior vice president and dean of the College. “The fact that professors Bey and Galaty received grants in the same year is an extraordinary accomplishment; indeed, I suspect there is no other undergraduate sociology/anthropology department in the nation in which two members of the same department in the same year received NSF funding. “But what’s even more significant is that such funding creates wonderful opportunities for our undergraduates to be involved in cutting-edge research. These grants therefore help enhance the education we offer our students at Millsaps and ensure that Millsaps remains one of the premier colleges in the region.”

—Lisa Purdie

Presidents briefed on the Millsaps Yucatán initiative Tomás Gallareta Negrón, center, the Millsaps scholar of Maya studies, was the official guide for President Felipe Calderón of Mexico, left, and President George W. Bush at Uxmal, the preColumbian ruins of the Maya city in the Mexican state of Yucatán. Negrón told Dr. George Bey III, professor of anthropology, that he had discussed with Bush and Calderón the unique Mexican/American partnership that Millsaps College and Kaxil Kiuic had created, as well as the College’s interest and investment in Yucatán.

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FacultyStaff & Arts and Letters

George Herbert’s ‘Holy Patterns’: Reforming Individuals in Community, a study of the

Carolyn Brown (English) ran in the Nike

17th-century Anglican poet and priest, was published by Continuum Publishing.

Women’s Marathon in San Francisco on Oct. 21 as part of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training program in Jackson. She has raised more than $5,000 for the society. Brent Fogt (art) is among 40 artists

featured in the 2007 Midwestern edition of New American Paintings, “a juried exhibition in print.” The juror, Elizabeth Dunbar, curator of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City,

Darby Ray (religious studies) published an essay in the edited volume Empire and

the Christian Tradition: New Readings of Classical Theologians (Fortress Press, 2007). The book presents 30 major Christian thinkers in relation to the “empires” of their day and considers the implications of their thought for 21st-century life. Ray wrote the chapter on Anselm of Canterbury (10331109). Ray is also joining six other faculty colleagues from around the country on a Teagle Foundation grant project entitled “The Religion Major and Liberal Education.” For that project, Ray wrote a brief article for Religious

Studies News

and was to cohost a daylong workshop and The Camac Centre d’Art in the Champagne region of France, where Greg Miller spent four months. an academic Missouri, selected Fogt from more paper session at the annual meeting of the than 1,300 entrants. Information about American Academy of Religion in San Diego the publication can be found at www. in November. newamericanpaintings.com. Elise Smith (art) had an article entitled Robert Kahn (modern languages) had a “‘Whom the gods love die young’: record number of students enrolled in the Evelyn De Morgan and the Legend of the Costa Rica program this summer. TwentyWandering Jew” published in the British Art six students attended the first session of Journal 7.3 (Winter 2006/2007): 29-39. summer school and 10 the second session, Another article, “‘The aged pollard’s shade’: which was added this year in response to Gainsborough’s Landscape with Woodcutter the program’s earlier popularity. and Milkmaid,” is scheduled for publication in Eighteenth Century Studies 41.1 (Fall Greg Miller (English) spent four months 2007), and an entry on “Marie Hull” will in residence at the Camac Centre d’Art, appear in the Mississippi Encyclopedia, ed. an international artists’ colony in the Charles Reagan Wilson and Ted Ownby Champagne region of France. His book (forthcoming from the University Press of

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Mississippi, 2008). Smith’s article “‘In the home-garden’: The Arbor, Wall, and Gate in Moral Tales for Children” has been accepted by Children’s Literature. Steve Smith (philosophy) published an

article on “Zoroastrianism: The Appeal of the Good Mind” in Calliope (November 2006), a young people’s world history magazine. Smith also presented “Historical Meaningfulness in Shared Action” to the Mississippi Philosophical Association in Hattiesburg on April 14.

Else School Bill Brister (finance) and his wife, Liz, took two Millsaps students and 12 Murrah High School boys to New York City over spring break. This trip was part of the Bibles and Basketball program at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church. More than $10,000 was raised to send these youths to New York. They visited the United Nations, the Ford Foundation, the New York Historical Society, the Museum of Modern Art, and Bill Clinton’s offices in Harlem. They also attended a Knicks game. Kim Burke (accounting) co-wrote a paper, “Walking the Tightrope: The Impact of Teaching and Service on Scholarly Productivity for Accountants,” with her colleagues Blakely Fender (economics) and Susan Taylor (economics). It was published in The Journal of Learning in Higher Education. It had previously been presented at the Academic Business World Conference in May 2007, where it received a Best Paper Award and Burke received a Best Presentation award.

In October Walter Neely (finance) presented a paper entitled “Equity Valuation Using Value Line, the Internet, and Dividend Discount Models” at the Financial Education Association annual meeting in Southampton, Bermuda.


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Science Michael Galaty (sociology-anthropology) received a travel grant from the American Council of Learned Societies to attend the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists, Sept. 18–23 in Zadar, Croatia. While there, he presented papers on cultural resource management in Albania and the prehistoric settlement of the Albanian Adriatic coast. Ledora Harris (education) continued her direction of the Millsaps College Principals’ Institute this summer and reports that this year’s 15th annual event was composed of 63 school administrators and five facilitators from across the state of Mississippi, representing 30 public school districts and six private and/or parochial schools. This same group was to participate in a follow-up session in November. Next summer’s institute will be held June 8-13. Jim Purser (chemistry) presented at the

southeast regional meeting of the American Chemical Society in October at Greenville, S.C. His presentation was a follow-up to previous presentations at regional and national chemical society meetings. The presentation centers on the inclusion of “Ethics” as a topic in the senior chemistry seminar based upon the society’s Chemist Code of Conduct. Connie Schimmel (education) presented

results from the Delta Council/Adult Literacy project with Mayor Shirley Allen of Metcalfe, Mississippi, at the 16th Annual National Conference on Family Literacy in March in Orlando, Fla. To date, 28 programs have been completed, serving 132 adult participants from 11 Delta counties. Schimmel also presented at the Illinois Teachers of Hard of Hearing/Deaf Individuals 43rd Annual Conference in Bloomingdale, Ill., in March. The initial results from an ongoing reading program for deaf students in the suburban Chicago public school system were presented.

Donald Schwartz (computer science) presented a paper entitled “Service Learning and Software Engineering: Defining and Managing ‘Real World’ Group Projects,” at the 16th International Conference on Software Engineering and Data Engineering (SEDE-07) in Las Vegas this summer. He also served as the session chair for the Software Engineering and Learning session.

Staff John Conway (campus life) received his

master’s degree in community counseling from Jackson State University in December 2006. As part of his coursework, he completed a four-month internship at St. Dominic Hospital Behavioral Health Unit in Jackson. In April 2007, Conway was sworn in as a deputy of the Hinds County Sheriff’s Office Reserve Unit.

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featured guest was Neal Lerner of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, coeditor of The Writing Center Journal and co-author of The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring, author of more than 20 peerreviewed articles and book chapters on the history, theory, and assessment of teaching writing, and three-time recipient of the International Writing Centers Association Outstanding Scholarship award. He led two workshops that included eight current Millsaps peer writing tutors—Elaine Blaine, Cartier Gwin, Katie Hamm, Ross Leblanc, Amy Marcellus, Michael Mohr, James Rice, and Caroline Stroud, as well as two Millsaps

Bill Brister and his wife, Liz, with Millsaps and Murrah students on a church-sponsored trip to New York.

Nola Gibson, Wanda Manor, and Diane Fleming (continuing education) conducted

the Advanced Placement Institute for high school AP teachers July 13–18 on campus. Three hundred and thirty-three teachers, mostly from Mississippi schools, attended the institute, setting an all-time record. Fourteen College Board-certified instructors from the Southern states conducted the workshops. In September, Kathi Griffin (Writing Center) held the seventh annual Mississippi Writing Centers Association conference, “Writing the Center,” attended by administrators, faculty, and tutors from 11 institutions of higher education. The

graduates, Ramsey Wise, B.A. 2006, and Jon-Mark Olivier, B.A. 2007. Griffin also coled two workshops, on tutoring strategies and tutor training. Isabelle Patterson, B.A. 1978 (financial

aid), along with Ann Hendrick, B.A. 1975, presented “Counseling Students and Families: Tackling Financial Issues” at the Mississippi Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators’ fall training event. Isabelle also serves on the association’s training committee.

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f you’re planning to study or teach at Millsaps, you might want to make sure you have a valid passport and sturdy luggage, for the College has been exporting students and faculty in greater numbers and to more destinations than ever before. Among the many opportunities that Millsaps faculty members have developed for international study in 2008 are courses or research projects in Albania, Belgium, Costa Rica, England, France, Ghana, Greece, Israel, and Mexico. During other years, courses are also offered in China, Italy, and Tanzania. These courses are designed to complement the College’s existing curriculum and in some cases can be taken for Core credit. In the last two years, the College has focused increasing attention on its commitment to providing exciting study-abroad and international opportunities to students and faculty. As part of this commitment, the school has established an Office of International Education, directed by Dr. George Bey III, who serves as the College’s first associate dean of international education. “The goal of this office is to help support and sustain a wide variety of Millsaps-taught study-abroad programs, as well as to assist students in finding affordable ways to study abroad for a semester or year at a foreign institution,” Bey said. “In my role as associate dean, I am also responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the College’s multidisciplinary Yucatán Initiative, which has continued to grow since its inception in 2000.” Bey was selected for the position because of his outstanding credentials in international scholarship and research, said Dr. Richard A. Smith, senior vice president and dean of the College. “As an anthropologist and one of the leading experts on Mayan ceramics, Dr. Bey is well trained in the study of cultures and teaches courses that help students understand and analyze the cultures of many societies, both past and present,” Smith said. “Dr. Bey is also the driving force

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behind the College’s Yucatán initiative. It was his vision and his infectious enthusiasm for the project that has helped the College develop a site for undergraduate teaching and scholarship that has no parallel in higher education. “I am confident that Dr. Bey will bring the same skills and energy to developing international education opportunities for Millsaps students. I fully expect that Dr. Bey, with the necessary resources, will move Millsaps College to the forefront of liberal arts colleges in international education.” But travel carries a high price tag, and many students who are most interested in studying abroad simply cannot afford it: thus the establishment of the Robinson International Fellows Program, funded by a $500,000 pledge over five years by Bud and Judy Robinson of Jackson. The program provides Millsaps students who otherwise would not be able to afford to participate in international study the opportunity to do so. Robinson fellows can receive up to $3,000 to use on an international course taught by a Millsaps faculty member. Although there are a number of criteria, the two primary considerations for receiving a Robinson fellowship are that students have a grade point average of at least 3.0 and show strong evidence of financial need. In addition, the Reverend Don Fortenberry will continue to oversee the McNair Fund for Christian Missions, a charge he accepted while serving as campus chaplain. David McNair, a Jackson businessman, has pledged $1million to be used to underwrite campus programs geared toward evangelical missions and stipends for Millsaps students and faculty who wish to participate in Christian missionary work. The following journal entries written by students and staff provide a taste of the Millsaps experience abroad.

—John Webb


from tanzania to albania

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hen Chelsi West, a senior, came to Millsaps three years ago, she envisioned her future as a premed student majoring in biology. Now a senior, West is an anthropology major who spent her summer abroad with Millsaps professors. She traveled to Tanzania with Dr. Julian Murchison, assistant professor of anthropology, to study and understand what life is like there. Then she flew to Albania directly from Tanzania to work with Dr. Michael Galaty, associate professor of anthropology, and his team on the Shala Valley Project in the northern part of the country. All the while, West compiled research on her honors thesis about hip-hop music in these two countries. Her research and writing incorporate ideas of globalization, cultural transfer, performance theories, and identity formation. “To be honest, I cannot even believe that I did what I did this past summer,” West said. “I’m glad that my life took a different turn. I like to think of it not as me finding anthropology, but rather as anthropology finding me.” Here are some excerpts from the journal she kept on her extraordinary journey:

ania!

Greetings from Tanz

backpack) That’s me (with the saps friends chilling with my Mill group at and a Ngoma dancing lled when Paramiho. I was thri in in! they invited me to jo Chelsi

Millsaps College 1701 N. State St. Jackson, MS 39210 U.S.A.

June 1 Songea,Tanzania Today we went to London Secondary School, a community-based institution. We saw all types of classrooms, from the science rooms to the language-arts rooms. I noticed that written above many of the classroom doors was the phrase “No English, No Service.” The headmistress informed us that while Swahili is Tanzania’s national language, the school teaches English in the classroom because English is the language of the world. She emphasized that to interact internationally the students would need to know English. “Jina langu Chelsi. Mimi ni Mmarekani Mweusi. Ninasoma Millsaps College. Mambo?” In English that means,“My name is Chelsi. I am an African American. I study at Millsaps College. What’s up?” The kids loved it when we all asked them “what’s up,” because it showed that we were interested in connecting with them through the more youthful language.

The headmistress found out about my thesis research on hip-hop music and told the students that we would like to hear some hip-hop music performances (in Tanzania they call hip-hop music Bongo Flava). So a few of the students came before the crowd and performed songs for us in Swahili. I was really impressed by their performances; though I do not know much Swahili, I was informed by the headmistress and Dr. Murchison that the songs had various messages, such as ones about HIV/AIDS and what it’s like to live as a teenager in Tanzania. June 3 Paramiho,Tanzania In Swahili the verb to dance is “kucheza.” Today we went to Paramiho to see some dancing known as Ngoma, which in English means drum. On the drive, I kept trying to picture what it was going to be like. But when we pulled up to a house and got out of the car, I definitely did not expect to see as many people as I did. Residents from the community had gathered for the performance, some as dancers, some ff aa ll ll –– w w ii nn tt ee rr 22 00 00 77

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Greetings from Albania! Here I am with a traditional es of musician. Even the smallest not in society culture or how people interact fieldwork have been beneficial during my studies.

Chelsi

Millsaps College 1701 N. State St. Jackson, MS 39210 U.S.A.

as musicians, others just there to watch.They were wearing various outfits, many with bright colors. One guy even had a stuffed monkey bag on his back. A lot of the men were wearing mango nuts around their lower legs, which I later learned served as musical instruments. A lot of music, especially music involving the drum, was supposed to remind us of our homeland. As we were watching, it was difficult to ignore my feelings of wanting to join in, my desire to see what the dancing was like. So I was thrilled when one of the gentlemen noticed me admiring the dancing and invited me down to join. A lady from one of the groups tied a kitenge (a fabric worn by women in Tanzania) around my waist and pulled me into the circle. Once I started moving, the dancing felt so familiar. We were no longer just observing Tanzanian culture; we were participating in it. June 18 Theth, Albania It’s my first week in Albania, and I must say that life here is somewhat different than in Tanzania.This week is going to be used to explore and develop ideas for an Albanian interdisciplinary summer program. Our crew consists of Millsaps professors Michael Galaty, James Bowley, and Harvey Fiser.The Trustees and their wives are William and Susan Jeanes, Bud and Judy Robinson, and Bob and Dee Leggett. Also, Ols Lafe and Zamir Tafilica (the two Albanians who co-direct the ShalaValley Project with Dr. Galaty) are with us. Basically we’ve shown the cities of Tirana and Shkdora to everyone, visiting museums, mosques, cathedrals, historic landmarks; and now it is time for them to experience Theth, the village where we stay in the ShalaValley.Theth is where I first fell in love with Albania.

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July 23 Tirana, Albania They call me the chocolate girl. Both the people in the high mountains and here in the city refer to me as the girl who looks like chocolate. My Albanian roommate says that they do so because many Albanians do not quite understand the concept of darker skin, and to say that I am black makes no sense to them. So for the Albanians that I’ve come into contact with, chocolate seems to be their choice of word. I’ve decided that when I write a book about my Albanian experiences, it will be called “The Adventures of the Chocolate Girl in theValley.” Never try to show off your Albanian. I have had to learn this lesson the hard way. I know that people like it when I try to communicate in Albanian, but the truth is that I really am a beginner and do not know enough to carry on a conversation. I get really excited when I can say maybe one or two sentences, but if I try to speak with an Albanian right off the bat, he or she will then want to continue the conversation in Albanian.That’s when I have to stop the person and explain that I don’t really speak much Albanian and that I was just trying out the little that I know. I’m still going to practice communicating in the language to learn it, but from now on I think I will explain first that I’m an American and that I don’t know much Albanian. Actually, I can now say that in Albanian! I’m glad that I am picking up little pieces of Albanian culture. As an anthropology student I’ve been taught by all of my professors to pay attention to detail. Even the smallest notes of culture or how people interact in society have been beneficial during my fieldwork studies.


the european business program

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he European Business Program was established at Millsaps in 1987 by President George Harmon as a means of internationalizing the business curriculum and providing a study-abroad experience for faculty and students. Over a long summer session, students have the chance to travel and study with Millsaps professors in London, Maastricht, and Munich, each with its distinctive culture and business practices. Because London is the center of finance for much of the world, the College focuses on the financial industry there. “We introduce our students to executives representing businesses such as Lloyd’s of London, Saatchi and Saatchi, the Bank of England, KPMG, Citigroup, and the senior commercial specialist at the American Embassy in London,” said Dr. Jesse Beeler, professor of accounting at the Else School of Management. “These meetings provide an opportunity for our students to interact with top executives in the field and to understand how these businesses operate and what it takes to be a part of the world of finance.” The Dutch city of Maastricht is the site of the Maastricht Treaty, which formed the basis for the European Union. Near Brussels, the EU’s center of government, it provides a base for visiting important business and governmental centers. In Munich, classes are held in the morning at the University of Munich, and in the afternoon students visit such businesses as BMW, Siemens, and Audi. “In living and studying abroad for an extended period of time—even if it is only a summer—students learn to understand the nature of culture and identify the dimensions of culture,” Beeler said. “They learn to identify differences and similarities between cultures, and explore the questions of why differences exist. This understanding is essential for anyone who will be responsible for managing a multicultural workforce.” Dr. Frances Lucas, president of the College, and Maribeth Wann, special projects coordinator, joined the business students and faculty on their European tour, and Wann kept a journal of their travels:

Greetings from

Munich!

With iane Baker That’s Dr. D udents, who her Grad st uch w have a m say they No e ore Inclusiv m d n a r e d a Bro world. view of the Maribeth

llege Millsaps Co St. 1701 N. State 39210 Jackson, MS U.S.A.

July 30 Munich We had dinner in the first of many biergartens, the Augustiner.The setting was really beautiful.There were lots of trees and outdoor lights and a cool breeze. While the beer seems to be the main attraction, I got the sense that the company was really the point. It is a great social gathering place.We met Dr. Beeler and Dr. Baker there for dinner.The food in biergartens tends to be quite heavy with lots of meat, like wienerschnitzel and potatoes. . . . Almost as heavy as what we in the South know as chicken fried steak.

August 1 Today, after the morning classes at the University of Munich, we walked to the Siemens International Headquarters.There, we met Peter Olfs, who spoke to the group on Siemens and their international business ventures.That afternoon we took a walking tour and saw some beautiful architecture around the Marienplatz. which is one of the largest and oldest squares in Munich. Around the corner, we ventured into a church that had been nearly destroyed by bombs in World War II. There were pictures of it from before the war that depicted a gorgeous sanctuary leafed in gold with many stained glass windows and beautiful icons.While the church is still standing, it has been preserved in its postwar state with bare brick walls. It was ff aa ll ll –– ww ii nn tt ee rr 22 00 00 77

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an eerie reminder of what the world went through during that terrible period. August 2 We toured the BMW plant this morning. It was absolutely fascinating.The factory is very mechanized, and robots do a lot of the car building.We were shown the entire process of building a custom car from the original steel parts to the painted, upholstered, and finished product. One of the things that struck me there, and all over Munich, was how incredibly clean everything was.We were standing in an automotive plant, and you could have eaten off the floor! Our guide told us that BMW makes cars in 26 colors, but they ship only six colors to America because we tend to drive them off the lot rather than wait for the custom version.That was a good example of a notable cultural difference.The pace of life is much slower here. No one seems to be in a hurry (except in traffic), and waiters don’t run you off at lunch. We Americans do seem to be more hurried and harried and used to instant gratification. Another major difference was the absence of crime.They just don’t have much. People leave their bicycles unchained all over the city, and no one takes them.

August 3 This was a day for travel. Dr. Lucas, Patrick Emmanuel, and I left for the tiny country of Liechtenstein.The entire principality is 15 miles long and three miles wide. It is situated between Switzerland and Austria. On the way to our hotel in Malbun, which sits on the top of a mountain, we stopped at the castle of CountWalburg Zeil, Franz Clemens. He gave us coffee and a gracious tour of a corner of his castle. As you can imagine, the upkeep of a castle is no small thing, and most families have to create ways to use the castles themselves as income-producing property. Here, part of the castle is now a restaurant, and they rent the facility for large parties and events. There is a rare type of wild garlic that grows on the mountain behind the castle that is used to make chocolate, among other things. August 8 Coming to Germany has been an incredible experience. It’s true that you don’t fully understand what it means to be an American until you have experienced a different culture.The students that I spoke with agree that they are forever changed by this experience. They have a much broader and more inclusive view of the world, and feel more independent and confident than ever before. I hope that every student gets to have such an opportunity.

ermany!

Greetings from G

rom Frances, F . . . !” g a T “Guten rad r Business G Diane, and ou u Truly don’t students. yo hat it means understand w an until you ic r e m a n a e to b ent nced a differ have expErie culture. MAribeth

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lege Millsaps Col St. 1701 N. State 39210 Jackson, MS U.S.A.


Roman legacy field Study

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N MAY, STUDENTS ON THE ROMAN LEGACY Field Study and Italy for Artists trips had the opportunity to travel with and learn from Dr. Holly Sypniewski, assistant professor of classics, and Michelle Acuff, visiting assistant professor of art. At one course credit each, the concurrent trips offered experiential learning without the pressure of classroom meetings. The two classes traveled together and visited many of the same sites, diverging as necessary to focus on different subjects. All students taking the course for credit made reports on the trip. In the art class, each student was required to make a presentation about a particular artist; in the Roman Legacy class, each student presented information about archaeological sites or particular monuments on the trip. Acuff and Sypniewski planned and executed the trip together, and they even allowed students to switch classes for a day to see how the other group was approaching the material. “Our goal was to immerse the students in Roman civilization or the history of Italian art—both classical and Renaissance—and spark their interest for further study,” Sypniewski said. Michelle Palmer, a senior, kept a diary:

ome!

Greetings from R

d e Spanish Steps an Today we saw th n, where the Trevi Fountai row a coin I made sure to th over my shoulder! Michelle

Millsaps College 1701 N. State St. 210 Jackson, MS 39 U.S.A.

May 15 Pompeii

May 19 Rome

Today started with an early train ride to Pompeii, the ancient town destroyed and preserved by the eruption of MountVesuvius in 79 A.D. Pompeii has incredible examples of early Roman houses with their open floor plans, well-preserved wall paintings, and—in some of the wealthier homes—large fountains and garden space. Pompeii isn’t entirely excavated, and I found it so intriguing that archaeologists are still learning about this site.

We took the train from Sorrento to Rome yesterday, and today was devoted to classic Roman sites like the Forum and the Coliseum. We walked from the Forum to Trajan’s column and then entered the Capitoline Museum, which houses the famous parts of Constantine’s statue and Romulus and Remus with the she-wolf. We also saw the Spanish Steps and the Trevi Fountain, and I made sure to throw a coin over my shoulder.

May 17 Sorrento

May 23 Rome

After spending another great night in local Sorrento restaurants, we took a train today to Naples to view the Villa Oplontis, one of Nero’s wives’ palaces.This villa is almost entirely intact and is an excellent example of how the rich lived in ancient Italy. After grabbing some pizza on the street (Naples is the home of pizza!), we had enough energy to enter the National Museum in Naples, where many of the sculptures from the Villa Oplontis are housed.

Today was special because we visited the Ara Pacis, Augustus’s monument to peace, in its own museum space. It was a very contemporary building, located next to all of Augustus’s famous monuments and ruins. A small group of us took a church pilgrimage to Santa Maria Maggiore, one of the earliest basilicas, and to San Pietro en Vicoli, or the Church of Saint Peter in Chains, which contains Michelangelo’s Moses, Rachel, and Leah sculptures.Tomorrow is our last full day in Rome before the long flight back to Jackson. ff aa ll ll –– w w ii nn tt ee rr 22 00 00 77

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Mcnair fund for christian Missions

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N 2003, DAVID MCNAIR, A LOCAL BUSINESSMAN, made a large gift to Millsaps to fund Christian mission experiences for members of the College community—students, faculty, staff, and in some cases recent alumni. With the intention of supporting those who wish to participate in Christian mission work either in the United States or abroad, the McNair Fund for Christian Missions provides stipends toward the total cost of mission experiences, including transportation, living expenses, and placement fees. The following is from a travelogue by Katie Lewallen, a junior who spent her summer in Malawi, thanks to the McNair Fund:

July 13 Malawi I asked if we could drive Mr. Blessing home. Mr. Blessing, who takes care of the house we are staying in, has a two-hour walk to and from work. Mr. Blessing’s home was between two others. (Rectangular cement buildings were divided into three smaller squares and then given grass roofs.) He welcomed us into his home and then sat us on straw mats; he and the four of us barely fit into this room that made up his house. His wife went to fetch his five children after welcoming and hugging us.There were no lights, no electricity, no running water . . . only a small, empty room with a dirt floor. Raw cement walls and small unintentional holes exposed a view of the horizon. Chickens and goats ran around outside, the day’s washing was hung between two of the houses, and families gathered outside.

second-oldest daughter; and the three sons, Precious, Blessing (after his father), and Bryan. His wife hugged my neck again, telling me she had heard that I was here and was thankful I had come. Children gathered in the doorway staring at us, the strange visitors, as we chatted. As we talked I played with Bryan, who appeared to be about 4, exchanging high fives and fist pounding as the kids outdoors mocked our game. Mr. Blessing thanked us for our humility as I just sat dumbfounded. “You walked through dirt and then lowered yourselves to sit on a floor in my home.” I tried to turn the thanks back to him, where it belonged.“No, thank you for sharing this with me.” These were the only words I could produce without tears.

When the children came in, they were introduced one by one, allowing enough time to show bits of their personality through a curtsy or shy handshake.There was Desire, the oldest daughter; Diamont, the

An Appetite for Learning

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his summer, Dr. Kurt Thaw, associate professor of psychology, took 12 students to Europe, where they spent 10 days in the Netherlands and another 10 days in Munich. They visited labs at the University of Maastricht specializing in obesity research and also took side trips to Amsterdam and Rome. In Germany, they visited the Dachau concentration camp to get insights into severely restricted diets. In many locations, the class dined with local citizens and kept careful records of obesity rates, food preferences, portion sizes, meal preparation and presentation, and marketing and shopping differences. They interviewed local citizens on their attitudes toward food and its importance to their daily lives. Finally, they tracked the influence of American cuisine on Germany, with a focus on fast foods. According to Thaw, food is intimately related to politics, economics, religion, health, and even mental disorders. “Even more subtle is the influence food has over people and the way marketers manipulate this influence to sell their products,” he said. “A seemingly very biological event thus takes on a very psychological profile.” Mimi Grissom, a senior, kept a record of her thoughts:

July 20 London I fervently believe that people should travel outside of their native country. Even more, I believe that every college student should be required to study abroad, whether it is two weeks-plus in summer school or even a semester abroad.There is just something about leav32 32

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ing one’s comfort zone to experience another culture. It changes you, oftentimes for the better, but not always.You might be grateful for the experience but learn that you do not want to travel abroad again. You have to be ready for the experience, both intellectually and emotionally, which I was not in high school.That said, the psychology class in Europe was one of the best experiences I have ever had. Having been to Yucatán this summer, studying the Mayans, and


ngland!

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having spent many vacations in Mexico, I found Europe to be a refreshing change. Just as great, but a totally different atmosphere.

July 30 Amsterdam

July 23 London

This is quite possibly the craziest city in the world, but it is still safe and lots of fun. I tried a Dutch petit-four pastry, which had a strange name but was very good.The museums and sights in Amsterdam were my favorite of the entire trip. My suggestion is to make this leg of the trip the very last; that way, everyone ends the trip in an awesome place with tons to do.

Two classes were being offered, Psychology of Violence and Psychology of Food. I opted to take the latter because of the sociology-anthropology credit I had already earned in Yucatán. London was a cool city with a NewYork kind of feel. All of the women were dressed in heels, booking it across cobblestone streets or riding bikes in dresses.The shopping was monumental, but the British pound eats your soul. Everything is so expensive.The English breakfast consisted of eggs, toast, some sort of meat, baked beans, and coffee or tea.The teas and coffees all over Europe are very small and potent. July 28 Maastricht The Dutch do not really have a specific Dutch cuisine, but they borrow foods from other cultures and make it their own.The European meal takes place over a long period of time. People eat their food very slowly and have long conversations during meals.The drinks and some of the portion sizes are very small. I have decided that Europeans do not drink that much liquid and must be part camel. Although they do drink an enormous amount of alcohol, they are still skinny. I must figure out the secret.

August 1 Munich The setup of the beer gardens in general is fascinating. It is like an outdoor picnic with a buffet of food and beer, similar to cafeteria style, but outside.These are great places to watch people and look at what different people eat. In Munich we found out that children are taught to eat their meals more slowly and that school lunches are much longer than those in the United States. August 3 Rome Rome was the last place I visited on my journey. I have mixed feelings about it. On one hand, everyone spoke English and the Italian food was to die for, but the city was dirty and hot.The Coliseum was amazing, but I found it ridiculous that you were charged just to go inside. And even the men dressed up as gladiators charged 10 euros per picture. I went to an opera in Rome and loved it. And, as I said, the Italian food was scrumptious—lots of pasta and pizza. I loved and disliked Rome, but I am very glad I went.

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After graduation and beyond....

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NDREA DEWEY, B.A. 2006, SPENT THE SUMMER before her junior year working in Rwanda and Uganda as the start-up project for the McNair Fund for Christian Missions. When she returned to the United States, her high school friend Rachel LeNeave had also just returned—from studying abroad in London. The two had a serious conversation about wanting to see more of the world for a longer period of time. Shortly thereafter, they opened a joint savings account and began planning their “trip of a lifetime.” Three years later, in 2007, the girls quit their jobs, packed their backpacks, and took off across the world. Their six-month trip took them to New Zealand, Thailand, Mauritius, Greece, Italy, Belgium, Holland, France, Germany, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, England, and Ireland. Along the way, they met up with Millsaps alumni, current students studying abroad, and one international student in her home country. Dewey, originally from Paducah, Kentucky, now lives in Nashville, working with the Downs Syndrome Association as an earlychildhood development teacher assistant and a personal assistant to a family with a Downs child. In answer to the most frequently asked question about the trip, Dewey said, “Yes, [Rachel and I] are still great friends, we still get along, we never yelled at one another while traveling, and we still talk on a regular basis.” Dewey kept a travelogue of her adventures:

ew Zealand!

Greetings from N

the tongariro t A e r a e w e r He took eight crossing. Our Hike the mountain et m e W d n a s, hour nt Doom in that played mOu e rings.” “the lord of th Andrea

Millsaps College . 1701 N. State St 0 Jackson, MS 3921 U.S.A.

January 22 South Island, New Zealand Greetings! Just last week we followed the Geothermal Trail through the North Island—so many new sights and experiences in the natural world.We especially liked the bubbling pools of mud and the Lady Knox Geyser.The entire trail smelled of sulfur—not so pleasant. Rachel went skydiving!What an awesome day, because when she woke up that morning she had no idea that she would be jumping out of a plane.The weather was perfect, and she jumped 12,000 feet over Lake Taupo. It is doubtful that there is any better scenery to experience while plunging toward the ground at insane speeds. She 34 34

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survived the 45 seconds of free fall and six minutes of parachuting. I was waiting for her safely on the ground and had a panic attack only while watching the whole thing on video. We hiked the Tongariro crossing, which is 18.5 kilometers or about 12 miles, and took us about eight hours. Here’s a taste of what we experienced: 5 a.m.: Wake up to rain in our tent. 5:30 a.m.: Almost miss the bus. 7 a.m.: Easy enough hike here.We met the mountain that played Mount Doom in “The Lord of the Rings.” We were both too bashful to ask for an autograph.


ew Zealand!

Greetings from N

rald lake, We saw the eme afternoon and then in the we walked s a g in in a r d te it star rs or so down the six kilomete omplishment the crossing. Acc y! outweighed miser Andrea

Millsaps College . 1701 N. State St 0 Jackson, MS 3921 U.S.A.

8 a.m.: Devil’s Staircase—think hellacious StairMaster on the highest setting for 45 minutes.That’s what our butts were thinking for the next three days. 8 a.m. continued: Red Crater—truly a red crater. 8 a.m. continued: Emerald Lake, Blue Lake—also self-explanatory. Afternoon: It started raining as we walked the six kilometers or so down the crossing. Accomplishment outweighed misery, making a wonderful day.

5.The abundance of waterfalls. 4. Fjords: Who wouldn’t love a fjord? 3. Kiwis: Cute guys and adorable birds. 2. Eco-conscious society: People live with their environment in mind. All of the toilets offer a convenient half-flush option. Everyone, including hostels, recycles and composts. So get inspired! 1. Hokey Pokey ice cream and crunchy Cadbury bars!

February 14 Tomorrow morning we fly to Thailand. Before we leave this beautiful country we thought we would create a New Zealand Top 10 list. Some are serious, some are funny, but all are something we have grown to love about New Zealand. Enjoy! 10. Going barefoot in public. 9. Great walking tracks in almost every city, clearly marked and very accessible. 8. Excellent and clean public bathroom facilities. No holes in the ground. 7. Hospitable people. Cheers to Danny, Sue, Kylie, Jim, Jill, Andrew, Hannah, Lois, Graham, Joey, O’Neil, Jay, and other Kiwis we met along the way. 6. Being offered tea, Milo, and coffee, morning, noon, and night, along with toast or cookies.

ealand!

om New Z Greetings fr amazing There were g a giant in d lu c in , s e kit anda, and penguin, a p with legs y d o b a lf ha The wind. Flapping in Andrea

ege Millsaps Coll St. 1701 N. State 39210 Jackson, MS U.S.A.

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Legacy: A Campaign for Millsaps College $160 Million Commitment to Faculty Excellence At Millsaps College, faculty members are more than teachers, scholars, and artists. They are mentors. The lifelong bond between students and the scholars who teach them reflects the best of a Millsaps education. To build on its rich legacy of outstanding faculty, Millsaps must increase its ability to attract and retain the highest caliber of professors and to provide the funds for faculty to make scholarly contributions to their chosen fields of study.

Endowed Chairs and Professorships $160 mil lion

An endowed chair is typically granted to a professor for the term of his or her career. An endowed professorship rewards high-performing faculty. Usually awarded on a rotating basis, an endowed professorship can spotlight a professor who shows promise. Millsaps College seeks to add three endowed chairs and five endowed professorships, especially in the sciences, where there are currently no chairs to award. Endowed Chair................................................................................................... $1,000,000

87 mil lion

Endowed Professorship........................................................................... $500,000

Faculty Development Increasing the endowment for faculty development would provide funds for faculty to travel abroad to enhance their curricula, plan for new courses, or observe the culture and business practices in other countries. These funds would also support scholarly or artistic projects, curriculum development, and travel to conferences for participation and/or for presentation of research.

5 mil lion

ce Glan e at a s l l lenc a e o t Ex c n ign G e a d p Stu Cam l e n ce n t to E x ce l itme y m t l u m c Co Fa e n ce n t to x ce l l itme am E m r g m o o r C Study t to P onal i tmen t i a m n Co m n te r n ce t to I x ce l l e tmen i m ility E c Co m a F t to itmen Fu n d Co m m ies nual n A s ctanc Ex p e il ls ap t f M i G e d Th lanne and P e t a t Es l l Goa Tota

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Faculty Development................................................................ $225,000 per year

$4,500,000 to endow

$35 million 10 million 17 million 8 million 18 million 12 million 60 million $160 million

From left, Debby Denson, B.A. 1969, and Lisa Hapgood, B.A. 1985, M.B.A. 1989, in Birmingham.


Visiting Scholars and Artists Distinguished visiting scholars would commit to an academic year at Millsaps and would bring a fresh perspective from their country of origin. Implementing pre- and postdoctoral fellowships would not only offer students the energy and passion of an up-and-coming professor, but would also provide a pool of candidates for professors who would bring racial, ethnic, gender, and religious diversity to the faculty. Distinguished visiting scholars.................................................................................................................... $50,000 per year $1,000,000 to endow Pre- and postdoctoral fellowships............................................................................................................... $50,000 per year $1,000,000 to endow While we aspire to endow fully each component of the Faculty Excellence objective, your gift of $2,000, $5,000, $10,000, or more will make a significant difference in the professional development of our faculty.

Regional Campaign Events Alumni and friends of Millsaps College gathered in Greenwood, Birmingham, and Hattiesburg to celebrate Legacy: A Campaign for Millsaps College. The events featured remarks from Dr. Frances Lucas, president of Millsaps College, and J. Murray Underwood, chair of the Legacy campaign, and a showing of the Legacy campaign DVD. Serving as hosts for the Greenwood event were Leila C. Wynn, Pratt and Kathryn Lewis, and Mike and Ygondine Sturdivant. Serving as hosts for the Birmingham event were Archie Lamb, Bill and Debby Denson, David and Lindsay Diaz, John Morgan Douglas, Kenneth and Lois Farmer, Lisa Hapgood, Alan Hunter, Linn and Sandy Litkenhous, David Loper, Jeff McDonald, Tommy Powell, Ollie Smith, Naomi Williamson, and Tom Woodall. Serving as hosts for the Hattiesburg event were Lewis (Hudi) and Betty Bly Hatten, Kevin and Vicki Hughes, Fred and Mary Margaret Tatum, Joe Ed and Betty Lynn Varner, Carolyn Wolfe, and Becky Woodrick. For more information on the Legacy campaign, visit legacy.millsaps.edu.

The Reverend Vicki Hughes, B.S. 1981, Millsaps Trustee; J. Murray Underwood, B.A. 1963, Legacy campaign chair; Carolyn Wolfe, B.A. 1957; and Kathye Wolfe Jarrell in Hattiesburg.

