Michigan Milk Messenger: February 2016

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

MESSENGER INSIDE

VOL. 98 | ISSUE 8 | FEBRUARY 2016

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 2015

Annual Report

POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

www.mimilk.com


Michigan Milk

MESSENGER Columns 4 MMPA Matters Local Meetings Discuss Co-op and Dairy Industry Issues

6 Quality Watch FARM Program: What’s Next?

8 News & Views

13

10 Legislative Watch

February Features 13 MMPA Members’ Milk Quality Recognized at National Level 14 For Love of Cows MMPA Top Ten OYDC Craig and Karen Palosaari

16 Michigan Animal Ag Alliance Grants

14

MSU Animal Agriculture Scientists Receive Over $600,000

Managing Editor ............................................... Sheila Burkhardt

41310 Bridge Street

Editor ..............................................................................Allison Stuby

P.O. Box 8002

f: 248-474-0924

Advertising Manager .....................................Nancy Muszynski

Novi, MI 48376-8002

w: www.mimilk.com

p: 248-474-6672

Circulation .................................................................................... 2,843 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)


18 18 From Farm to Table for 100 Years 22 Pursuing the Dream of Generations MMPA Top Ten OYDC Reuben Nelkie

24 Your Dairy Promotion at Work Grants Available to Promote Michigan’s Dairy Industry

Departments

Cover Story

25

Merchandise

Be sure to check out the

26

Quality Premiums

27

Freeliners

28

Classifieds

cooperative and how in this

29

Policies

next century of MMPA, we

30

Market Report

31

Staff

2015 Annual Report inside this issue. Learn more about the financial strength of your

recognize the “Power of the Past” and our “Vision for the Future.”

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA) Michigan Milk Producers Association, established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

Board of Directors Officers

Directors-At-Large Ken Nobis, St. Johns ...........................989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore........................................................ 989-756-4935

Ken Nobis, President

Dan Javor, Hastings ..................................................................... 269-948-8345

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Mark Halbert, Battle Creek ......................................................... 269-964-0511

Eric Frahm, Treasurer Joe Diglio, General Manager/ Secretary Josep Barenys, Assistant Treasurer Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

James Reid, Jeddo ....................................................................... 810-327-6830

District Directors 1. Hank Choate, Cement City ...................................................... 517-529-9032 2. Tim Hood, Paw Paw ................................................................ 269-657-5771 3. David Pyle, Zeeland ................................................................. 616-772-1512 4. Corby Werth, Alpena ............................................................... 989-464-5436 5. Brent Wilson, Carson City ........................................................ 989-584-3481 6. Tony Jandernoa, Fowler ........................................................... 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm, Frankenmuth ......................................................... 989-652-3552 8. Leonard Brown, Sandusky ........................................................ 810-648-4505

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

Local Meetings Discuss Co-op and Dairy Industry Issues BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

Another Local Annual meeting season has come and gone for MMPA. It is a season I look forward to each year for the opportunity to talk directly with our members. Attendance was excellent in most locations this year, and when members left their Local meetings, it appeared that they took a better understanding of the dairy world with them. It would be great if every member could attend, but then being a dairy producer, I know full well that attending a meeting can’t always be possible for everyone. The weather for this year’s meetings was perfect for driving, but not so great for the winter sports enthusiast. When I walked out of the Western Upper Peninsula Local Meeting on Dec. 12, it was sunny and a balmy 50 degrees Fahrenheit. To the north I spotted a herd of Holsteins enjoying the sun in a field that would normally be covered with snow. It was equally nice the next day on the east side of the U.P. But then after the last two winters, I think most dairy producers were ready for some above-normal temperatures.

“The thoughtful exchange of ideas we had at our meetings about this and other issues was important as we chart our path into the second century of MMPA’s existence.”