Campaign Steering Committee members Don Mitchell, B.S. 1964, and Mary Sue Mitchell, B.A. 1963, with Stacy Kellum, B.A. 1938, in Greenwood.

fall–winter 2007

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The gift that keeps on giving: The charitable gift annuity “A charitable gift annuity (CGA) was a wonderful investment. It was just right for me,” says Nell Smith, B.A. 1938 (left). In exchange for her gift of cash for a gift annuity at 91 years old, Smith was paid 11.3 percent interest, and she received a generous tax deduction and quarterly payments for life. “I get needed income for the rest of my life, and when the annuity matures the residual of the corpus will be used to establish a scholarship to aid a needy student who wants to attend Millsaps,” she said. When you complete a charitable gift annuity, the property that funds it is eventually used for charitable purposes, just as if you had left a bequest. But unlike a bequest, your gift annuity will provide you with regular payments and other benefits as long as you live. Once established, the payment rate never changes. You cannot outlive the benefits of a gift annuity, and all of the available assets of Millsaps College stand behind the obligation to make the quarterly payments. Federal tax laws provide that you can use the charitable deduction to reduce your income taxes over as many as six years. You will not owe taxes on a large part of your payments for a period of time equal to your life expectancy. Finally, the amount used to fund the gift annuity will not be part of your estate for federal tax purposes. If you need additional information on donating a CGA, contact Dudley Marble at 601-974-1026 or marblrd@millsaps.edu.

Charitable gift annuity rates—single life• Age

Rate

Age

Rate

65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.0%

78 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.6%

66 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.1%

79 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.8%

67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.2%

80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.0%

68 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3%

81 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.3%

69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.4%

82 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5%

70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5%

83 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.8%

71 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.6%

84 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.2%

72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.7%

85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.5%

73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.8%

86 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.9%

74 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.9%

87 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.2%

75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.1%

88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.6%

76 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2%

89 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.0%

77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.4%

90+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.3%

•For illustrative purposes only. Rates are subject to change. Please write to us for rates for two persons and exact benefits.


Athletics In perhaps the greatest single-play finish in college football history at any level, 19th-ranked Trinity University converted

in the race for the conference title and an automatic berth into the Division III playoffs. With the score at 24-22 in favor of Millsaps, destiny was on the Tigers’ sideline at Harper Davis Field. In a reversal of fortune now known as the “Mississippi Miracle” (or “Major Travesty” if you were a fan of Millsaps), and featured in Sports Illustrated, USA Today, national newscasts,

a 60-yard play for the winning score as time expired with 15 laterals to stun 24thranked Millsaps at the Homecoming game in front of a near capacity crowd. Plainly put, you had to see it to believe it. In a battle of two Top 25 teams, a first in the SCAC in the same season in league history, Trinity bounced back from a loss in Jackson a year ago to earn a leg up

and ESPN’s Sportscenter and First Take, Trinity completed the remarkable play. Trinity quarterback Blake Barmore completed a 16-yard forward pass to wide receiver Shawn Thompson over the middle of the field, followed by 15 successful laterals that traveled 60 yards and touched seven players over a span of 62 seconds after the final buzzer had sounded.

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The final lateral bounced off the turf and right into the hands of Riley Curry, who sprinted 32 yards down the Trinity sideline untouched for the dramatic score and the 28-24 win. The play thrust Curry into the media spotlight. “It was heartbreaking,” said Harper Davis, the former coach for whom Harper Davis Field is named. “I don’t coach the team anymore, and it depressed me. But I’m beginning to realize some of the plusses from it. It’s been on every network. I also heard that one company was giving Trinity a scholarship in honor of that play.” “I’m anxious to see how we respond,” Head Coach Mike DuBose told The ClarionLedger afterward. “A play like that can define who you are. You can learn from it, it can make you a better player or coach and one day a better businessman, husband, and father because of the way you respond to adversity. I think we’ll respond in a very positive way.”

—Kevin Maloney, John Webb

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Wesley statue dedicated at Homecoming A bronze statue of the founder of Methodism, John Wesley, by Mississippi sculptor Ben Watts, B.B.A. 1980, was presented to the College and dedicated during Homecoming Weekend. Lee McCormick, B.S. 1966, Ward Van Skiver, B.A. 1965, and Kay Barksdale, B.A. 1964, led the campaign to fund it. Above, from top, Casey Parks, B.A. 2005, addressing the Friday Forum on her journey into Africa with Nicholas Kristof, a New York Times columnist; President Frances Lucas with David Loper, B.A. 1986, the new Millsaps Alumni Association president; and Dr. Timothy Ward, professor of chemistry, demonstrating the principles of chirality at the Faculty Showcase.


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New tennis facilities to be named in honor of James Montgomery James Montgomery, a former tennis and basketball coach and athletic director for

Millsaps College, passed away on August 31, 2001. More than six years after his death, he is still vividly remembered, and current plans to renovate and build tennis facilities on campus include dedicating and naming the courts in Montgomery’s honor. Born in Birmingham on January 12,

1929, Montgomery attended BirminghamSouthern College for his undergraduate degrees in English and physical education. He went on to attain a master’s degree and doctorate in physical education at George Peabody College. After teaching and coaching in Alabama for Hewitt High School, Haleyville High School, and Athens State University, he joined the Millsaps community. During his career with the Majors, he served as director of athletics and physical education (1960–82), director of intramural athletics (1960–82), teacher of physical education classes and coach of football (three years), basketball (11 years), baseball (one year), track (one year), and tennis (33 years). Among the players he coached, 22 were awarded All-American certificates, and one of his tennis players was the first woman ever to play in the NCAA National Tennis Tournament. He was actively involved in publicity for Millsaps, and he always sought more effective techniques for helping students balance athletics and academics. In 1979, Montgomery received the Mississippi Tennis Association’s Junior Development Award for his promotion of tennis among young adults in Mississippi. He was also selected in 1984 as NCAA Male Coach of the Year, Division III. The coach was a member of the United States Tennis Association and had many other affiliations and association memberships; he also wrote the book

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Tennis for the Mature Adult and contributed to the book A History of Physical Education and Sport in the United States and Canada. On sabbatical in the fall of 1979,

Montgomery worked at the Methodist Rehabilitation Center of the Mississippi Medical Center in exercise physiology and rehabilitation. He also spent significant time in a class on exercise programming at an aerobics center in Dallas. At the age of 64 and less than 10 years before his death, Montgomery completed his 34-year career at Millsaps. He was known for claiming and encouraging a view of athletics at Millsaps College different from that of many other schools. He reminded spectators that Millsaps was serious about victory, but that the process and effort of achievement was a goal in and of itself. Montgomery’s outlook and record are still sources of inspiration, and Scott Pennington, the current head men’s and women’s tennis coach at Millsaps, has always envisioned having the courts named in honor of Montgomery. The Coach Montgomery Tennis Courts are to be dedicated in the spring. The courts will have new lighting and be resurfaced with a purple playing area surrounded by green. Additional courts and a clubhouse are also being included in plans for future renovations. Donations are currently being accepted for the renovations and can be sent to Millsaps Tennis, c/o Coach Montgomery Courts, 1701 North State Street, Jackson, MS, 39210. For information, call Scott Pennington at 601-974-1347.

—Kathryn Buchan

Baseball Majors are declared 2007 doubles champions On March 27, a day after taking three of four games from conference foe Southwestern University, the Millsaps

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At No. 11, the Majors baseball team was rewarded with its highest national ranking in the history of Millsaps.

Majors baseball team was rewarded with its highest national ranking in school history. They moved up two slots to No. 11, as released by the ABCA/Collegiate Baseball Division III Poll. After a 35-11 mark on the diamond produced eight different players with 10 or more doubles, Millsaps was declared the 2007 statistical champion with an NCAA Division III mark of 150—31 better than the runner-up, The College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, Minnesota. It marked the second time in the Jim Page era that the Majors have received the award, with the first in 1996. “Extra base hits are important in putting runners in scoring position real quick,” said Page, the 19-year head coach. “Our philosophy is that doubles are made right out of the box and that it’s a double until the opposing team stops you.” The Majors recorded 109 doubles in 2006 in 50 games en route to a 37-13 season, led by Hunter Abrams (17), Luke Morrow (15), and Garner Wetzel (14). A pair of outfielders led the pack last season, with junior Hunter Owen (23) and

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senior Jason Hadley (20) each breaking Kirk Kinard’s Millsaps single-season record of 19. Also posting double-digit totals were Abrams (17), Justin Carter (14), John Pacillo (13), Derrik Boland (13), Luke Morrow (13), and Nick Crawford (12). “Hitting with wood during the off season helps us out a lot heading into the fall,” Page said. “Our guys are extremely aggressive on the base paths, and I’m really proud of the effort.”

—Kevin Maloney

Saints continue to draw thousands to training camp When the New Orleans Saints arrived for their 2007 summer training camp, the campus and city were buzzing with excitement. Thanks to a spectacular campmanagement team headed by Vice President and Dean of Students Brit Katz, everything was ready and waiting on July 16 when the

first of the Saints personnel arrived. With 150 beds reserved and an abundance of food on hand, players and staff were treated once again to a dose of Mississippi and Millsaps College hospitality. Having experienced the onslaught of the camp last year, the Millsaps campmanagement team was prepared for glitches. They scheduled an extra week in between the camp and student movein, and David Wilkinson, physical plant director, had his team of maintenance professionals working around the clock to provide a seamless transition. Saints and Millsaps officials worked together to make sure the camp was an enjoyable and mutually beneficial experience for everyone involved. Coming off a spectacular 2006 season, the Saints drew in thousands despite the late July heat. With attendance averaging around 800 people per practice, visitors are speculated to have totaled a little more than 20,000. The Saints showed their appreciation for the College, as well as their commitment to a topnotch training experience, by providing the Millsaps campus with new air-conditioning in the Hangar Dome, a new washer-dryer complex, a new set of high-quality tables and chairs, a new practice field and retaining wall, and a new parking area. Millsaps was also able to play host to national sports television personalities and receive widespread national attention through its affiliation with the team. While this season may not have started well for the Saints, the Millsaps family knows how talented and caring the Saints organization is and looks forward to another spectacular training camp next year. Says Katz: “The College community loves their Saints. We learned that they are high-class individuals who treat our students and staff with great respect; they are welcome here any time!”

—Rebecca Day


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MajorNotes Hailman profiles Thomas Jefferson and his love of wine John Hailman, B.A. 1965, has received acclaim for his 2006 book Thomas

Jefferson on Wine

“Millsaps helped me as a lawyer and a writer by its teaching of reasoning rather than memorizing.”

(University Press of Mississippi), a work that provides extensive insight into our third president’s love for wine. As a student, Hailman had planned to major in philosophy, but when he found out how difficult the comprehensive exam was, he switched to French—a decision that may very well have changed his professional life. His knowledge of the language helped him get a job as a consultant at a wine shop, and when the owners of the store learned that the fellow unloading trucks could accurately pronounce what was written on the wine labels, he was given a promotion on the spot. He then transitioned into writing a wine column published in The Washington Post and in syndication for more than a decade by Gannett News Service. One week Hailman wrote a piece that highlighted the Founding Fathers and their little known affinity for Madeira. According to Hailman, “all of the Founding Fathers were expected to be goody-goody teetotalers,” an assumption that he would find to be false. The curator of Monticello read his column and asked Hailman to examine more than 300 of Jefferson’s letters. Hailman’s aim in 1974 was to write an eight-page pamphlet—a project that got “a

little out of hand,” says Hailman. Now, 32 years later, it is a 455-page book that has received national attention from The New York Times Book Review, Wine Spectator, and Bon Appetit, among other publications. When asked how his Millsaps education prepared him for his law career as well as his writing endeavors, Hailman cites the College’s commitment to writing across the curriculum. “Millsaps helped me as a lawyer and a writer by its teaching of reasoning rather than memorizing.” He gives an endearing list of influential classes and professors, staff members, and coaches. Yet Hailman claims that Dr. T. W. Lewis, now professor emeritus of religion, was his biggest influence, as he not only taught him and his wife, Regan, but also married the couple in the Millsaps chapel in 1969. Hailman has served as a judge at numerous international wine competitions for more than 20 years. He now divides his time between homes in Oxford, Mississippi, and Merignac in the Charente region of southwest France.

—Rebecca Day

Doctor-poet Stone inducted into Georgia Writers Hall of Fame Millsaps College graduates are known for creating fascinating career paths, often blending their most ardent passions in unusual ways. Stealing moments between seeing patients to record an inspiration of poetry and jotting down lines for poems on index cards, Dr. John Stone, B.A. 1958, attended to writing while doctoring. Likewise, his writing attends to doctoring. As one example, On Doctoring, a collection of stories, poems, and essays that

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Stone edited with Richard Reynolds, M.D., is given each year to all students entering medical school in the United States. More than 275,000 copies of the book have been distributed through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant. The physician, poet, essayist, educator, and lecturer was inducted into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame this year. The award recognizes writers who have contributed to the literary heritage of Georgia and was established by the University of Georgia’s Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Stone, of Tucker, Georgia, is emeritus professor of cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. An early aptitude for both writing and medical studies was evident during Stone’s

years at Millsaps. The Jackson native edited and contributed essays and poems to the College’s literary magazine, Stylus; was a member of Kit Kat, the creative writing honorary at Millsaps; and garnered both the Tatum Award, for the highest grade point average among premed students, and the coveted Founders Medal, for the highest grade point average among all students over four years. He was named “Mississippi’s Outstanding Young Poet of 1957” from among 2,000 entries. Prior to attending Millsaps, he wrote poetry and served as editor of a high school literary magazine for which Eudora Welty served as a judge. Stone included Welty’s A Worn Path as a selection in On Doctoring. Stone’s association with Millsaps

College has developed in memorable ways over the years. In 1977, he was named Alumnus of the Year. This award was established by the College in 1950 and is presented annually to an individual in recognition of outstanding contributions to his or her chosen profession, church, and community, as well as to Millsaps. In 1990, he wrote the libretto for Canticles of Time, a choral symphony with music by Dr. Samuel Jones, B.A. 1957, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Millsaps College. The symphony won the Music Award of the Mississippi Institute of Arts & Letters in 1991. In 1993, the Writing Center, John Stone Hall, was named in his honor. Once serving as the president’s residence, John Stone Hall is

Once serving as the president’s residence, John Stone Hall is the home of the Writing Center, the Core Curriculum office, and the classical studies department.

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also the home of the Core Curriculum office and the classical studies department. The Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters has twice bestowed upon Stone the Literature Award. Stone’s collections of poetry, which are published by Louisiana State University Press, include The Smell of Matches (1972), In All This Rain (1980), Renaming the Streets (1985), Where Water Begins (1998), and Music From Apartment 8: New and Selected Poems (2004). A book of his new and collected essays, In the Country of Hearts, was originally published by Dell and reprinted by LSU Press in 1996. His essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, Discover, and MD Magazine. Stone’s work has also appeared in Poetry, The American Scholar, The New York Quarterly, The Georgia Review, The Southern Review, New England Review, and Poetry Northwest. His work has been widely anthologized, for instance in The Norton Introduction to Literature and Contemporary Southern Poetry.

—Patti Wade, Sophia Halkias

Cancer foundation a testament to the life of Jennifer Sorrells Basketball has long been Lance Stoner’s first love. “I knew I would always regret it if I did not pursue it past high school if the opportunity presented itself,” he said. When he graduated in 2002, he was a four-year letter winner on the Millsaps basketball team, and today he coaches youth basketball—passing on his love for the game to a new generation. But basketball isn’t the only thing Stoner has carried over from his life at Millsaps.

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Lance Stoner and Jennifer Sorrells, for whom a cancer research foundation is named. They met in an environmental science class.

In addition to coaching, Stoner runs both the Jacksonville franchise of Stanley Steemer Carpet Cleaners and the Jennifer Sorrells Foundation for cancer research. He met Sorrells, B.S. 2002, in an environmental science class during his sophomore year. “She had transferred in, and I had never really seen her out or on campus,” Stoner recalled. “I was immediately drawn to her. As I got to know her, I found that not only was she beautiful, but she was smart, funny, shy, and adventurous.” After graduation, Stoner knew his future lay in returning home to Jacksonville to run the family business, while Sorrells went on to graduate school at the University of Kentucky. But the long-distance relationship didn’t last long: Sorrells moved to Jacksonville, and the two became engaged shortly thereafter. They were in the process of making wedding plans when their lives changed again. Sorrells experienced some back pain while doing yard work and was soon diagnosed with osteosarcoma—bone cancer. Stoner calls the next two years “an emotional roller coaster that consumed our lives.” Sorrells, who died in 2006, received most of her treatment at the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, where the foundation has now formed an

endowment. “The great thing about this foundation is that just before Jenn passed away we had an opportunity to discuss starting the foundation and where we wanted the money to go,” Stoner said. “That is the most special detail about starting and continuing the work.” Setting up the endowment at the cancer center required $20,000, which took the foundation about six months to raise. Stoner is working closely with one of the doctors who was on Sorrells’s treatment team—Dr. C. Parker Gibbs—and who is on the cusp of a major breakthrough on how to treat the very cancer with which Sorrells was afflicted. “It’s a very exciting time for the foundation,” Stoner said. “We can be part of revolutionizing how this disease is treated.” For more information about the Jennifer Sorrells Foundation, call 904-3618433. Donations can also be made to the Jennifer L. Sorrells Endowed Fellowship for Geophysics Research, by contacting the Millsaps College Office of Development at 601-974-1023.

­— Margaret Cahoon

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MajorNotes Send it in: Millsaps Magazine would like you to know that its Major Notes policy has changed. The magazine is now printing only information sent in specifically for Major Notes. In the past, material was gleaned from newspaper clippings and other sources. The change was made to protect the privacy of alumni and to simplify the editing process. We would like to encourage all alumni to send in their news items, whether big or small, personal or professional, to Tanya Newkirk, Major Notes Editor, Office of Alumni Relations, Millsaps College, 1701 North State Street, Jackson, MS 39210-0001. Fax : 601-974-1088. Phone: 601-974-1038 or 1-86-MILLSAPS (1-866 - 455-7277). Email: alumni @ millsaps.edu. Please include your name, address, phone numbers, email address, graduation year and degree, and any news you want to share. Appropriate items include births, weddings, advanced degrees, awards, job promotions, etc. Photographs are also welcome. If you are aware of alumni who are not receiving the magazine, please send us their names and addresses.

1956 Valera B. (Bailey) Jones, B.A. 1956,

of Murfreesboro, Tenn., won two gold medals and medaled in three other events at the 2007 Senior Olympics National Summer Senior Games, held in Louisville, Ky., in June. She won gold medals in both the 10K and 5K runs. She finished third in the 400 meters, second in the 800 meters, and second in the 1,500 meters in the 70-74 age group. These three finishing times put her in the top 10 in Senior Olympic history. The national games, for athletes age 50 and older, are held every two years in different locations. This year’s event featured nearly 12,000 athletes from 26 states, as well as Trinidad and Tobago. Jones was one of the 833 participants registered from Tennessee.

1960 Else (Mia) Aurbakken Adjali, B.A. 1960, of New York City retired Dec. 31, 2006, after serving 46 years in the United Methodist Office for the United Nations. She was the executive secretary for Global Concerns for the Women’s Division and director of the United Methodist Office for the UN at the Church Center for the UN in New York City. The Women’s Division is a nongovernmental organization in a special consultative status with the UN. Adjali also served as a member of the executive and the finance and administration committees of the Church World Service (CWS) Board, a representative for the CWS on the Governing Board of the National Council of Churches (NCC), and a member of the United Methodist delegation to the

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NCC/CWS General Assembly. She has led numerous delegations to the UN, including the 1980 UN Mid-Decade Conference on Women in Copenhagen, the 1985 UN End of Decade Conference on Women in Nairobi, and the 2005 UN World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis. She chaired the International Affairs Commission of the NCC from 1986 to 1988 and the CWS Program Ministry on International Justice and Human Rights until 2000. Adjali has organized many national and international seminars, consultations, and workshops on critical issues such as women political prisoners, the right to communication and information, and the new economic order. Her published works include: Liberation as an Aim of the Churches’ EducationalWork (United Methodist Board of Discipleship, 1975);

Of Life and Hope:Toward EffectiveWitness in Human Rights (Friendship Press, 1979); and The Community of Nations (Friendship Press, 1995). She has also written for United Methodist magazines. Adjali will continue as a member of the Global Ministries General Conference Resolutions Committee until 2008, in preparation for that year’s General Conference of the United Methodist Church. In July 2006, she was elected to a five-year term as vice president of the World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women at the group’s 11th assembly in Jeju, South Korea. As vice president, her responsibilities include serving as UN facilitator for the federation. Adjali has also been asked by the Women’s Division to write a history of the United Methodist-owned Church Center for the UN.

1968 Dr. Geary S. Alford, B.A. 1968, of Jackson has retired as professor of psychiatrypsychology and director of the division of psychology at the University of

Mississippi Medical Center. He was also associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, and clinical associate professor of family medicine. A former president of the Mississippi Psychological Association, Alford is board-certified and a fellow of the American Psychological Association. He has published numerous empirical, basic, and clinical research studies, and a total of 15 chapters in professional textbooks. He has served on the editorial boards of the journals Behavior Therapy (the most widely cited psychotherapy research journal in the world) and, for 24 years, Behavior Modification. He has also been an ad hoc editorial reviewer for more than 20 scientific journals, including American Psychologist, Archives of Neurology, Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and Addictive Behavior. Alford was voted Psychiatry Teacher of the Year by UMC medical students in 2004, and Best Teacher by psychiatry residents in 2007. His lectures and seminars at the medical school were consistently rated highly by students and residents. Alford has also been a frequent speaker at the College, having presented several Millsaps Forums and given lectures in the departments of psychology, philosophy, and anthropology. He plans to continue scholarly writing, lecturing at UMC, and traveling to Europe and North Africa, where he has lived and studied.


To find alumni online, log on to MyMillsaps.com

1972 George Edward Pickle Jr., B.A. 1972,

of Kingwood, Texas, was elected corporate vice president on the International Association of Defense Counsel (IADC) board of directors for 2007–08 at the association’s annual meeting in July 2007. He has been an active member of the IADC since 1991, and has served as the chair of its Legislative, Judicial and Government Affairs Committee. The IADC serves an international membership of 2,500 peer-reviewed, invitation-only corporate and insurance defense attorneys, as well as their clients. Pickle is the senior government affairs counsel of Shell Oil Company in Humble, Texas. He is responsible for governmental relationships and lobbying, with particular emphasis on civil-justice reform in the United States and Europe. He also serves as board chair of the Product Liability Advisory Council. He is a board member of the Texas Civil Justice League, Lawyers for Civil Justice, and the American Tort Reform Association.

1974 Dr. Elaine M. Coney, B.A. 1974, of Magnolia represented Southwest Mississippi Community College as a William Winter Scholar at the Natchez Literary and Cinema Celebration in February 2007. Held annually, the celebration presents a themebased lecture series enhanced by films, field trips, workshops, exhibits, book signings, and discussions. Each scholar is chosen by his or her educational institution as the humanities division’s most outstanding student, faculty, or staff member. Scholars are honored at the celebration’s opening and closing sessions, and in printed materials and publicity. The group is also photographed with William Winter,

The Millsaps alumni online community makes it easy for alumni to stay in touch with classmates and their alma mater. Access to the online community is a password-protected benefit exclusively for Millsaps alumni. Registered users enjoy a number of services, including an online search for other alumni and permanent email forwarding, which allows alumni to receive email no matter how many times their addresses change. An online calendar alerts alumni to upcoming events on and off campus, enabling graduates to stay informed. Alumni can also report changes in their addresses and personal information. If you would like additional information or if you have questions or comments about the online community, please email us at alumni@millsaps.edu or call 1-86-MILLSAPS.

former governor of Mississippi, who has served as the director of proceedings for the celebration each year since the event began in 1990. Coney teaches English composition, first- and secondlevel Spanish, and emergency medical and conversational Spanish at Southwest Mississippi Community College in Summit.

1975 Russell H. Beard, B.A. 1975, B.S. 1986, of Diamondhead was selected in May as the director of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration’s National Coastal Data Development Center at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. He has served the center as chief science officer since 2002, during which time he has been instrumental in shaping the center’s capability for producing diverse data products. Dr. Robert (Dub) H. Darville III, B.A. 1975,

of Rome, Ga., was promoted to dean of the School of Business Administration at Shorter College in February 2007. Prior to this appointment, he was chair of the Department of Business Administration at Shorter. He is also professor of accounting and the Sewell Chair of Business Ethics. Shorter is a four-year, Southern Baptistaffiliated liberal arts college in Rome.

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Darville has been with the College since June 1985.

1976 William (Bill) P. Elliott, B.B.A. 1976, of

Meridian joined the public accounting and management consulting firm Mahoney Cohen & Company as a shareholder in July 2007. He was also named head of the firm’s International Tax and Consulting Practice, a new division that will provide business advisory services in international tax planning, business valuations, asset protection, and facilitation of operations in foreign markets to clients with global operations. Prior to joining Mahoney Cohen, Elliott served as managing member of the international tax and consulting division of Decosimo, a regional CPA, finance, and advisory firm. He was also a tax principal at Decosimo and a valuation practitioner within Decosimo Corporate Finance. A prolific writer and publisher, he is a frequent contributor to the tax magazine CCH’s Taxes, is the review editor of CCH’s 1120S Express product, and is a CCH audio series contributor. He publishes professional articles in the areas of international taxation, asset protection planning, and captive insurance companies. He also delivers speeches and presentations worldwide on international taxation and consulting. Elliott holds a master of law degree in international taxation from St. Thomas University School of Law in Miami, from which he graduated summa cum laude. He is currently pursuing a J.D. from Concord Law School, an accredited online law school registered with the California Committee of Bar Examiners.

1978 Steven G. Dean, B.B.A. 1978, of Memphis was promoted to senior vice president and chief financial officer of Buckeye Technologies Inc. in Memphis in July 2007. The company is a leading manufacturer and marketer of specialty fibers and nonwoven materials.

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1979 Alan C. Hunter,

B.A. 1979, and Elizabeth A. Bradley of Birmingham, Ala., were married July 7, 2007, in Birmingham. One of the five original video jockeys for MTV when the station first went on television in 1981, Hunter is a co-founder of the independent film production company Hunter Films, Inc., and the production studio/ entertainment venue WorkPlay. He is also president of the board of the Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival, an independent film festival in Birmingham that he cofounded. With his brother Hugh, he created the Birmingham/Jefferson Regional Film Office to promote and stimulate the economic viability of the film business in central Alabama. Hunter is also a radio and TV host on Sirius Satellite Radio and the STARZ/ENCORE networks. Bradley is a screenwriter and founder of MUSE OF FIRE: Shakespeare at Sloss, a nonprofit theatre company that stages performances in Birmingham’s inner city.

1982 Richard D. (Dwayne) Chesnutt, B.S. 1982, of Long Beach is general sales manager with Turan Foley Motors, a Buick, Cadillac, and Chevrolet dealer in Gulfport.

1983 Amy Lyles Wilson, B.A. 1983, of Nashville was featured on NPR’s Morning Edition on March 12, 2007, as part of the “This I Believe” essay series. In “The Guts to Keep Going,” Wilson describes how she helped her newly widowed mother adjust to life alone by teaching her how to do things her father had always done. The essay project was begun in 1951 by the radio pioneer Edward R. Murrow to encourage Americans to communicate openly about the personal

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philosophies and core values that guide them through their daily lives. A writer and editor, Wilson is currently working on a book about grief. She is the founder and publisher of Hamblett House Inc. in Nashville, and is studying theology at Vanderbilt University Divinity School.

1984 Anna Walker Crump, B.E. 1984, of Jackson

presented a paper entitled “The Unsung Hero: Celebrating the Grant Writer” at the American Association of Grant Professionals’ ninth annual conference in Washington, D.C., on November 10, 2007. Her paper focused on the grant writer’s contributions to nonprofits and communities. In September, Crump was named executive director of the Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence. A statewide organization based in Jackson, the coalition was begun in 1980 by domestic violence shelter programs and advocates for battered women to provide technical assistance to domestic violence shelters, community and professional education, and other related assistance to victims of domestic violence in Mississippi. Anna and her husband, minister Greg Crump, continue to provide trainings to churches and faithbased nonprofit organizations in central Louisiana through the Rapides Foundation in Alexandria. Their faith-based consulting agency, The Body of Christ Fellowship Ministries, LLC, has recently been added to the consultant pool for the National Network of Adoption Advocacy Programs, based in Richmond, Virginia. This will give them the opportunity to work nationally with churches and faith-based organizations, training them to organize and sustain ministries serving children in the foster care system.

1985 Carol Y. (Young) Mowen, B.A. 1985, of

Greencastle, Pa., accepted a position as a senior associate with the National School Public Relations Association in July 2007. The association, which provides

school communication training and services worldwide, is based in Rockville, Md. Mowen’s responsibilities include coordinating the production of several publications and providing support for public information officers and other officials within school systems. Prior to joining the association, Mowen was the public information officer for the public school system in Washington County, Maryland.

1987 Rick D. Patt, B.A. 1987 of Ridgeland is an attorney with his own practice in Jackson.

1989 David W. Higgs, B.L.S.

1989, of Wesson received the 2007 Barry M. Goldwater Award in April. The award is sponsored by the Arizona Historical Society and given annually to the best paper presented at the Arizona History Convention. Higgs’s paper, “George Wratten and the Apache Prisoners of War,” focuses on the white interpreter who became the legendary Apache chief Geronimo’s mentor and guardian after the tribe’s final surrender in the late 19th century. Higgs is an instructor in the social science division at Copiah-Lincoln Community College in Wesson, where he has taught for 14 years. He teaches a world civilizations survey course, Honors World Civilization II, and anthropology. Dr. David M. Laird, B.S. 1989, of Jackson, Tenn., was named the 2007 Guest Excellence Doctor of the Year by the Jackson-Madison County General Hospital in April. Awarded by hospital staff members, the distinction is given annually to the doctor who best exhibits excellence in his or her service to patients and their families, as well as to colleagues


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and hospital staff. The award recognizes integrity and professionalism, good conflict-management skills, a willingness to go beyond the scope of duty, and an attitude of respect for other professionals. Laird is a board-certified general surgeon and partner with Jackson Surgical Associates. He specializes in surgery of the endocrine organs, diseases of the breast, surgery of the gastrointestinal tract, surgery of the vascular system, thoracic surgery, and many other diseases.

1990 Dr. Peter M. Mitias, B.A. 1990, of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, was profiled in the NewYork Times article “Rising Breed of Migrant: Skilled and Welcome,” on August, 20, 2007. The article examined the way skilled professionals are welcomed by foreign countries at a time when unskilled workers face new barriers to migration. Mitias left a position at Hampden-Sydney College in Hampton City, Va., to become an associate professor of economics and director of graduate programs at the American University of Sharjah. He has helped create two new graduate programs at the university and guide its business school to American accreditation. The American University, located in the suburbs of Dubai, was founded in 1997 with financial support from the Sharjah ruler in hopes of building East-West ties. The school now has 4,000 international students and 300 professors, about half of whom hail from North America.

1991 Richard (Ricky) J. Manning, B.A. 1991, and Rev. Shannon R. (Rogers) Manning, B.A.

1997, of Jackson are the parents of Tucker Alexander, born Dec. 16, 2006. He has one brother, Nicholas. Ricky was named a property accountant with Parkway Properties in Jackson on May 7, 2007. Shannon has served as associate rector at St. James Episcopal Church since September.

1992 Susan Averitt Bobbitt, B.S. 1992, and Derrick Bobbitt of Fayetteville, Ark., are the parents of Carington Hope, born Feb. 1, 2007. She has two sisters, Kennedy and Brooklynn. Susan is a pediatrician with Northwest Children’s Clinic at Willow Creek in Johnson. Derrick is a full-time father. A fund has been established in memory of their first daughter, who died in 2006. The Cameron Averitt Bobbitt Memorial Fund contributes to causes that will improve the lives of children and families, including children’s hospitals, libraries, schools, and extracurricular activities. The fund’s partnership with the nonprofit Fayetteville Community Foundation allows donations to be tax deductible. The family’s other cause, donating children’s books to needy children in Cameron’s memory, has been established at cameronsamazingbooks.com.

1993 Alicia Peterson Clark, B.A. 1993, and Bill

Clark of Alexandria, Va., announce the birth of their son, William Jacob (Jake), on April 22, 2007. Lucy Pittman Culver, M.B.A. 1993, and Eskridge van N. Culver of New York City are the parents of Lillie Marilyn, born March 27, 2007. She has one sister, Jennevieve. Anthony O.Willis,

B.S. 1993, of Mableton, Ga., received the Helene Krivosha Scholarship for the 2006–07 academic year from Capella University, a regionally accredited online university headquartered in Minneapolis. Two Krivosha scholarships are awarded annually to students enrolled in the School of Education, one at the master’s degree level and one at the

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doctoral level. Willis is pursuing a Ph.D. in postsecondary and adult education. He teaches grades K-5 in the gifted and talented program at LaBelle Elementary School in Marietta, Ga.

1995 Joe (Jody) F.Tidwell, M.B.A. 1995, of Jackson was named in June 2007 as president of the southeast division of Blue Clover, a San Antonio-based firm that combines strategic online and traditional marketing communications. He was also named a partner with the firm. As division president, he will oversee all of Blue Clover’s operations east of Mississippi, working from the firm’s newly opened office in Ridgeland. Prior to joining Blue Clover, Tidwell was vice president of business development for Yates Construction Company for 12 years. He also served as chief of staff for Eddie Briggs, former Mississippi Lieutenant governor, and worked in various roles in economic development throughout the southeast. He has been a member of numerous boards and commissions, such as the MetroJackson Chamber of Commerce, the Governor’s Workforce Training Council, and the Madison Economic Development Foundation. He has also served as president of the Mississippi Economic Development Council.

1996 J. Knox Boteler III, B.B.A. 1996, and Marian C. Boteler of Mobile announce the birth of their daughter, Anne Gliddon, on July 26, 2007. Knox is an attorney with the law firm Moore & Wolfe P.C. in Mobile.

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Kim M. Budde, B.A. 1996, and Jake Rosenbarger of Boulder, Colo., were married Oct. 21, 2006, in New Orleans. Budde received her master’s degree in exercise science from the University of Georgia in May 2002. She works with professional cyclists for the BMC Racing Team in the United States and abroad. He is a professional cyclist for the BMC Racing Team. Jennifer Ballard Gross, B.A. 1996, of Canton has been promoted to information technology customer advocate lead for Parkway Realty Services, LLC, in Jackson. The company is a subsidiary of Parkway Properties, Inc., a self-administered real estate investment trust specializing in operations, acquisition, ownership, management, and leasing of office properties.

1997 Rev. Shannon R. (Rogers) Manning, B.A. 1997, and Richard (Ricky) J. Manning, B.A. 1991, of Jackson are the parents of Tucker Alexander, born Dec. 16, 2006. He has one brother, Nicholas. Shannon was named associate rector at St. James Episcopal Church in Jackson on September 1, 2007. Ricky began as a property accountant with Parkway Properties in May.

1998 Mary Kathleen (Kate) Calvert Thornton, B.A.

1998, and James Leon Thornton of Atlanta announce the birth of their son, James Aubrey, on March 10, 2007.

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1999

Jeffrey R. Mitchell, B.A. 2001, M.B.A. 2003, Scott Vickers, B.L.S.

1999, and Shelly Cecile Frank of Denver announce the birth of their son, Benjamin Taj, on March 2, 2006. Scott is an air quality enforcement officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Shelly is an early childhood specialist, with an emphasis on special education, for the Jefferson County School District.

2000 Michael J. Bentley, B.A. 2000, of Jackson graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007. He received the Dean’s Award, which is given on rare occasion to the student who has excelled academically in an extraordinary way, has contributed much to the life of the law school, has been active and engaged in its co-curricular activities, and exhibits great character, leadership, and commitment. Bentley joined the Jackson office of the law firm Bradley Arant Rose & White LLP as an associate in October 2007. Paul Welch, M.B.A. 2000, of Ridgeland graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007.

2001 Brandon G. Garcia, B.A. 2001, of Jeanerette, La., was chosen in July 2007 to handle a new beat created by The Daily News in Bogalusa and St.Tammany News in Covington to help improve court and governmental reporting for both publications, which serve parishes located within the 22nd Judicial District and share some legislators. Before his appointment to the joint position, Garcia worked for The New Mexican in Santa Fe for five years, covering a number of high-profile stories.

of Redwood City, Calif., was named director of compliance and student services for the Department of Athletics at Santa Clara University on Jan. 16, 2007. He had served in an interim capacity in the same position since October 2006. A member of the department’s senior staff, he is responsible for coordinating the department’s NCAA Division I compliance program. His duties include the administration of financial aid, the evaluation of student-athlete eligibility, and the monitoring of coaching activities during recruiting and playing seasons. He is also responsible for conducting internal investigations and providing rules education and interpretations to department staff, other university personnel, and representatives of athletic interests. Mitchell’s career in athletic administration was nurtured while he was in law school at the University of Mississippi, where he earned a J.D. in May 2006. While there, he served as a graduate assistant in the Department of Athletics, assistant operations manager for men’s basketball, and the public address announcer for Ole Miss baseball, women’s basketball, and volleyball. He served as Millsaps’ sports information director following graduation, from 2001–03. He was also an assistant coach for the 2002–03 Millsaps baseball team, which advanced to the NCAA Division III South Regional Tournament. His wife, April Slayden Mitchell, B.S. 2001, is a research engineer at Hewlett-Packard Labs in Palo Alto, where she has worked for five years. Julie C. Skipper, B.A. 2001, of Brandon joined the Jackson office of McGlinchey Stafford PLLC in July 2007. She is an associate in the law firm’s commercial litigation


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department. Her practice focuses on class actions, consumer finance matters, and business litigation.

Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007.

2002

Anne J. (Jordan) Junkin, B.B.A. 2003, of

Ella A. Kuhn, B.A. 2002, of Natchez graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007.

2003 James (Jamie) W. Fite, B.B.A. 2003, M.B.A. 2004, of Jackson graduated from the

Fairhope, Ala., graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007. Matthew J. O’Bryant, B.S. 2003, of Ridgeland received his J.D. from the Mississippi College of Law on May 11, 2007.

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Timothy A. Parsons, B.A.

2003, and Alexandra Gabrielle Carr of Tallahassee, Fla., were married May 5, 2007, in Wakulla Springs, Fla. Aaron P. Head, B.S. 2002, served as a groomsman. His wife, Brandi S. (Stockstill) Head, B.S. 2002, was also in attendance at the wedding. Tim and Alex are both

but can you think? In business, vision is more vital than memory. So we don’t just open books in our M.B.A. classes. We open minds.