2015 was not your average year for our association, as milk prices plunged from record highs in 2014 to levels that barely covered the cost of production for many members. Milk production continued to grow very rapidly in our member area. While domestic markets held stable, the U.S. share of the export market shrank. Milk prices in the other exporting countries of the world were lower than ours, causing importing countries to buy more product at cheaper costs elsewhere. There were days when our processing capacity just couldn’t keep up with the growing supply of milk. The result was that some milk was discarded, not just in Michigan but throughout the northeast quadrant of the U.S. In our area, processing capacity is and was adequate as long as no plant interruptions occur due to mechanical issues or are necessitated by regulatory inspections or a customer just not needing as much milk as scheduled. There is simply no excess processing capacity in Michigan or the surrounding states available to handle even small disruptions. We discussed these and other issues with members at the Local Annual meetings. The two-way conversations that took place really helped all of us to better understand what is happening within our co-op. Questions about the operational soundness of our two MMPA owned and operated processing facilities were fielded in most every meeting. Answers included statistics showing the increased processing in both plants and why they were able to achieve the outstanding records in 2015. We were privileged to present many awards for consistent high quality. Already noted for our high quality, we were able to announce a record low somatic cell count (SCC) of 153,000 cells per mL for the month of November followed by yet another new record for December of 151,000 cells per mL average for MMPA. Members who reliably produce high quality milk enable MMPA to find new markets for that milk. Many members asked the question, “When will prices rebound?” It is the hardest one to answer, because more than enough milk is being produced around the globe and predicting when production and consumption will come back into balance is difficult. There is reason to be optimistic for the future with the continued growth of the global middle class. The thoughtful exchange of ideas we had at our meetings about this and other issues was important as we chart our path into the second century of MMPA’s existence. Members coming together as they did at this year’s meetings helps to keep our co-op strong. CORRECTION: THE MMPA MATTERS COLUMN IN THE JANUARY 2016 ISSUE STATED 9.8 BILLION TONS OF MILK WORLDWIDE WERE SEEKING A HOME DUE TO CONDITIONS IN RUSSIA AND CHINA. THAT NUMBER IS INCORRECT, AND THE CORRECT FIGURE IS 9.8 MILLION TONS OF MILK WORLDWIDE.

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100th Annual State Delegate Meeting POWER of the Past.

WHEN:

VISION for the Future.

Thursday, March 24, 2016 Registration begins at 9 a.m. | Meeting called to order promptly at 10 a.m.

WHERE:

Lansing Center 333 East Michigan Avenue, Lansing, MI 48933

ON THE AGENDA: • Consideration of policy statements and resolutions • Election of two director-at-large positions on the MMPA board of directors • Recognition of MMPA’s 35 and 50+ year members • Announcement of MMPA Quality Award recipient • Introduction of the MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators • Recognition of MMPA’s 100th Anniversary Business will be conducted only by accredited delegates, but all members are welcome to attend. Members who are not serving as delegates are asked to RSVP to Nancy Muszynski at 248-474-6672, ext. 202 or muszynski@mimilk.com by March 9.

A CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY RECEPTION WILL FOLLOW THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED MEETING

#MMPA100AM


QUALITY WATCH

FARM Program: What’s Next? BY LINDSAY GREEN, ANIMAL CARE COORDINATOR/MEMBER REPRESENTATIVE

Last year was filled with changes and challenges throughout the dairy industry but through it all, our producers once again demonstrated their dedication to betterment by achieving 100 percent enrollment in the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (FARM) program by years end. This milestone was reached through a team effort and we greatly thank you for your participation! However, the story doesn’t end at 100 percent enrollment. Now that 2016 is well under way, your MMPA Animal Care team is hard at work to ensure our members are well prepared to meet the practices set forth in the FARM program as well as critical practices outlined by MMPA processor customers. Critical practices are principles found within the FARM program that our customers have requested be in place on all member farms. Compliance with the practices outlined in your FARM action plan is necessary to ensure a market for your milk. If you enrolled in FARM in 2013 you would not have received an action plan but you will be provided with one by March 1st, 2016. Essentially your action plan serves as a “to-do” list. Listed below are the essential practices that must be in place by the end of the year: • Herd Health Plan – developed with your veterinarian • Standard Operating Procedures (see list of SOPs in sidebar at left) Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs): • Milking Procedure • Stockmanship/Cattle movement • Calf Processing -Feeding -Dipping Navels -Painful procedures • Dehorning • Castration • Supernumerary teats -Disinfection • Feeding and Water Management for All Animals • Non-ambulatory Cow • Care/Sick cow care • Vaccination Protocol • Treatment Protocols • Calving Protocol • Lameness Protocol

• Signed employee code of conduct or animal care agreement

*It is now recommended that these agreements be signed by not only employees but anyone who comes onto your facility to work with animals i.e. veterinarians, AI technicians, hoof trimmers, etc. • Annual Employee Training with documentation of who, what, where and when. • Painful Procedure Protocols – disbudding and removal of supernumerary teats • Tail Docking – must be discontinued by December 31st, 2016. Evidence of tail docking on member

farms after this deadline will result in loss of market. This does NOT mean that members cannot have cows with docked tails on their farms at this point. Processors expect there to be animals with docked tails present on farms, but the number of animals with docked tails will lessen over time through culling and discontinuation of this practice. Your MMPA animal care team will be checking in with you throughout the 2016 calendar year to offer assistance to institute and document these practices. Recently, MMPA partnered with MERCK Animal Health to conduct a series of trainings on the topics of animal care commitments, Herd Health Plans (HHP) and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Members had an opportunity to develop an animal care commitment for their operation, as well as SOPs for euthanasia and down cow care. In addition, those that attended the workshops were provided with a USB flash drive that contained SOP templates in word documents that can be edited and changed to fit their operations. We had great feedback on these workshops and producers were grateful to have templates to edit instead of starting from a blank page to write their SOPs. The MMPA team plans to hold another series of MERCK workshops later this spring so please be on the lookout for more information!

In addition to meetings such as the MERCK workshops, MMPA will continue to provide training opportunities for you and your employees including milker training and calf care schools. It will take hard work, dedication and a team approach to ensure all of our members implement and document critical practices by the end of 2016. We know MMPA members will rise to the occasion! IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING THE FARM PROGRAM, ITEMS LISTED ON YOUR ACTION PLAN, OR WOULD LIKE TO GET A COPY OF MERCK’S SOP TEMPLATES AND TRAINING VIDEOS, FEEL FREE TO CONTACT THE ANIMAL CARE COORDINATORS LINDSAY GREEN 989-488-8159 AND DREW RUPPRECHT 269-986-6793 OR YOUR MEMBER REPRESENTATIVE.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


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FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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& VIEWS NEWS &NEWS VIEWS

December Class III and IV Price Down USDA reported last week that the December Class III price was $14.44 per cwt., down 86 cents from last month, and $3.38 below December 2014. The Class III price averaged $15.80 in 2015. December’s Class IV price was $15.52, down $1.37 from the prior month, and $1.18 less than December of last year.

Producers Scoring 95 Percent or Higher on Grade A Surveys Judge Dairy Farm Inc. Louis / Ronald Brecht* Black Locust Farm LLC H Brushaber Sons Farm LLC

MMPA Welcomes Jessica Welch to Member Relations Team The MMPA Member Relations team recently added Jessica Welch as a new member relations coordinator. In this role, Welch will manage member events and programming including the 4-H Milk Marketing Tour and Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator program. Welch grew up in Gratiot County midst cash crop farming and raised beef cattle. Her youth and young adult life was spent in 4-H and FFA where her passion for agriculture and youth development was ignited. She attended the Michigan State University agriculture technologies program and finished her Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Leadership at Oklahoma State University. Zealous for agriculture and youth development, she spent the last five years as a 4-H educator serving Oklahoma Cooperative Extension. Excited to be back in Michigan, Welch is looking forward to working with Michigan milk producers as an advocate for Michigan agriculture. The dairy industry has a special place in her heart and she thrilled to be a member of the MMPA team.

Oberlin Farms LLC Grassley Farms William Hough Dairy Inc. Kenneth Vredenburg Michael Yoder Paul Miller* Devon Miller *100 percent

The MSU Extension Forage Team will be conducting winter meetings across Michigan during February and early March for forage producers, forage harvesters, farmers, and agribusiness professionals. Dr. Kim Cassida has aggressively increased her research trials and with three years of research finished, she and the rest of the MSUE Forage Team, are eager to share the results.

Upcoming Events

To register, visit events.anr.msu.edu/focusonforages.