To find out more, call 601-974-1253 or go to www.millsaps.edu

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pursuing doctorates in anthropology at Florida State University. He is specializing in Eastern European prehistory, and she in pre- and proto-historic Floridian materials. In summer 2007, Tim began the initial phases of his dissertation research in Békéscsaba, Hungary, where he collected ceramic, bone, and carbon samples for petrographic analysis, trace element analysis, and radiometric dating. His goal is to eventually assign burial mounds constructed on the Great Hungarian Plain in the Late Copper Age and Early Bronze Age to specific cultural phases, which has not yet been done. For the past six summers, he has worked with the Körös Regional Archaeological Project in Hungary.

2007, she taught the K–5 special-needs classroom at Casey Elementary School in Jackson. She served as a mentor to Monica Reible, B.S. 2007, who interned in her classroom in fall 2006. Lorio was named the school’s Teacher of the Year for 2006– 07. In May, she received the Outstanding Special Education Teacher Award from the National Association of Special Education Teachers. She is married to Jared E. Lorio, B.A. 2005.

2004

is pursuing a master’s degree in Spanish and French linguistics at the University of Georgia. She is a teaching assistant for both French and Spanish introductory language courses.

Nicole L. Christopher, B.A. 2004, of Pensacola, Fla., received a master of divinity degree from the Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta on May 14, 2007. She is a member of the Alabama-West Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church. Adam O. Cook, B.B.A. 2004, of Memphis was promoted in April 2007 to corporate manager of system operations for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare in Memphis. The integrated health-care delivery system includes seven hospitals located throughout West Tennessee, making it the third largest hospital system in the country. Cook received an M.B.A. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in May 2006, and an M.S. in healthcare administration from UAB in May 2007. Daria K. (Kovalyova) Lorio, B.A. 2004, of Williamsburg, Va., is pursuing a master’s degree in K–12 school administration at the College of William & Mary, where she is a graduate assistant in the School of Education’s office of graduate admissions. Lorio served as coordinator of children’s activities for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in the summer. From 2004 to

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James (Trey) B. McClain III, B.S. 2004, of Memphis graduated from the Mississippi College School of Law on May 11, 2007. Gloria B. Surber, B.A. 2004, of Athens, Ga.,

Joshua Wittie, B.A. 2004, and Kelly (Sellers) Wittie, B.A. 2004, of Hammond, La.,

announce the birth of their son, Daniel Aaron, on March 9, 2007. Josh teaches world history and Western civilization to freshmen and sophomores and coaches football, soccer, cross country, and track at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School in Hammond. Kelly is an architectural historian with the New Orleans branch of a national cultural resource management firm. She is pursuing a master’s degree in public history at Southeastern Louisiana University.

2005 Nora T. Oliver, B.S. 2005, of Baltimore began a master’s degree program in public health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore in July 2007. Following the 11month program, she will return to Jackson to complete her M.D. at UMC. Casey M. Parks, B.A. 2005, of Portland

accepted a position as a full-time reporter with The Oregonian in Portland in August 2007. She was an intern with the

newspaper from January to August 2007, during which time she covered education and the low-income suburb of Gresham. Parks’s freelance articles have appeared in such publications as Glamour and the Christian Science Monitor. Her article “Black Woman, White Skin” appeared in the July 2007 edition of Marie Claire. The article is narrated by Kenosha Robinson, a current Millsaps junior, who describes growing up as an African American with albinism. Parks has also given several presentations, including one as a keynote speaker at the Global Issues Network Conference in Luxembourg in March 2007. At the conference, she spoke about the trip to Africa that she won through an essay contest held by Nicholas D. Kristof, a columnist for The NewYork Times. Parks accompanied Kristof on a two-week reporting trip through central Africa in October 2006. She also kept a blog chronicling the trip for The NewYork Times website. In June 2007, Parks spoke about multimedia journalism for beginners at the National Writers Workshop, hosted in Portland by The Oregonian and the Poynter Institute.

2007 Kate H. Anderson, B.A. 2007, of St. Louis, Mo., was selected in May 2007 as a member of the St. Louis Rams cheerleaders. She was also featured on the cover of the Rams’ 2007–08 Cheerleader Calendar. The cheerleaders perform at all home games and attend a minimum of 12 public relations and charity events per year. Anderson is a marketing intern at Fleishman-Hillard Inc., a global communications agency headquartered in St. Louis.


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MajorNotes Dorothy M. (Moore) Alford, B.A. 1930, of Baton Rouge, La., died April 4, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of the Student Executive Board, Eta Sigma, the All One Club, and the YWCA Freshman Commission. She was a faculty assistant in the religious education department, secretary and president of the YWCA, secretary-treasurer of the Co-Ed Council, and secretary of the Philomathean Literary Society. She received the Tribbett Scholarship and graduated magna cum laude. Rev. Hubert L. Barlow, B.A. 1949, of

Long Beach died Dec. 19, 2006. While at Millsaps, he was a member of The Millsaps Singers. Martha C. (Conner) Bartsch, B.S. 1940, of

Lakewood, Colo., died March 2, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of Beta Sigma Omicron sorority and The Millsaps Singers. Rev. J. A. Bridewell Sr., B.S. 1939, of Ridgeland died Jan. 24, 2007. At Millsaps, he majored in religion. Dr.Tarver H. Butler, B.S. 1954, of Hattiesburg died Jan. 26, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity and The Millsaps Players.

Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity and Omicron Delta Kappa. He was on the Dean’s List and played varsity football and basketball. He also served as president of the M-Club and was named to Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities. Deaton was inducted into the Millsaps Sports Hall of Fame in 1983. In 1995, he received the College’s Alumnus of the Year Award. Spurgeon P. Gaskin, B.S. 1932, of Atlanta

died July 18, 2005. At Millsaps, he was a member of the P& W staff, the Glee Club, the Galloway Literary Society, the Science Club, and the band. He served as president of the Ramblers Club and business manager for The Millsaps Players. Thomas A. (T. A.) Gilbert, B.S. 1932, of

Westborough, Mass., died March 10, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity, the YMCA, and the Student Executive Board. He served as president of Omicron Delta Kappa, of the band, and of his sophomore class, vice president of his senior class, and secretary of the Catella Club.

Dr. Clyde (Skip) Xenophon Copeland Jr.,

Robert S. Graham, B.A. 1948, of Jackson died August 25, 2007. At Millsaps, he majored in economics.

B.S. 1956, of Jackson died May 3, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Delta, and Theta Nu Sigma. He graduated cum laude.

Capt. Samuel H. (Hurd) Horton, 1937, of Beaufort, S.C., died March 16, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.

Rev. Henry H. Crisler, B.A. 1943, of Savannah, Ga., died July 19, 2006. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, the YMCA, Kit Kat, the Science Club, and the band. He served as news and department editor of the P&W, co-editor of the P&W’s freshman edition, and literary editor of the Bobashela.

Werdna S. (Sue) McMurchy Howder, B.A. 1964, of Fairfax Station, Va., died June 22, 2007. While at Millsaps, she was a member of the Women’s Council, Wesley Fellowship, the Majorette Club, The Millsaps Singers, and the P& W staff. She served as house and membership chair for Phi Mu sorority, and was secretary for the Panhellenic Council. She was also on the Dean’s List.

Pauline (Polly) Currie Dawson, B.A. 1977, of

Madison died Dec. 18, 2006. At Millsaps, she majored in psychology. Charles M. Deaton, B.A. 1956, of

Greenwood died June 6, 2007. While at

Jessie Vic (Russell) Jones, 1938, of Madison died June 18, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of Beta Beta Beta, The Millsaps Singers, and the first pledge class of Chi Omega sorority.

William R. Jones Jr., B.A. 1950, of Jackson died March 27, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. He was a student assistant in the department of economics and graduated with honors. Josephine K. (Kemp) Kersh, 1943, of Jackson died April 9, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. Diane Kay (Messmann) Mann, B.S. 1962, of

Urbana, Ill., died Feb. 19, 2007. At Millsaps, she majored in history. Paul E. Martin, B.S. 1949, of Jackson died

July 29, 2007. At Millsaps, he majored in history. Dan McCullen, B.A. 1947, of Jackson died

August 26, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and the International Relations Club. A longtime financial supporter of the College, he and his wife, Beth, established a charitable gift annuity to benefit the Ross Moore Endowment Fund for the Humanities. They also contributed to Rev. and Mrs. W.C. Lester Scholarship Fund. George Meldon (G.M.) McWilliams, B.A. 1948, of Jackson died June 2, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. Joe G. Miles, 1941, of Kent, Wash., died

Nov. 6, 2006. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Sigma Rho Chi and the M-Club, played varsity football and basketball, and participated in track. He was on the basketball team that won the Dixie Conference Championship in 1940. He donated several items to the Millsaps Archives, including the Dixie Championship game ball signed by all the team members. Richard L. Miller, 1949, of Jackson died Feb.

7, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. Lucy Gerald Moak, 1946, of Richton died

March 6, 2007. While at Millsaps, she was a member of Kappa Delta sorority.

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Dr. Charles Edgar (Ed) Morrison, B.S. 1969, of Columbus died Feb. 11, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity and Beta Beta Beta.

2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of Chi Omega sorority, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Wesley Fellowship, The Millsaps Singers, the Women’s Council, and the Bobashela staff.

William L. Norton, 1938, of Ridgeland died

Jan. 25, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity and The Millsaps Singers. Dr. Robert Dodd Pearson, B.S. 1943, of Ardsley-on-Hudson, N.Y., died June 21, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, The Millsaps Singers, the Science Club, Alpha Epsilon Delta, and the YMCA. He was also on the Dean’s List. A longtime financial supporter of the College, he was a member of both the Presidents Society and Heritage Society. He created the Robert D. Pearson M.D., Foundation Trust, which will fund general scholarships for Millsaps students annually.

Henry B. Spurrier, 1947, of San Francisco

died May 26, 2007. He attended Millsaps as part of the Navy V-12 officer training program. A.J. Stevens III, 1953, of West died Jan. 24,

2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity, the M-Club, and the varsity baseball and basketball teams.

Robert H.Wilkins, 1950, of Ridgeland died William C. Stewart, 1950, of Kosciusko

died March 21, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. Kenneth Tillman Strange, 1950, of Jackson

died April 11, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity.

Reed H. Pendleton, B.A. 1992, of Nashville

died May 27, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of the P&W and Bobashela staffs and contributed to the Stylus. In fall 1990, he served as an off-campus senator. Mary Elizabeth Tingle (Tink) Selah, B.A.

1947, of Huntsville, Ala., died May 21, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of Phi Mu sorority, Kappa Delta Epsilon, The Millsaps Singers, and the Bobashela staff.

Charles E. Underhill, B.S. 1956, of Memphis died Jan. 16, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. Walter I.Waldrop, B.S. 1955, of Houston,

Texas, died April 23, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of the football and baseball teams and the M-Club. He served as president of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and was a student assistant in the geology department.

Mamye Barksdale (Felder) Shackelford, B.S.

1936, of LaGrange, Ga., died July 3, 2007. While at Millsaps, she was a member of Delta Zeta sorority, the YWCA cabinet, the Glee Club, and the women’s basketball team. She also served as a football sponsor.

David N.Welch, B.S. 1988, of Denmark, Maine, died August 15, 2007. At Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity, Beta Beta Beta, Deutsche Verein, Theta Nu Sigma, and the varsity football team.

Margaret Ann (Renfroe) Singleton, B.S.

Milton R.White, B.S. 1941, of Blacksburg,

1961, of Houston, Texas, died May 30,

Va., died Nov. 26, 2006. At Millsaps, he was

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Feb. 14, 2007. While at Millsaps, he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. Grace K. (Kirk) Wofford, Grenada College 1934, of Madison died March 18, 2007. John A.Yeager, 1940, of Wendell, N.C., died April 14, 2007.

Geneala V. (Van Valkenburgh) Swink, B.A.

1950, of Richmond, Va., died March 2, 2007. At Millsaps, she was a member of The Millsaps Players, Wesley Fellowship, the Women Christian Workers, the YWCA, and the Vikings.

Inazelle Pierce Selman, 1941, of Madison died Dec. 9, 2006. At Millsaps, she was a Campus Favorite and served as secretary of Chi Omega sorority. She was also a member of Omicron Delta Kappa and The Millsaps Players.

a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, YMCA, the Dramatic Club, and the band. He also served as a student assistant in the physics department. A longstanding financial supporter of the College, he and his wife, June, were scholarship representatives for the Milton C. White Scholarship Fund. The scholarship was established in memory of his father, who was professor and chair of the Millsaps English department from 1920 to 1960. Dr. White also helped establish The Millsaps Players and the Millsaps chapter of the national theatre honorary, Alpha Psi Omega.

Friends Mary Louise Dunn Fleming of Atlanta died June 7, 2007. She assisted in the Millsaps library and served as secretary to her husband, Dr. Neal Bond Fleming, a former Millsaps professor who served as chair of the religion and philosophy department. During their time at the College, from 1945–62, the Flemings lived on Faculty Row, where they raised their four children. Dr. Francis (Frank) William Frohnhoefer of Alexandria, Va., died May 16, 2006. From 1972–79, he was an assistant professor of administration and accounting at Millsaps. He served as coordinator of the College’s Small Business Institute, which paired students with local businesses. He also served as chair of the Honors Program. Rev. John David Humphrey of Tupelo died

Feb. 18, 2007. In 1959, Millsaps awarded him an honorary doctor of divinity degree.


Dr. Eugene Cain Emeritus professor of chemistry Dr. Eugene Cain, emeritus professor of chemistry at Millsaps College, died on August 1 in Linville Falls, North Carolina, following an automobile accident. Cain and his wife, Helen, had been dividing their time between their homes in Jackson and Linville Falls since he retired from Millsaps in 2002. Born on June 22, 1932, in Mineral Springs, North Carolina, Cain received his undergraduate degree from the University of North Carolina and his graduate degrees in chemistry from Duke University. His love for his North Carolina roots continued to call him home, where he and Helen spent summers and holidays throughout his tenure at Millsaps. Cain joined the Millsaps College faculty in 1960 as an associate professor of chemistry. For 42 years, he unlocked the secrets of chemistry for countless students and inspired many of them to become research chemists, doctors, and teachers. For more than 10 years, he chaired the chemistry department and the Premedical Advisory Committee; and it was during this time that the department achieved accreditation by the American Chemical Society and acquired a reputation for successfully placing students in medical schools and graduate programs. A lifetime member of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences, he was particularly proud of grant programs he had directed at Millsaps that focused on increasing the number of minority students who would pursue careers in medicine and scientific research. At a 2002 reunion of Millsaps alumni who were part of the Millsaps/UMC Pre-Medical Training Co-Operative for minority students, his former students contributed to an endowed scholarship for premed students named in honor of Cain, who was an adviser, a mentor, and a friend to many of them. “He was not only a teacher but also a father figure and an adviser,” said Dr. Perry Wallace, B.S. 1979. He was recognized by students and faculty alike as a remarkable teacher-scholar who had an uncanny ability to connect his research with his teaching and bring to the classroom realworld stories of how chemistry affects so many other fields. Students saw him as a guide who helped them navigate challenging curricula and challenging lives. A colleague once said of him that “he has devoted himself to the well-being of the College and contributed as much as anyone to its reputation for academic excellence.” “Gene came back from retirement to teach my organic course when I was on maternity leave,” said Kristy Stensaas, associate professor of chemistry. “He always wanted the best for our students and the chemistry department. His support of faculty and students truly cannot be measured—I feel it was off the charts!” He once married his love of chemistry with his love of history by focusing some of his research into the degradation of paper—a serious problem encountered in the preservation of books and other historical documents. During one sabbatical he put his historical research to good use as a visiting scientist at Colonial Williamsburg. While Cain surely loved chemistry, history, and music, they were no match for the love he had for Helen, his wife of 49 years. They were constant companions, whether going to concerts, collecting antiques, or walking in their beloved mountains of North Carolina. “Dr. Cain always had an encouraging and positive word for everyone,” said Dr. Timothy Ward, professor of chemistry. “I admired the wonderful relationship he had with students, always encouraging them to give their best and making them believe in themselves. Gene was truly a special person who embodied all the best attributes a professor should have.”

“I admired the wonderful relationship he had with his students, always encouraging them to give their best and making them believe in themselves.”

—Kay Barksdale fall–winter 2007

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Dr. Benjamin Graves Former president of Millsaps College

“He was a great guy to work with. It was only in later years that I became aware of his courageous stand for equality during the turbulent civil rights era.”

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Dr. Benjamin Graves, under whose skillful guidance Millsaps navigated the cultural and racial tumult of the 1960s to be called “the most courageous little college in America,” died on October 19. He was 86. After his tenure from 1965 to 1970 as the College’s seventh president, Graves went on to serve from 1970 to 1978 as the first president of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. When he stepped down from that position he returned to the classroom, teaching business courses at UAH until 1989. Graves could hardly have arrived at the College at a more difficult time. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 had just become law, there had been rioting over the admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi, and racial tension was palpable across the state. Enrollment at the College was declining and deficits were accumulating, all U.S. colleges were required to integrate to receive federal funding, and the national Methodist church was favoring integration, leaving Millsaps caught in the crossfire of a state at war with itself. Faced with these dilemmas, Graves took “an agonizing two weeks to make a decision” to assume the presidency, he said in a 1987 Founders Day speech. Marking the high point of this traumatic period, he said, was an editorial by the prominent journalist Hodding Carter that called Millsaps “the most courageous little college in America”—a column that eventually appeared in Time magazine. “I first came to know Ben when he was president of Millsaps and, for several summers, we both taught finance to future senior bankers at the Banking School of the South at LSU in Baton Rouge,” said George Harmon, president emeritus of Millsaps. “He was a great guy to work with. It was only in later years that I became aware of his courageous stand for equality during the turbulent civil rights era.” “Dr. Ben Graves was a force for positive change at Millsaps College,” said President Frances Lucas. “That force lives on in his relatives who continue to love and nurture the College.” Nat Rogers, who was chairman of the Millsaps Board of Trustees when Graves was the unanimous choice for president, remembers the period well. “He was well aware of the perils and pressures he would be facing,” because then-President H. Ellis Finger Jr. “had been subjected to unwarranted criticism from hard-line segregationists for his moderate views for several years,” Rogers said. “Ben did not waver but assumed his new duties enthusiastically. Shortly after his arrival the Trustees voted to amend admission policies to comply with federal laws and to eliminate discrimination entirely with respect to admissions. “Immediately after the open policy was announced, Ben Graves wrote letters to all parents, alumni, and Methodist clergy in Mississippi, giving compelling reasons for the change and seeking widespread understanding. On the whole, communication was well received. Nevertheless, a troublesome period followed, but Ben was successful in taking the edge off of the severest critics of the move.” Graves’s daughter, Janis Black of Oxford, emphasized that her father was standing on the shoulders of progressive faculty and Trustees who were very mindful of the tenor the times. “He was able to take that forward,” she said. “He would not have accepted the position without the prospect of an open-door policy.” Among the many ways in which Graves helped advance the College was his role in the establishment of the Millsaps College Arts & Lecture Series. “He wanted Jackson to be a ‘little Athens’ and for Millsaps to be a part of that,” said Luran Buchanan, executive director of the


series. “He and his wife, Hazeline, were instrumental in the founding of what has become a phenomenally successful program featuring writers, artists, musicians, and other prominent figures from the national cultural and political landscape.” Harper Davis, former head football coach, said that Graves, at the urging of John Christmas, then the dean of students, was responsible for the survival of Millsaps football. The program was saved by Diamond Anniversary Scholarships, tuition scholarships arranged by Graves in 1965. “Millsaps had only 20 players at the time and the Diamond Scholarships allowed Millsaps to survive in football,” he said. “The scholarships were outlawed in 1976 by the NCAA—they prohibited scholarships for all 350 Division III colleges and universities. However, they were followed by different types of grants by the federal government, as well as private donors.” Davis recalled that Graves’s son, Ben Jr., played tackle, saying, “The president came to observe practice quite a bit.” Graves also sought changes in the leadership of the College. “He was a wonderful man to work with,” said Dr. James McKeown, professor of biology, who came to Millsaps in 1962. “He expanded the Board of Trustees to include business leaders. And he basically began to open up the campus.” “What I will always remember is that Dr. Graves was well-suited to be the president of Millsaps,” said Dr. Robert Shive, professor of mathematics, who was hired by Graves in 1969. “He had a calm and dignified approach to doing business. Dr. Graves had a sense of how important our faculty was, and he communicated his respect for us. He was greatly respected among the faculty, staff, and students. In later years when I would see him, he always remembered me and seemed to enjoy our conversations.” Graves is also affectionately remembered for his sense of humor, which helped him cope with the frustrations of campus politics. “Ben and his son were both excellent tennis players,” said Robert Nevins, associate professor of biology. “The one thing I remember him saying was that he used to name his tennis balls after faculty members before he served them. He took great delight in that.” Hazeline Graves, who passed away in 1991, was a well-known and active Millsaps figure who greatly enhanced her husband’s popularity with her support for and close rapport with faculty and students, Rogers said. Her contributions are commemorated with a campus plaque. Before coming to Millsaps, Graves held the Milner Chair of Industrial Economics at the University of Mississippi. Prior to that he was an associate professor at the University of Virginia and also taught at Louisiana State University. A native of Hebron in Jones County, Graves was for a number of years associated with Esso Standard Oil Company in staff and advisory capacities in Baton Rouge and New York in the fields of employee relations and personnel management, business and cost analysis, purchasing, and public relations. A 1942 graduate of the University of Mississippi, where he held a college record for quality points earned in one semester, Graves received a master’s degree in business administration from Harvard and a Ph.D. from LSU. He was a published author and assisted in the production of a documentary film that won awards at the Venice and Edinburgh festivals of 1955. He held prominent positions with the Methodist church, Jackson Chamber of Commerce, Jackson Rotary Club, Jackson Symphony Association, Jackson Ballet Guild, and many other civic and professional organizations. During World War II, he served in the Navy. He is survived by one son, Ben Graves Jr. of Hebron; and two daughters, Janis Black of Oxford and Cynthia Dent of Huntsville, Alabama. All three attended Millsaps between 1966 and 1973. Contributions can be sent to the Graves-Black Scholarship Fund, c/o Charles Lewis, Millsaps College, 1701 North State Street, Jackson, MS, 39210.

“Dr. Graves had a sense of how important our faculty was, and he communicated his respect for us. He was greatly respected among the faculty, staff, and students.”

—John Webb fall–winter 2007

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Joe Lee Gibson A Millsaps legend It was early June when news hit campus that beloved Millsaps staff member Joe Lee Gibson had passed away over the previous weekend. Gibson started working on campus in 1936, at the age of 17. Gibson’s June 9 funeral took place at Parkview Church of Christ, where Bill Goodman Jr., B.A. 1949, commemorated the Millsaps legend:

Joe Lee Gibson was a better man than I. Some of us, sadly, waste precious time. He never wasted a minute. Joe Lee’s work ethic was legendary. I have never known anyone else who worked like that. And not grudgingly but happily, with joy on his face and a smile I can never forget.Yet Joe Lee was far from only a loyal, trustworthy, dependable worker. He was a good and decent man through and through.There was not a devious bone in his body. He was honest to the core. But that is only part of the story. When I first met Joe my freshman year at Millsaps College, he was working on the grounds and in the gym, in his father’s footsteps. I was told Joe had no formal education. If I remember correctly, I was told he had never had a single day of schooling. “Joe Lee became the paradox The consensus on campus was that here was a young man deprived of learning and destined for a life of gloom and misery, with no possible chance of success or prominence or power or fame. of Millsaps College—in a How foolish we were.We may have had some notion of the ways of the world but not of the ways of God. sense wiser than many with In the first chapter of his first letter to the Corinthians, St. Paul writes that not many of us are wise by human standards—not many of us are of noble birth—not many of us are books and diplomas.” powerful by human standards. But, he writes, God is the source of wisdom. God is the source of righteousness. God chooses from those who appear weak in the eyes of the world to shame those whom the world sees as strong. As the years went by, I watched that scripture unfold in the life of Joe Lee. God took that man whom the world deemed unlearned and used him as a channel for goodness. Joe Lee’s life teaches that God does not equate wisdom with learning.The best man is the one who has the best heart. Joe Lee became the paradox of Millsaps College—in a sense wiser than many with books and diplomas. His wisdom came from the spirit deep within him. He learned that life is not about self, but that we exist for others. He became the perfect example that what matters is not what we have but who we are. Through the years I noticed that whenever and wherever I would encounter people with a connection to Millsaps, the inquiries were relatively few and far between about Trustees or presidents or professors or even former classmates; the questions were almost always about Joe Lee.The man destined to obscurity became a man of renown—a veritable legend. Any history of Millsaps College, to be complete, will feature Joe Lee. He not only toiled there for well over 60 years, but he became almost synonymous with the institution itself. Indeed, whenever we step on the campus we will be enveloped by his spirit—the man who, if you will, graduated summa cum laude with a degree in goodness. Today we celebrate human goodness as we thank God for the life of Joe Lee Gibson. A memorial garden is planned to honor the life of Joe Lee Gibson. For more information or to make a gift, contact Dr. Charles Lewis at 601-974-1023 or charles.lewis@millsaps.edu.

—Margaret Cahoon

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Selby Watkins McRae Alumna and benefactor of the College Selby Watkins McRae, B.A. 1946, a longtime supporter of the College, died on July 26 at her home at Green’s Crossing Farm near Jackson after a brief illness. She was 81. She had attended the University of Georgia and Mississippi University for Women before coming to Millsaps, where she majored in English and graduated with honors. She was a member of Chi Omega sorority. A lifelong resident of Jackson, her family has long been connected with Millsaps and Galloway Memorial United Methodist Church, where she was active in the Ben Fatherree Sunday School Class and served as a Stephen Minister. Her great uncle, Dr. A. F. Watkins, was both the pastor at Galloway and president of Millsaps in the early 1920s. She was the wife of Richard McRae, a Life Trustee of the College. She served as trustee and vice president of the Selby and Richard McRae Foundation. In 2005, the foundation established the Selby and Richard McRae Scholars Program at Millsaps. The Scholars Program grants a full scholarship every two years to an entering freshman who exhibits outstanding academic merit and demonstrates financial need. The first McRae Scholar, sophomore Amy Marcellus of Ridgeland, was named in fall 2006. The McRaes also established a chair of business administration in the Else School of Management in 1989 to support recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty. Dr. Penelope Prenshaw, professor of marketing, is the current McRae Chair. The McRaes’ generous support of the College also includes their contributions over several decades to the Annual Fund and various capital campaigns. The Selby and Richard McRae Fitness Center is a testament to their generosity to Millsaps. Their son, Vaughan McRae, is a current member of the Board of Trustees. Married for 61 years, Selby McRae was instrumental in supporting her husband’s development of McRae’s Department Stores into one of Mississippi’s leading business enterprises. She was also deeply interested in the improvement of the Jackson community and held memberships in many civic and cultural organizations.

The McRaes established a chair of business administration in the Else School of Management to support the recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty.

—K. B.

fall–winter 2007

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Glenn Phifer Pate Former dean of women

“The meaningful college experience involves the tireless efforts of an interested behind-the-scenes personality whose unceasing patience and genuine concern for every student make college life worthwhile.”

Glenn Phifer Pate, an honor graduate of the class of 1940 and former dean of women at Millsaps College, died on September 4 following a brief illness. She was 89. Described by friends and associates as the epitome of a Southern lady, she was small in stature with a quiet, ladylike demeanor and an aura of gentleness that may have belied both her enthusiasm for her responsibilities and an efficient work ethic that endeared her to students, faculty, and staff. Pate joined the public relations staff at her alma mater in 1957, and in May 1961 she was named dean of women, a position she held until 1968. She served at a time in the College’s history when men and women lived on separate ends of the campus and women were required to be in the residence halls by 10 p.m. on weeknights (10:30 for seniors). It was her responsibility to enforce the rule allowing women to wear pants only if they were covered by raincoats when coming to the student union on Saturdays. She was adviser for the Panhellenic Association, and women students reported to her office to receive their bids for sorority rush. She led the Women’s Student Government Association, which was responsible for making and enforcing regulations and restrictions for women students. Some students may have thought they could take advantage of this small, quiet woman; but consequences were dealt fairly under her rule, and several were convinced to take a brief “sabbatical” as a result of their misbehavior. She also was an adviser to the women’s leadership honorary, Sigma Lambda, and to the Chi Delta chapter of Chi Omega. Alumni of these groups have a special love for Pate, who offered wise counsel and support to their organizations. In 1967, the Bobashela was dedicated to her with this inscription: “More than classroom work, dormitory life, or extracurricular activities, the meaningful college experience involves the tireless efforts of an interested behind-the-scenes personality whose unceasing patience and genuine concern for every student make college life worthwhile. It is in Mrs. Glenn Pate that we find such a person.” She had two children, Henry Pate Jr., a 1968 graduate of Millsaps, and Elise. Her family members were communicants of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral until she left to help found St. Stephen’s Reformed Episcopal Church. After leaving Millsaps, she worked at Unifirst and then as corporate secretary of Feild Co-Operative Association, which provided college loans to students. In her memory, Feild Co-Op has donated funds for a bench, which will be placed in the Bowl and will have a plaque bearing her name and years of service to the College.

—K. B.

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President’s Report 2007


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(July 1, 2006, through June 30, 2007)

The gifts of all donors listed in this report were received by Millsaps College from July 1, 2006, through June 30, 2007. Millsaps takes seriously its responsibility for demonstrating good stewardship with the gifts generously given by alumni and friends. Please contact the Millsaps College Office of Development at 601-974-1035 or vernon.king@millsaps.edu if you discover an error in the listing of your name.

Founders Society

Legacy campaign objectives include increased scholarship funding, more support for faculty, offering international learning opportunities to more students, enhancing professional and preprofessional programs, and improvements to the campus.

president’s report

The Millsaps College Founders Society is made up of individuals and organizations of the highest distinction. Each member has played a profound role in shaping the future of the College through lifetime gifts to Millsaps of $1 million or more. These preeminent supporters help make possible a superior liberal arts education for generations of students to come, in much the same way the founders of the College did more than a century ago. The Founders Society members are listed here and are also recognized on the Millsaps Tower, alongside the College’s three founders—Reuben Webster Millsaps, Charles Betts Galloway, and William Belton Murrah. Henry Vergil and Carol Howie Allen Asbury Foundation of Hattiesburg BellSouth Corporation Paul T. Benton The Chisholm Foundation Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Charitable Foundation Inc. Robert H. Dunlap Charles W. and Eloise T. Else The Ford Foundation Gertrude C. Ford Foundation M. H. Hall Family Phil Hardin Foundation Robert and Dee Leggett Lilly Endowment Inc. Raymond and Margery Martin H. F. McCarty Jr. Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Hyman F. McCarty Jr. Selby and Richard McRae Millsaps Navy V-12 Unit 1943–45 Mississippi Conference of The United Methodist Church Merle Berry Montjoy Edward L. and Helen Moyers North Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church F. W. Olin Foundation Inc. Luther and Janet Ott Mr. and Mrs. Nat S. Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Joe Frank Sanderson Thomas L. Spengler Mary Davenport Spiva Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Sumners Foundation

Celia Brevard Trimble and Janice Trimble Vicksburg Hospital Medical Foundation Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Inc. R. E. Williams Leila Clark Wynn Heritage Society The Millsaps College Heritage Society was inaugurated in 1990 as a means of honoring those individuals who have made a planned gift to the College. Planned gifts include bequests, annuities, trust arrangements, life insurance gifts, and other deferred giving options that allow donors to meet charitable goals while making plans beneficial to their financial circumstances. The individuals listed in this report represent many, but not all, of those who have chosen to make a planned gift to Millsaps College. Other planned gifts have been made by many individuals who wish to remain anonymous. Ruth Curtis Alford 1929 Carol Howie Allen 1936 William (1950) and Minna Appleby William F. Appleby Jr. 1978 Henry A. Ash 1962 Diane Brown Ayres 1953 Dorothy Ford Bainton 1955 Fred A. Barfoot 1961 Lottie L. Bash 1996 T. Michael (1969) and Jennifer Beam William H. (1939) and Rita Bizzell A. Kevin (1986) and Tina Foraker Blackwell Richard L. (1958) and Martha Blount Daniel S. (1977) and Libby Bowling Robert and Johnnye Catherine Bradford Alleen Davis (1955) and Jim Bratton Luran Luper (1963) and Buddy Buchanan 1962 Peggy Carr Buchanan 1947 Oralee Graves Buie 1936 Carl J. Bush 1969 Ruth B. Caillavet

Mary Elizabeth Wharton (1947) and Neal Calhoun Carla Jenkins (1980) and Alexander Campbell 1986 James B. Campbell Jr. 1995 William (1948) and Yuvette Carter Clara Porter (1944) and James Cavett 1941 Blanche Jones Caviness 1930 Ann Hanson Chamberlain 1967 Reynolds S. Cheney II 1957 Brad (1982) and Julie Chism Barbara Robertson (1949) and John Christmas 1948 Hazel Clowe Heron S. Collins Pam Capps (1971) and Robert Collins 1969 Theresa Terry Conerly 1955 Maria Lekas (1967) and Peter Costas 1953 David E. Davidson Jr. 1969 Roy C. DeLamotte 1939 Frances Ashley (1946) and Robert Donaldson 1948 James K. Dossett Jr.1965 John M. Douglass Jr. 1963 Luther M. Dove 1966 Elizabeth McGee (1952) and Paul Engel Kenneth L. (1949) and Lois Farmer Homer Ellis Finger 1937 George (1972) and Olivia Fleming Maggie Wynn Fortier 1979 J. Thomas (1965) and Donna Fowlkes Marilyn Dickson Foxworth 1965 James T. Gabbert Jr. 1966 Stewart (1957) and Lynn Gammill James (1966) and Mary Beth Gentry Janet W. Gildermaster George E. Gillespie Jr. 1970 N. J. and Jennie Golding Nancy Sue Gregorie 1982 Maurice (1967) and Cathy Hall Alice Wofford (1969) and Charles Hallford 1967 George and Bessie Harmon Monica Sethi (1988) and Ray Harrigill (1990) Kenneth R. Harrison 1974 Helene Holleman (1981) and David Hassell 1979 George S. Haymans III 1972 J. Herman Hines


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Helen Davis (1954) and Louis Hodges 1954 Anne Sisson (1952) and William Holland 1952 J. Henry (1939) and Donna Holleman Robert (1947) and Kate Hollingsworth Faye Junkin (1968) and Stuart Hudnall 1965 Joe (1941) and Pat Humphries Philip (1949) and Mary Helen Irby William and Paula James William (1959) and Susan Jeanes Lady Ann Snuggs (1960) and Charles R. Jennings 1960 Janice M. Johnson 1976 Martha Johnson Peder R. Johnson 1979 Ayrlene McGahey Jones 1935 Elliott Anna Jones 1959 Robert P. Jones Jr. 1986 Maurice and Lois Joseph Matthew H. Kaye 1986 Daniel (1954) and Rose Keel Timothy V. Kemp 1980 William B. Kerr 1959 Mildred Kirkland John (1975) and Marcella LaFoe Archie C. Lamb 1977 David M. Lassiter 1965 R. Eason (1968) and Ellen Leake Clifton (1960) and Nancy LeCornu B. F. (1952) and Ruth Lee Robert (1962) and Dee Leggett James H. Lemly 1936 Catherine Herring Lindsey 1947 J. Walton (1956) and Evelyn Lipscomb Edna McShane Lipson 1960 Kathie Gunn (1982) and Chuck Lott Dana Millwood (1981) and Robert L. Lyle 1979 Frances Lucas Helen Murphy (1947) and Sutton Marks 1948 Dianne Humphries (1972) and John Mason 1974 Clyde H. Mathews 1964 Raymond McClinton 1936 Dan (1947) and Beth McCullen David C. McNair 1960 W. Melton (1959) and Ann McNeill Michael T. McRee Jean Nicholson (1968) and Timothy Medley 1966 Esther Read Miller 1947 Marjorie Miller 1941 Merle Montjoy 1962 William B. Mooney Helen Moyers James R. Muse 1966 C. Lee Nicholson 1957 Austin (1968) and Carol Parker Cynthia Harper (1983) and Hugh Parker

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John Marshall Pemberton 1983 Richard Lee Perry 1970 Lynne Krutz (1965) and George Pickett 1966 Rudy R. Pollan (1971) Rex (1963) and Lenda Poole Jessie D. Puckett Jr. 1949 Jane Ramsey 1961 C. Robert (1935) and Sara Ridgway Naomi Tattis (1970) and C.R. “Bob� Ridgway IV 1968 Ellnora Riecken 1955 Virginia Mayfield Riggs 1940 E.B. and Judy Robinson Helen Ricks (1942) and Nat Rogers 1941 Sandra Sabatini 1962 Polly Crisler Shanks 1947 T. Stanley Sims Harmon L. Smith 1952 Nell Permenter Smith 1938 Steven W. (1981) and Nancy Smith Curtis C. and Helen C. Sorrells John (1955) and Nelda Stringer Paul M. Sumerall 1976 Alvin Sumerlin 1949 Rowan H. Taylor Sr. James D. (1967) and Carol V. Thompson Janice Trimble 1943 Sandra Rainwater (1964) and J. Murray Underwood 1963 John C. and Marcia C Vaughey Billy L. (1959) and Sylvia Walker Christopher M. Walters 2004 W. David (1971) and Susan Watkins C. Ruth Wedig Watson 1948 Nanette Weaver (1954) and W. Lamar Weems 1953 Elizabeth Weems Weir 1976 Lynda Elizabeth Williams 1986 Edward (1962) and Rosemary Woodall Rebecca Nell Woodrick 1982 Leila Clark Wynn Ronald (1970) and Jean Yarbrough The Presidents Society The Millsaps College Presidents Society plays a critical role in providing philanthropic support to Millsaps. Four Councils within the Presidents Society recognize annual giving at different levels and compose the total membership: William B. Murrah Council ($10,000 or more); Marion L. Smith Council ($5,000 to $9,999); Homer Ellis Finger Council ($2,500 to $4,999); Member ($1,000 to $2,499). Asterisks indicate individuals who have been Presidents Society members for 10 or more consecutive years.

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William B. Murrah Council *Joy Williamson Ainsworth 1966 *W. Eugene Ainsworth 1964 Asbury Foundation of Hattiesburg *Bradley R. Benton 1982 *Mary Frances Hillman Benton 1985 Paul T. Benton 1976 A. Kevin Blackwell 1986 Daniel S. Bowling 1977 Libby Bowling Howard Brent Robert I. Brock 1974 C. E. Cain Helen Cain Chisholm Foundation James A. Coggin Pat Coggin Patricia Long Cook 1960 *Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Charitable Foundation *Elaine Crystal *Emanuel Crystal Arthur Vining Davis Foundation Joseph P. Donovan 1996 Patricia Donovan Eugene G. Douglass Jr. 1972 Judith Lane Douglass 1974 *Robert H. Dunlap 1951 Dunlap and Kyle Company Tina S. Foraker-Blackwell *Donna Fowlkes *J. Thomas Fowlkes 1965 Charles A. Frueauff Foundation Gerald A. Gafford 1945 GLS, L.L.C. Jennie C. Golding N. J. Golding Jr. *Cathy Hall H. Gaston Hall 1952 *Maurice H. Hall Jr. 1967 Blythe Jeffrey Hardin 1958 William J. Hardin 1958 Monica Sethi Harrigill 1988 Ray F. Harrigill 1990 Melinda N. Hendrix Steven M. Hendrix W. T. Hogg Jr. Hogg Family Charitable Corporation *Carolyn Hood *Warren A. Hood Jr. Horne CPA Group HPS Oil & Gas Properties Dudley Hughes *Susan Jeanes *William T. Jeanes 1959 Joseph C. Langston 1979 Tracie A. Langston Langston Law Firm *Ellen Leake *R. Eason Leake 1968 *Dee C. Leggett *Robert N. Leggett Jr. 1962

Alexander C. Lindsey John L. Lindsey A. Gordon Lyons 1979 Mary K. Lyons Harold C. Malchow 1973 *Betty Maloney *J. Con Maloney Jr. 1961 Mary Ann McCarty H. F. McCarty Jr. Family Foundation Howard L. McMillan Jr. Mary Eliza McMillan James M. McMullan Madeleine McMullan Madeleine and James McMullan Foundation Janie McQuinn William C. McQuinn *Nora Frances McRae *Richard D. McRae Richard D. McRae Jr. *Selby Watkins McRae 1946 *Vaughan W. McRae Selby & Richard McRae Foundation *Michael T. McRee Mary C. Mills 1990 Richard H. Mills Jr. 1988 *Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church *Don Q. Mitchell 1964 *Mary Sue McDonnell Mitchell 1963 Alma Moreton Frances Morrison Paul Cooper Morrison 1978 *Robert R. Morrison Jr. Robert S. Morrison III 2001 *Twick Morrison Morrison Foundation *Estate of Edward L. Moyers *Helen Moyers New Orleans Saints *Janet Sanderson Ott 1970 *Luther S. Ott 1971 Estate of James R. Preston 1929 *Jessie D. Puckett Jr. 1949 Sharon Scott Rhoden 1969 Thomas H. Rhoden 1967 *C. Robert Ridgway III 1935 *Sara R. Ridgway *E. B. Robinson Jr. *Judy Robinson *Helen Ricks Rogers 1942 *Nat S. Rogers 1941 Deborah B. Salmon Gary L. Salmon Joe F. Sanderson Jr. 1969 Kathy Sanderson Joe Frank Sanderson Foundation *Sanderson Farms Incorporated Ann M. Schimmel George Schimmel Raksha Sethi S. L. Sethi Charles Shanor

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“We chose ‘legacy’ as the theme for our campaign to represent two things: All that you have gained from Millsaps College, and all that you hope to give back.” —President Frances Lucas, speaking at the Legacy gala

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Susan M. Shanor Nancy A. Smith Nell Permenter Smith 1938 Steven W. Smith 1981 Curtis C. Sorrells Helen C. Sorrells Estate of Thomas L. Spengler 1942 Gloria Stricklin Lee A. Stricklin Jr. 1954 *Mike P. Sturdivant *Ygondine W. Sturdivant Estate of Mary Nordin Teague 1942 Tellus Operating Group Elizabeth Cunningham Turnbull 1937 *J. Murray Underwood 1963 *Sandra Rainwater Underwood 1964 *Valley Services John C. Vaughey Marcia C. Vaughey *Vicksburg Medical Foundation *John H. Wear Jr. Foundation Estate of Susanne Batson Weaver 1962 Catherine Welles John E. Welles II Estate of Paul L. Wells Jr. *Terrance B. Wells 1976 *Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Cleve J. Whitley Virginia Anne Jones Whitley 1968 *Kathryn L. Wiener Sam E. and Burnice C. Wittel Foundation Marion L. Smith Council Jean P. Baker Ronald K. Baker Guy Barbee Patty Barbee John H. Caldwell Jr. John H. Caldwell Sr. *Wesley A. Caldwell Foundation Michelle Clingan-Waits 2001 *Coca-Cola Bottling Company Ollie Dillon Jr. 1951 *David H. Donald 1941 Wayne E. Ferrell Jr. 1969 *Janet W. Gildermaster Edwina Goodman William F. Goodman Jr. 1949 J. Scott Greene 1974 Claudia Carithers Hauberg 1972 Robert E. Hauberg Jr. Charles R. Haygood 1977 Jackson Vaughan Agency *Paula P. James *William R. James

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Earle F. Jones Irene Jones Archie C. Lamb 1977 The Lamb Firm Rebecca M. Langston Shane F. Langston 1980 Frances Lucas Jeanne Burnet Luckett 1966 J. David Marsh III 1973 Patricia Pharr Marsh 1976 Jean Nicholson Medley 1968 Timothy C. Medley 1966 Meyer Crystal Family Foundation A. Bruce Miller 1974 Kimberly L. Myers 1983 Mary M. Nichols Wendy Caldwell Nixon Clementine B. Palmer John N. Palmer Margaret J. Pharr Richard Pharr 1972 Rudy R. Pollan 1971 Lenda H. Poole Rex D. Poole 1963 Ridgway Realty *Tom B. Scott III 1976 Leo W. Seal Jr. Leo W. Seal Family Foundation John E. Seddelmeyer Sarah R. Seddelmeyer *Sandra B. Sims *T. Stanley Sims Eugenia Summer Jonathan M. Sweat Janice Trimble 1943 Velocity Sports & Entertainment Group Ned Welles Memorial Fund, Inc. William G. Yates III W.G.Yates & Sons Construction Company Homer Ellis Finger Council 4th and 1 Inc. *Kay Barret Barksdale 1964 Ann Anderson Blumer 1956 Frederick E. Blumer 1955 Bower Foundation Brice H. Brackin Linda L. Brackin *Reynolds S. Cheney II 1957 Cheryl Coker Timothy C. Coker Cecilia A. Collins 1984 Anne Johnson Culpepper 1981 David H. Culpepper 1980 John M. Douglass Jr. 1963 William G. Duck 1967 Linda Schrayer Dupree 1981 Thomas R. Dupree 1971 Clyde B. Edwards Jr.

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O

R

S

Yvonne Moss Edwards 1957 Michael L. Fondren 1988 *Rachel Davis Fowlkes 1967 Isak Gerson Christina Glick Dale W. Green Griffin & Griffin Oil and Exploration Amanda Griffin William K. Griffin III W. L. Gullett Monty P. Hamilton 1984 Mary Lene Harrison Newt P. Harrison 1957 Janet Hickson Richard G. Hickson Hickson Family Foundation Chadwick Hill William W. Hill Albert L. Hopkins Florence O. Hopkins Charitable Fund Jackson Pulmonary Associates Peder R. Johnson 1979 Matthew H. Kaye 1986 Charles R. Lathem 1981 Louise Lathem Clifton M. LeCornu 1960 Nancy LeCornu *Lynda Lee 1962 Laura L. Lillard 1979 Mary Lee Busby Livesay 1943 Livesay Historical Society Lynn A. Loring Porter Loring III *Evelyn Godbold Maddox 1948 *George L. Maddox Jr. 1949 Lee B. McCormick Jr. 1966 Steve McNair Foundation Mississippi Methodist RehabilitationCenter Mississippi Puppetry Guild Mississippi State Medical Association *Estelle Noel Mockbee 1967 *Michael M. Mockbee Jr. 1967 Helen Cabell Moffat 1964 James N.C Moffat III 1965 Brad E. Mutchler Phyllis A Mutchler Ida Alford Noblin 1937 Julia Park Ogden 1985 Paul F. Ogden 1984 Jim A. Payne Emily J. Pointer Gift Trust Steve P. Raftopoulos 1988 David Ruml Claire King Sargent 1956 Sue Spang William F. Spang Jr. *Jerry M. Sullivan Jr. *Patti McCarty Sullivan 1970 Andrew R. Townes 1953


H

Kay Townes Truly, Smith and Latham Carla D. Webb 1997 Webb Endodontics Robert C. Wingate 1941 Terry G. Winstead 1973 *James L. Young 1952 Members Mark Adams Ted J. Alexander 1958 Clyde R. Allen Jr. 1963 Nancy Norton Allen 1964 Alexander A. Alston Jr. 1958 Sarah Jane Alston AmSouth Nancy Grisham Anderson 1962 W. Franklin Appleby Jr. 1978 William K. Austin 1966 Olen McCadoo Bailey Jr. 1986 Teresa White Bailey 1994 Martin H. Baker Jr. 1979 Bancorpsouth-Tupelo BankPlus Ken H. Barnett 1978 Gene R. Barrett 1970 Linda Barrett Lottie L. Bash 1996 James K. Bell Patricia A. Bell Benchmark Construction Corp G. Bradley Bennett 2000 Donna Benson Robert Benson Benson Dermatology and Skin Cancer R. Edward Bergmark Brett J. Berry Peggy M. Billings 1950 Richard H. Birdsong 1982 Julia Dawson Bishop 1962 Dameron Black III Jane Black Noble B. Black 1998 *Martha Blount *Richard L. Blount 1958 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Mississippi A. Gary Boone 1961 Barbara V. Boone Bragg Drywall Dan E. Breland Collins Brent *Elizabeth Martin Brister 1991 *William Brister Carl G. Brooking 1971 Patsy Brooking Diane M. Bruser 1974 Christian R. Burck 2002 S. Louise Burney 1996 Leigh Ann Burns-Naas 1986 Robert M. Buxton 1985 Martha H. Campbell

O

N

O

R

R O

L

Canizaro Cawthon Davis Capitol Street Corporation Joseph William Carroll 1950 Yung Wong Chang Elaine Chatham Franklin E. Chatham 1970 Henry E. Chatham Jr. 1968 Marie Dickson Chatham 1971 W. Dean Chow *Barbara Robertson Christmas 1949 *John H. Christmas 1948 Citizens National Bank Charles Clark 1947 Emily R. Clark William Rodney Clement Jr. 1980 Necie Coats-Borroni 1981 Lauri S. Collins 1983 *Pamela Capps Collins 1971 Riley B. Collins Jr. 1999 *Robert K. Collins 1969 Dorothy W. Colom Scott W. Colom 2005 Wilbur O. Colom CommuniGroup Brinson Conerly-Perks 1959 Cheryl Barrett Converse 1969 Philip R. Converse 1964 Arie Jacobs Cooper 1961 Charlie W. Cooper 1957 *Maria Lekas Costas 1967 *Peter J. Costas 1953 Peter J. Costas Enterprises Margaret Countiss Brian C. Courville 1998 Covenant Partners LLC Mathew Cox Terra Cox Craft-Croswell Contract Furnishings Create Foundation Sally Crim William L. Crim 1954 *O’Hara Baas Croswell 1967 *William W. Croswell 1966 Andrea Alfonso Crowson 1993 Thomas D. Crowson Jr. 1993 Sam W. Currie 1961 Marilyn J. Currier Brenda Watts Da Silveira 1981 Ricor Da Silveira 1981 *Jimmye B. Danks James O. Darnell Susan M. Darnell *June Langston DeHart 1974 Matthew B. Devall 2002 Lindsay Mercer Diaz 1968 Betsy M. Ditto J. Kane Ditto Jr. *Louisa O. Dixon *Joyce Nall Dortch 1958 *Richard W. Dortch Victor G. Dostrow 1979 Frank M. Duke Susan Barry Duke 1964

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

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*Henry N. Easley 1956 Paul Eason Charles R. Elgert Laura Mae Godbold Elgert 1947 Enterprise Corporation of the Delta Mark B. Eppes 1976 Renee Ethridge 1981 Exxell Developers, Inc. *Ben Fatherree Bible Class Feild Co-Operative Association First Commercial Bank Hal G. Fiser Harvey Fiser George H. Fleming Jr. 1972 Olivia Fleming Donald H. Flynt Katherine M. Flynt *Douglas S. Folk 1983 *Gretchen Folk Robert S. Fortenberry *Deward G. Fountain Jr. 1959 *Margaret Fountain Fountain Family Foundation Judy Frascogna Xavier M. Frascogna Jr. Harry C. Frye Jr. 1947 Helen McGehee Frye 1945 Susan Galandiuk Clytice Robertson Gardner 1990 Don Garvey Marguerite Darden Godbold 1940 Deborah McGregor Good 1985 Jeffrey E. Good 1986 William F. Goodman III 1974 Benjamin B. Graves Robin B. Gray Tim D. Gray 1991 Greenbough Inc. Margaret H. Greene Michael F. Griffith 1993 *Debra S. Grubbs *Michael Ray Grubbs 1973 Gay Piper Gwinner 1959 Maurice Gwinner Haddox, Reid, Burkes, & Calhoun Janet M. Hall 1978 Lisa Marie Holland Hannah 1990 William R. Hannah 1991 William B. Harper 1982 James Huel Harris 1978 Lynn C. Harris Carol Burrus Hartman 1979 *Clotilde Hendrick *Harry Julian Hendrick 1937 Beverly R. Herbert Mark D. Herbert 1975 H. Lee Hetherington 1970 Lucile Pillow Hicks 1960 *J. Herman Hines *Helen Davis Hodges 1954 *Louis W. Hodges 1954 Holistic Dental Care Gene Honeycutt

Rose Ann Honeycutt Mary A. Howkins 1973 Margaret Ferrell Hubbert 1962 Arlene J. Huber Michael T. Huber Renee Hudson Walter Hudson Kevin O. Hughes Vicki Loflin Hughes 1981 *Joe T. Humphries 1941 *Pat Humphries Margaret D. Hutzel Patrick J. Hutzel Internal Medicine and Pediatric Associates Beth Boswell Jacks 1966 Gerald H. Jacks 1965 Donna Daniel Jackson 1970 William D. Jackson B. Ruth Johnson *Wilton J. Johnson III 1972 James S. Jones *Kathryn Jones Renee S. Jones Virginia Hewitt Jones 1955 *William M. Jones Jr. 1950 Marion Fleming Jordan 1965 Ronald W. Jurney 1978 Sherri Jurney R. Brit Katz *Daniel T. Keel Jr. 1954 Daniel T. Keel III 1984 Lauren B. Keel *Rose Keel Robert C. King 1977 Alan R. Kirk 2000 Bronwen Houston Kirk 2000 Connie Kossen P. T. Kossen Lampton Love Inc *Rachel Anne Laney Dana M. Lang Philip T. Lang *Genrose Mullen Lashinger 1967 Matthew J. Lautar 1963 Cathy J. Lazarus Vincent P. LeBlanc 1947 Eloise Leech Charles R. Lewis Earl T. Lewis 1950 Ellie Lewis Jane B. Lewis Julia Aust Lewis 1954 T. W. Lewis III 1953 Catherine Herring Lindsey 1947 Peggy M. Loehn Thomas E. Loehn David M. Loper 1986 Robert T. Lott 1953 Elizabeth Allen Lyle 1976 Tommy G. Lyle 1975 Mark R. Mahoney 1985 Jeffery A. Martin

2007


H

“Our goal is $160 million. We’ve already raised over half that amount, so we are well on our way, but we need your help. Millsaps deserves every dollar we can raise for her. ” —J. Murray Underwood, Legacy chairman

president’s report

O

N

Bettye West Mason 1962 Dick B. Mason III Justin L. Matheny 1998 David R. McCollum 1972 Mark J. McCreery 1988 Sharon O. McCreery *Beth McCullen *Dan McCullen 1947 Carrie E. McDonnell 2006 Jennifer M. McDonnell John M. McDonnell Vicky R. McDonnell Emily C. McInnis 1984 Robert Glade McInnis 1978 McInnis Electric Company Thomas W. McNair 1958 Jane C. McNaughton 1982 Paul F. McNeill 1987 Doug Medley 1962 Marilyn Medley Mississippi School for the Deaf Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center Mississippi Teachers Association *Kathleen Montgomery Mitchell 1992 *Thomas M. Mitchell 1993 *Willard S. Moore 1962 John C. Moseley 1963 Barbara Himel Mullins 1961 *Robert G. Mullins 1971 William S. Mullins III 1959 Thomas Murphy Virginia Murphy Patricia G. Namias Ronald A. Namias Jere Nash Frances J. Neely Walter P. Neely John A. Neill Sr. 1949 Mary Neill Nosworc Holdings LP Dale O. Overmyer 1952 Judy Parker *William H. Parker Jr. 1966 Wayne Parker Investments Parker Construction Company Michelle Partridge Tereau Pearson 1986 *Robert D. Pearson 1943 Michele Biegel Pendergrast 1998 *George B. Pickett Jr. 1966 *Lynne Krutz Pickett 1965 Constance M. Piraino John L. Piraino Hiram C. Polk Jr. 1956 Georgette Prejean Ronald J. Prejean Barbara Swann Price 1957 Roy B. Price Jr. 1955 James C. Provost Leslie M. Provost George I. Puckett

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Pamela G. Purcell W. Thomas Purcell III 1985 *John E. Rawson 1960 *Mary C. Rawson Nicholas C. Rebold 1966 Elizabeth Williams Reeves 1997 Joseph Todd Reeves 1998 Michael R. Reinhard Estate of Frances E. Rembert 1941 Linda Wells Rice 1977 Robert E. Rice Jr. 1978 Henry Crozier Ricks Jr. 1940 Bethe Rimmer John R. Rimmer 1938 J. Richard Robbins 1968 Janis Roberts Stanley Roberts Jerry Gaskins Robinson 1962 Robert D. Robinson *Charlton S. Roby Sr. 1942 *Marie Roby Todd S. Rose Penny L. Samuels Willard R. Samuels Jr. 1941 Sand Control Systems Steven W. Sansom 1991 Virginia Saunders Connie Schimmel John Schimmel Christine M. Schott 1990 Michael A. Schwitter 2002 Deborah P. Scipper Thomas H. Scipper Laura Elizabeth Hewes Scott 1946 Tom B. Scott Jr. 1944 Manisha Sethi 1994 Polly Crisler Shanks 1947 Louis H. Shornick Shornick Foundation William H. Simon Jr. 1966 W. H. Simon & Company *Colleen C.Y. Smith *James K. Smith *Richard A. Smith *Sarah Posey Smith 1944 *Alfred G. Snelgrove *Frances Ogden Snelgrove 1940 Charles M. Sours 1948 Charles P. Stall Karen T. Stall State Bank and Trust Mack B. Stokes *John H. Stone III 1958 John T. Stupka 2004 Carol Hederman Tatum 1968 Frederick E. Tatum 1943 Mary M. Tatum *Rowan H. Taylor Sr. George W. Tebo Mary E. Tebo Telos Foundation John Ed Thomas III 1959 Margaret Ewing Thomas 1958

D

O

N

O

R

S

Ellen Burns Treadway 1962 Marcus A. Treadway Jr. 1963 Donald G. Triplett 1958 Triton Diving Services J. Mack Varner 1967 Penny Sanders Varner 1967 Carolyn Caves Vaughan 1971 Holly Wagner James D. Waide III 1968 Fentress Boone Waits 1965 James L. Waits 1958 Jim Walden Ree Ridgway Walden 1974 Molly Mitchell Walker 1999 Robert F. Walker 1999 *Betsy Stone Walkup 1968 *John Knox Walkup Hope Morgan Ward Peter C. Ward William S. Ware 1973 Dorris S. Wasson R. Warren Wasson 1955 Eleanor B. Weaver Robert H. Weaver *Nanette Weaver Weems 1954 *W. Lamar Weems 1953 Charles Donald Wells Jr. 1975 Ashley L. Wells Leslie V. Wells Lynn P. Wells Garnette A. Wetzel James K. Wetzel James K. Wetzel & Associates June C. White Lee I. White Jerry D. Whitt Sue Yeager Whitt J. Todd Willis 1984 Elizabeth Ridgway Wofford 1950 John D. Wofford Sr. 1950 Carolyn Allen Wolfe 1957 Jack L. Woodward 1951 Nelda W. Woodward Sarah Eaton Wooten 1976 Dan A. Wright 1947 Leila Clark Wynn Wirt A. Yerger III Trustees W. Eugene Ainsworth 1964 (PS-M) Gene R. Barrett 1970 (PS) Paul T. Benton 1976 (PS-M) Warren C. Black Jr. 1971 (DA) A. Kevin Blackwell 1986 (PS-M) Daniel S. Bowling III 1977 (PS-M) Martha H. Campbell (PS) Alveno N. Castilla 1975 (DA) James A. Coggin (PS-M) Elaine Crystal (PS-M) Robert H. Dunlap 1951 (PS-M) J. Thomas Fowlkes 1965 (PS-M) Maurice H. Hall Jr. 1967 (PS-M)


H

Monica Sethi Harrigill 1988 (PS-M) Richard G. Hickson (PS-F) J. Herman Hines (PS-F) Carolyn Hood (PS-M) Vicki Loflin Hughes 1981 (PS) William R. James (PS-S) William T. Jeanes 1959 (PS-M) Earle F. Jones (PS-S) Archie C. Lamb 1977 (PS-S) R. Eason Leake 1968 (PS-M) Robert N. Leggett Jr. 1962 (PS-M) John L. Lindsey (PS-M) J. Con Maloney Jr. 1961 (PS-M) Richard D. McRae (PS-M) Vaughan W. McRae (PS-M) Michael T. McRee (PS-M) Timothy C. Medley 1966 (PS-S) Don Q. Mitchell 1964 (PS-M) Robert R. Morrison Jr. (PS-M) Helen Moyers (PS-M) Luther S. Ott 1971 (PS-M) Jim A. Payne (PS-F) Vonda Reeves-Darby 1978 (PS-F) Thomas H. Rhoden 1967 (PS-M) C. R. Ridgway IV 1968 (PS-S) E. B. Robinson Jr. (PS-M) Nat S. Rogers 1941 (PS-M) Tom B. Scott Jr. 1944 (PS) Steven W. Smith 1981 (PS-M) Mike P. Sturdivant (PS-M) Rowan H. Taylor (PS) John Ed Thomas III 1959 (PS) Janice Trimble 1943 (PS-S) J. Murray Underwood 1963 (PS-M) John C. Vaughey (PS-M) Hope Morgan Ward (PS) Sue Yeager Whitt (PS) Leila Clark Wynn (PS) William G. Yates (PS-S) 2006–07 Alumni Donors by Class Major Generals (Early Days) 30% Participation A. Ray Adams 1944 (CC) James M. Ainsworth 1942 (CC) Ruth C. Alford 1929 Bettye Smith Allen 1953 Frank T. Allen 1949 (SCC) Mary Pitts Allen 1952 (SCC) Barbara Linder Anderson 1951 Robert R. Anderson 1952 Linda McCluney Anglin 1951 (SCC) Bill F. Appleby Sr. 1950 (DA) John L. Ash III 1949 (CC) Vivian Ramsey Aubert 1936 (SCC)

O

N

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

John M. Awad 1956 (CC) Betty Dement Bailess 1951 (CC) Oren Bailess 1951 (CC) Carroll R. Ball 1946 (SCC) Ray K. Bardin 1956 Lynn Bacot Barlow 1953 Ouida Eldridge Barnes 1952 Elizabeth Hulen Barr 1953 (CC) John R. Barr 1953 (CC) Martha Conner Bartsch 1940 (SCC) Dixie Briggs Bauman 1947 Francis M. Beaird Jr. 1951 (SC) Betty McGaha Bennett 1950 Mary Smith Best 1952 (CC) Richard L. Berry Sr. 1951 (SCC) Neal B. Biggers 1956 (CC) Peggy M. Billings 1950 (PS) Jack R. Birchum 1954 William H. Bizzell 1939 (DA) Catherine Hamilton Blanton 1952 (CC) Ann Anderson Blumer 1956 (PS-F) Frederick E. Blumer 1955 (PS-F) Edna Khayat Boone 1954 (SC) Thomas H. Boone 1956 (SC) Darden J. Bourne 1953 John L. Bowie 1952 (CC) Elizabeth H. Box 1952 (SCC) Leonard H. Brandon 1948 (DA) Alleen Davis Bratton 1955 (CC) W. P. Bridges Jr. 1950 (SCC) Elsie Drake Brindley 1956 (SCC) James Barry Brindley 1953 (SCC) Catherine Shumaker Brinson 1949 Elton Brown 1950 Daphne Middlebrooke Bruce 1950 Peggy Carr Buchanan 1947 (SCC) Clarice Black Burch 1955 (CC) Fred J. Bush 1939 Martha Lee Byrd 1950 Taylor D. Caffey 1954 Glenn A. Cain 1954 (CC) Sara Selby Caldwell 1953 (CC) John B. Campbell 1956 Floyd Thomas Carey Sr. 1956 (SCC) Charles E. Carmichael 1947 (SC) Mildred M. Carpenter 1953 (CC) Joseph William Carroll 1950 (PS) Clara Porter Cavett 1944 (SCC) James R. Cavett Jr. 1941 (SCC) Van A. Cavett 1953 (CC) Mary Lipsey Champion 1951 Billy K. Chapman 1947 (CC) Dorothy Lauderdale Chastain 1946 (SCC) James G. Chastain III 1944 (SCC) Howard B. Cheek 1955 (SCC) Joanne Henderson Cheek 1955 (SCC) Ann Simpson Chenault 1951 (CC) Barbara Robertson Christmas 1949 (PS)

D

O

N

O

R

S

John H. Christmas 1948 (PS) Janet McRae Clancy 1939 Charles Clark 1947 (PS) Duncan A. Clark 1952 (SCC) Patricia Busby Clark 1951 (SCC) Jean E. Clarkson 1947 Rosemary Williams Cloughley 1955 John W. Cochran 1945 (DA) Edward M. Collins Jr. 1953 (SCC) Peggy Suthoff Collins 1954 (SCC) Mildred Ellis Colotta 1946 (SCC) Bob H. Conerly 1949 Theresa Terry Conerly 1955 (SCC) Oscar Weir Conner III 1949 (SC) John E. Cooper Jr. 1954 (SCC) John A. Cope 1943 W. Deloach Cope 1943 (CC) Clyde X. Copeland Jr. 1956 Dorothy Dean Copeland 1934 Peter J. Costas 1953 (PS) Mabel Buckley Crawford 1953 (CC) William L. Crim 1954 (PS) Doris Murphree Crumbley 1943 (SCC) Betty Langdon Conner-Currey 1947 (CC) George T. Currey Sr. 1951 (CC) Lois Fritz Curtis 1946 Ed Curtis 1952 (CC) Harper Davis Jr. 1947 (DA) Anne Roberts Dean 1953 (SCC) Elizabeth Hardwick Dean 1954 Charles M. Deaton Sr. 1956 (SCC) Mary Dent Dickerson Deaton 1952 (SCC) Clara Foy Derrington 1946 Ollie Dillon Jr. 1951 (PS-S) Robert Caxton Doggett 1936 (SCC) Thad H. Doggett 1946 David H. Donald 1941 (PS-S) Frances Ashley Donaldson 1946 (CC) Robert W. Donaldson 1948 (CC) Wilford C. Doss 1942 (CC) Robert H. Dunlap 1951 (PS-M) Jack Eady 1950 (SCC) Henry N. Easley 1956 (PS) Joseph L. Ebersole 1955 (SC) Martha Ford Edwards 1953 Laura Mae Godbold Elgert 1947 (PS) Mary Moore Ellis 1940 Nell Vaughan Ellis 1955 (CC) Roderick Entrekin 1950 (SC) Alfred T. Eubanks 1955 (SCC) Kenneth L. Farmer 1949 (SCC) Samuel E. Field Jr. 1956 (SCC) Edwin E. Flournoy 1956 (SCC) Audrey Jennings Franks 1954 (SCC) Imogene Harrell Freeman 1953 (CC) Harry C. Frye Jr. 1947 (PS) Helen McGehee Frye 1945 (PS) Elizabeth Crisler Fugate 1946

Abbreviations after donor names indicate annual giving society membership. PS-M: Presidents Society, Murrah Council ($10,000 or more); PS-S: Presidents Society, Smith Council ($5,000-$9,999); PS-F: Presidents Society, Finger Council ($2,500-$4,999); PS: Presidents Society, Member ($1,000-$2,499); DA: Deans Associates ($500-999); SC: Scholars Club ($350-499); SCC: Second Century Club ($200-349); CC: Century Club ($100-$199).

2007


H

The Millsaps Founders Society comprises people and organizations who have played a profound role in shaping the future of the College through lifetime gifts to Millsaps of $1 million or more. This year’s Founders Day remembered Thomas Spengler, B.A. 1942, who left the majority of his estate to Millsaps. His gift established the Thomas L. Spengler Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund to benefit students majoring in English or theatre.

president’s report

O

N

David C. Fulghum 1951 Kathryn Decelle Gabbert 1941 (CC) Carolyn Hudspeth Gaby 1955 Gerald A. Gafford 1945 (PS-M) Dorothy Stietenroth Garrard 1950 (SC) John Garrard Jr. 1949 (CC) Sammie J. Glorioso 1954 (CC) Marguerite Darden Godbold 1940 (PS) Robert R. Godbold Jr. 1945 (CC) Jo Anne Weisinger Godwin 1951 (CC) William F. Goodman Jr. 1949 (PS-S) Albert N. Gore Jr. 1952 (SCC) Edgar A. Gossard 1954 Sarah Dennis Gossard 1954 Anne Finger Graves 1955 (SC) Bernice Edgar Green 1954 (SCC) George Waverly Hall Jr. 1951 (SCC) H. Gaston Hall 1952 (PS-M) Frances Williams Hardy 1947 Nancy A. Harris 1955 (SCC) Robert V. Haynes 1952 (CC) Harry Julian Hendrick 1937 (PS) Evelyn Walker Herm 1947 (CC) Byron T. Hetrick 1953 George T. Hicks 1955 Byrd Hillman Jr. 1956 (SC) Joe W. Hobbs 1954 (CC) Helen Davis Hodges 1954 (PS) Louis W. Hodges 1954 (PS) Anne Sisson Holland 1952 (SCC) William H. Holland Jr. 1952 (SCC) Robert T. Hollingsworth 1947 (DA) Eugene C. Holmes 1955 (CC) Shirley Shipp Holston 1953 (SCC) Patricia Leep Hovatter 1953 John M. Howell 1954 (CC) Lou Skidmore Hubbard 1947 Clydell Carter Hudson 1956 (DA) Louise Hight Hudson 1954 (SCC) Rebecca Ely Hudson 1947 Yeager Hudson 1954 (SCC) Barbara Walker Huggins 1954 (DA) Joseph R. Huggins 1950 (DA) Joe T. Humphries 1941 (PS) Martha Selby Hunter 1955 (SC) Adene Hurst 1944 (SC) Aylene Hurst 1944 (SC) Lenora Thompson Irby 1952 Philip E. Irby Jr. 1949 (SCC) Kathryn Klumb Izard 1947 (CC) Glenna Goodwin James 1953 Sybil Foy James 1954 (DA) William J. James 1955 (DA) Cecil G. Jenkins 1951 (SCC) Patsy Abernethy Jenkins 1950 (SCC)

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Lonnie B. Johnston 1953 (CC) Cecil B. Jones 1956 George K. Jones 1955 (CC) R. Lanier Jones 1952 (SCC) Valera Bailey Jones 1956 (CC) Virginia Hewitt Jones 1955 (PS) William B. Jones II 1950 (SCC) William M. Jones Jr. 1950 (PS) Daniel T. Keel Jr. 1954 (PS) Glenn S. Key 1942 (CC) Ann Pullen King 1934 (SCC) Robert B. Kochtitzky 1950 (SCC) John D. Krebs 1945 (CC) Vincent P. LeBlanc 1947 (PS) B. F. Lee 1952 (SCC) Clay F. Lee Jr. 1951 (DA) Dot Stricklin Lee 1953 (DA) George D. Lee 1949 Louise Campbell Legate 1953 (SC) Carol Brown Leggett 1955 (CC) James H. Lemly 1936 (SCC) Earl T. Lewis 1950 (PS) Julia Aust Lewis 1954 (PS) T. W. Lewis III 1953 (PS) Evelyn Hawkins Lilly 1952 Sale Lilly Jr. 1952 Catherine Herring Lindsey 1947 (PS) J. Walton Lipscomb 1956 (DA) Mary Lee Busby Livesay 1943 (PS-F) Samuel T. Lloyd Jr. 1940 (SCC) George T. Locke 1945 (SC) Mary Bass Loftin 1948 (CC) John B. Lott 1955 Robert T. Lott 1953 (PS) Jean White Lowe 1946 (SCC) Reginald S. Lowe Jr. 1956 (SCC) William F. Lynch Jr. 1956 (DA) Evelyn Godbold Maddox 1948 (PS-F) George L. Maddox Jr. 1949 (PS-F) Frank B. Mangum 1954 (CC) Helen Murphy Marks 1947 (CC) Sutton Marks 1948 (CC) Beatrice Williamson Martin 1955 Paul E. Martin 1949 Raymond S. Martin Jr. 1942 (SCC) Wayne Mayer 1955 Martha Mayo Simmons 1952 Roy D. McAlilly 1952 (CC) Raymond McClinton 1936 (SCC) Dan McCullen 1947 (PS) Charles B. McDaniel 1944 (CC) Curtis H. McGown II 1952 (CC) David A. McIntosh 1949 Rosemary Thigpen McIntosh 1950 Selby Watkins McRae 1946 (PS-M) Marie Stokes Melichar 1950 (CC) Esther Read Miller 1947 (SCC) John W. Moore Jr. 1953 (SCC) Leland E. Moore 1948 (SCC) R. Inman Moore Jr. 1947 (CC)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Virginia Edge Moore 1953 (SCC) Louise Lancaster Mumpower 1943 Mary Utley Murphy 1946 (CC) Patricia Hillman Murrell 1956 (CC) Anna Coleman Myers 1951 (CC) L. Leslie Nabors Jr. 1955 John A. Neill Sr. 1949 (PS) E. H. Nicholson 1945 (CC) Elizabeth Timberlake Nicholson 1944 (CC) Josephine Timberlake Nicholson 1941 (SCC) Ida Alford Noblin 1937 (PS-F) Rachel Simpson Norris 1953 Norma L. Norton 1954 (SC) Lewis G. Odom Jr. 1944 (SCC) Lynda Wasson Ollerton 1954 Dale O. Overmyer 1952 (PS) Leslie J. Page Jr. 1954 (CC) Roy A. Parker 1955 (SCC) Patricia Patrick Phillips 1954 Betty D. Pearson 1951 Don R. Pearson 1951 (CC) Robert D. Pearson 1943 (PS) Charlotte Gulledge Peets 1946 (CC) Randolph Peets Jr. 1946 (CC) Frances Johnson Pelegrin 1949 Priscilla Morson Picheloup 1944 Clara Booth Pinkston 1956 (DA) Charles A. Planch 1955 (SCC) Hiram C. Polk Jr. 1956 (PS) Ernest R. Porter 1956 (CC) Mary Emma Ervin Potts 1943 (CC) Jo Lee Powell 1956 (SC) Joe J. Powell Jr. 1949 (SCC) William F. Powell 1956 (SC) Estate of James R. Preston 1929 (PS-M) Amaryllis Griffin Price 1956 (CC) William Price 1949 Roy B. Price Jr. 1955 (PS) Ruby McDonald Price 1950 Thomas E. Price 1956 (CC) Julian D. Prince Sr. 1949 (SCC) Peggy Bonner Prock 1951 Charles V. Prouty 1951 (CC) Jessie D. Puckett Jr. 1949 (PS-M) Kathryn Runge Reaves 1951 (CC) Nina H. Reeves 1945 (CC) Estate of Frances E. Rembert 1941 (PS) Norma Neill Richards 1955 (SCC) Van M. Richardson 1941 (SC) Vera Coffman Richardson 1944 (SC) Robert L. Richter Sr. 1953 (CC) Sara Linn Richter 1954 (CC) Henry Crozier Ricks Jr. 1940 (PS) C. Robert Ridgway III 1935 (PS-M) W. Bryant Ridgway 1940 Ellnora Riecken 1955 (SCC) John R. Rimmer 1938 (PS)


H

McWillie M. Robinson Jr. 1954 (DA) Virginia Sanders Robinson 1956 (CC) Charlton S. Roby Sr. 1942 (PS) Victor M. Roby 1938 (CC) Jerome B. Roebuck 1954 (SCC) Jessie Wynn Morgan Roebuck 1954 (SCC) Helen Ricks Rogers 1942 (PS-M) Nat S. Rogers 1941 (PS-M) Rosalind Butler Ross 1949 Warren E. Rummelhoff 1944 (CC) Barbara McBride Russell 1952 Roy H. Ryan 1952 (SCC) Willard R. Samuels Jr. 1941 (PS) John C. Sandefur 1949 (CC) Mary Flowers Sandefur 1955 (CC) Thomas W. Sanford 1950 Claire King Sargent 1956 (PS-F) Robin Smith Sciortino 1956 Charles L. Scott 1943 (CC) James P. Scott 1941 (SCC) Laura Elizabeth Hewes Scott 1946 (PS) Tom B. Scott Jr. 1944 (PS) Mary Tingle Selah 1947 (SCC) Virginia Carmichael Shackelford 1944 (SCC) William G. Shackelford Sr. 1947 (SCC) Polly Crisler Shanks 1947 (PS) David Shelton 1951 (DA) Barbara Bartlett Short 1951 (CC) Mary Derrick Sibbald 1953 Virginia Conerly Sickels 1947 Carrie Marler Sides 1952 Joe B. Sills 1948 (CC) Myra Nichols Sills 1947 (CC) William F. Sistrunk 1954 Josephine Lampton Sivewright 1953 (CC) Bettye Watkins Smith 1952 Ike F. Smith 1950 Myra Fisher Smith 1956 (CC) Nell Permenter Smith 1938 (PS-M) Sarah Posey Smith 1944 (PS) V. K. Smith Jr. 1953 (CC) Thomas P. Sneed 1951 (CC) Frances Ogden Snelgrove 1940 (PS) Charles M. Sours 1948 (PS) Estate of Thomas L. Spengler 1942 (PS-M) William K. Stallworth 1956 (SCC) Dorothy Lipham Steen 1950 Billy M. Stokes Jr. 1948 Sandra Campbell Stone 1952 (SC) Lee A. Stricklin Jr. 1954 (PS-M) Mildred Nobles Sumner 1930 (SCC) Felix A. Sutphin 1940 (CC) Frederick E. Tatum 1943 (PS) Cynthia Morse Taylor 1956 Dorothy Jones Taylor 1945 Betty Robbins Taylor 1955 Estate of Mary Nordin Teague 1942 (PS-M) John S. Thompson Jr. 1950