February 4-6

February 8, 2016

February 17, 2016

Great Lakes Regional

Isabella County Commission on Aging

Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizer

Dairy Conference,

2200 S. Lincoln Rd.

3055 M-21

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858

St Johns, MI 48879

February 9, 2016

February 25, 2016

Franklin Inn

Hillsdale County MSU Extension

1070 E. Huron Ave.

20 Care Dr.

Bad Axe, MI 48413

Hillsdale, MI 49242

February 16, 2016

March 2, 2016

Wexford MSU Extension

Allegan County Human Services

401 N. Lake St., Suite 400

3255 122nd Ave #300

Cadillac, MI 49601

Allegan, MI 49010

Mt. Pleasant

March 23 State Resolutions Committee, Lansing

March 24 100th Annual MMPA State Delegate Meeting, Lansing

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Focus on Forages: MSU Extension Hosts Winter Training for Forage Producers

MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


MMPA Milker Training School – Sign Up Today! MMPA Milker Training School (MTS) has provided in-depth training to members and their employees for almost 20 years. The program establishes best milking practices on the farm to improve milk quality and reduce mastitis infections. MTS fulfills the National Dairy FARM Program guidelines of providing yearly training to animal caretakers on your farm.

2016 MMPA Milker Training School Dates and Locations February 18 At Steve Miller’s 4740 W 400 S Topeka, IN

March 2 County building 800 Livingston Blvd Gaylord, MI

March 15 (Spanish) Agro Liquid Headquarters 1130 S. DeWitt Rd. St. Johns, MI

March 16 (English) Agro Liquid Headquarters 1130 S. DeWitt Rd. St. Johns, MI

April 19 Polkton Township Hall 6900 Arthur St. Coopersville, MI

A $10 registration fee will be deducted from your milk check to cover lunch and material costs. Registration for all sessions is at 9:30 a.m. and all programs will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch is included with the registration fee.

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

2015 Dietary Guidelines Affirm Role of Dairy Foods in Healthy Eating Patterns The final version of the 2015 federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA), released in January, affirms the vital, unrivaled contribution made by dairy foods, and reminds Americans that they will continue to benefit from three daily servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy. In fact, the DGA notes that current intakes of dairy foods for most Americans “are far below recommendations of the Healthy U.S.-Style Pattern,” and they call for a shift to consume more dairy products. Milk, cheese and yogurt are important answers to the question of how Americans should change their diets for the better. As America strives to create a culture of wellness, the 2015 DGA embraces flexibility to help people build and enjoy healthy eating patterns that will nourish them physically, while also nourishing cultural and personal connections.

Regardless of one’s path to a healthy diet, three daily servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy foods like milk, cheese or yogurt can play an important role in healthy eating and well-being, from childhood through adulthood.

While people eat foods, not nutrients, the nutrients in food do matter. Low-fat or fat-free dairy foods are fundamental to all of the patterns recommended by the DGA: Healthy US-style Pattern, Healthy Vegetarian-Style Pattern and Healthy Mediterranean-style Pattern. That’s because low-fat and fat-free dairy foods offer a unique set of nine essential nutrients, including calcium, vitamin D and potassium, which most people do not get enough of in their diets.

MMPA Advisory Committee District 1 Art Riske, Hanover .............................................. 517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH................................ 419-452-6764 Jeff Alexander, Hanover ...................................... 517-740-9981 Perry Cisco, Hudson............................................ 517-404-7997 Carlton Evans, Litchfield ...................................... 517-398-0629

District 2 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN ......................... 574-825-5198 Donald Bever, Delton........................................... 269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue ....................................... 269-660-0498 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN ............................ 574-825-2454 Danny Ransler, Gobles........................................ 269-628-4218

District 3 Burke Larsen, Scottville ....................................... 231-757-2090 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil ......................................... 231-757-9340 Gary Nelsen, Grant.............................................. 231-834-7610 Tim Butler, Sand Lake ......................................... 616-636-8567 Nico Eadie, Conklin ............................................. 616-550-4041

District 4 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard ................................... 906-478-3023 Russ Tolan, Ossineke .......................................... 989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen ............................................... 989-379-4694 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth ................................... 231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron ......................................... 989-464-4022

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016

The new Guidelines note “strong evidence shows that healthy eating patterns are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Moderate evidence indicates that healthy eating patterns also are associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, certain types of cancer… overweight, and obesity.” In addition, “research also has linked dairy intake to improved bone health, especially in children and adolescents.” The good news is that dairy foods taste great, are accessible, contain essential nutrients and come in a variety of options from lactose-free to low-fat, fat-free or lower sodium—all at a reasonable cost. The dairy community is committed to doing its part to ensure healthy products are available to enhance the health of people and communities, now and for future generations.