O

N

O

R

R O

L

L

Peggy Weppler Thompson 1946 Harmon E. Tillman Jr. 1951 (CC) Nona Kinchloe Tillman 1956 (CC) Anita Reed Toler 1956 Andrew R. Townes 1953 (PS-F) O. Gerald Trigg 1956 (DA) Janice Trimble 1943 (PS-S) Alanson V. Turnbough 1948 (SC) Elizabeth Cunningham Turnbull 1937 (PS-M) John E. Turner 1956 Virginia Price Van Hecke 1951 (CC) Joseph S. Vandiver 1940 (SCC) Jo Anne Cooper Vansuch 1954 S. Lowery Varnado 1951 (CC) Mary Joy Hill Vought 1952 (DA) Fred M. Walker 1952 (CC) Helen Maddox Wall 1956 (SCC) Virginia James Walters 1941 (CC) Scott S. Warfield 1938 R. Warren Wasson 1955 (PS) Katherine Webb Lindenborn 1955 (CC) Nanette Weaver Weems 1954 (PS) W. Lamar Weems 1953 (PS) L. Conrad Welker Jr. 1950 (CC) Mary Boyles Welker 1950 (CC) George A. Whitener 1956 Dayton E. Whites 1956 (SCC) Charles H. Williams Jr. 1955 Robert L. Williams Jr. 1949 Jerry M. Williamson Sr. 1954 Naomi Ware Williamson 1944 Robert C. Wingate 1941 (PS-F) Estate of Burnice Crosby Wittel 1935 (PS-M) James C. Witten 1956 (CC) Elizabeth Ridgway Wofford 1950 (PS) Grace Kirk Wofford 1934 John D. Wofford Sr. 1950 (PS) Ernestine Crisler Woodall 1949 (DA) Frances Moore Woodard 1955 (SCC) Robert Thomas Woodard 1954 (SCC) Mary Eudy Woods 1949 Jack L. Woodward 1951 (PS) Betty Small Wright 1953 (SC) Dan A. Wright 1947 (PS) Thomas L. Wright 1947 Mary Weber Yonker 1953 Clarence N. Young 1953 James L. Young 1952 (PS-F) J. Wesley Youngblood 1949 William L. Youngblood 1948 (CC) Grace Chang Yueh 1951 Jordan M. Zesch 1948 (DA) Class of 1957 49% Participation Jo Anne Abernathy (CC) Ezra M. Alexander Anita Perry Barlow Doris Pittman Blackwood Alice Starnes Bolton

O

F

D

O

N

O

R

Benjamin E. Box (SCC) Robert G. Bryant Kathryn L. Bufkin (CC) John Henry Carney (CC) Carl B. Causey (DA) Reynolds S. Cheney II (PS-F) M. Olin Cook (SCC) Millicent King Cook (SCC) Charlie W. Cooper (PS) Spiro P. Cora Ted B. Cottrell Enoch G. Dangerfield (CC) Kenneth R. Dew (SCC) Eugenia Kelly Dickinson (CC) J. Oscar Dowdle (CC) Harry W. Dowling (SCC) Yvonne Moss Edwards (PS-F) Mary Brandon Flournoy (SCC) David D. Franks (SCC) Tommy D. Gilbert Jane Pickering Gillis (SCC) Nena Doiron Griffis (CC) Newt P. Harrison (PS-F) James W. Hudson Jr. Samuel L. Jones (CC) Paul D. Kern (CC) Ilah Nicholas King (CC) Jack B. King (CC) James R. McCormick (CC) Patricia Chunn McCormick (CC) Max H. McDaniel (CC) Sandra Miller McDaniel (CC) Mary Huntley McSwain (CC) Carolyn Goff Middleton (CC) Harold D. Miller Jr. (DA) Warren Curtis Moffat Carolyn Williams Pate John C. Philley (CC) Elwyn Addkison Porizky Barbara Swann Price (PS) Jeanette D. Pullen (CC) Helen Reilly Richards (SC) Daphne A. Richardson S. James Robertson Peggy Sanford Sample (DA) Tex S. Sample (DA) Lora Gossard Shepherd Rose C. Trigg (DA) Larry T. Tynes (CC) Frances Jernigan Williams (CC) Carolyn Allen Wolfe (PS) Betty Dyess Youngblood (CC) Class of 1958 45% Participation Bobby D. Ainsworth Ted J. Alexander (PS) Alexander A. Alston Jr. (PS) Janice Bower Arnold (SCC) John E. Baxter Jr. Louise Riddell Bethay Richard L. Blount (PS)

S

Willette Wilkins Bonney (SCC) Betty Trapp Chapman (CC) Caroline Watson Cheek (CC) Joyce Nall Dortch (PS) Thomas B. Fanning (DA) Sue Ferguson Grace Blythe Jeffrey Hardin (PS-M) William J. Hardin (PS-M) Curtis O. Holladay Mary Smith Jones (SCC) Sarah Louisa Jones R. Edwin King Douglas M. Lay (CC) Dorothy Cargill Liberty (CC) Gay Lambert Lord Margaret McCorkle McDougall (SCC) Thomas W. McNair (PS) Claudette Hall Millar Charlotte Oswalt Moncrief Ray H. Montgomery Susan Young Mosley Barbara Bowie Neel Charles W. Nicholson Sr. (CC) Lin Carruth Purtle (CC) Clifton L. Rushing Jr. (CC) Gerald E. Russell Betty Miller Sadler Clarence M. Shannon Johnny B. Sharp (CC) Ruth A. Short (CC) Jeannette Ratcliff Stagg (CC) John H. Stone III (PS) Caroline Hutchins Tarpley Margaret Ewing Thomas (PS) Sam A. Tomlinson III (CC) Donald G. Triplett (PS) James L. Waits (PS) William C. Wall Jr. (SCC) Carol Broun Wansong (CC) Herbert A. Ward Jr. (CC) Kennard W. Wellons Joan Anderson Whitener Edwin W. Williams (CC) Mabel Gill Workman Class of 1959 47% Participation Richard M. Alderson Jeanette Harpole Bell Clarice Pennebaker Brantley Peggy Seay Brent (SCC) Cathryn Collins Bryant Arnold A. Bush Jr. Sue Mozingo Carter (CC) John M. Case Shirley Stoker Cherry Nancy Reed Chickering Brinson Conerly-Perks (PS) Myrna Drew Cooper (CC) Joseph R. Cowart (SCC) Julia Beckes Dawson Fred B. Dowling

2007


H

Tom Spengler was “a dear friend to Millsaps College and a true original.” —President Frances Lucas, speaking at Founders Day

O

N

Franz R. Epting Elizabeth Taylor Eure (CC) Deward G. Fountain Jr. (PS) Robert E. Gentry (SC) Gay Piper Gwinner (PS) Inge M. Halbert Martha Egger Halbert Herman L. Heath Avit J. Hebert (CC) William W. Horlock (SCC) William T. Jeanes (PS-M) Elliott A. Jones (SC) Lynda Ray King Ralph N. King Mary Tumlin Lansing Colleen Thompson Lipscomb Marguerita Krestensen Lyda (CC) Anne Marler E. S. McIntyre (CC) Edwin P. McKaskel (CC) W. Melton McNeill (DA) James Maxwell Miller (CC) Bailey Moncrief Rebecca Larche Moreton (CC) William S. Mullins III (PS) Frances West Page (CC) Wendell M. Pou (SCC) Mary Reid Ratcliff (SC) S. Smiley Ratcliff (SC) Paul J. Register William W. Rhymes III Carolyn Allen Richmond (CC) John S. Robinson Lynette Garst Robinson Patsy Robbins Robinson James P. Rush (CC) Robert D. Sartin (CC) Jesse O. Snowden Jr. (SCC) Raymond C. Swartzfager Jr. (CC) John Ed Thomas III (PS) Lillian Starnes Thomas (CC) Milton J. Whatley Betty Horne Whisnant Clyde V. Williams (CC) Clara Smith Wimberly (SCC) Anne Brooks Winstead (CC) Hank G. Winstead (CC) Class of 1960 37% Participation Frank D. Allen Jr. (CC) Tom A. Binford (SCC) Regina Harlan Boyles (SCC) W. Gardner Brock (CC) Margaret Woodall Brooke (DA) Zoe H. Bush Mary Stubblefield Carraway Lester Clark Jr. (CC) Hunter McKelva Cole (CC) Patricia Long Cook (PS-M) Albert E. Davis Jr. (SCC) Ina Paine Davis (DA)

president’s report

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

James R. Day (SC) Beverly Jumper Dickson Carole Shields Dye (SCC) Jackie R. Giffin Carol Jenkins Hagerman Lucile Pillow Hicks (PS) John C. Hunsucker Charles R. Jennings (CC) Lady Snuggs Jennings (CC) Charles R. Johnson (SCC) Roger W. Kinnard (SCC) Clifton M. LeCornu (PS-F) Beverly Evans Leggett Donald D. Lewis (SCC) Edna McShane Lipson (SCC) S. K. Love (CC) Albert M. Lovett Sue Sanders Maisel (CC) Lawrence Marett Elizabeth Smith Matthews Robert E. McArthur (CC) Sue Roberts McKnight William E. McKnight Sue Hemphill McRaney (SCC) Dorothy Davis Miley Dorothy Huddleston Miller (DA) Glenda Chapman Moore (CC) Alfred E. Moreton III (CC) James F. Oaks III Ann Kelly Raley (DA) John E. Rawson (PS) Mary White Robinson (CC) John T. Rush (SCC) Julia Campbell Shirley Margaret Merrell Smith Jane Ellis Soehner (CC) Grace Frost Steiner David H. Strong (SCC) Betty Smith Taylor Elizabeth Walter Willcockson Mary Semmes Wright Margaret Bennett Yerger (CC) Paul W. Young (CC) Class of 1961 29% Participation Jane L. Allen (CC) Nancy Dunshee Baker Janice Davidson Blumenthal (CC) A. Gary Boone (PS) James Gary Boutwell (CC) R. Russ Buckley Arthur Price Burdine (SCC) Arie Jacobs Cooper (PS) Ella Butler Cox (SCC) Sam W. Currie (PS) Lois Shetler Decker (CC) Betty Burgdorff Dowling Charles B. Felder (SCC) John L. Greenway (CC) John A. Higginbotham Ruth Tomlinson Lewis (SCC)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Francis M. Libbey Anne Hyman Love (CC) J. Con Maloney Jr. (PS-M) Sue Wood McKay (SCC) Barbara Himel Mullins (PS) Virginia Cowan Pierson (SC) Marvin R. Pyron (DA) Jane Ramsey (SCC) Edwin L. Redding (CC) Nina Cunningham Redding (CC) Hilda Cochran Roberts (SCC) Sara Webb Smith (CC) Richard L. Soehner (CC) Sydney Overstreet Swartzfager (CC) Eleanor Crabtree Taylor (CC) James B. Tucker (CC) Betty Jones Varner (CC) Joe Ed Varner Jr. (CC) Charles O. Williams (SCC) Class of 1962 36% Participation Nancy Grisham Anderson (PS) Bettie Williams Austin Julia Dawson Bishop (PS) Sandra Godbold Boucher Buddy Buchanan (DA) Ivan Blackwell Burnett Jr. (CC) Mary McClung Case Carole Cater Ciskowski Jack R. Clement (CC) Wilkes H. Davis Jr. (CC) Donald P. Fortenberry (SCC) Elizabeth Warren Foster (CC) John Fred Gipson Katherine Walt Grice Judith Jones Hamilton James F. Haynes (CC) Margaret Ferrell Hubbert (PS) Cynthia Kite Hudgins (SCC) Carole Whiteside Hurdle Sue Hall Johnson Lynda Lee (PS-F) Robert N. Leggett Jr. (PS-S) Martha Stephens Lemieux John Lipscomb Carolyn Baumgartner Loposer Lewis J. Lord (CC) Virginia Lamb MacNaughton (CC) Bettye West Mason (PS) Shirley Prouty McCraw (SCC) Roger L. McGehee Jr. (CC) Gail Garrison McNeill (CC) Doug Medley (PS) Barbara Goodyear Minar Willard S. Moore (PS) Mary Simpson Morgan Robert H. Naylor II (CC) Emily Lemasson Newcomb (CC) Linda Neely Powell (SCC) Terry J. Puckett (CC)


H

George H. Robinson (CC) Jerry Gaskins Robinson (PS) Dell Pyron Rogers J. E. Rogers (CC) William R. Sanders (CC) Leah Park Schott Robert T. Sharp Vic Shaw Jr. (DA) Judith Brook St. John (CC) Senith Couillard Tipton (DA) Ellen Burns Treadway (PS) James A. Underwood (SC) Cynthia Orcutt Virden Charlotte Utesch Walsh Miriam C. Wankerl (DA) Lee L. Wardlaw Estate of Susanne Batson Weaver (PS-M) Martha Huddleston Wilkins (CC) Patricia Thompson Wilson Edwin E. Woodall Jr. (CC) Class of 1963 41% Participation Clyde R. Allen Jr. (PS) Sarah McInnis Allen (CC) Patricia H. Arnold Martha Burt Bolick (CC) Susan Hymers Boutwell (CC) Miriam Jordan Brown (SCC) Luran Luper Buchanan (DA) Virginia K. Buckner Susan Ward Clement (CC) William L. Collins (DA) Patricia Brown Currie (CC) William E. Davenport (CC) John M. Douglass Jr. (PS-F) James Russell Dumas Jr. (CC) Billy Chambers Elrick (CC) Alex O. Gatewood Sandra Graves Guess (DA) Betty Williams Hartley (CC) William Larry Hawkins (SC) Anne-Marie Mendell Hewitt Elizabeth Jenkins-Joffe (CC) Judy McGuffee Johnson (SCC) Linda M. Lane (SC) Matthew J. Lautar (PS) Rivers Yerger Lurate Ann Guidroz Marion Tom S. McHorse (SCC) Roberta Erwin McHugh Nina McLemore-Baker (SCC) Mary Sue McDonnell Mitchell (PS-M) Marvin L. Moncrief Margaret Riley Montgomery Alice Wells Moreland (CC) John C. Moseley (PS) Lewis A. Nordan (CC) Rex D. Poole (PS-S) E. Carol Posey Elizabeth Box Price (SCC)

O

N

O

R

R O

Joan Allen Sanders (CC) Richard J. Stamm Mary Williamson Stanley Sara Clark Stone Marcus A. Treadway Jr. (PS) J. Murray Underwood (PS-M) Marjorie Buie Underwood Class of 1964 41% Participation W. Eugene Ainsworth (PS-M) David L. Allen (CC) Dorothy Herron Allen (CC) Nancy Norton Allen (PS) Theresa Griffin Arnold (CC) Faye Tatum Ballard (SCC) Kay Barret Barksdale (PS-F) William A. Barksdale (CC) Gerald M. Bell Suzanne DeMoss Brown Celia Breland Burnham (CC) Sammy H. Clark (CC) Sue Thomas Coker Samuel G. Cole III (SCC) Philip R. Converse (PS) Sigrid Andre Conway (CC) Thomas L. Cooley (SCC) Lynda A. Costas (CC) Steve V. Cranford (SCC) William Dudley Crawford (CC) Sandra Robison Davenport (CC) Susan Barry Duke (PS) Sally Cunningham Gay Jack R. Gordy (CC) Marilyn Fincher Hathcock Diane Dickerson Hogsett (SCC) Warren C. Jones Jr. (SCC) Paul C. Keller (CC) J. William Kemp (SC) Mary Ivy Kemp (SC) Mary Holt Kepner (CC) John H. Kohler III (CC) Janice Ray Kynard (CC) Curt Lamar (SC) Dana Townes Lamar (SC) Rachel Gerdes Lewand (CC) John S. Lewis Jr. (CC) Margaret Smith Lowery Sammie Pickering Malone Martha Norman Markland Clyde H. Mathews (CC) Judy K. Michael (CC) Don Q. Mitchell (PS-M) Helen Cabell Moffat (PS-F) Samuel A. Montgomery (CC) Mary Coral Weller Murphree (SCC) Jackie Miller Nabors (SCC) Claire Smith Nowlin Paula V. Page Dell Fleming Palazzolo (CC) Sarah Irby Parsonson (SCC) Allen D. Phillips

L

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

R

S

Joseph M. Price (CC) Hugh C. Redhead (DA) Walter Thomas Rueff (DA) Alice Scott Schutte (CC) Lynda Fowler Shive (CC) Grace Moore Smith (CC) Kathryn Alexander Smith (SCC) Vence Smith Jr. (SCC) Charles E. Swain Sandra Rainwater Underwood (PS-M) Louise Haley Williamson Marilyn Stewart Witt (CC) William J. Witt (CC) Janice Thigpen Wood (CC) Class of 1965 44% Participation Joy Weston Arnold (SC) Ron J. Barham (CC) Vera Barron (CC) Connie Cutrer Blair (SCC) George L. Bounds Jr. (CC) James A. Breaux James A. Cloy Ruth Pickett Cole (SCC) Peggy Whittington Coleman (CC) Fay Lomax Cook (CC) Jean Thickens Cooper Evelyn Freeney Crawford (SC) Francis A. Critz IV (DA) James K. Dossett Jr. (SCC) Margaret Burke Drummond Joanne Edgar (CC) J. Thomas Fowlkes (PS-M) Gale McDonnell Fuller (CC) Mary Ervin Gildea Mabel Mullins Greene (CC) Carl W. Grubbs John R. Hailman (CC) Regan McGrew Hailman (CC) Raymond B. Hester (SCC) Barbara Donald Hogan (SCC) E. Stuart Hudnall (SC) Gerald H. Jacks (PS) Francis Fulton Jacobs Marion Fleming Jordan (PS) Boyd E. Kynard (CC) Raymond L. Lewand Jr. (CC) Robert E. Lewis W. Lee Lewis (DA) William E. Lindsey Jr. (SCC) Gaines R. Massey (CC) Pearl Mackler Meltzer (SCC) T. Jerry Mitchell James N.C Moffat III (PS-F) Max B. Ostner Jr. (CC) Judith Weissinger Painter Lynne Krutz Pickett (PS) Bonnie James Powell (CC) Jimmie M. Purser Sarah Moffett Richards Mary Ford McDougall Roach (CC)

Mary Witherspoon Smith (DA) Charles E. Steele Jr. (CC) Ward W. Van Skiver (SCC) Diane Wells Vaughn Fentress Boone Waits (PS) Mary Redus Walker (CC) Mary Lewis Wardlaw Richard B. Warren Jr. (CC) Billy R. Wilson Willis C. Woody Jr. (CC) Class of 1966 57% Participation Larry E. Adams (CC) Joy Williamson Ainsworth (PS-M) William K. Austin (PS) Carolyn Sartell Barkley Wallace S. Briggs Don R. Carlisle (SCC) Peggy Coleman Cochran (SCC) William W. Croswell (PS) Luther M. Dove (DA) Nat B. Ellis Richard Murphree Evans (SC) Mary-Neal Richerson Fullerton (SCC) James T. Gabbert Jr. (SCC) Glynna Lisenby Garrott Elaine Lord Gemmell (SC) Michael K. Gemmell (SC) James K. Gentry (DA) Carol A. Goris Ann Williams Gourlay Glen R. Graves (SCC) Douglas H. Greene Sr. (CC) Charles D. Guess (DA) John R. Harper (SCC) Louise Perkins Hetrick Susan Zeiss Holiman (CC) Rosemary Hillman Hopkins Ronald P. Husband (CC) Beth Boswell Jacks (PS) Nancy Underwood King Linda Banes Lewis (DA) Waverly B. Liles (SCC) Gerald D. Lord (SC) Roger L. Lowery (SCC) Jeanne Burnet Luckett (PS-S) Ann Stephenson Lumsden (CC) Beauvais Staples McCaddon Thomas S. McClary Jr. Lee B. McCormick Jr. (PS-F) Anna Dennery McDonald Timothy C. Medley (PS-S) Joe Miklas (DA) Robert F. Morris (SC) John H. Morrow III (SCC) F. Kirk Nelson (SC) Sandra Hill Nelson (SC) R. H. Newcomb Jr. (SCC) Benjamin W. Nichols Jr. (SC) Mary Fairfax Nichols (SC) William H. Parker Jr. (PS)

2007


H

O

N

George B. Pickett Jr. (PS) Nicholas C. Rebold (PS) Marion Taylor Reid (CC) Wilson Ragan Rodgers (SCC) John H. Rohrer Jr. Carolyn Bryant Rowe Albert P. Shepherd Jr. (SCC) Melissa Darnell Shepherd (SCC) William H. Simon Jr. (PS) Amanda Frank Stokes (SCC) Ann Williamson Stubblefield (CC) Martha Byrd Thompson (SCC) Frank Venturini Jr. (CC) Margaret Brown Vinson (SC) Virginia Alford Warren (CC) Norma L. Watkins (SCC) Class of 1967 41% Participation

We should “be knowledgeable and deep enough in our own faith that we may be able to explore and understand the faith and cultures of all world citizens.” —Dr. T. W. Lewis, professor emeritus of religion and Founders Day speaker

president’s report

Haven S. Aldrich (SCC) Michael W. Allen (SCC) Suzanne Riley Brown William Charles Cooper (CC) Maria Lekas Costas (PS) Dema Bosarge Crockett (SC) Robert Stephens Crockett (SC) O’Hara Baas Croswell (PS) J. Torrey Curtis (CC) Pauline O. Dement (CC) William G. Duck (PS-F) Sarah Hodo Evans (SC) William L. Forester (SCC) Rachel Davis Fowlkes (PS-F) Dawn Pittman Gamble (DA) James R. Golden Jr. (SC) Maurice H. Hall Jr. (PS-M) Charles R. Hallford Martha Curtis Hannifan (SCC) Jerry Huskey (CC) Troy L. Jenkins (CC) Beverly Humphries Jones (SCC) Darrell Bush Jones Dianne Anderson Kernell (SCC) Samuel H. Kernell (SCC) Genrose Mullen Lashinger (PS) Dan D. McKee Patsy White McLemore (CC) Tim Millis Sr. (CC) Estelle Noel Mockbee (PS-F) Michael M. Mockbee Jr. (PS-F) Mary Desha Dye Montgomery (CC) Kennedy O. Quick (SC) Sally Williams Quick (SC) Thomas H. Rhoden (PS-M) James L. Roberts Jr. (DA) James T. Roberts (SCC) Margaret Allen Roberts (SCC) Harry H. Shattuck A. Jerry Sheldon (SC) Lark Gildermaster Smith (SCC) Earl T. Stubblefield (CC)

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Charles E. Varner Sr. (CC) J. Mack Varner (PS) Penny Sanders Varner (PS) Lovett H. Weems Jr. (CC) Class of 1968 43% Participation Geary S. Alford (SCC) Polly G. Bailey (SCC) William R. Barnett (DA) Anita Hall Baroni Mary Morrison Bollinger Willis J. Britt Jr. (CC) Gary H. Brooks Florence Meyer Cartier Henry E. Chatham Jr. (PS) Lucy Cavett Cobbe (CC) Lindsay Mercer Diaz (PS) A. Millsaps Dye Jr. (CC) Marion W. Francis (SCC) Erwyn E. Freeman Jr. (DA) William E. Gamble (CC) Cynthia Tollison Harrison (CC) Gerald J. Hasselman (SC) Brenda Davis Hawkins (SC) Russell Hawkins (SC) Floy S. Holloman (SCC) Faye Junkin Hudnall (SC) Judith Sanders Hutson Elizabeth Burdine Hyde (SCC) R. Eason Leake (PS-M) Sue Lowery Leuschke (SCC) Martha Tatum Lopez (SCC) Irene Carroll Marshall Annette McCaskill McMullen Jean Nicholson Medley (PS-S) Sara McDavid Meeks (CC) Ben L. Mitchell (CC) Carolyn Davis Mizne Gladys Walters Moffett Marilyn Moore Hammond Charlotte Cox Morrow (SCC) Gerald T. Pearson (SC) C. R. Ridgway IV J. Richard Robbins (PS) James N. Robertson (CC) Elbert Sam Rush Jr. (SCC) Melanie Maxwell Shain (CC) Leslie Floyd Shannon Russell S. Tarver (CC) Carol Hederman Tatum (PS) Ernest Harmon Tumlinson (CC) Alec C. Valentine (SCC) Beryl H. Van Lierop James D. Waide III (PS) Betsy Stone Walkup (PS) Edward C. Weller Virginia Anne Jones Whitley (PS-M)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Class of 1969 39% Participation Virginia L. Allen (SC) James E. Anderson (SCC) Russell P. Atchley (SCC) Wayne M. Babin (SCC) Joe N. Bailey III (SCC) Judith DeWolfe Barnett (DA) Don L. Bishop Linda Hines Broadus (SCC) Alice Moore Clark Robert K. Collins (PS) Cheryl Barrett Converse (PS) Kathryn Grabau Davis (SC) Deborah Davis Denson (DA) Pat Dorr (CC) Wayne E. Ferrell Jr. (PS-S) Donald L. Flood (CC) Adrienne Doss Ford (SCC) Hugh A. Gamble II (DA) Margaret Atkinson Graham (CC) Alice Wofford Hallford Clifton G. Lamb Jr. (CC) C. Rebecca Meacham (CC) Charles G. Millstein Linda Boswell Montgomery (CC) Anne Page Mosby (CC) Evelyn Snipes Petterson (CC) Carroll Perrett Putzel Sharon Scott Rhoden (PS-M) Darrelyn Clawson Sanders (SCC) Joe F. Sanderson Jr. (PS-M) George W. Self Jr. (CC) Susan Moak Sheldon (SC) Keith Starrett (CC) Esther Marett Still (CC) Brenda K. Street (SC) Julianne Hughes Summerford Mary Ann McDonald Swenson (SCC) Mary Baroni Tarver (CC) Perry K. Thomas III Muriel Bradshaw Twitty (CC) Susanne Hicks Van Lierop Dorothy Sibley Walker Charlotte Oakley Whitehead (CC) Patricia Hawthorne Wilson (CC) James M. Wray Jr. (SCC) Class of 1970 31% Participation Gene R. Barrett (PS) Elizabeth Campbell Bailey Kenneth W. Barton Clyde W. Biddle (DA) Donald S. Blythe (DA) Sally A. Boggan Elizabeth Davis Bowman Thomas R. Bryant (SCC) Z. Terry Buckalew (SCC) Franklin E. Chatham (PS)


H

Charles Clark Jr. (SC) Coela Jordan Clark Kathy Murray Cohen Foster E. Collins Jr. (CC) F. Dee Conerly (SCC) Robert E. Cunningham III George E. Gillespie Jr. (DA) Stanley Graham (CC) J. Erik Hearon (SCC) Robert F. Hester (SCC) H. Lee Hetherington (PS) Elizabeth Hood (CC) Donna Daniel Jackson (PS) Hugh B. Jones Jr. (CC) Elizabeth Furr Kimbriel G. Rodney Meeks (CC) Margaret Sample Mitchell (CC) Andrew P. Mullins Jr. (CC) Janet Sanderson Ott (PS-M) Barry K. Plunkett (SCC) Janet Smith Richardson Naomi Tattis Ridgway Patricia Lefoldt Shappley Patti McCarty Sullivan (PS-F) John E. Sutphin Jr. (DA) David J. Walker Dianne Partridge Walton (SC) Robert F. Ward (SCC) Timothy W. Whitaker (CC) Jeanne Terpstra Yarbrough Class of 1971 34% Participation Richard J. Aubert (DA) William W. Aycock Mary Craft Barth (CC) Karin Leftwich Bell Warren C. Black Jr. (DA) Carl G. Brooking (PS) Sandy L.V. Byrd (SCC) Marie Dickson Chatham (PS) Robert L. Clark (DA) Pamela Capps Collins (PS) Jeverly R. Cook (SC) Jeffrey Smith Deblieu (SCC) Thomas R. Dupree (PS-F) Beverly Ann Fabian Joe B. Gheesling Jr. Sandra I. Hackemann Margie McDavid Harper (SCC) Margaret L. Harris (CC) Victor E. Lindsey (CC) William C. McKie Jr. (DA) Jamie Pierce McKlemurry (CC) Alice Rhea Mitchell (SCC) Lem E. Mitchell (SCC) Robert G. Mullins (PS) Lillian L. Nolley Luther S. Ott (PS-M) Barbara Stauss Plunkett (SCC) Rudy R. Pollan (PS-S) Susan Richardson Purser (SCC)

O

N

O

R

R O

Simmie H. Roberts (CC) Janice Self Sabatini (SCC) Nicholas Sabatini (SCC) Roland D. Seals Rosemary Gregg Shows (CC) John E. Spencer (DA) Kathy Rowell Spire (CC) Robert C. Strong Robert E. Sylar (SCC) Nan Weakley Thomas Carolyn Caves Vaughan (PS) Burton L. Wade Jr. (SCC) Candice Dudley Ward (SCC) Class of 1972 31% Participation Janis Graves Black (DA) Edmund R. Butler Jr. (CC) Fred L. Callon (CC) Eugene G. Douglass Jr. (PS-M) Robert E. Farr II (SC) George H. Fleming Jr. (PS) Jerry W. Fuller William N. Graham (SCC) Claudia Carithers Hauberg (PS-S) George S. Haymans III Gilliam Swink Hicks Jr. (CC) Thomas E. Holder (SCC) James M. Holston (SCC) Fran Houser (CC) Charles L. Howorth Jr. Wilton J. Johnson III (PS) Carolyn Jackson LaBarbera Jane Mitchell Leech (CC) Steven H. Leech Jr. (CC) Tony F. Martinez David R. McCollum (PS) James Robby McLeod Stephen L. Meeks (CC) Michael A. Parnell (CC) Richard Pharr (PS-S) David N. Sawyer (SCC) Calvin L. Schuster (SCC) Jolyne Wise Shirley Leonette Walker Slay (DA) Constance Maize Smith (CC) William H. Smith Jr. (CC) Kevin G. Stauffer (SCC) Mike P. Sturdivant Jr. (SCC) Ferrell L. Tadlock (SCC) James H. Williams David R. Williamson Thomas A. Woodall (SC) Phyllis A. Yarbrough (CC) Class of 1973 36% Participation Signe Pearson Adams James E. Anding (SCC) Victor H. Applewhite Jr. (DA) Austin Blaine Baggett (SCC)

L

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

R

Ann Mitchell Bartling (DA) Joan Sauer Bertaut (SC) Allyn Clark Boone (CC) Douglas S. Boone (CC) Janis Crawford Booth (CC) Guy Blann Britton Thomas Stevens Burnett (SCC) Janice Thornton Cate Robert M. Corban (CC) Jeri Jeffreys Durrett (DA) Kathryn Minyard Edwards (CC) Virginia Cooper Farr (SC) Jessica H. Germany George Gober (DA) Frances Moran Gordy (CC) Michael Ray Grubbs (PS) Deborah K. Hall Brian P. Hearon (DA) Ann Sumner Holmes (SCC) Mary A. Howkins (PS) Carol M. Hudson Eugene C. Johnson (CC) Dorothy Hannah Kitchings Sandra Williamson Litkenhous Alvin A. Loewenberg Elisabeth J. Lord (SCC) Ivenne Love-Stanley (SC) Harold C. Malchow (PS-M) J. David Marsh III (PS-S) Mary Hagwood Mullins (SCC) W. Randall Pinkston (SCC) Robert H. Randle (SCC) Carrol E. Rhodes (DA) Timothy C. Terpstra (DA) William S. Ware (PS) Robert Wayne West Emma Dennis White Mary C. Wiginton (CC) Auvergne Williams III (SCC) Terry G. Winstead (PS-F) Jane L. Woosley (CC) Johnny W. Wray (DA) Marsha Caves Yon (CC) Rebecca C. Youngblood (SCC) Rocky H. Zachry Jr. (CC) Class of 1974 33% Participation Marilyn Thompson Altman (CC) R. Bruce Bartling (DA) Robert I. Brock (PS-M) Diane M. Bruser (PS) Florence Jo Smith Corban (CC) Jacqueline Frazier Crudup Marybeth Wood Davis June Langston DeHart (PS) Judith Lane Douglass (PS-M) James T. Dulin Jr. (SC) Sue Bryant Dulin (SC) Sue Tremaine Glenn (SCC) William F. Goodman III (PS) J. Scott Greene (PS-S)

S

Robert F. Grisham (DA) H. L. Harkey III Katie L. Holder Wendell H. Holmes (SCC) Jonson Huang (SCC) Danny L. Jones (SCC) Donald Reginald Jones (SCC) A. Bruce Miller (PS-S) E. Lyle Miller Jr. (CC) Joseph L. Morris (CC) Nancy Nicholson Lloyd B. Nunn III Karen Ezelle Redhead (DA) Roger G. Stuart Jr. (CC) Thais Brown Tonore (CC) Arthur A. Vingiello Elizabeth Bass Vogt (CC) Melanie Boswell Wadlington (DA) Warner Wadlington III (DA) Ree Ridgway Walden (PS) William E. Wheeler (DA) Janet Roby Wofford (SC) John D. Wofford Jr. (SC) Susan Tipton Wolf (CC) J. Daniel Young Cynthia Walker Zubic (CC) Class of 1975 33% Participation Mena Zouboukos Applewhite (DA) Martha A. Ashe Brian T. Askew (SCC) Mary Tonos Bishop William F. Blair (DA) John S. Bown (SC) David W. Boydstun (SC) Rickey H. Bullard (SCC) William P. Carroll (SCC) Alveno N. Castilla (DA) Vivian A. Charleston Janet Dykes Crawford (CC) Robert H. Darville III (CC) Carrie McKenzie Davidson (CC) Diane Foust (SC) Gregory D. Freeman (CC) William G. Gamble (SCC) Craig R. Gibson Nan Graves Goodman (CC) Ann G. Hendrick Ronnie E. Hendrix (CC) Mark D. Herbert (PS) Laurie Newton Howorth J. Wilson LaFoe Frank T. Laney Tommy G. Lyle (PS) Kathleen Smith Miles (SCC) Jean Bailey Norton (CC) Jodie Phillips-Robinson C. Edward Pruett (CC) Claire Chastain Schmid (SCC) Victor A. Sheely (CC) Rachel Wallace Starnes

2007


H

O

Brenda Twyner Thordarson Belmont Dickerson Trapp (SC) Cyndi Trauernicht Trauernicht Charles Donald Wells Jr. (PS) Marcia Melichar Whatley (CC) William Chris Wilkerson (SCC) James B. Wiseman Jr. (CC) Rebecca Simmons Young Class of 1976 35% Participation

“Thank you for giving us a chance to change our lives—a chance to find the true purpose of our lives. Thank you for giving us a chance to succeed in this world. I don’t know what my life would have been like without Millsaps College.” —Senior Cari Taylor, scholarship recipient from Long Beach

David A. Anderson (CC) Melissa Hudspeth Applewhite (SCC) Charles A. Araujo Lance J. Benefield Paul T. Benton (PS-M) Susan Strong Cannon (SCC) Jeffrey N. Cook (SC) Albert G. Delgadillo David E. Dyess Sandra Napier Dyess Edward L. Emling Jr. (SCC) Mark B. Eppes (PS) Paul R. Graham II (CC) Lloyd S. Gray Sr. (DA) Ralph C. Griffin Jr. (SCC) Mary Breed Harris C. Dees Hinton (SC) Mary Lloyd Hooper (CC) J. Stacy Jenkins (CC) Elizabeth Allen Lyle (PS) Mark J. Lynch (SCC) Patricia Pharr Marsh (PS-S) Caryn Salter Quilter Betty Clark Reiff (CC) Joseph T. Reiff (CC) Robin A. Robinson (SCC) Tom B. Scott III (PS-S) Elizabeth Holmes See (DA) John G. Shields Jr. (DA) Carolyn M. Skinner (SCC) Howard B. Smith Jr. (SCC) Thomas E. Stanford Jr. (SC) Walter Scott Varnado III (CC) Terrance B. Wells (PS-M) Steve A. Whatley (CC) A. Terrel Williams (CC) Sarah Eaton Wooten (PS) Class of 1977 40% Participation Mary Al Cobb Alford (SC) Toni McMillan Bailey (CC) Daniel S. Bowling (PS-M) Sibyl M. Child (CC) Barry K. Cockrell (SCC) Kerry Matheny Cook (SC) Juliet W. Dantin George A. Eyrich (DA) Bryan F. Friddle (CC)

president’s report

N

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Laurie Brown Gillespie Michael L. Harrison (CC) Charles R. Haygood (PS-S) Randy B. Hooper (CC) J. Steven Jenkins (DA) Robert C. King (PS) Archie C. Lamb (PS-F) Stephen H. Laney Nancy W. Lang (SC) Catherine Ivy Larsen (CC) Douglas E. Levanway (SCC) Edward L. Manning (SCC) Toni W. Manning (SCC) Phillip Maples (DA) Margaret Wilson McCarty Adren E. McCoy (SC) Dennis J. McIntosh (SCC) Jenny Bates Miller Douglas M. Minor (CC) Elizabeth McKinnon Parry (SCC) Thomas C. Parry III (SCC) Karen Roemer Paxton William R. Presson (SC) Linda Wells Rice (PS) Sherry Pearson Stegall (DA) Susan Humphrey Taylor-Geier (CC) Pamela J. Turner Jeffrey R. Tye Lindsey Shallcross Varnado (CC) Peg Wahrendorff (DA) Robert L. Wells (SCC) Margaret Williams (SCC) Stephen H. Wilsey (SC) Class of 1978 32% Participation Timothy J. Alford (SC) W. Franklin Appleby Jr. (PS) Charle’ C. Avery Ken H. Barnett (PS) Carol Albritton Biedenharn (SCC) David A. Bourgeois (DA) Gloria Steinwinder Bourgeois (DA) C. Rebecca Brent (CC) David W. Carroll (SC) Beverly J. Clement (CC) Steven G. Dean (SC) Janet M. Hall (PS) James Huel Harris (PS) James D. Holland (CC) Sally Sudduth Isaacs (SCC) Ronald W. Jurney (PS) W. Criss Lott (SCC) Robert Glade McInnis (PS) Paul Cooper Morrison (PS-M) Karleen H. Neill (CC) Norman D. Packer James C. Ranager (SCC) James C. Ray Vonda Reeves-Darby (PS-F) Robert E. Rice Jr. (PS)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Elise McNees Ryan (CC) Robert E. Scott (CC) W. Mark Stanton (SCC) John M. Stark Gail Gober Sweat (SC) Hugh W. Tedder Jr. (CC) Susan R. Tsimortos (SC) Ralph P. Wells (SCC) Frank L. Young (SCC) Mary Martin Young (SCC) Martin H. Baker Jr. (PS) Class of 1979 22% Participation Kate Bradley Bledsoe Charlene Rosenthal Cunningham Jeffery E. Delmas (CC) Victor G. Dostrow (PS) Blair Chisum Erwin (CC) Sonja Fuqua Fuqua Carol Burrus Hartman (PS) Kenneth E. Hipple (SCC) Peder R. Johnson (PS-F) William R. Lancaster (DA) Joseph C. Langston (PS-M) Nancy Bush Lawrence Laura L. Lillard (PS-F) Ellynda Price Lipsey (SCC) Lisa Lowe (SC) Robert L. Lyle (SC) A. Gordon Lyons (PS-M) Richard E. MacNealy Lynn Woodard McBroom Silas W. McCharen Edward W. Mizell James B. Morris (DA) Martha de Hombre O’Brien (SCC) Helen McCormick Parsons (CC) Beth Thomas Ploch Nancy F. Williams (CC) Class of 1980 22% Participation Ann Roscopf Allen (CC) Ann Bishop Burke (SC) William Rodney Clement Jr. (PS) Amanda Harding Cottingham (SCC) Elise Norfleet Crockett (DA) David H. Culpepper (PS-F) Gerald M. Davis C. A. Dodson (SCC) Michael C. Faust (SCC) Robert J. Giraud (CC) William C. Griffin (SCC) Emily Crews Hatch (CC) Michael A. Henderson (SCC) Virginia Boyd Hodges Randy J. Johnson (SCC) Shane F. Langston (PS-S) Sylvain M. Metz


H

Kellye Miller Montjoy (CC) Lisa Lee Mullins (CC) S. Dixon Myers (CC) Guy H. Robinson Jr. John P. Sneed (SCC) Benjamin D. Sydboten Jr. (CC) Joe W. Terry III (CC) Frank C. Wade Jr. (SCC) Class of 1981 45% Participation David B. Allen (SC) Kathleen Payne Berg Martina Bebin Bickley (CC) Christopher S. Brunt (SCC) Necie Coats-Borroni (PS) Shari L. Cochran Kimberly Mansel Costa (CC) Anne Johnson Culpepper (PS-F) Lisa Mathis Cunningham Brenda Watts Da Silveira (PS) Ricor Da Silveira (PS) Evalin Weaver Daniel Melissa Thomas Darden Virginia Simpkins Darwin Drew Davis Ralph D. Davison III (SCC) Thomas T. Dunbar (SCC) Linda Schrayer Dupree (PS-F) Renee Ethridge (PS) Susan Eskridge Frazier (DA) Samuel A. Gaston III (SCC) Eric K. Glatzer Michael E. Grillis (CC) Brantley W. Helvenston IV (CC) Rose M. Hopper Vicki Loflin Hughes (PS) Charles R. Lathem (PS-F) William J. Little Jr. (SC) Linda J. Lofton Dana Millwood Lyle (SC) Jimmy L. Middlebrook (CC) Michael H. Morris (DA) John F. Murrah (SCC) Dan H. Murrell Annwn Hawkins Myers (CC) Shane Pittman (DA) Joel C. Reynolds (CC) Gusanita Grant Roberson (CC) Diane Torrey Skypeck (SCC) Steven W. Smith (PS-M) Ann Decker Snyder (SCC) Sheryl K. Stringer Leo Riley Trehern Jr. (DA) Elizabeth A. Trotter (CC) Jane Franklin Tyson Beveraly Hebron Wallace (CC) Martha Wynn Weissinger (DA) Robert B. Wiygul (DA)

O

N

O

R

R O

Class of 1982 21% Participation Carol Wead Baucum Bradley R. Benton (PS-M) Richard H. Birdsong (PS) Shelley Wyckoff Boltri (CC) Camille Clement Boyles (CC) Debra Basham Fauss (SCC) Philip W. Gaines Nancy Gregorie (CC) William B. Harper (PS) Gretchen Kurzweg Keller Anita Creel Lewis Steven B. Lott Joanne Shipp Lyell Gerald E. Maddox Lee McMullin Maxwell Victoria I. McDonald Dennis W. McGraw (CC) Jane C. McNaughton (PS) George A. Morris III (SC) James S. Morris (DA) Thomas W. Murrey Jr. (CC) Gilson Davis Peterson (CC) Monte D. Rector (SCC) Elizabeth A. Sekul (CC) Barry C. Tedder (DA) Rebecca N. Woodrick (SCC) Class of 1983 25% Participation Steven J. Allen Frederick S. Bauer (CC) Marie Nation Becker (CC) Rory V. Berry Anthony P. Bonds Robert B. Britt (SC) Anita Broome Cliburn Lauri S. Collins (PS) James L. Crawford (CC) Laurie Eskridge (CC) Douglas S. Folk (PS) Phyllis Pfanschmidt Gay (SC) Patrick J. Hare William E. Harper III Paul I. Hathorn A. Byrd Hillman III (CC) Mikell J. Jarratt (SCC) Lou Knighton (CC) Grace Nevins Krauss Katherine Stark Landrum (SCC) Anna Bennett Liddell (CC) Dale Massey Massey (SCC) Vicki Sallis Murrell Kimberly L. Myers (PS-S) John Marshall Pemberton (SCC) Elizabeth Wilson Peterson (CC) Larisa Krolls Phillips (CC) Richard W. Poulter W. Whitaker Rayner (CC) Oney Plunk Reynolds (CC)

L

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

R

S

Nancy Flowers Seepe (SC) Vicki Lee Sydboten (CC) Robert M. Thompson (SCC) Michael D. Turello Amy Lyles Wilson Cordelia Douzenis Zinskie (DA) Class of 1984 28% Participation Burrell M. Brown (SCC) Timothy P. Carrigan (SC) Cecilia A. Collins (PS-F) Lee E. Dempsey (SCC) Steven L. Dickerson (CC) Erin Fairley Fairley (SCC) Michael P. Ford Roger E. Garrett Patrick K. Gregory Robin Adams Gregory Monty P. Hamilton (PS-F) William T. Hetrick (CC) Melanie Lee Hunsberger (CC) Daniel T. Keel III (PS) Kenneth N. Lancaster Maud DeLes Gober Lancaster Keri Slaton McGraw (CC) Emily C. McInnis (PS) Mary Kraft McLean (SCC) Michelle Meggs (CC) Suzannah Bowie Moorman James D. Morgan Billie Dunahoo Murphy Paul F. Ogden (PS-F) Elizabeth Jordan Orians (SCC) Scott D. Singletary (CC) William S. Stephens (CC) Diane Chill Studdard Louis V. Sturgeon Jr (CC) James H. Tindall (SCC) Elizabeth Sullivan Turello Janet Van Walsh Evelyn Stewart Westover (SCC) William R. Wheeler Jr. (SCC) Thomas A. Williamson (CC) J. Todd Willis (PS) Benjamin R. Wynne (SCC) Class of 1985 22% Participation Nicholas G. Anderson (CC) Elizabeth Bland Bauer (CC) Mary Frances Hillman Benton (PS-M) Robert M. Buxton (PS) Harry Patrick Byrd (CC) William G. Cheney Jr. (CC) R. Michael Collum (DA) Rhodrick E. Cook (SCC) Amy Bunnell Dankel (SCC) Roger J. Dankel (SCC) Patrick R. Doherty (SCC) Vincent C. Dungan (DA)

Deborah McGregor Good (PS) Porter C. Hudson Susan Graves Hyde Patrick E. Lanclos (SCC) Henry C. Lyons (SC) Mark R. Mahoney (PS) Stephen K. Martin (SCC) Gilbert B. Meyers III Mark A. Mitchell (CC) Carol Young Mowen J. Greg Murphy Julia Park Ogden (PS-F) Christine Clark Olsson (SCC) Cynthia A. Phelps W. Thomas Purcell III (PS) Janna Ingle Sowers (SCC) Jane Ellen Wasson Scott A. Weidie James R. Woodrick Jr. Class of 1986 33% Participation James O. Bailey (SCC) Olen McCadoo Bailey Jr. (PS) A. Lee Barlow Jacqueline Love Berry A. Kevin Blackwell (PS) Archibald W. Bullard (CC) Leigh Ann Burns-Naas (PS) H. Patterson Fiedler Jr. Frankie L. Franklin Ned M. French II (SC) Jeffrey E. Good (PS) Nancy Williams Green Stuart B. Green Renee Coates Harrison (CC) Mary Ballard Hitchings (CC) Jennifer Jack-Cashmore Matthew H. Kaye (PS-F) Stephen E. Langworthy (SCC) David M. Loper (PS) Anne Lee McElvaine Neely Pemberton McGrew (CC) William Stewart McKell (CC) Frederick P. Moreton II C. Nicholas Mowen Roy E. Murrell Jr. (CC) Nancy Messer Myers (CC) James J. Page Kirk A. Patrick III (DA) Tereau Pearson (PS) Leona Kusick Polson Patricia Cooper Rector (SCC) Kevin A. Russell (DA) Mark T. Saxon (SCC) John B. Saye (SC) Lee Rice Smith (SC) Barton B. Thrasher (SCC) Robert Clinton Tibbs III (SCC) John W. Turner Jr. (CC) Lynn Toney Williamson (CC) Mary T. Woodward

2007


H

O

N

Class of 1987 28% Participation

The Langston Family Sponsored Scholarship Fund will assist students returning to Millsaps who have increased financial need.

Jane Biggs Alexander Eleanor Taylor Anthony (CC) James W. Boswell III (CC) Sarah Bowden Boswell (CC) William J. Carr III (CC) Martha Lott Caskey (CC) William D. Cheek (SC) Holly Walters Craft (SCC) Scott J. Drawe (CC) James Bryan Edwards (CC) Craig P. Fickling Jr. (SCC) Michelle M. Forrester Steve Fuson (CC) Kara Winsett Gibson Melissa Cumbest Groff (CC) James E. Harwood IV (SC) Zelphia Rowe Hawkins Mary Dulaney Hurley (SC) Lee Darden Johnson (SC) Maggie Solomon Kaplan Maria Karam Kelley (SCC) Cathryn Derrow LaCour Alexander F. Lankford IV Laurie Pruitt Lovely (CC) Sheila Farnsworth Malvagna (CC) Mike W. McLaurin Jr. (CC) Paul F. McNeill (PS) Daniel S. Moore Mona A. Nicholas Nadine Middour Peacock (CC) Tom R. Shima (SC) Dee Parks Spencer (SCC) Lynn Starrett Stall (CC) Marcus G. Taylor Laura Hogan Tedder (CC) Grover B. Ward (SCC) Maria D. Ward (SCC) Brian L. Wilkinson (CC) Class of 1988 24% Participation David A. Adkins (SCC) Ruth M. Arnold Crisler Moffat Boone (SCC) Denise Wyont Boosalis (SCC) LeAnne Pyron Brewer (CC) Timothy C. Brown (CC) William Joel Brown Dana Miller Bullard (CC) Susan Sanders Byrd (CC) Kenneth J. Carpenter (CC) Martha Campbell Cooke (SCC) William R. Devlin (DA) Barbara Hess Elias (CC) Michael L. Fondren (PS-F) Misty Skelton Hammett Gilroy H. Harden (SC) Monica Sethi Harrigill (PS-M) Gregory J. Hurley (SC)

president’s report

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Ronald A. LaCour Michael J. Lignos (SCC) Wesley R. Lominick III (CC) Donald Marston (CC) William J. May Jr. Mark J. McCreery (PS) Mary Kiser Meeks (SCC) Paul A. Mitchell Cindy Yarbrough Page Wayne V. Pratt Steve P. Raftopoulos (PS-F) Justin P. Ransome (CC) David B. Remley (CC) Shelley C. Ritter (SCC) Larrin Holbert Rockwell Andrea Pritchett Rosler (DA) Jeanne L. Rozman Anne Jung Sanchez (SCC) Judy Jens Seabrook (CC) John L. Sewell Stacy Shiflett Sneed (SCC) Cheryl Brooks Ware Class of 1989 24% Participation Ralph B. Armstrong (CC) Krista Atkinson Barnhart (CC) Carolyn A. Bibb (CC) Carah L. Billups (SCC) John E. Blanchard (CC) Angela Belzer Brackbill (SCC) R. Marshall Brackbill Jr. (SCC) Lisa C. Brown (CC) Lee H. Chawla (CC) Dosha F. Cummins (SCC) Michael C. Doherty (SCC) Randy M. Dukes (CC) Polly Roach Dunlavy (CC) Yvette Edwards Cook (DA) Jeffrey A. Ezell (SC) Margaret Weems Feldmayer Susan E. Fulton (SCC) John W. Garrard II Susan Grant Hagler (CC) John T. Helbling (SCC) Kathia Simo Hicks (CC) James Page Inman (SCC) James A. Lancaster (CC) Robert E. Lancaster (CC) Marc E. Leffler Deborah McNeill Lominick (CC) Victor W. Matthews (CC) Charles Daniel McLaughlin (CC) John L. McLemore John W. Meyers (SCC) Beth Smith Mikeska Pilar Martinez Morrison (DA) Mitylene H. Myhr (CC) Philip D. Partington John S. Person Thomas M. Rockwell Michelle Hewitt Rolfe (SC)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Dorree Jane Smith (SCC) Mary Ellen Vanderlick (SC) Jason W. Walenta (CC) William P. Wilson (SC) Timothy A. Wise (SCC) Class of 1990 28% Participation Kenneth T. Andrews Zeba Afzal Boughner Steven T. Bricker (CC) David M. Chancellor (CC) Corinne Grady Ciaccio (SCC) Jay S. Ciaccio (SCC) Helen M. Currie (CC) Susan Elson Dean Lydia Marble Dell Kristin Magee Doherty (SCC) David A. Ellner Samuel B. Field (CC) Clytice Robertson Gardner (PS) Norton M. Geddie (CC) Lynn Gieger Amy Ridlehoover Green Lisa Marie Holland Hannah (PS) Ray F. Harrigill (PS-M) John F. Hawkins (SCC) Marla Ann Bond-Inman (SCC) Jonathan M. Jones Leslie Petrus Kennedy (CC) Erin Clark Mason (CC) Charlotte Sullivan McDonnell (CC) Jeffery McIntire-Strasburg Tiffany Mixon Merriman (SCC) Patti L. Nation (SCC) Douglas S. Patterson Jerry B. Peavy Paige Carpenter Pratt Beverly V. Renfroe Stephanie J. Richards Christine M. Schott (PS) Robert L. Sindelar Adrianna Miller Spain (CC) Sharon L. Stephenson (SCC) Todd N. Thriffiley (CC) Barry Taylor Weeks Martin E. Willoughby (CC) Class of 1991 29% Participation Arin Clark Adkins (SCC) Patricia Gleason Barrios Anne Best Burdick Max W. Burdick Jean M. Burns Brian D. Campbell (SCC) Eric D. Chisolm (CC) Jeffrey L. Clay (CC) Kelly Blake Denton Anne Lewis Gamble (SCC) Melissa Gordon Pringle (SCC)


H

Jodi L. Graves Tim D. Gray (PS) Eryn Hackett Fisher Price Williams Halford (DA) William R. Hannah (PS) Dorothy Allen Hawkins (SCC) Jennifer Miller Hoffman (CC) Shelley Lose Johansson Kenneth M. Kellum (SC) Laura Riemer Kellum (SC) Lee K. Lofton Blair Richards Manning Richard J. Manning (CC) Rita Randall Martinson Joseph K. McAllister (SCC) Kelli Kriss McKie Marne A. Meredith Charles H. Mitchell Margaret Jones Moore Chris D. Odom (CC) Stacey F. Oliver (SCC) Lea Ann Smith-Vaniz Packer Regan Marler Painter (CC) George C. Plauche’ Stephanie Stacy Richter Susan L. Roberts Steven W. Sansom (PS) Margaret Walton Seicshnaydre Harold C. Stanley Shannon Williams Stanley Christopher C. Thacker (SCC) Chandler C. Tipton (CC) John R. Tull III (CC) Kelly Bricker Webb Elizabeth Stuckey Williams Kenneth W. Williams Jr. Rachel Cook Wise (SCC) Oran V. Zimmerman (CC) Class of 1992 26% Participation Katherine Pigott Alexis (SCC) Elizabeth Hagood Alley Karen Greer Amos Shawn Linette Barrick (SCC) Christopher H. Beck (SCC) Dameron Black IV (SCC) Susan Averitt Bobbitt (SCC) Kim Kalkitis Bowman Marcus Dale Buckley Tracy L. Butchee Natalie Rice Carlson (CC) Sarah Crisler-Ruskey (CC) Jennifer J. Davis (CC) Norman R. Downey III (CC) Allison L. Edwards (SC) Randall John Ellis Jr. (SCC) Todd D. Glisson Suzanne E. Gueydan (SCC) Margaret Minor Harvey John E. Hendrix Nancy Garrett Hoover (SCC)

O

N

O

R

R O

Christina Coker Hrivnak Jessica Deffes Huckaby (CC) Lee Huckaby (CC) J. Banks Link (DA) Tracy Pennebaker Link (DA) Nathan W. McKie Jr. Douglas D. Mitchell Kathleen Montgomery Mitchell (PS) David W. Morgan Milton M. Ourso III (DA) William L. Painter (CC) Shelley LeBlanc Payne (SCC) William Brian Payne (SCC) Arleen Rosner-Barwick (CC) Kimberley Doom Scales Kenyatta O. Scott (SCC) Kathryn Beck Snodgrass (SCC) William W. Snow (SCC) John Lacy Sturdivant (CC) Rachel Furner Sturdivant (CC) Christopher S. Verdery Kimberly Warren-Ellis (CC) Nancy White (CC) Cynthia Clark Wilkinson (SCC) Class of 1993 21% Participation Jason C. Alexis (SCC) Julie L. Anderson Angela Gafford Asmus (SCC) Elizabeth Burch Banks (CC) Nicole Billeaud-Poncelet Elizabeth S. Black (SCC) Scott E. Blissman (CC) Rae Chumley Brown Lee Waskom Bryan (CC) Meredeth Purser Campbell (SCC) Andrea Alfonso Crowson (PS) Thomas D. Crowson Jr. (PS) Amy Reid Felder (CC) David P. Felder (CC) Lisa Garvin (CC) Bruce D. Golden (SCC) Michael F. Griffith (PS) Peter D. Halverson Carol Vickers Hardwick (CC) Mimi Mitchell Jeffers Debra Tucker Jones (SCC) Edward P. Jordan (CC) John O. Lawrence (SCC) Andrew M. Macey (CC) Gregory M. Maloney (CC) Janie Varner McIntire (SCC) Gregory E. McNeely (SCC) Daniel A. Meyers (DA) Thomas McDonnell Mitchell (PS) Jennifer Scherer Nieman (SCC) Molly Nichols Pace (SCC) Cynthia Doiron Pugh David Shane Rasner Walter Burley Salmon Mary Montgomery Seely (SC)

L

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

R

S

Marshall H. Smith Jr. (CC) Julie Jones Tipton (SCC) Stephanie A. Warmbrod (SCC) Class of 1994 21% Participation David C. Armistead (CC) Teresa White Bailey (PS) Elizabeth C. Carraway Gerald A. Coker (SCC) Adam Patrick Cooper Richard G. Diethelm Anthony B. Evans Katherine Rodgers Fagan (CC) Laura Santoro Flynn Joshua A. Fowler (SCC) Sarah Overman Freed (CC) Martha Roberson Frye William Davis Frye Jeremy F. Litton (CC) James S. Love IV (SC) John P. McCall Robert Kersey Mehrle Jr. (SCC) Christopher F. Minshew Lucy L. Molinaro Janice LaBlue Nicholson James M. Randall (SCC) Laurie Carpenter Randall (SCC) Edgar S. Reeves Susan Lueger Robbins (SCC) Hilary Davis Robinson (CC) Montgomery B. Sernel (CC) Manisha Sethi (PS) Michele Soho Kettering (CC) Karen I. Varney Jennifer Waguespack-Labiche (CC) Cynthia Dee Weems (SCC) Charles W. Williams Jr. (CC) Class of 1995 19% Participation Amy W. Bagby (CC) Russell W. Bagby (CC) Rosanna P. Bahadur (SCC) James B. Campbell Jr. (CC) James Clayton Cazier (CC) Rogen K. Chabra (CC) Monique S. Clark Kimberly Williams Crowder (SCC) William H. Crowder IV (SCC) C. Chadwick Duncan Jennifer Beal Duncan Russell E. Hawkins Jr. (CC) Mary Pitts Huffstetler Steven Paul Keen Elaine Trotter Kerr Alice Blaylock Macey (CC) Paul D. McCluskey (CC) Dorian E. McIntyre Christopher M. Nelson Forrest V. Nesbitt

Brian M. Oberlies (DA) Kelly Abney Orr (SCC) Lynn M. Pohl Douglas E. Redman (CC) Rebecca Brown Redman (CC) Charles D. Robb (DA) Kerry Wilson Sernel (CC) Jenness B. Simler Ellen E. Treadway (CC) Suzanne S. Willis Class of 1996 24% Participation Jennifer Turnipseed Adams Jodie C. Adams Diane L. Barton Lottie L. Bash (PS) Christy Beswick Carrie Coker Blount (SCC) Michael S. Brooks Cara Strickland Buckner (SC) Mary H. Cheairs Elizabeth H. Cooper Charles E. Dann III Jean Grayson Davis Kristopher M. Dickson (CC) Joan M. Fabbri (SCC) Courtney Caver Finnan Cora E. Gee Christina Finzel Gomez Kimberly Hollimon Hoover (SCC) Wynton C. Hoover (SCC) Katherine V. Kemp Morgan Richardson Kotlarczyk Keturah Thurmond Maraska Robert M. Mayo III Abby G. McCall James Robert Mozingo III (CC) Benjamin H. Nelson III Daniel A. Nix Vickie Pettis-Cooper Jacqueline Harper Ray (CC) Michael Todd Reese (CC) Jonathon T. Reeves (DA) Jeffrey S. Seabold (CC) David W. Shelton (SCC) Emily Varner Shelton (SCC) Lee D. Smith Joseph R. Townsend III (DA) Minette Marley Townsend (DA) Brian D. Vaught (CC) Valerie Wade Walters Lisa P. Waskom (CC) Jonathan P. Woodward (SCC) Heather Gilliam Young Class of 1997 16% Participation Halley A. Austin (CC) Peter G. Austin Amanda O’Kelly Black

2007


H

“We are grateful to have the resources to help students whose families have been faced with an unexpected financial crisis, such as a job loss or major health issues. The Langston Family Sponsored Scholarship Fund will be an important tool in retaining students who might otherwise be forced to end their Millsaps careers.” —President Frances Lucas

N

Julie Whittington Buhrman (CC) Philip J. Chapman (SCC) Kristen McRae Fowler (SCC) Susan Feldman Gibbes Walter H. Gibbes III Kutenia Tate Good (CC) Jamie F. Hanry Phillip L. Hartness (CC) Hillary Wilson Horn Gene A. Lang Shannon Rogers Manning (CC) Eloise Harris May (CC) Elizabeth Warren Mehrle (SCC) Thomas H. Moore (SCC) Lauren Mancini Mozingo (CC) Christy Sylvan Nash David R. Neely Amber Shippee Nix Christine Meyers Pastor Harmony Albert Pittman Elizabeth Williams Reeves (PS) Dora G. Robertson (CC) Charles A. Robinson (CC) Amy Balducci Shepherd John E. Thomas IV (CC) Carla D. Webb (PS-F) Heather Lott Welch (CC) Class of 1998 12% Participation Lauren Williams Bertsch (SCC) Noble B. Black (PS) Catherine Simmons Bond Allison Priebe Brooks Brian C. Courville (PS) Eugene R. Davis (CC) David S. Fontenot L. Heather Lindsey Justin L. Matheny (PS) Walter P. May (CC) Christopher W. McLean (CC) Betsy Dorough McLean (CC) Amelia Brown Metcalf Emily Peoples Neely David A. Nelsen Jana E. Nye Michele Biegel Pendergrast (PS) Joshua F. Phillips (SC) Mark Post (CC) Joseph Todd Reeves (PS) Paul A. Thompson April D. Turner D. Duncan Welch (CC) Class of 1999 17% Participation Albert Morris Austin (CC) Junko Fukuma Barnes Kimberly P. Becker Walter K. Biggins

president’s report

O

O

R

R O

L

L

O

F

Charles C. Brewer (SCC) Stephanie Fanguy Bryant (CC) Christopher R. Evans Danielle Bowling Fontenot Chad A. Gardner (CC) Mary McElwee Harbour (SCC) Paul M. Holland II (SCC) Tracy Perry Holland (SCC) Rhoda L. Holman (SCC) Kathryn Bratton Hughes David R. Jones Bonnie Mitchell Kraybill (CC) Ashley A. Martin (CC) Michael A. McKinzie Tara L. McLellan Ashley E. Reed (CC) Wade M. Russell Jr (SCC) Cassie A. Sheldon Erika R. Slaton Marcus B. Smith Suzanne E. Wahrle (SCC) Molly Mitchell Walker (PS) Robert F. Walker (PS) Kate England Walton Tyler M. Walton Rhonda White Richard Class of 2000 15% Participation G. Bradley Bennett (PS) Clifton L. Boren Leon C. Campbell Anne Roberson Chapman (SCC) Marin Dawson-Caswell Liz A. Dubuisson Catherine E. Hall (CC) Lillian Wallace Houston Shanell H. Watson (SCC) Jaime Miles Jones Martha Ostenrude Kerns Zane D. King Alan R. Kirk (PS) Bronwen Houston Kirk (PS) Susan H. Mareno (CC) Jeanne M. Martin (CC) Margaret C. O’Beirne Andrew S. O’Dell Caroline H. Ranck Catherine L. Smith (CC) Susan Lacouture Stegall (CC) William A. Stegall Jr. (CC) John R. Suggs (CC) Kellie A. Woodling (CC) Michelle Clingan-Waits (PS-S) Class of 2001 8% Participation Kelli Crossland Agnich (SCC) Carla Morrison Dumontier (SC) Joseph D. DuMontier (SC)

D

O

N

O

R

S

Nicole Neidlinger Erdim Lindsey May Henley (CC) Annah Marshall Joseph (SC) Julie T. Lassalle April Slayden Mitchell (SC) Jeffrey R. Mitchell (SC) Robert S. Morrison III (PS) Mary E. Serpa Jason M. Stine Melissa Holley Wempren Carolina Whitfield-Smith Billy R. Williams Class of 2002 11% Participation Mary J. Barber Sondra Perry Barrett Jane E. Buck (CC) Christian R. Burck (PS) Blair H. Burnside Matthew F. Chandler J. Walker Coburn (SCC) Matthew B. Devall (PS) Colleen S. Fagan (CC) Sara E. Jones (SCC) Jonathan E. Kelly Lawrence Y. Ou (SC) Claire Freeney Pitt Ellen L. Schoolar Michael A. Schwitter (PS) Melissa Skertich Sutherlin (CC) Raymond M. Waters IV (SC) Class of 2003 14% Participation Marlana Evans Barousse (SCC) Martha H. Carlson (SCC) Amanda K. Cashman Erin D. Cook William S. Darsey III Kelly L. Eaton Russell S. Fletcher Kendall N. Grisham Jackie Adams Hankins Amber E. Hudson Rose M. Hurder Heather K. Isbell Ned M. Jabour III (DA) Eliceia Jackson Amy S. Janovsky James R. Johnson (CC) Angela Christine Koenig Ann C. Long Erin A. O’Neal Natalie M. Pilato Thomas P. Pitt Calcutta H. Poole Katharine Neely Pulvere Erin M. Redding James N. Scarff II


H

Elizabeth S. Smith (CC) R. Bradford Sutherlin Jr. (CC) William B. Wadlington Donald D. Williams Jr. (CC) Class of 2004 13% Participation Leslie D. Aldridge (SCC) Brett Bateman (SCC) William W. Cunningham Jr. Stephen M. Cutter (SCC) Mikaela Levy Ford (CC) James D. Graffam Jr. (CC) Courtney Bergeron Holcomb George Richard James (SC) Catherine Claire Kurtts Brian A. Lindsey Daria Kovalyova Lorio Raymond G. Messer Julia Lane Mitchell Juliane D. Morris Demeria L. Nichols William M. Pickard Stacy N. Ponder Malcolm B. Roberts Monica D. Roberts Daniel L. Searcy Jennie Golden Searcy Walter David Smith Gloria B. Surber Kenneth L. Townsend Anna Crell Wadlington Christopher M. Walters Lisha Jenine Cox Woodward (CC) Class of 2005 13% Participation Crystal J. Bender Doc M. Billingsley Scott W. Colom (PS) Jillian L. Compton (CC) Michelle Cormier Ryan B. Day (SCC) John M. Fox (SC) Kathryn Abel Graffam Hillary Paige Henderson (CC) Jivka I. Ivanova Jennifer M. Keith Eleanore D. Kelly (CC) Jared E. Lorio Elizabeth Olds Marston Matthew H. Martson Meghan L. McCaffery Nora T. Oliver Margaret D. Owen Marianne E. Portier Robert John Sawyer II (SCC) Geoffrey P. Stone Trevor C. Theilen (CC) Benjamin F. Tillman (CC) Angela D. Ward

O

N

O

R

R O

Jacob D. Wilson Margaret Cooper Wilson William T. Withers V Class of 2006 12% Participation Katie Anderson Dwight W. Andrus IV (CC) Gina M. Colon Mia M. Cowgill Paul T. Dearing Anna K. Ellis Emily C. Greaney (SCC) Justin G. Hupp (CC) Kate M. Jacobson Kristen E. Keating Martha E. McDaniel (CC) Carrie E. McDonnell (PS) David M. Papale William B. Privett Jr. (CC) Belinda B. Rives Jacques H. Roman Amanda D. Simpson Morgan T. Walvoord Elizabeth Ramsey Wise (SCC) Class of 2007 18% Participation Leah M. Alford George R. Alpaugh Kathryn E. Barlow Pamela R. Beidleman Courtney S. Costello James N. Crawford Holly E. Dickens John F. Douglas Andrew S. Gilder Samuel C. Griffin Thomas J. Hadley Andrew S. Harris William J. Hippler III Jessica L. Hoffpauir Joseph M. Ingram Taylor S. Jones Keisha E. Keyes Rebecca C. Lasoski Andrew C. Mallette Danielle L. Mayer Hannah M. McKnight Ashley A. McPhail Luke E. Morrow Nicholas J. Prather Zackary B. Prather Kelly A. Rasmus Michael A. Rueff Walter T. Rueff Jr. Nancy Salloum Jessica C. Sanford John L. S. Schettler Stuart A. Simon Charles T. Stall

L

L

O

F

D

O

N

O

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Julia A. Stewart Mark E. Surber Timothy P. Tackett Jr. (CC) Ashley R. Wilbourn Carl A. Woods III Brad Yakots Graduate Alumni* * Does not include alumni who received a bachelor’s degree from Millsaps College 8% Participation John M. Badeaux 1999 (CC) Douglas R. Boone 1994 (SCC) Elizabeth Martin Brister 1991 (PS) S. Louise Burney 1996 (PS) Riley B. Collins Jr. 1999 (PS) Joseph P. Donovan 1996 (PS-M) Mary Yerger Dunbar 1985 (SCC) Mark D. Eckenrode 2000 (CC) Edwin G. Egger 2004 Victor C. Fettes 1996 Naomi G. Freeman 1992 William Fulcher Jr. 1999 Stacey Naron Hall 1992 Anne N. Hamilton 1990 Phillip D. Hardwick 1984 (CC) Thomas S. Hayes III 1989 Ann E. Highfill 1999 (CC) Melissa Harkins Hopkins 1984 (CC) Janet R. Langley 2000 (CC) J. Philip Macon 1983 Robert A. Mallette 2004 (CC) Stacey S. Martin 1999 Ruth C. May 1991 Ronnie G. Michaels 1998 (SCC) Joann E. Mickens 1993 Mary C. Mills 1990 (PS-M) Richard H. Mills Jr. 1988 (PS-M) Don A. Pomeroy III 1983 (CC) Julius M. Ridgway Jr. 1993 (CC) Joseph R. Sandlin 1999 Lenard Alan Smith 1999 (CC) John T. Stupka 2004 (PS) Richard T. Warren 1999 (CC) Amanda L. Wellington 2004 (SCC) Albert J. Woelfle 1985 (SCC) Dudley D. Wooley 1995 (SCC) 2006-2007 Faculty and Staff Donors ** Emeriti Faculty * Retired Faculty or Staff Theodore G. Ammon (CC) Diane F. Baker (PS-F) William H. Bares Kay Barret Barksdale 1964 (PS-F) G. Bradley Bennett 2000 (PS) **Roy A. Berry Jr. (CC) George J. Bey (SCC) *Doris Pittman Blackwood 1957

Carrie Coker Blount 1996 (CC) Janis Crawford Booth 1973 (CC) William Brister (PS) Carl G. Brooking 1971 (PS) *Sara L. Brooks Kristen M. Brown (CC) Patricia S. Bruce Barbara Brunini Luran Luper Buchanan 1963 (DA) S. Louise Burney 1996 (PS) Karen D. Cadiere (CC) **C. Eugene Cain (PS-M) Claudine Chadeyras (CC) *John H. Christmas 1948 (PS) Corinne Grady Ciaccio 1990 (SCC) Raymond Clothier Cheryl Coker (PS-F) Timothy C. Coker (PS-F) John A. Conway III (CC) Adam Patrick Cooper 1994 Mathew Cox (PS) Tonya Craft (SCC) David H. Culpepper 1980 (PS-F) David C. Davis (CC) **Harper Davis Jr. 1947 (SCC) *Pearl Dyer Colleen S. Fagan 2002 (CC) *Donald P. Fortenberry 1962 (SCC) Naomi G. Freeman 1992 Catherine Ruggiero Freis (SCC) *Richard S. Freis (SCC) Michael L. Galaty Stanley Galicki (CC) Delbert E. Gann (SCC) Paula Garrett (DA) Lisa Garvin 1993 (CC) Nola K. Gibson (CC) Michael Ray Grubbs 1973 (PS) Phillip D. Hardwick 1984 (CC) Thomas W. Henderson (DA) Jean H. Heslin (CC) Louise Perkins Hetrick 1966 *Dick R. Highfill (CC) Patrick D. Hopkins (CC) Patrick G. James (CC) Robert J. Kahn R. Brit Katz (PS) Asif Khandker (CC) Vernon E. King (SCC) Katherine Stark Landrum 1983 (SCC) Dana M. Lang (PS) Janet R. Langley 2000 (CC) Martha McMullin Lee Charles R. Lewis (PS) *Julia Aust Lewis 1954 (PS) **T. W. Lewis III 1953 (PS) W. Criss Lott 1978 (SCC) Frances Lucas (PS-S) Mark J. Lynch 1976 (SCC) J. Philip Macon 1983 Larry E. Madison (CC) Debora L. Mann R. Dudley Marble Jr. (CC)

2007


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“We are educating the next generation of leaders, and the support of alumni and friends, like the Langston family, gives us the resources to attract and retain the best and brightest students from across the country.” —President Frances Lucas

president’s report

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Mark J. McCreery 1988 (PS) Robert S. McElvaine Sarah L. Mcguire (CC) Daniel McKnatt Howard L. McMillan Jr. (PS-M) Kenneth D. McRae (CC) D. Greg Miller (CC) **Lucy W. Millsaps (SCC) Julian M. Murchison Sandra E. Murchison Robert B. Nevins (SCC) Tanya A. Newkirk Linda S. Nix James J. Page 1986 Marshall Palmer (CC) Trenee C. Palmer (CC) Scott J. Pennington *Francis E. Polanski (DA) *Sandra Polanski (DA) Penelope J. Prenshaw (CC) Jimmie M. Purser 1965 Darby K. Ray Michael R. Reinhard (PS) Dora G. Robertson 1997 (CC) Todd S. Rose (PS) **Harrylyn Sallis **W. Charles Sallis Connie Schimmel (PS) Donald R. Schwartz (CC) Hunter E. Scott (CC) Nancy Flowers Seepe 1983 (SCC) Robert A. Shive Jr. (CC) Elise Smith (DA) Richard A. Smith (PS) Steven G. Smith (DA) Kristina L. Stensaas Tracy E. Stites Vicki Stuart (CC) John T. Stupka 2004 (PS) Theresa Surber (CC) **Jonathan M. Sweat (PS-S) Patrick Taylor (CC) Susan W. Taylor (CC) Andrew K. Thaw Ming Tsui Paul Van Hooydonk Marlys T. Vaughn (CC) Gene Vinson Patricia Reed Wade 1948 Sarah R. Wamester *Nancy White 1992 **Jerry D. Whitt (PS) *Sue Yeager Whitt (PS) Timothy A. Wise 1989 (SCC) *Jack L. Woodward 1951 (PS) *Nelda W. Woodward (PS) Rebecca C. Youngblood 1973 (SCC) Sanford C. Zale Rebecca Abbott Zotti 2000

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Parents (Includes parents of current & former Millsaps students) *indicates a gift to the 2006–07 Parents Fund for Campus Improvement Ms. Renee W. Abel *Mr. & Mrs. John E. Adams III Dr. & Mrs. James G. Adams Mr. Thomas E. Adams (CC) Rev. Jane B. Alexander Dr. & Mrs. Ted J. Alexander (PS) Dr. & Mrs. Timothy J. Alford (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. Tom Allain Mr. Edgar L. Allen *Dr. & Mrs. Glenn E. Allen Mrs. Mary A. Allen (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Frank D. Alley Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth L. Almond Ms. Katherine T. Alpaugh (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Felicito D. Amaya Mrs. Edgar L. Anderson Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mark K. Anderson (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Michael Anderson (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William F. Angell (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Antone (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. John Antonini (CC) Rev. & Mrs. William F. Appleby Sr. (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Henry R. Arnold Mr. & Mrs. John Arnold (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joe P. Arnold (SCC) Rev. & Mrs. John L. Ash III (CC) Mrs. Vivian R. Aubert (CC) Dr. William K. Austin (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Usama Y. Awwad *Mr. & Mrs. Gregory B. Baber (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Wayne M. Babin (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Joe N. Bailey III (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Wesley R. Bailey Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William D. Bailey Ms. Ida G. Ballard (CC) Mr. & Mrs. H. Allen Ballenger Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. F. Scott Balton *Mr. & Mrs. Joel E. Barber Mrs. Mary Jane Barber (CC) Dr. & Mrs. James E. Barcus Mr. Samuel R. Bardwell Rev. & Mrs. Ronald J. Barham (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Ed Barlow Mrs. Lynn B. Barlow Ms. Patricia D. Barlow Colonel & Mrs. John R. Barr (CC) Mr. Wallace W. Bass (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Batson (CC)