District 5 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton ....................................... 989-762-5399 Bruce Benthem, McBain ...................................... 231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy ............................................... 231-388-0496 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore .................................. 989-762-5380 Bill Jernstadt, Big Rapids..................................... 231-796-4650

District 6 Kris Wardin, St. Johns ......................................... 989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell .......................................... 616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler........................................... 989-640-1075 David Reed, Owosso ........................................... 989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia ............................................. 989-640-3372

District 7 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar ........................................... 989-652-6500 Steve Foley, Millington......................................... 989-871-4028 Rod Fowler, Chesaning ....................................... 989-845-6131 John Bennett, Prescott ........................................ 989-345-4264 Scott Kleinhardt, Clare......................................... 989-386-8037

District 8 Mike Bender, Croswell ......................................... 810-679-4782 Scott Lamb, Jeddo............................................... 810-404-8003 Mike Noll, Croswell .............................................. 810-404-4071 Jeremy Sharrard, Peck ........................................ 810-404-5076 Dale Phillips, Marlette .......................................... 989-635-7917

At-Large Mark Crandall, Battle Creek ................................ 269-660-2229 Tom Wing, Bellevue ............................................. 269-660-0498 Bill Blumerich, Berlin............................................ 810-395-2926 Chuck White, Fowlerville ..................................... 517-521-3564


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2016 District Meetings District

Date

Time

Place

1

Wed, Feb. 17

11:00 a.m.

Gene Davis Banquet Center 3575 Francis Street, Jackson

2

Mon., Feb. 15

11:00 a.m.

Blue Gate Restaurant 195 N. Van Buren St., Shipshewana, IN

3

Mon., Feb. 15

11:00 a.m.

Russ’ Restaurant 1499 E. River Road, Muskegon

4

Fri., Feb. 26

11:00 a.m.

Audie’s Restaurant 314 Nicolet Street, Mackinaw City

5

Tues., Feb. 16

11:00 a.m.

New Hope United Methodist Church 7296 Nine Mile Road, Remus

6

Tues., Feb. 16

11:00 a.m.

Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers 1130 S. DeWitt Road, St. Johns

7

Fri., Feb. 19

10:15 a.m.

Valley Plaza Resort 5221 Bay City Road, Midland

8

Thur., Feb. 18

11:00 a.m.

Woodland Hills Gulf Club 320 N. Gates Road, Sandusky

POWER of the

Past. VISION for the

Future.

MMPA Young Cooperators Conference NET WORK | LEARN | CONNEC T | GROW

Connecting Younger Members for over Two Decades Attend the 22nd Annual YC Conference for: ❱ Town hall meeting dialogue with dairy leaders ❱ Informative presentations geared toward young dairy leaders ❱ Tour of a Michigan dairy farm ❱ Dinner and entertainment with other young dairy farmers

April 15, 2016

REGISTRATION: Conference registration is free to MMPA and members and MMPA member employees. RSVP details will be enclosed in the February 26 milk check. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Contact the MMPA Member Relations Department, 248-474-6672. HOTEL RESERVATIONS: Make hotel reservations by March 24, 2016 and mention MMPA to receive the discounted $109 rate.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016

Comfort Inn Mt. Pleasant, MI


MMPA Members’ Milk Quality Recognized at National Level

H

Platinum Winners:

alf of all National Dairy Quality Platinum Awards were awarded to MMPA members, with three of the six platinum winners belonging to MMPA farms. In total, 12 MMPA members were among 36 nationally recognized farms in the annual National Dairy Quality Award program. In addition to the three platinum winners, four of the gold awards and five of the silver awards were earned by MMPA members.

“Every day on their farms, our memberowners do their best to produce the highest quality milk possible. We are proud to see their accomplishments recognized on a national level,” Joe Diglio, MMPA General Manager said.

Jeremy Beebe, Whittemore David and Karen Vander Zanden, Casnovia Brent, Nancy, Tyler and Ben Wilson, Carson City Gold Winners: Michael and Andrew Hogan, Muir DOUBLE B DAIRY IN WHITTEMORE, MICHIGAN. PICTURED FRONT ROW (L-R): JOHNNY KNOELLINGER, DEANNA BOOTH, JEREMY BEEBE, ALI BEEBE. MIDDLE ROW (L-R): ALEX KNOELLINGER, LYNN STELTER, JOANNE BEEBE. BACK ROW (L-R): TYLOR MURRINGER, ERIC KNOELLINGER, GARRET BEEBE, JOSH LANNING, GEORGE COINER, BOB LIEBER, TOM RIVERS, ROGER BEEBE AND ERIC BEEBE.

Larry, Therese, Brent and Emily Simon, Westphalia Duane, Laurie, Ken and Anna Van Polen, Marion

“We are the 10th largest dairy cooperative in the United States, yet our members captured half of the platinum awards and over 30 percent of the total National Dairy Quality Awards this year. This achievement demonstrates the superior quality of our members’ milk and each farm’s dedication and commitment to excellence.” MMPA offers a portfolio of member services to help members produce the highest quality milk possible. Christy Dinsmoore, MMPA Northeast Area supervisor and mastitis management specialist, explains, “From nationally recognized Milker Training Schools to on-farm equipment evaluation and individual mastitis management programs, MMPA works closely with members to achieve high quality milk.”

Brad and Debbie Kartes, West Branch

Silver Winners: Charles, Susan, Albert and Perter Anscheutz, Tawas City Randy and Cindy Dragt, Howard City Jacob and Elaine Jahfetson, Baraga Mark and Robert Rau, West Branch VANDER ZANDEN FARMS IN CASINOVIA, MICHIGAN. PICTURED (L-R): CAMERON FUNK, RILEY STARR, JALYN RANGER, DAVID GRAHAM, KAREN AND JACOB VANDER ZANDEN.

Dough, Jacob and Andrew Wirth, Evart PHOTO CREDIT: HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

MMPA also offers a quality premium incentive for its members producing higher quality milk. This past year, MMPA paid $16.3 million in quality premiums to its dairy farmer members. The winners were selected from a pool of over 140 applicants nationwide. The winning operations stood out for having produced high-quality milk consistently. Applications were evaluated for measures of quality, systems of monitoring udder health, milking routine, protocols for detection and treatment of clinical and subclinical cases of mastitis and strategies for overall herd health and welfare. MMPA winners were nominated by their member representatives.

WILSON CENTENNIAL FARM, LLC, CARSON CITY, MICHIGAN. PICTURED FRONT ROW (L-R): LUCERITO ALONSO, KAITLYNN CARD, ADALBERTO TORREZ. MIDDLE ROW (L-R): TOMAS PACHECO, NANCY WILSON, ANGEL ESCOBAR, VICTOR PACHECO AND BILLAMAR ALONSO. BACK ROW (L-R): JEREMY GILLSON, TYLER WILSON, BRENT WILSON, BEN WILSON AND BUTCH BLACKMER.

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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For Love of Cows MMPA TOP TEN OYDC CRAIG AND KAREN PALOSAARI BY ALLISON STUBY

The Keweenaw Peninsula may be known as the home of copper mines and scenic landscapes, but up near the northernmost point of Michigan lies a handful of dairy farms. Not dissuaded by the remote location and the challenges that come with it, Karen Palosaari is passionate about agriculture with a love of cows on the Palosaari family farm.

And it was on that very farm where Top Ten OYDC Karen met her husband, Craig, when she began working for his parents several years ago. Today, Karen works on the 65-cow dairy alongside her father-in-law, while Craig works off the farm as a construction foreman. Karen grew up on another local dairy farm in the area and attended Northern Michigan University for two years studying child development while figuring out her passions. “I started working on the farm about fifteen years ago and have learned a lot

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY DECEMBER2016 JANUARY 2016 2015

in that time. I’m still learning, Karen revealed. “For a while I had a job at a Head Start Program while continuing to work on the farm. Yet I have a passion for cows and I simply enjoy being on the farm more so I now work solely in dairy.” Her passion directly translates into the role Karen encompasses on the farm. She manages calves, milking, breeding and record keeping on herd health. Milking 65 head in a tie-stall barn, the Palosaaris continually focus on producing quality milk. As the daughter of 2013 and 2014 MMPA Quality Award