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Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Bauerl (CC) Dr. & Mrs. John E. Baxter Jr. Mr. & Mrs. John A. Beal *Dr. & Mrs. Jerry S. Beam (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Gary Beaumont (CC) Mr. Jerry L. Beavers (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Bruce M. Bebensee (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Bill Beidleman (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Belden (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Henry S. Bell (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. James K. Bell (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Mark Bellish (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Bender Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery A. Bennett Mr. Brett J. Berry (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Berry (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Roy A. Berry Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Brent Berryman *Mr. & Mrs. Robert Best (CC) Mr. Clyde W. Biddle (DA) *The Revs. James & Claire Biedenharn *Mr. & Mrs. Carl N. Bishop Mr. & Mrs. Dameron Black III (PS) Rev. & Mrs. Warren C. Black Jr. (DA) Mr. Joseph D. Blackburn (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Blackwood Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Blades (DA) Mr. William F. Blair (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Blanche Mr. & Mrs. David Blaylock Dr. Richard & Rev. Dr. Martha Blount (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Adam Blumer Jr. (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Boettcher (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Bonneau Mr. Paul R. Boone Drs. Philip & Janis Booth (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John R. Booth II (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Wallace L. Boteler Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Bott Jr. *Mr. & Mrs. Sam L. Bourne Sr (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Bowen (CC) Rev. & Mrs. John L. Bowie (CC) Mr. & Mrs. George A. Boyd (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. Brice H. Brackin (PS-F) Dr. & Mrs. W. M. Bradford *Mr. & Mrs. James K. Bramlett Dr. & Mrs. Leonard H. Brandon (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Jerry C. Bratton Mrs. W. J. Breed Mr. & Mrs. Patrick K. Brian Mr. & Mrs. Sidney G. Brian (DA) Mr. & Mrs. W. P. Bridges Jr. (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James Barry Brindley (SCC) Mrs. Catherine S. Brinson *Mr. & Mrs. William E. Briscoe (SCC)


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Mr. & Mrs. John C. Brooks Mr. & Mrs. Cecil C. Brown (CC) *Dr. & Mrs. Otis B. Brown (SCC) *Ms. Karen Brunetti (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Edmund L. Brunini Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Carl M. Bruser (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Bryant Dr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Bryant (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Buddy Buchanan (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Keith Buchanan *Ms. Caroline P. Buck (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Michael G. Buck (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Buckalew *Ms. Leigh F. Buckner *Mr. & Mrs. William Buffa (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Darwin Bufkin (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Taylor D. Buntin (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Donald V. Burch (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. William M. Burch Mr. & Mrs. David Burns (SCC) *Ms. Denise Burns Rev. & Mrs. Arnold A. Bush Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Fred M. Bush Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Samuel M. Butchee *Mr. & Mrs. David T. Butler Mr. & Mrs. Clinton Cain Judge & Mrs. John C. Calhoun (CC) Ms. Shirley A. Calhoun Mr. & Mrs. Fred L. Callon (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Charles Campbell (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Leon Campbell Mrs. Martha H. Campbell (PS) Dr. Floyd Thomas Carey Sr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Frederick D. Carlson (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Arne Carlsson Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy L. Carr (SCC) Rev. Joseph William Carroll (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Carter (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Cascio Jr. Rev. & Mrs. John M. Case *Mr. & Mrs Charles J. Caskey *Mr. & Mrs. Wayne P. Castille Dr. & Mrs. James R. Cavett Jr. (SCC) Col. & Mrs. Gary R. Cazier *Ms. Genie S. Chadwick *Mr. Michael W. Chadwick *Mr. & Mrs. James R. Chandler Mr. & Mrs. Stanley L. Chapman (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James G. Chastain III (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Howard B. Cheek (CC) Rev. Reynolds S. Cheney II (PS-F) Dr. & Mrs. Amnuey Chiemprabha (SCC) Dr. and Mrs. W. Dean Chow (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Russell J. Christesen (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John H. Christmas (PS) Mr. Peter J. Cianciola Mr. & Mrs. Duncan A. Clark (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Edgar M. Clark Mr. & Mrs. G. Lewis Clark Mr. Lester Clark Jr. (CC) Mrs. Maureen M. Clark (CC) Rev. & Mrs. Henry C. Clay Jr. (SCC)

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*Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Clayton (DA) Mr. & Mrs. James A. Cloy Dr. & Mrs. Alton B. Cobb (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James A. Coggin (PS-M) Drs. Timothy & Cheryl Coker (PS-F) Mr. & Mrs. Samuel G. Cole III (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Edward M. Collins Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur O. Colom (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Carlos W. Colon Rev. & Mrs. Robert H. Conerly Dr. Oscar Weir Conner III (SC) Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Connor Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey N. Cook (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. David L. Cook Mr. Richard L. Cook Mr. & Mrs. George A. Cooke Sr (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Gerald R. Cooper (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Corban (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Chris Cortese Mr. & Mrs. Walter N. Cosby *Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Costello (SCC) Mrs. Margaret Countiss (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert Cowan Mr. & Mrs. Leigh H. Craddock *Mr. & Mrs. E. Nick Crawford (SCC) Mrs. Sarah M. Crawford (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Carroll L. Credeur (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William W. Croswell (PS) Mr. Gerald P. Crystal (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Dennis P. Curren (CC) Rev. and Mrs. George T. Currey Sr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Dan E. Currie Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Currie Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. John Curtis *Mr. Curley J. Darby (CC) Mr. & Mrs. James O. Darnell (PS) Dr. & Mrs. Jewel S. Daughety Mr. & Mrs. Dan B. Davidson (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Theodore E. Davie (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Davis Jr. (SCC) Mr. Billy M. Davis Dr. & Mrs. David C. Davis (CC) Mr. Harper Davis Jr. (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James B. Davis (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John L. De Kozan (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Peter DeBeukelaer Mr. & Mrs. Walter L. Dean (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Mark H. Dearing Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Deaton Sr. (SCC) *Ms. Kathy E. Detzler Mr. Kenneth R. Dew (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Carl D. Deweese (CC) Mr. & Mrs. David E. Dewey (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Dews (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Elmer C. Dickens (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Dickerson (CC) *Mr. C. A. Dodson (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Donaldson (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Donovan (PS-M) *Mr. & Mrs. David Dorsey (SCC) Mrs. Nelda L. Doss (CC) Dr. Wilford C. Doss (CC)

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*Mr. William D. Douglas Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Eugene G. Douglass Jr. (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Luther M. Dove (DA) Mr. Robert W. Dowdy (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Philip E. Downer (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. David B. Doxey *Mr. Lee D. Dudinsky (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mack H. Dudley Mr. William P. Dulaney *Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Duncan Sr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. James Dusek Drs. William & Carole Dye (CC) Mr. Thomas R. Dyer Mr. & Mrs. Weldon R. Dyer Dr. & Mrs. A. Eugene Dyess (CC) Mr. & Mrs. David E. Dyess Mr. & Mrs. Wayne C. Eastlack (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Jerome C. Edwards (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Clyde B. Edwards Jr. (PS-F) Ms. Kathryn Ellis Mr. & Mrs. Nat B. Ellis *Mr. & Mrs. Christopher English (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Entrekin Mrs. Rhonda V. Entrikin (CC) Ms. Becky S. Ertz Mr. & Mrs. Clark G. Evans Mr. & Mrs. Leonard A. Evans Mr. & Mrs. Richard Murphree Evans (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Gern D. Exley *Dr. & Mrs. George A. Eyrich (DA) Dr. & Mrs. Thomas K. Fagan Rev. C. B. Felder (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Roger V. Fell (SCC) *Mr.& Mrs. William Fenstermaker (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joel G. Ferriss Mr. & Mrs. Warren Fesmire *Mr. & Mrs. James Field (CC) Dr. Samuel E. Field Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Francis Fisher (CC) Dr. N. Bond Fleming (CC) *Dr. John E. Fontaine (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Fossen (DA) Mrs. Barbara S. Fountain Mr. & Mrs. Deward G. Fountain Jr. (PS) Mr. & Mrs. J. Thomas Fowlkes (PS-M) Mrs. Rachel D. Fowlkes (PS-F) Mr. & Mrs. Xavier M. Frascogna Jr. (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Albert C. Frese (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Howard Fromkin Dr. & Mrs. Harry C. Frye Jr. (PS) Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fugate Rev. E. S. Furr (CC) *Mr. J. Brooke Furrh Mrs. Kathryn R. Gabbert Mrs. Carolyn H. Gaby Mr. Gerald A. Gafford (PS-M) Dr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Gamble II (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. R. L. Gavioli *Mr. William M. Gay Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Gee *Mr. & Mrs. Su Giang Dr. Nola K. Gibson (CC)

*Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth S. Gikas (CC) Mrs. Janet W. Gildermaster (PS-S) Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Gillenwater (CC) Mr. & Mrs. George E. Gillespie Jr. (DA) Dr. Christina Glick (PS-F) Mr. & Mrs. F. Russell Glidewell III (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William F. Goodman Jr. (PS-S) Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd J. Gordon Mr. & Mrs. Harold C. Gosnell Jr. (CC) Dr. Benjamin B. Graves (PS) Rt. Rev. & Mrs. Duncan Gray Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd S. Gray Sr. (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Tim D. Gray (PS) Ms. Maxine M. Green Mr. & Mrs. Douglas H. Greene Sr. Mr. & Mrs. William G. Griesbeck (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William C. Griffin (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. William K. Griffin III (SC) Mr. V. W. Grisham Dr. & Mrs. Carl W. Grubbs Mr. Leo J. Guedry Mrs. Jane Gunn Mr. & Mrs. David F. Guthrie DrS. Rao J. & Kumari V. Gutti (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. T. Craig Hadley (SC) *Ms. Jeanne M. Hakklia-Wills (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Maurice H. Hall Jr. (PS-M) Rev. & Mrs. Charles R. Hallford *Ms. Lisa A. Halterman *Mr. & Mrs. Duane E. Hamill Mrs. Anne N. Hamilton *Mr. & Mrs. John Hamm (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Harry G. Hanna (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. & Mrs. Richard H. Harb (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. George T. Hardin (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Phillip D. Hardwick (CC) Mr. James A. Harrell (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. E. Harrington Jr. *Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Harris (DA) Dr. & Mrs. James Huel Harris (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Bill Harrison (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Greg Hartzog Dr. & Mrs. Gerald J. Hasselman (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Russell Hawkins (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. William S. Hays Sr. (CC) *Ms. Mary M. Heck (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Alex Heffington (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Helfrich (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mike Helo Ms. Ann G. Hendrick *Mr. & Mrs. Harold D. Hendric (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Steven M. Hendrix (PS-M) *Dr. & Mrs. J. Charles Henry (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Henry (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mark D. Herbert (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. James P. Herden (SCC) *Dr. & Mrs. Martin I. Herman *Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Herman Mr. & Mrs. Byron T. Hetrick Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Hewitt *Mr. & Mrs. Ron Hickman (CC) Col. David W. Higgins (CC)

2007


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The McNair Fund for Christian Missions enabled 18 Millsaps students to travel around the world this past summer and put their faith to work.

president’s report

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Mr. & Mrs. William W. Hill (PS-F) Rev. & Mrs. Byrd Hillman Jr. (SC) Mr. J. Herman Hines (PS) Mrs. Connie J. Hinman *Ms. Shelley M. Hodges *Mr. & Mrs. Herschel Hoffpauir (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Daniel A. Hogan (CC) Rev. & Mrs. C. David Hogsett (CC) Ms. Edna L. Holbrook *Ms. Wanda S. Holley Mr. & Mrs. Billy D. Holliday (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Robert T. Hollingsworth Jr. (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Holly Mr. & Mrs. Wendell H. Holmes (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. James M. Holston (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Gene Honeycutt (PS) Dr. & Mrs. James R. Horner Dr. & Mrs. James J. Hoth (SC) Dr. & Mrs. James R. Houston *Dr. & Mrs. Craig S. Howard (SCC) *Rev. & Mrs. Ralph F. Howe (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Michael T. Huber (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Willie J. Hudnell Mr. & Mrs. Walter Hudson (PS) Rev. & Mrs. Joe T. Humphries (PS) Mr. Thomas & Dr. Joyce Hunt (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Huskey (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. Hutzel (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Arthur W. Hyatt (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. George E. Ingle (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph H. Ingram (SCC) Mrs. Susan C. Ingram Mr. & Mrs. Frank Inman Jr. (SC) Mr. & Mrs. Philip E. Irby Jr. (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Jack Irwin *Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey Iverson Dr. & Mrs. Ned M. Jabour (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Gerald H. Jacks (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Joe G. Jackson Mr. & Mrs. Kirk R. Jackson (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William J. James (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Michael Jefcoat *Mr. & Mrs. Allen Jenkins Dr. & Mrs. Cecil G. Jenkins (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John A. Jenkins *Mr. & Mrs. James M. Jesuit Rev. & Mrs. Charles R. Johnson (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Dwayne Johnson (SCC) Dr. J. H. Johnston Jr. Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Johnston (CC) *Mrs. Pam P. Johnston Mr. & Mrs. W. Wright Johnston Rev. & Mrs. Cecil B. Jones Mr. Donald Reginald Jones (SCC)

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Mr. & Mrs. Earle F. Jones (PS-S) Dr. & Mrs. James S. Jones (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert Jones Jr. (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Don Jordan *Mr. & Mrs. Patrick W. Juneau *Mr. & Mrs. Paul Keating Dr. & Mrs. Daniel T. Keel Jr. (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Richard Keen III (CC) Rev. & Mrs. & Mrs. William V. Kemp *Mr. & Mrs. Robert Kerr (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Lance A. Keyes (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Asif Khandker (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Kilgore *Mr. & Mrs. Alvin L. Killcreas Dr. & Mrs. Wallace Killcreas Mrs. Ina G. Kimbrough (SCC) Rev. & Mrs. Jack B. King (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Marion C. Kirk John Bales & Wanda Knighton Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Kocher (CC) Mr. Robert B. Kochtitzky (CC) Mr. & Mrs. I. Frank Koeninger *Ms. Dianna L. Kolar Mr. & Mrs. David M. Kors Dr. & Mrs. Sigurds O. Krolls *Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Ladnier Mr. & Mrs. John Warren Lambert Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth N. Lancaster *Mr. & Mrs. Don Landrum (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Stephen H. Landy (CC) Mrs. Rachel Anne Laney (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Langley (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Langston (PS-M) Dr. Cathy J. Lazarus (PS) Rev. & Mrs. B. F. Lee (SCC) Bishop & Mrs. Clay F. Lee Jr. (DA) Dr. Lynda G. Lee (PS-F) Mrs. Eloise Leech (PS) Mrs. Carol M. Leggett (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Stanley R. Leonard (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Earl T. Lewis (PS) Mr. & Mrs. John S. Lewis Jr. (CC) Dr. & Mrs. T. W. Lewis III (PS) Rev. & Mrs. Sale Lilly Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Linn W. Litkenhous Mrs. Mary Lee B. Livesay (PS-F) Mr. Samuel T. Lloyd Jr. (SCC) Mrs. Erminia G. Lobo Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Loehn (PS) Mrs. Mary B. Loftin (CC) Mr. Lewis J. Lord (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Porter Loring II (PS-F) Mr. Clinton M. Lott *Mr. & Mrs. James R. Lott Dr. & Mrs. Robert T. Lott (PS) Mr. & Mrs. John W. Love Mr. Albert M. Lovett Mrs. Jean W. Lowe (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Roger L. Lowery (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Lyle (SC)

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Mr. & Mrs. Tommy G. Lyle (PS) Mr. & Mrs. J. V. MacNaughton (CC) *Ms. Cathi Mahaffey Drs. Robert & Mary Currier Mallette (CC) *Drs. Mark & Patricia Malone (CC) Ms. Darlene C. Manley (DA) Phillip Maples & Peg Wahrendorff (DA) Mr. & Mrs. William H. Marks Jr. Mr. & Mrs. J. David Marsh III (PS-S) *Mr. & Mrs. Denotee Martin (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Javier F. Martinez (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Gaines R. Massey (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. James Massey (CC) Dr. Randell P. Mayer (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Roy D. McAlilly (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey McAllister *Mr. & Mrs. James F. McCann Mrs. Mary Ann McCarty (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Van K. McCarty (CC) Mr. & Mrs. & Mrs. Silas W. McCharen *Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth G. McCoin (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Lee B. McCormick Jr. (PS-F) Mr. & Mrs. William D. McDole Mr. & Mrs. Eric L. McDonald Mrs. Mary M. McDonald (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John M. McDonnell (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Paul G. McDowell (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Robert S. McElvaine Mr. & Mrs. William C. McGehee Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Roger L. McGehee Jr. *Mr. & Mrs. James McGinnis (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Jasper McGowan (CC) Rev. & Mrs. David A. McIntosh Rev. & Mrs. Daniel D. McKee Mr. & Mrs. Dolphus R. McKenzie Mr. & Mrs. William S. McKenzie (CC) *Ms. Merrill Tenney McKewen *Mr. & Mrs. Michael McKey Mr. & Mrs. William C. McKie Jr. (DA) *Dr. Robert A. McKnight Rev. & Mrs. William E. McKnight *Mr. & Mrs. Jesse L. McLeod Mr. & Mrs. Howard L. McMillan Jr. (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Dempsey McMullen Mr. James H. McPhail Ms. Janie McPhail Dr. & Mrs. William C. McQuinn (PS-M) Col. & Mrs. Kenneth D. McRae (CC) Mr. Michael T. McRee (PS-M) Mr. John Meacham Jr.


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Mr. & Mrs. George I. Melichar (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Donald Melsheimer Mr. & Mrs. Carl D. Menist Mrs. Amanda S. Merriman (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Steve R. Merritt (CC) Mr. & Mrs. James W. Metcalf Mr. & Mrs. George L. Meyers (CC) *Dr. & Mrs. Owen M. Meyers Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence A. Michaud Mr. & Mrs. Harold D. Miller Jr. (DA) Mr. James L. Miller Mr. & Mrs. Joe R. Miller III (CC) Ms. Lynn D. Miller Dr. & Mrs. Don Q. Mitchell (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Lem E. Mitchell (SCC) Mr. Robert K. Mitchell (CC) Rev. & Mrs. T. Jerry Mitchell *Mr. & Mrs. James F. Mixson Dr. & Mrs. Wilson E. Moak Mr. & Mrs. James N. C. Moffat III (PS-F) Rev. & Mrs. Warren Curtis Moffat *Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Mohr (CC) *Ms. Vivian B. Monistere Mr. & Mrs. Bob Montgomery Mr. & Mrs. Bradley Moody Mrs. Emma J. Moore Mr. & Mrs. Daniel M. Moore III (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Winfred H. Morgan (CC) Mrs. Sue Ann Morris Mr. & Mrs. Paul Cooper Morrison (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Morrison Jr. (PS-M) *Mr. & Mrs. Russell S. Morris *Mr. & Mrs. Craig P. Morrow (DA) Mrs. Susan Y. Mosley Mr. & Mrs. Randy L. Moulder (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. H. J. Mueschke (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Bill Murphy (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Murphy (PS) Mr. Dan & Dr. Patricia Murrell (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Brad Mutchler (PS-F) Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Namias (PS) Mrs. Barbara B. Neel Dr. & Mrs. Walter P. Neely (PS) Mr. & Mrs. John A. Neill Sr. (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Nevins (SCC) Drs. Jefferson & Jeanne Newbern (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin W. Nichols Jr. (SC) Mrs. Mary M. Nichols (PS-S) Mr. & Mrs. Wis Nichols Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Marco W. Nicovich Rev. Lillian L. Nolley *Mr. Charles W. Norton (CC) *Ms. Sharon H. Norton Mrs. Martha F. O’Brien (CC) Ms. Nancy A. O’Neal *Mr. & Mrs. Paul Oglesbee (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Mark S. Olinger (CC) Rev. & Mrs. Ross A. Olivier (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Steven L. Olivier (CC) Mrs. Martha Oseman *Ms. Tabitha Otieno The Revs. Luther & Janet Ott (PS-M)

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*Mr. & Mrs. Calvin D. Owen (CC) Ms. Ann R. Pace *Mr. & Mrs. John Pacillo III (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Arthur S. Paine II (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Palmerton (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. John F. Papale (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James L. Parker (DA) Dr. & Mrs. Roy A. Parker (SCC) Drs. William & Judy Parker (PS) *Mr. Charles N. Parrott Mr. & Mrs. Keith Parsons (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William A. Patterson (DA) Clarence Foreman & Virginia Payne Mrs. Jeanne M. Peet (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Randolph Peets Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery Penuel *Mr. & Mrs. Danny L. Peppers Mr. & Mrs. Robert Petersen (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Bobby E. Pettitt Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Phalen (DA) Dr. Richard Pharr (PS-S) Dr. & Mrs. John C. Philley (CC) Mrs. Ann R. Phillips Mr. & Mrs. George B. Pickett Jr. (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Stephen R. Piesch Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Pigott Mrs. Clara B. Pinkston (DA) Mr. & Mrs. John L. Piraino (PS) Mr. K. E. Pittman Dr. & Mrs. Louis A. Portera (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joe J. Powell Jr. (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Powell (CC) Dr. & Mrs. William F. Powell (SC) Mrs. Donna C. Powers Mr. & Mrs. James B. Prather (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. David C. Prejean Dr. & Mrs. J. C. Prejean (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Ronald J. Prejean (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Bob M. Prescott (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Walter A. Presswood *Mr. & Mrs. Carl Price (CC) Dr. & Mrs. F. William Price Dr. & Mrs. Julian D. Prince Sr. (SCC) Mr. George I. Puckett (PS) Dr. & Mrs. Jimmie M. Purser *Dr. James W. Quillin (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. James Quimby *Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Quinn (CC) Mrs. Kathlyn G. Rainwater (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Paul Rasmus Mr. & Mrs. Robert Rector Dr. & Mrs. Edwin L. Redding (CC) Mr. Jeffrey R. Redding (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Hugh C. Redhead (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. James Redman (DA) LTC Andrew C. Reeves Mr. Archie Reeves Mr. & Mrs. Danny D. Reible (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Rice Jr. (CC) Mrs. Mary M. Rice (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Carl A. Richard (CC) Mr. Ralph G. Richardson

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*Dr.& Mrs.Thomas C. Richardson (CC) Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Ridgway IV Mr. & Mrs. C. Robert Ridgway III (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. W. Bryant Ridgway *Ms. Heather Roberts (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James T. Roberts (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. John Roberts (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Roberts (PS) *Ms. Anne W. Robertson Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Robertson (CC) Mrs. Elizabeth A. Robertson Mrs. Marie Roby (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Larry W. Rochelle (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Wilson Ragan Rodgers (SCC) *Mr. C. Paul Rogers III (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Lewis P. Rogers (CC) *Ms. Lynn T. Rogers (SCC) Mr. Ellis G. Rohrberger (CC) *Ms. Jennifer L. Rohrer *Mr. & Mrs. James A. Rollins Mr. & Mrs. Jacques H. Roman IV (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Douglas J. Roome Mr. & Mrs. Julian F. Rose (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Scott Roth Dr. & Mrs. Glen A. Rountree *Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rourke (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Gaither S. Rowe III *Dr. & Mrs. Walter Thomas Rueff (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Rutledge (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Marcelo J. Ruvinsky Lt. Col. & Mrs. Nicholas Sabatini (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Miles H. Sager (CC) Drs. W. C. & Harrylyn Sallis Mr. & Mrs. Gary L. Salmon (PS-M) Dr. & Mrs. John C. Sandefur (CC) Mr. Ernest D. Sanders (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Micheal W. Sanders (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Sandlin *Dr. & Mrs. Jack C. Sanford Jr (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Umesh Sanjanwala Dr. & Mrs. Eduardo L. Santiago (CC) *Ms. Karol K. Sargent (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Satterlee *Mr. & Mrs. William Schettler (SC) Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Schmidt (SC) *Mr. & Mrs. Leonard J. Schnec Mr. & Mrs. James R. Schoolar Mr. & Mrs. Matthew J. Schott Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Scipper (PS) *Mr. David A. Scott (CC) Ms. Nancey T. Scott (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Tom B. Scott Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John E. Seddelmeyer (PS-S) Mr. & Mrs. Elmer D. Sellers Mr. J. M. Sessions III (CC) Mr. T. O. Sessions Jr. Dr. & Mrs. S. L. Sethi (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Rickey Settlemires (CC) Mrs. William E. Shanks (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Andy Sharp Mr. & Mrs. Hugh J. Shaw (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Johathan Shear (CC)

Mr. & Mrs. A. Jerry Sheldon (SC) Mr. & Mrs. David C. Shelton (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Albert P. Shepherd Jr. (SCC) *Ms. Ethel M. Shine Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. Shive Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Johnny Shivers (CC) Mr. & Mrs. James D. Shoptaug (SCC) Mrs. Constance J. Sigsby Dr. Robert J. Sigsby Mr. & Mrs. Joe B. Sills (CC) Mr. Thomas M. Sims Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Ed Skipper (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. David G. Slater (CC) Mr. & Mrs. David Ray Smith *Mr. Edwin Smith *Mr. & Mrs. Mark W. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Robert Smith Mr. & Mrs. James K. Smith (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Stephen C. Smith (SCC) *Ms. Teresa C. Smith Mr. & Mrs. V. K. Smith Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Andrew M. Smither (CC) Mr. Thomas P. Sneed (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Randall C. Songy (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Sooby (CC) *Dr. & Mrs. William H. Sorey (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert Spaulding (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Doyle P. Spell (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Larry Spencer Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Spencer *Ms. Nancy Spiller Mr. & Mrs. James L. Stafford (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Charles P. Stall (PS) Ms. Dale S. Stanford Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Stanford Jr. (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Earl Stark (DA) Mrs. Wilena H. Stark Mr. & Mrs. Kevin G. Stauffer (CC) Mr. Charles L. Steel IV (CC) Mr. B. M. Stevens Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. David S. Stewart (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Paul A. Stewart (DA) *Ms. Vivienne G. Stewart (CC) Mr. Stanford Stolzenhaler Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Deck Stone (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Wallace Strickland (CC) Mr. Forrest W. Stringfellow Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Strong Mr. & Mrs. Raymond B. Stronsky (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Stephen A. Stuart (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mike P. Sturdivant (PS-M) Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Summerford Mrs. P. E. Sumner (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Dan Surber (CC) Dr. & Mrs. John E. Sutphin Jr. (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John W. Sweat (SCC) *Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Tackett Sr. (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Russell S. Tarver (CC) Mr. Christopher W. Taylor Mrs. Eleanor Crabtree Taylor (CC) Mr. Rowan H. Taylor Sr. (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. George W. Tebo (PS) Dr. Barry C. Tedder (DA)

2007


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“My major goal in overseeing the McNair endowment is to increase the number of possible placements, not only abroad, but in Jackson, in Mississippi, and within the United States. I want our students to cover a variety of areas. The calls for servantleadership abound; there is always a need somewhere.” —Dr. Don Fortenberry, minister for student missions

president’s report

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Mr. Thomas R. Temple Sr. Dr. & Mrs. Joe W. Terry III (CC) *Mr. Brian H. Tew (CC) Dr. & Mrs. George B. Theilen (CC) Rev. & Mrs. John Ed Thomas III (PS) *Mrs. Lillian S. Thomas (CC) Ms. Yvonne Thomas (CC) Mrs. Barbara J. Thompson *Mr. & Mrs. Dennis L. Thompson Dr. & Mrs. Ancel Tipton (DA) Mr. & Mrs. John B. Tomlinson Rev. Sam A. Tomlinson III (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Frank W. Trapp (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Marcus A. Treadway Jr. (PS) Mr. & Mrs. John D. Treanor Dr. & Mrs. O. Gerald Trigg (DA) *Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth A. Trocquet *Dr. & Mrs. Sam C. Tumminello Mr. & Mrs. Thayer Turner *Mr. & Mrs. Forrest T. Tutor Mr. & Mrs. Timothy D. Ullmer Mr. & Mrs. Walter Scott Varnado III (CC) Mr. & Mrs. J. Mack Varner (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Marko Ventic (CC) Mr. Harvey J. Vest Jr. (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Gene Vinson (SCC) Mrs. Cynthia O. Virden *Mr. & Mrs. Richard Vowell Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Warner Wadlington III (DA) Dr. & Mrs. Barthel D. Waggoner Mr. Wayne L. Wahrendorff (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Jim Walden (PS) Dr. & Mrs. Harrison C. Walker Jr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Walker Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Walker Mr. George K. Wallace Mrs. Mary R. Walter Mr. & Mrs. Ronnie L. Walton (SC) Mr. & Mrs. William G. Walvoord (CC) Mrs. Miriam C. Wankerl (DA) Mrs. Carol B. Wansong *Mrs. Allison V. Warburton Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Ward (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Lee L. Wardlaw Dr. & Mrs. Richard B. Warren Jr. (CC) Rev. & Mrs. R. Warren Wasson (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Waterman (CC) *Mr. William F. Waters Jr. (SCC) *Dr. Roderick C. Webb Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Lovett H. Weems Jr. (CC) Dr. & Mrs. W. Lamar Weems (PS) Mr. & Mrs. John J. Weglicki (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John E. Welles II (PS-M)

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Dr. Kennard W. Wellons Dr. & Mrs. Charles Donald Wells Jr. (DA) Estate of Paul L. Wells Jr. (PS-M) *Dr. James M. West (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. James K. Wetzel (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Steve A. Whatley (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Fred E. White (SCC) Mrs. June C. White (PS) Mr. Lee I. White (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. Lorimer J. White Mrs. Nancy White *Mr. Cleve J. & Dr. Virginia Anne Whitley (PS-M) *Mr. & Mrs. Billy F. Wilbourn (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Wilkinson (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Auvergne Williams III (CC) Dr. Edwin W. Williams (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John M. Williams Rev. & Mrs. Jerry M. Williamson Sr. Mr. & Mrs. James E. Williamson Mrs. Naomi W. Williamson Ms. Pegi A. Willrich Ms. Donna M. Wilson Mrs. Clara S. Wimberly (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm Wimbish Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Wise Mr. James C. Witten Mr. & Mrs. Keith A. Wittie Mrs. Grace K. Wofford Dr. & Mrs. John D. Wofford Sr. (PS) Dr. & Mrs. Robert Thomas Woodard (SCC) *Dr. & Mrs. Carl A. Woods (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John F. Woods Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Jack L. Woodward (PS) *Mr. & Mrs. John Wooten Mrs. Betty Small Wright (SCC) Mrs. Leila Clark Wynn (PS) Mr. & Mrs. Stephen H. Yakots Mr. & Mrs. Ben S. Yandell Mrs. Jeanne T. Yarbrough Mr. John Yargo Sr. (CC) *Mr. & Mrs. Philip W. Yeates (CC) Mrs. Margaret B. Yerger (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Wirt A. Yerger Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Clarence N. Young Mr. James L. Young (PS-F) *Mr. & Mrs. Wallace Young Rev. J. Wesley Youngblood *Mr. & Mrs. Jeffery P. Zagone (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Zubic (CC) Friends Dr. & Mrs. Holland M. Addison Jr. Mr. H. M. Addkison Jr. (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Joe Alderman Ms. Anna R. Alford Mr. Michael M. Allison

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Mr. & Mrs. Frank A. Anderson Mr. R. Charles Anding (DA) Mr. Carl Andre’ Mrs. Inez Anthony (CC) Mr. Joe P. Arnold (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Randall Atchley Dr. Isaac Aultman Rev. E. Allen Bailey Mr. & Mrs. Carter Baker (SCC) Ms. Barbara F. Baker Ms. Melissa Baltz Ms. E. B. Barnett Mrs. Sammie Bateman (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Paul Bellenger Jr. Mrs. Carol Bergmark (DA) Ms. Barri E. Bernstein Ms. Faye S. Berry Ms. Martha Gray Berryhill (SCC) Mr. Ronnie L. Bethay Mrs. Sheryl Bey (SCC) Mrs. Rita Bizzell (DA) Mrs. Rebecca K. Blythe (DA) Mr. Derrick Bobbitt (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Walter H. Boone (CC) Mr. David R. Bowen Mrs. C. M. Bowman Dr. D. Royce Boyer (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Ralph E. Bradley Mrs. Rachel Brandon (SCC) Mr. Allen E. Brewer (CC) Mr. Conway Briscoe Ms. Margaret G. Briscoe Mr. & Mrs. William G. Brockman (CC) Mr. James F. Brooke III (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Brooks Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Buckley Mrs. Beverly Bufkin (CC) Mrs. Sharron S. Burch (SCC) Mr. James A. Burke (SC) Mrs. Ingrid S. Burnett (SCC) Mrs. Joanne M. Burnett (CC) Ms. Julia T. Burnett Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Burney (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Duke Cain (SCC) Ms. Helen B. Cambell Mr. William R. Capps (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Duke Carlisle Mrs. Sarah W. Carmichael (SC) Ms. Susan Carmichael Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Carruth Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Carruth (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Laurance W. Carter Mr. & Mrs. Hollis Carter Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth G. Carter Mr. & Mrs. Rives Carter (CC) Mrs. Emogene H. Carter Mr. Juan Castillo (DA) Mr. William I. Chenault (CC) Mrs. Dorothy H. Christesen (CC) Mrs. Mary H. Clark (SC) Ms. Susan B. Clark Rev. Henry C. Clay Jr.


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Mrs. Margaret Clingan Mr. James Clodfelter (CC) Dr. W. Q. Cole Mr. Ronald Collins Mr. Stephen K. Collins Mr. John A. Conway Jr. (CC) Mrs. Jennifer L. Cook Mr. Jack Cooke (CC) Mrs. Allegra W. Cope (CC) Mrs. Elizabeth W. Copeland Judge & Mrs. Edward Cortright Jr. Mr. C. R. Cox (SCC) Ms. Christine C. Cox Mr. & Mrs. Blythe B. Cragon Mrs. John L. Crawford (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Silas B. Cross Mr. Dewain Culp (CC) Mr. George W. Cummings IV Ms. Margaret O. Cupples Ms. Rebecca M. Cutler (CC) Mrs. James E. Davis Jr. (CC) Ms. Esther B. Davis Mr. & Mrs. Rene De la Cruz (SCC) Mr. William F. Denson III (DA) Rev. Claire Dobbs Ms. Mary Dorr Mrs. Marlane Dove (DA) Mrs. Peggy Joy Dumas (CC) Mrs. Carol Durham Mrs. Pauline W. Elliott (CC) Mr. Tim Ellis Mr. Thomas L. Engdahl (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John F. England Ms. Sara Erwin Mr. & Mrs. Ralph D. Farr Mr. Paul H. Farr (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Brian T. Fenelon Dr. E. Harold Fisher (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John Fontaine III (CC) Mr. Tyler C. Ford (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Fortenberry Mrs. Kaye Fortenberry (SCC) Mr. E. D. Foster Dr. William D. Frazier (DA) Mr. & Mrs. William R. Freeman Mrs. Linda Freeman (DA) Dr. Richard S. Freis (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John R. Fry Jr. Mr. William W. Fuller (CC) Dr. Theo F. Fullerton (CC) Ms. Cynthia Galabota Mr. Christopher Galaty Ms. Carol P. Galaty Ms. Diane K. Galaty Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Garlington Ms. Anne T. Gathings (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy Gattis Mr. & Mrs. John H. Geary Mr. & Mrs. William W. Gibson Mr. & Mrs. Don Gilbert (CC) Miss Martha Louise Ginn (CC) Ms. Joette Giovineo Mrs. Margaret Glorioso (CC)

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Mrs. Martha Graber Ms. Kathleen Grafton Mrs. Deborah N. Graham (SCC) Dr. Marilyn D. Graves (SCC) Mr. Robert C. Graves (SC) Mrs. Mary S. Green (SCC) Dr. & Mrs. Robert L. Guy (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. William A. Hailey (CC) Mr. Kirby W. Halford (CC) Mr. Robert Halford (DA) Ms. Sarah H. Halford Ms. Sandra Halford-Amburg (SCC) Ms. Jennifer Hall Dr. & Mrs. George Hamilton (CC) Dr. K. C. Harbour (CC) Mr. & Mrs. John Hardy (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Charles P. Harris Ms. Frances Harris Mrs. Shelley Harrison (CC) Mr. L. H. Hartzog (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Haskins (SCC) Ms. Delories Hassler Mrs. Michelle H. Hawkins (CC) Ms. Marla Harbor Mr. Lowell Heinmiller Mrs. Kate S. Hendricks (CC) Mrs. Marilyn S. Hetrick (CC) Mr. David E. Hicks Sr. (SCC) Mr. C. Y. Higginbotham III Mr. C. Y. Higginbotham Jr. (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Randall S. Hines Mr. & Mrs. Harvey Holland (CC) Mrs. Ouida Holland (CC) Mr. James W. Hood (DA) Mr. Gregory H. Hopkins (DA) Ms. Mary Ginn Howell Mr. John Hudson (CC) Mrs. Joyce B. Hull Ms. Harriet H. Humphreys (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Hunt Mr. & Ms. Patrick R. Huntley (CC) Mr. Jerry W. Hurt Mr. & Mrs. Rennix Isner Mrs. Elaine Jarratt (SCC) Mr. Paul Joffe (CC) Mr. Edward Y. Joe Sr. (CC) Mr. Chris Johnson (SC) Mr. Otho S. Johnson Jr. Ms. Susan K. Johnson Mr. William T. Jolly (CC) Mrs. Carolyn L. Jones (SCC) Ms. Syble T. Jones Ms. Nelda Jordan (CC) Ms. Barbara Juister Ms. Cynthia H. Kavanaugh Mrs. Nazneen Khandker (CC) Dr. & Mrs. Ray Kimble (SCC) Mrs. Susan King (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Phil Kline Mrs. Ruth Kocher Ms. Ellen M. Kocher Mr. & Mrs. Fletcher Kurtz (CC) Mrs. Nancy Lamb (CC)

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Mr. & Mrs. Mike Lamensdorf (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Dunn Lampton (CC) Mr. Leslie B. Lampton Sr. Ms. Martha J. Langford (CC) Mr. J. Henry LaRose III Mr. & Mrs. Robin H. Ledyard (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm B. Lightsey Ms. Elta Livingston Ms. Tressa K. Love (SCC) Mr. Aubrey Bell Lucas Dr. & Mrs. Aubrey K. Lucas Mr. & Mrs. John W. Luter (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Peter K. Lutken Mr. Wesley C. Lutken Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Jack R. Lyband Ms. Donna D. Lydick Mrs. Nelwyn Madison (CC) Ms. Laura Magee (SCC) Ms. Marsha G. Manuel Mr. Roland D. Marble Mrs. Betty M. Marble (CC) Mr. Jim D. Marler (CC) Mr. David W. Martin (CC) Mrs. Margery L. Martin (SCC) Mr. Jack H. McCall Jr. Mr. Michael A. McCarty (DA) Mrs. Mary D. McCormick Mr. & Mrs. Bob L. McCullough Mr. David J. McDougall Jr. (CC) Mrs. Mary W. McDowall Ms. Frances McDowall Miss Frances McEwen Ms. Judy A. McGinnis Ms. Tara McGowan Mrs. Kay McHorse (CC) Mrs. Molly McKenzie (CC) Mrs. Ann W. McNeill (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Charles McPhail Dr. Michael C. Meadows Mr. Bernard D. Meltzer (SCC) Mr. John Milner (CC) Mrs. Ruthie W. Mitchell (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Dick Molpus (DA) Mr. R. Wilson Montjoy II (CC) Mr. Lawrence W. Moore Mr. & Mrs. Dana C. Moore Jr. Mrs. Nellie R. Moore (CC) Mrs. William W. Moore Mr. William H. Morris Jr. (DA) Mrs. Raleigh M. Morris (DA) Mr. & Mrs. W. D. Mounger (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Luther Munford (CC) Mrs. Laurie Murphy (CC) Mrs. C. M. Murry Mr. & Mrs. Glen Myers (CC) Mr. & Mrs. William Nation Jr. Mr. James A. Newquist (SCC) Mr. William B. Oakley (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Mark O. Olson Mr. Robert K. Osburn (SCC) Ms. Monica Osburn (CC) Mr. Henry A. Paben (SC) Ms. Marylin M. Passino

Mr. & Mrs. Bill Patterson Ms. Carol D. Penn Mr. & Mrs. H. W. Phelps (CC) Mr. Chris Pika Mrs. Patricia McLain (SCC) Mr. Enrico C. Poggio Mrs. Jeanette Prescott (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. John W. Price Ms. Margo L. Quiriconi (SCC) Ms. Martha S. Ray (SCC) Mr. John F. Redus Dr. Lloyd Roberts Mr. & Mrs. Harry H. Roberts Mrs. Rose D. Roberts (DA) Mr. Ronald E. Robinson (CC) Mrs. Josephine E. Roby (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Eric Rodrigue Mrs. Deborah K. Rodrigue Mrs. Sheryl H. Rogers (CC) Mr. & Mrs. Jack Root Mr. Thomas A. Ross Jr. Mrs. Ann Rueff (DA) Mrs. Elaine Rush (SCC) Mrs. Elizabeth P. Rush (CC) Mrs. Linda K. Russell (DA) Mrs. Marguerite Rutledge Mr. John Ryan (CC) Ms. Julie G. Sandberg Mrs. Bobbie J. Sanders Dr. F. H. Savoie (SCC) Mr. David H. Selah (SCC) Mr. Andrew Sessions Mrs. W. C. Shands Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Shaw III Mrs. Jack D. Shults Mr. Alexander M. Sivewright (CC) Dr. J. G. Smith (DA) Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Smith (CC) Mr. & Mrs. McKamy Smith (SCC) Mr. & Mrs. Michael S. Smith Mrs. Mary Frances Smith-Vaniz Ms. Mary R. Spang Lawton (CC) Mr. Kevin R. Spence (SC) Dr. & Mrs. Anderson Spickard Ms. Martha R. Stainton Mr. J. Dan Stephens Jr. (CC) Mr. Charles Stephenson Mr. & Mrs. Phineas Stevens Ms. Elizabeth A. Stevens (SCC) Ms. Anne Stevenson (CC) Mr. John W. Stewart Mrs. Flolynn T. Stover (SCC) Mr. Joseph B. Stradinger Mr. & Mrs. Daniel F. Stubbs Mr. Lawrence B. Stumb Jr. Mr. Thomas B. Sweeney Mr. Clarence B. Synakiewicz (SCC) Mr. Paul Tauchar (CC) Mrs. George J. Taylor III Mrs. Judy J. Taylor (CC) Ms. Helen C. Taylor (SCC) Ms. Cynthia Thomas Mrs. Pam Thompson (DA)

2007


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“International missionary work seems particularly important in an increasingly global society. The McNair fund allows Millsaps students to live out the command to ‘love thy neighbor as thyself ’ and to demonstrate tangible acts of service that make the world a better place.” —Dr. Charles Lewis, vice president for institutional advancement

president’s report

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Bower Foundation (PS) Bragg Drywall (PS) Briarwood Animal Hospital Buccaneer Films C.W. Farms Wesley A. Caldwell Foundation (PS) Mike Calvert Toyota Canizaro Cawthon Davis (PS) Capitol Street Corporation (PS) Central High Class of 54 Champions Baseball Camp Charles A. Frueauff Foundation (PS-M) Chisholm Foundation (PS-M) Citibank Citizens National Bank (PS) Clarkco Contractors Coca-Cola Bottling Company (PS) Coker and Palmer, Phillips and Mullen CommuniGroup (PS) Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Charitable Foundation (PS-M) Cooke, Douglass, Farr, Lemons Peter J. Costas Enterprises (PS) Cost Segregation Technology Group Covenant Partners (PS) Craft-Croswell Contract Furnishings (PS) Create Foundation (PS) Arthur Vining Davis Foundation (PS-M) Deer Creek Publishing Dunbar Financial Strategies LLC Dunlap and Kyle Company (PS-M) East Wind Management Education Services Foundation Enterprise Corporation of the Delta - ECD Hope (PS) Eubank & Betts PLLC Exell Companies Exxell Developers (PS) Ben Fatherree Bible Class (PS) Feild Co-Operative Association (PS) First United Methodist Church, Columbus First United Methodist Church, Tupelo Fluor Foundation Fountain Family Foundation (PS) Fox Everett GLS LLC (PS-M) Grantham-Poole CPA Greenwood District Office Griffin & Griffin Oil and Exploration (PS) Haddox, Reid, Burkes, & Calhoun (PS) Hickson Family Foundation (PS) High Cotton Plantation

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High Noon Luncheon Club Hixon Autoplex Hogg Family Charitable Corporation (PS-M) Holistic Dental Care PC (PS) Florence O. Hopkins Charitable Fund (PS) Horne CPA Group (PS-M) HPS Oil & Gas Properties (PS-M) Inglewood Contruction Instant Access Wireless Communication Internal Medicine and Pediatric Associates (PS) Ipswich Bay Company Ivy Place Florist & Gifts J. & S. Sales Jackson Jewish Welfare Fund Jackson Optimist Club - Boys Work Fund Jackson Pulmonary Associates (PS) Jackson Vaughan Agency (PS) Troy L. Jenkins DDS Judge Little Company Kolar Advertising & Marketing Lamb Firm (PS) Lampton Love (PS) Langston Law Firm PA (PS-M) Lewis Clark Advertising Design Lifeshare Community Ministry Livesay Historical Society (PS) Lodec Properties H. F. McCarty Jr. Family Foundation (PS-M) Madeleine and James McMullan Foundation (PS-M) McInnis Electric Company (PS) Steve McNair Foundation (PS) Selby & Richard McRae Foundation (PS-M) Meyer Crystal Family Foundation (PS) Miller & Hamer PA Millsaps Basketball Camp LLC Millsaps Diamond Girls Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church (PS-M) Mississippi Health Partners Mississippi Magnolia Chapter of CPCU Mississippi Majors Mississippi Methodist Rehabilitation Center (PS) Mississippi Puppetry Guild (PS-M) Mississippi School for the Deaf (PS) Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center (PS) Mississippi State Medical Association (PS) Mississippi Talent Education


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Mississippi Teachers Association (PS) Molpus Woodlands Group Morrison Foundation (PS-M) Mozingo and Associates National Awards New Orleans Saints (PS-M) Northside Sun Nosworc Holdings LP Old Ladies Home Association Kim Owen’s Home Finishings Papa South LLC Parker Construction Company (PS) Wayne Parker Investments (PS) Pittman McLengan Group LC Porter & Malouf PA Printroom.com - ADPS Ramey Agency LLC Rankin First Development Foundation J. Todd Reeves and Associates (PS-M) R. J. Reynolds Nabisco Regions Bank Reservoir Dental Group Ridgway Realty (PS) River Oaks Health Systems Ross and Yerger S.R. Inc. Sand Control Systems Jimmy Sanders Inc. Joe Frank Sanderson Foundation (PS-M) Leo W. Seal Family Foundation Senatobia District Fund-UMC Service Printers Shornick Foundation (PS) Siemens Building Technologies W. H. Simon & Company CPA (PS) Sir Speedy Smith, Turner & Reeves Software Solutions Int’l Stanley Love-Stanley PC State Bank and Trust (PS) Stewart Iron Works Tellus Operating Group LLC (PS-M) Telos Foundation (PS) Triton Diving Services (PS) Truly, Smith and Latham PLLC (PS) Trustmark National Bank Valley Services (PS-M) Velocity Sports & Entertainment Group (PS) Vicksburg Medical Foundation (PS-M) Waide Chandler & Fleitas PA Waters Truck & Tractor Company John H. Wear Jr. Foundation (PS-M) Webb Endodontics (PS) Ned Welles Memorial Fund (PS) James K. Wetzel & Associates PA (PS) Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation (PS-M) Williams, Weiss, Hester Co. Sam E. and Burnice C. Wittel Foundation (PS) Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs

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W.G.Yates & Sons Construction Company (PS) Wirt A.Yerger Jr. Foundation Women’s Clinic Matching Gift Companies Accenture Advanced Micro Devices Aetna Life & Casualty Bank of America Bellsouth Brown-Forman Chevron Coca-Cola Conoco-Phillips Dow Chemical Eaton Entergy Exxonmobil Federated Department Stores First Tennessee Bank Fluor Foundation Arthur J. Gallagher & Co General Electric Hormel Foods Houghton Mifflin IBM International Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation KPMG Peat Marwick Kraft Eli Lilly & Co. Merrill Lynch & Co. Nissan North America Ohio National Life Insurance Paccar Foundation Pentair Foundation Pfizer Foundation Procter & Gamble Prudential R. J. Reynolds Nabisco Sanderson Farms SBC Enterprises Shell Oil Company Smith, Turner & Reeves State Farm Company Texas Instruments Union Bank of California UBS Matching Gift Program Verizon Communications Weyerhaeuser Co. Memorials and Honorariums In Memory

Lisa Arey Shellie M. Bailey 1926 Martha Conner Bartsch 1940 Christina Bergmark Robert E. Bergmark Stephen David Bischof

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Wanda H. Bishop Lillian Irene Breland 1929 Laren Brooks Thomas J. Brooks Sue Burch Paul H. Busby Evelyn Newman Carroll 1950 Sudie Faith Clayton William E. Clayton 1950 H. Wyatt Clowe 1936 Clyde X. Copeland 1956 Leigh Dennery Cox Timothy W. Davis Charles M. Deaton 1956 Bradley Morris Dew Mary Eleanor Barksdale Douglass 1963 Garvice Pennington Erwin 1931 Helen Thorne Eskridge 1958 Jeremy J. Eskridge 1955 Mary Louise Fleming Fred W Garraway Ellen Clayton Garwood Joe Lee Gibson Mary Narny Wooten Golden Raju Zahidul Haque Ruma Haque 1983 Matthew Robert Henry 1997 C. Y. and Sarah S. Higginbotham Wilton Sidney Holston 1951 Jonathan Michael Huber 1994 Kenneth Thomas Humphries 1971 Joshua Thomas Hunt Jessie Vic Russell Jones 1938 William P. Joseph 1944 Andrew Kaplan Donald D. Kilmer Samuel R. Knox Sally Kroon Maude McLean Lane 1934 Rabian Lane 1933 Joyce Patrick Langford 1948 Lewis H. Langford 1946 Allison Coggin Lee 1991 Katherine Lefoldt James Jefferson Livesay 1941 Susan Collins Logan 1970 Nell Lowe Paul E. Martin 1949 Walter B. McCreight 1950 Archie Leigh Meadows 1938 Syble Hinson Meadows 1938 William Gregory Meadows 1973 Alton Bruce Miller 1974 William Webster Millsaps Charlotte Minyard James A. Montgomery George Hyer Moore Sarah Buie Morris 1939 Mary Maud Nichols William L. Norton 1937 Martha Adrienne Novak 1961 Shirley DeBow O’Keefe Charlotte Murray Pace 2000

Robert H. Padgett Claudia Parson William Parson Reed Herrington Pendleton 1992 Fay Crawford Pollan Leonard W. Polson Rachel Pruitt Frances Elise Rembert 1941 Betty Langton Ridgway 1953 W. E. Riecken 1952 Stockes V. Robertson Bebe Rodgers Edith Cortright Schimmel 1944 V. Brevik Schimmel Mary Tingle Selah 1947 Marvin Festus Sigmon Dorris Liming Smith 1950 Jennifer Leigh Sorrells Thomas L. Spengler 1942 Olson Stogner Polly Stone Geneala Van V. Swink 1950 John H. Tatum 1968 Zachary Taylor 1944 Carolyn Lamon Thomas 1955 Edward E. Tollison William O. Tynes 1941 John Wayne VanSkiver Katherine Drake Wade 1969 Gladys Jimmie Waldrop Elizabeth Parsons Walker Helen Bond Weems Marsha McCarty Wells 1976 Frederick Joseph Weston 1939 David White Milton Robert White 1941 Anita Colbert Whitley Thomas K. Williams Kenneth W. Wills 1932 Charles Wilson 1900 Noel Catchings Womack 1944 Grace Cunningham Wood 1939 James Walter “Pete” Wood 1956 Joanie Wignall Young 1954

In Honor George Reade Alpaugh 2007 Robert E. Anding 1948 Joy Weston Arnold 1965 Diane F. Baker Howard G. Bavender Pamela Ruth Beidleman 2007 Stephen R. Belden 2006 Martha Norton Bennett Carl G. Brooking 1971 Kathy Weston Brun 1980 John H. Christmas 1948 James A. Coggin Pat Coggin Lauri Stamm Collins 1983 Adam Patrick Cooper 1994 Clyde Harwell Dabbs 1943

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The Sam and Burnice Wittel Endowed Scholarship Fund will award scholarships based on a student’s Christian faith rather than financial need.

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Mary Hart Davis Catherine Laurel Edwards 2007 N. Bond Fleming Donald P. Fortenberry 1962 Doris B. Fowlkes Hal Fowlkes Michael L. Galaty George Gober 1973 Michael Ray Grubbs 1973 John L. Guest Thomas Jason Hadley 2007 Price Williams Halford 1991 Maurice Hinton Hall 1967 Monira Haque Robert H. Hardin Rachel P. Heard Gretchen S. Henry Samuel P. Henry Timothy Henschel J. Herman Hines Amy Knox Hopkins Myrth Houston Graham Walton Howard 2007 Arlene J. Huber Michael T. Huber Kirk Raymond Jackson 2007 Percy Johnson Hewitt Griffin Jones 2007

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Elizabeth Lauderdale Ranager 1942 Monica Lynn Reible 2007 Marie Roby Helen Ricks Rogers 1942 Nat S. Rogers 1941 Tracie Houston Scales 2002 Alice Mary Valena Scott 2007 A. Jerry Sheldon 1967 Victoria E Sizemore-Tandy Kristina L. Stensaas Julia Alysse Stewart 2007 Patrick Taylor Susan Washburn Taylor D. Keith Tonkel 1958 J. Murray Underwood 1963 Ivana Ventic 2007 Timothy Wayne Whitaker 1970 Olivia R. White-Lowe Sherryl Elizabeth Wilburn 1999 Sandra Wilson William H Wilson J. Walter Wood 1989 Judy Wood Trey Woods John Joseph Yargo 2007

Taylor Sage Jones 2007 Robert A. Kinnaird Bill F. Knox Dot Knox Samuel Cragin Knox 1974 Eloise Leech T. W. Lewis 1953 James Jefferson Livesay 1970 Mary Lee Busby Livesay 1943 William Eugene Livesay 1982 Mary Bass Loftin 1948 Aubrey K. Lucas Ella Lucas Mary Markley John Cody McCain 2003 Brent McCarty 2007 Helen Maureen McDonald 2007 Howard L. McMillan Katie Beth Miksa 2006 Twick Morrison Luke Edward Morrow 2007 Ann R. Pace Casey C. Pace James Jeffrey Page 1986 Nicholas James Prather 2007 Zackary Blakely Prather 2007 Peggy W Prenshaw H. Lynn Raley

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The generosity of many individuals, families, and foundations is directly responsible for the scholarship funds at Millsaps. The scholarships listed below were established before July 1, 2007, and provide the funding for our merit- and need-based institutional aid.

• H. V. and Carol Howie Allen Endowed Scholarship

• Professor Howard Bavender Sponsored Scholarship

• Robert E. Anding Endowed Scholarship

• Bell-Vincent Endowed Scholarship

• Annie Redfield and Abe Rhodes Artz Endowed Scholarship

• Bergmark Endowed Scholarship

• Asbury Foundation Endowed Scholarship • Burlie Bagley Endowed Scholarship • Violet Khayat Baker Endowed Scholarship • Michael J. (Duke) Barbee Memorial Endowed Scholarship • Professor Howard Bavender Endowed Scholarship

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• Dr. Robert E. Bergmark Endowed Scholarship

• Maj. Gen. Robert and Alice Ridgway Blount Drama Endowed Scholarship • Roy N. and Hallie L. Boggan Sponsored Scholarship • Alfred Bourgeois Sponsored Scholarship

• J. E. Birmingham Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Cawthon A. Bowen and Nellie Sloss Bowen Endowed Scholarship

• Allen Bishop, Gene Cain, and Al Berry Endowed Scholarship

• Daniel S. Bowling Jr. Sponsored Scholarship

• Kathryn and Derwood Blackwell Scholarship

• Jesse and Ruth Brent Scholarship

• Kevin and Tina Blackwell Sponsored Scholarship

• Pet and Randall Brewer Memorial Endowed Scholarship • W. H. Brewer Endowed Scholarship


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• Lucile Mars Bridges Endowed Scholarship

• Dr. and Mrs. J. R. Countiss Sr. Endowed Scholarship

• Martha W. Gerald Endowed Scholarship

• Martha Parks Harrison Endowed Scholarship

• Rev. and Mrs. A. M. Broadfoot Memorial Scholarship

• Carol Covert Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Lilian Gladish Gibbes Sponsored Scholarship

• J. Blaine and Bertha S. Brown Endowed Scholarship

• Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Crisler Endowed Scholarship

• Gildermaster Endowed Art Scholarship

• Rev. L. D. Haughton Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund (given by Helen Murphy Marks and Gordon Sutton Marks)

• Dr. T. M. Brownlee and Dan F. Crumpton Endowed Scholarship

• Helen Daniel Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Frances Holstein Gill Endowed Music Scholarship

• C. Leland Byler Endowed Scholarship

• Davenport-Spiva Endowed Scholarship

• John T. Gober Endowed Scholarship

• Tim Davis Memorial Sponsored Scholarship

• N. J. Jr. and Jennie Carlisle Golding Endowed Scholarship

• David Leigh Easley Memorial Sponsored Scholarship

• Pattie Madgruder Sullivan Golding Endowed Scholarship

• Charles W. and Eloise T. Else Endowed Scholarship

• Sanford Martin Graham Phi Kappa Alpha Endowed Scholarship

• John Paul Henry Endowed Scholarship

• Graves-Black Family Endowed Scholarship

• Matthew Robert Henry Endowed Theatre Scholarship

• Cuple Works Gray Endowed Scholarship

• J. Herman and Martha H. Hines Endowed Scholarship

• Clara Barton Green Scholarship

• Hickson Family Foundation Sponsored Scholarship

• C. Eugene Cain / PMTC Endowed Scholarship • A. Boyd Campbell Endowed Scholarship • James Boyd Campbell Memorial Endowed Scholarship • Charles Noel Carney Endowed Scholarship • Henry Elbert Chatham Environmental Studies Endowed Scholarship • Dr. Elbert Alston Cheek and Son Endowed Scholarship • Cheney Memorial Scholarship Fund in Memory of Reynolds Smith Cheney and Winifred Green Cheney and Allan Walker Cheney

• Endowed Minority Scholarship • Endowed Scholarship Fund in Religion • Endowed Scholarship Fund for Jewish Students • Maggie Flowers Ewing Sponsored Scholarship • Robert L. Ezelle Jr. Endowed Scholarship

• Ralph and Hazel Hon Endowed Scholarship

• W. L. Gullett Sponsored Scholarship

• Albert L. and Florence O. Hopkins Scholarship

• Josie Millsaps Fitzhugh Scholarship

• Haining Family Endowed Scholarship

• Joseph W. Hough Endowed Scholarship

• Helene B. Fleming Memorial Sponsored Scholarship

• Clyde and Mary Hall Endowed Scholarship

• Jonathan Huber Scholarship

• Don Fortenberry Endowed Scholarship

• Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Hall Scholarship

• Hal T. and Doris B. Fowlkes Endowed Scholarship

• Maurice H. Hall Sr. Endowed Scholarship

• Fowlkes Sponsored Scholarship

• Willard W. Hanson Sponsored Scholarship

• G. C. Clark Jr. and Frances R. Clark Scholarship

• Dr. Marvin J. Few Scholarship

• George Caldwell Cortright Endowed Scholarship • George Curtis Cortright Endowed Scholarship • Ira Sherman Cortright and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship • Magnolia Coullet Endowed Scholarship

• Wharton Green Scholarship

• John L. Guest Endowed Scholarship

• Felder and Carruth Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Ella Lee Williams Cortright and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship

• Zach T. and Margaret Love Hederman Endowed Scholarship

• Holloman Family Endowment Fund

• Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Clark Endowed Scholarship

• Louise Vivian Cortright and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship

• Nellie Khayat Hederi Endowed Music Scholarship

• S. J. Greer Scholarship • Ben Fatheree Bible Class Sponsored Scholarship

• Kelly Gene Cook Sr. Sponsored Scholarship

• Karim E. Hederi Endowed Scholarship

• Bernice Hederman Scholarship

• John Christmas Endowed Scholarship

• Coca-Cola Foundation Minority Endowed Scholarship

• William Randolph Hearst Endowed Minority Scholarship

• Richard D. Foxworth Memorial Scholarship • Richard D. and Marilyn D. Foxworth Endowed Scholarship • Bishop Marvin A. Franklin Endowed Scholarship • Irene and S. H. Gaines Endowed Scholarship • Marvin Galloway Scholarship

• Dudley Hughes Endowment for Geology Internships • Kenneth Humphries Memorial Scholarship • Joshua Thomas Hunt Memorial Endowed Scholarship • Hurst Sponsored Scholarship

• Ruma and Raju Haque Memorial Endowed Scholarship • James E. Hardin Memorial Endowed Scholarship • Paul Douglas and Mary Giles Hardin Scholarship • W. Troy Harkey Endowed Music Scholarship

• Harrell Freeman Jeanes Sr. Endowed Scholarship • Rev. and Mrs. John Henderson Jolly Scholarship • International Sponsored Scholarship • Beth Griffin Jones Adult Scholarship Endowment

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and friend of Mrs. Wittel

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• William Edward and Joan F. Morris Endowed Scholarship

• Lucas Sponsored Scholarship • Jim Lucas Endowed Scholarship

• Edward and Helen Moyers Sponsored Scholarship Fund in memory of Lucille Lewis Moyers

• Mary Jane Mace Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• E. L. Moyers Endowed Scholarship

• Lida Ellsberry Malone Scholarship

• Mary Miller Murry Endowed Scholarship

• G. W. Mars Endowed Scholarship

• Navy V-12 Memorial Scholarship

• Robert and Marie May Endowed Scholarship

• Cooper Neill Adult Degree Endowed Scholarship

• S. W. and Ella C. McClinton Endowed Scholarship

• J. L. Neill Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• McDonald Family Scholarship

• Mary Maude Birmingham and Robert G. Nichols Jr. Endowed Scholarship

• Mary Elizabeth Nordin and Richard L. Lauderdale Endowed Scholarship • Norma C. Moore Lawrence Memorial Scholarship • Mr. and Mrs. C. E. LeCornu Endowed Scholarship • Leake Family Sponsored Scholarship • Allison Coggin Lee Memorial Endowed Scholarship • S. Herschel Leech Endowed Scholarship • Dr. John Willard Leggett Jr. Endowed Scholarship

• Fannie Buck Leonard Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Will and Della McGehee Memorial Scholarship • Joan B. McGinnis Endowed Scholarship • James Nicholas McLean Scholarship • Madeleine and James McMullan Tuition Sponsored Scholarship • Selby and Richard McRae Scholars Program • Greg Meadows Memorial Scholarship • Meeks Ford Teaching Fellowship Fund • Arthur C. Miller Pre-Engineering Scholarship

• Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Lester Scholarship

• William Webster and Lucille Martin Millsaps Endowed Art Scholarship

• Mary Sue Enochs Lewis Endowed Scholarship

• Millsaps United Methodist Bishops Endowed Scholarship

• Julia and T.W. Lewis Sponsored Scholarship

• Ministerial Student Scholarship Aid Fund

• Mary Haise Litton Endowed Scholarship

• Minority Student Scholarship Fund • Mitchell Endowed Scholarship

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• Susan Long Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• John Chatland (Chat) Lenhart Sponsored Scholarship

—Calvin Wells, attorney

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• James Byron Morris and Deborah McAbee Sponsored Scholarship

• Langston Family Sponsored Scholarship

their faith with others.”

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• Forest G., Maude McNease, and Rex Loftin Endowed Memorial Fund

• Frank M. Laney Endowed Scholarship

encourage them to share

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• Robert D. and Alma W. Moreton Endowed Scholarship

• Rabian and Maude Lane Endowed Scholarship

Christian faithfulness and will

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• James T. Livesay Endowed Scholarship

• John T. and Doris S. Lacey Endowed Scholarship

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• Vernon Jones Scholarship

• Samuel Roscoe Knox Endowed Scholarship

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• Mike and Estelle Mockbee Sponsored Scholarship

• Alvin Jon (Pop) King Endowed Music Scholarship

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• Mary Haise Litton Sponsored Scholarship

• Rames Assad and Edward Assad Khayat Memorial Endowed Scholarship

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• R. Cary Jones and Jessie Vic Jones Endowed Memorial Scholarship

• Dan and Rose Keel Endowed Scholarship

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• Ida Louise Noblin Sponsored Scholarship • Rev. Arthur M. O’Neill Endowed Scholarship • Janet and Luther Ott Sponsored Scholarship • Charlotte Murray Pace Endowed Scholarship • Marty Paine Endowed Scholarship • Marianne and Marion P. Parker Endowed Scholarship • William H. Parker Endowed Scholarship • William George Peek Endowed Scholarship • Randolph Peets Sr. Endowed Scholarship • Edward J. Pendergrass Scholarship • Warren and Lanita Pittman Servant Leadership Scholarship • Emily J. Pointer Sponsored Scholarship


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• J. B. Price Endowed Scholarship • Lillian Emily Benson Priddy Endowed Scholarship

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• Edith and Brevik Schimmel Endowed Scholarship

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• E. B. Stewart Endowed Scholarship • E. Edward Stewart Scholarship

• Charles Christopher Scott III Endowed Scholarship

• Ferris B. and Lou Strain Scholarship

• George W. Scott Endowed Scholarship

• R. Mason Stricker Endowed Scholarship • Sturdivant Endowed Scholarship

• T. W. Rankin Ford Fellowship Fund

• Mary Holloman Scott Endowed Scholarship

• Lois P. Reed Endowed MBA Scholarship

• James W. Searcy Scholarship Fund for Business Majors

• Jane Bridges Renka Endowed Scholarship

• Raksha Sethi Endowed Scholarship

• Kelly Mouzon Pylant Memorial Scholarship

• W. H. Watkins Endowed Scholarship

• Tommy L. Ranager Scholarship

• J. E. and Mildred Rhea Endowed Scholarship

• Dr. W. T. J. Sullivan and Dr. J. Magruder Sullivan and C. Carothers Sullivan Memorial Scholarship Fund • Charles E. Summer Jr. Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• William E. Shanks Sponsored Scholarship

• E. H. Sumners Endowed Scholarship

• Albert Burnell Shelton Scholarship

• Jonathan M. Sweat Music Endowment

• William Sharp Shipman Endowed Scholarship

• Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Tabb Endowed Scholarship

• Robert Emmert Silverstein Scholarship

• Tatum Family Endowed Scholarship

• R. S. Ricketts Endowed Scholarship • Ridgway Endowed Choral Music Scholarship • Dr. Walter Stevens Ridgway Sponsored Scholarship • Dr. William Emil and Alma Gollner Riecken Endowed Scholarship • John R. Rimmer Sponsored Scholarship • C. E. (Kem) and Majorie Risley Sponsored Scholarship

• Janet Lynne Sims Endowed Scholarship • Marion L. and Mary Hanes Smith Endowed Scholarship • Myriam McAllister Smith Endowed Scholarship

• Rowan Taylor Sr. Endowed Scholarship

• John Ed Thomas Family Endowed Scholarship • Keith Tonkel Endowed Scholarship

• Frank and Betty Robinson Memorial Scholarship • Helen and Nat Rogers Endowed Scholarship • Velma Jernigan Rodgers Endowed Scholarship • Thomas G. Ross, M.D., Pre-Med Endowed Scholarship

• Jennifer L. Sorrells Endowed Fellowship Fund for Geophysical Research • Jennifer L. Sorrells Sponsored Fellowship Fund for Geophysical Research • Spann Endowed Scholarship • Dr. Thomas R. Spell Endowed Scholarship

• John Houston Wear Jr. Foundation Sponsored Scholarship • Col. Lynn H. Webb Endowed Scholarship • James Thompson Weems Endowed Scholarship • Mary Virginia Weems Endowed Scholarship • Ned Welles Memorial Fund, Inc. Sponsored Scholarship • Ned Welles Scholarship at Millsaps College • Marsha McCarty Wells Memorial Sponsored Scholarship • Benjamin and Mary M. Wells Endowed Scholarship • Dr. Vernon Lane Wharton Scholarship

• Tellus Operating Group Endowed Scholarship

• Willie E. Smith Scholarship • Robinson International Fellows Program

• L. P. Wasson and Ella W. Wasson Endowed Scholarship

• William H. Tribette Endowed Scholarship • Florence M. Trull Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• Julian L. Wheless Endowed Scholarship • Milton C. White Scholarship • Lettie Pate Whitehead Sponsored Scholarship • Julian and Kathryn Wiener Fund for the Enhancement of Premedical Education • E. F. Williams Sponsored Scholarship

• Elizabeth Cunningham Turnbull Sponsored Scholarship

• Earl T. Wilson Sponsored Scholarship

• J. Murray and Sandra Rainwater Underwood Endowed Scholarship

• Sam and Burnice Wittel Endowed Scholarship

• J. Murray and Sandra Rainwater Underwood Sponsored Scholarship

• Sam and Burnice Wittel Sponsored Scholarship

• United Methodist Meridian Area District Endowed Scholarship

• James W. “Pete” Wood and Grace Cunningham Wood Memorial Scholarship

• Sadie Spencer Scholarship • H. Lowery Rush Sr. Endowed Scholarship • James R. Rush and Mary B. Rush Endowed Scholarship

• Thomas L. Spengler Memorial Endowed Scholarship

• UPS Scholarship Fund • Sponsored Scholarship Fund for Jewish Students

• Richard O. Rush Endowed Scholarship • Silvio A. Sabatini M.D. Memorial Endowed Scholarship • Harrylyn Sallis ADP Scholarship • Harrylyn G. and W. Charles Sallis ADP/Liberal Studies Sponsored Scholarship • Scott Schild Endowed Scholarship

• Rev. and Mrs. C. J. Stapp Memorial Scholarship • Dr. Benjamin M. Stevens Endowed Scholarship • Daisy McLaurin Stevens Ford Fellowship Fund • Henry and Betty Pope Stevens Scholarship

• Dennis E. Vickers Endowed Scholarship • Vicksburg Hospital Medical Foundation Endowed Scholarship Fund in honor of Emmett and Ellena Ward

• Shelby and Thera Little Woodward Scholarship • Young Women’s Christian Association Endowed Scholarship

• James Monroe Wallace III Scholarship • Paul A. and Dollie Mae Warren Scholarship

2007


2006–07 BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Trustees Mr. Maurice H. Hall Jr., Chair Mr. W. Eugene Ainsworth Dr. Gene R. Barrett Mr. Paul T. Benton Rev. Warren C. Black Jr. Mr. A. Kevin Blackwell Mr. Daniel S. Bowling Mr. Alveno N. Castilla Mr. James A. Coggin Mr. J. Thomas Fowlkes Mrs. Monica S. Harrigill Mrs. Carolyn Hood Rev. Vicki Loflin Hughes Mr. William R. James Mr. William T. Jeanes Mr. Archie C. Lamb Mr. Robert N. Leggett Jr. Mr. John L. Lindsey Mr. James S. Love III Rev. William T. McAlilly

Mr. J. Con Maloney Jr. Mr. Vaughan W. McRae Mr. Michael T. McRee Mr. Timothy C. Medley Dr. Samuel O. Morris Rev. Luther S. Ott Mr. Jim A. Payne Dr. Vonda Reeves-Darby Mr. Thomas H. Rhoden Mr. C. R. Ridgway IV Mr. E. B. Robinson Jr. Rev. Victoria Sizemore-Tandy Mr. Steven W. Smith Rev. John Ed Thomas III Mr. J. Murray Underwood Mr. John C. Vaughey Bishop Hope Morgan Ward Rev. Sue Yeager Whitt Mr. William G. Yates III

One-Year Advisory Status Mr. Richard G. Hickson Jr. Mr. R. Eason Leake

Dr. Don Q. Mitchell Mrs. Helen Moyers

Life Trustees Mrs. Elaine Crystal Mr. Gale L. Galloway Mr. J. Herman Hines Mr. Earle F. Jones Mr. Richard D. McRae Mr. Robert R. Morrison Jr.

Mr. Nat S. Rogers Mr. Tom B. Scott Jr. Mr. Mike P. Sturdivant Mr. Rowan H. Taylor Sr. Mrs. Leila Clark Wynn

Honorary Trustees Mrs. Carol Howie Allen Mrs. Martha H. Campbell Mr. Robert H. Dunlap

Mr. Robert W. Pittman Ms. Janice Trimble Mrs. Ruth C. Watson

This list reflects Trustees who served in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2007.

Contact Institutional Advancement Office of Institutional Advancement Millsaps College 1701 North State Street Jackson, MS 39210-0001 601-974-1031 866-974-1031 (toll-free) 601-974-1088 (fax) www.millsaps.edu

For our Scholarships and Funds web page, go to: www.millsaps.edu/devoff/. president’s report


‘Plain Living and High Thinking’ Recently, I attended a party for the new Millsaps faculty at the Millsaps-Buie House. This restored Victorian house was the home of Major Reuben Millsaps, one of the founders of the College. Howard McMillan, dean of the Else School of Management, is himself a member of the Millsaps-Buie family. Asked to speak about the College, he recounted one of my favorite Millsaps stories. As a young man born in 1833 and raised on a Copiah County farm, Reuben Millsaps deeply desired to attend college. But Mississippi then had none. So he walked the 500 miles from Mississippi to Indiana to gain a higher education. During that long, latesummer journey across the sparsely settled country, he vowed that, if ever he could do so, he would see a first-rate college established in Mississippi, so no other poor Mississippi boy would have to leave the state for a higher education. In 1889–90, he and Bishop Charles Galloway and Dr. William Belton Murrah, whose names live on in the name of the College and its buildings, opened the college Millsaps had dreamed of as a boy. We live as his dream made real. As I stood in the elegant courtyard of the Millsaps-Buie House listening, I considered the way many of the ideals of Millsaps College are conveyed in stories about Millsaps, stories that need to be told over and over to each new generation. When my husband and I moved to Mississippi in 1975, we received an invitation from two sisters, Bethany Swearingen and Crawford Enochs, who both attended Millsaps College. Their father, Dr. George Swearingen, had been the College’s first professor of classics as well as its first librarian. The sisters often spoke of how poor many of the Millsaps students were in the early years of the College and how cows helped earn scholarship money that supported those students. They also loved to quote a motto that defined the College’s character from its earliest days: “Plain Living and High Thinking.” Both stories underscore a founding vision of Millsaps: outstanding education for all, despite economic status, and leadership for the common good. Millsaps is still “Plain Living and High Thinking” and continues to excel because of the courage, humanity, and commitment of those who have dedicated their lives to the College. I am lucky to have spent 32 years here with wonderful students and colleagues who have helped me unfold and ripen as I hope I have helped them. I did not expect to find my life’s work in Mississippi. Yet, every time I thought I had drained what Millsaps had to teach me, there was another undertaking, another teaching challenge, another travel opportunity, so that the years (they seem so quickly gone) continually opened up new ways for me to learn the world and to share it with my students, colleagues, and the larger circle of friends of the College who look to Millsaps in so many ways. Now that I am coming to the close of my active career at Millsaps, I hope that my years in the classics program and the Core Curriculum—my part in the weave of stories that make up the story of Millsaps—have been informed by, and that I have passed on in turn, the dedication to “Plain Living and High Thinking” that has defined this college.

—Dr. Cather ine Freis


Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage P A I D Jackson, MS Permit No. 164

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS 1701 NORTH STATE STREET JACKSON • MS • 39210-0001

The future is in our hands Each year, the Millsaps Annual Fund provides financial resources that directly affect the quality of teaching and student life at Millsaps. Through scholarships, academic programs, and faculty or library support, your Annual Fund gift helps the College build on its foundation of excellence. As Millsaps shapes its learning environment, cultivates its students, and constructs new areas of study, your gift offers the support the College needs to remain one of the nation’s finest liberal arts colleges. Give to the Millsaps Annual Fund today to ensure our success for generations to come.

DR. MOM Millsaps professors with their children (and, we hope, future Millsaps students). Back row, from left, Molly McManus, Kristen Oertel, and Blakely Fender; in front, Amy Forbes, Kristen Brown, and Laura Franey.

Millsaps Department of Annual Giving 1701 North State Street Jackson, MS 39210 -0001 601-974-1037 1-86-MILLSAPS (toll-free)

www.millsaps.edu

Fall-Winter 2007 Millsaps Magazine  

Fall-Winter 2007 Millsaps Magazine

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