Winner Jacob and Elaine Jahfetson, a commitment to quality bleeds over into the Palosaari’s operation, as they strive to yield milk with low Somatic Cell Counts (SCC) and high butterfat and protein percentages. The herd’s SCC average around 60,000 cells per mL and Karen’s attention to detail has enabled their counts to drop as low as 37,000 cells per mL. Their cows produce an average of 72-75 pounds of milk per day. “I strive for quality over quantity,” she asserts. “We utilize the Northstar DHI services monthly for production records. This very useful tool allows us to manage and assess the herd on overall and individual production progress. Based on individual production, SCC and income over feed cost we are better able to cull out cows that would drag us down.” Yet in the Upper Peninsula, there are continual challenges to operating a dairy farm in such a northern location. Karen noted there are not many other dairy farms in her county and surrounding areas besides her parent’s farm. Shipping costs, supplies, feed and hiring services are often more expensive. Thus, the Palosaaris and other farmers grapple with higher operating costs and often work together to save money where possible. In a sparse dairy landscape, Karen utilizes her role as a dairy communicator for the U.P. West Central Local to educate locals about dairy by showing dairy cattle at the Houghton County Fair. She also hosts farm tours throughout the summer and has visited local schools to speak about farming to children. Looking forward, Karen hopes to take over the farm when her father-in-law retires, continuing to work hard every day for her love of cows.

Craig and Karen Palosaari of Gary and Teresa Palosaari Farm U.P. West Central Local, District 4 Children: Kyle (5), Kate (4) and Kaylee (3 months) Herd Size: 65 milking Acres farmed: 400, including pastureland Crops grown: hay alfalfa, high moisture corn, barley, corn silage Milking regime: twice-a-day in a tie-stall barn Breeding program: AI, clean-up bull Certifications/Training: FARM Program, MMPA Milker Training School, MMPA Calf Care School Education: Craig and Karen are both high school graduates. Karen studied child development at Northern Michigan University. Ag, Dairy and Community involvement: Karen is a Dairy Communicator for the UP West Central Local

LEFT: KAREN (RIGHT) PROUDLY SHOWS DAIRY CATTLE AT THE HOUGHTON COUNTY FAIR EACH YEAR TO EXPOSE LOCALS TO THE DAIRY INDUSTRY. SHE HOPES TO CONTINUE MANAGING THE FARM WITH HER FATHER-INLAW AND CHILDREN, (L-R) KYLE, KATE AND KAYLEE, AS THEY GROW OLDER. PHOTO CREDIT: FRANK BRAZEAU

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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MICHIGAN ALLIANCE FOR ANIMAL AG GRANTS

MSU Animal Agriculture Scientists Receive Over

$600,000 Fifteen Michigan State University (MSU) researchers and Extension specialists have received more than $600,000 in grants to be used to help advance the state’s animal agriculture industry. The funds were awarded by the Michigan Alliance for Animal Agriculture (M-AAA), a partnership between Michigan’s animal agriculture industries, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine, MSU AgBioResearch and MSU Extension. Formed in 2014, M-AAA focuses on advancing the state’s animal agriculture economy by supporting applied research and outreach efforts that address key issues identified by the industry.

The Michigan food and agriculture system contributes roughly $100 billion annually to the state’s economy and provides nearly 1 million jobs—about 22 percent of the state’s workforce. About 37 percent of the agricultural products sold are attributed to the animal agriculture sector. Twenty-seven proposals, requesting approximately $900,000, were submitted to M-AAA for consideration in three categories: applied research, Extension efforts and seed grants. George Smith, MSU AgBioResearch associate director, is in charge of administering the M-AAA grants program. “We were fortunate to receive a very strong set of proposals this year and to fund research and Extension projects addressing many of the major priorities of our animal agriculture industries,” Smith said. “These M-AAA research and Extension projects continue to exemplify the strong history of successful partnerships between the Michigan animal agriculture commodity groups and MSU to help grow the animal agriculture economy, enhance employment opportunities, and build economic vitality and sustainability for the entire state.”

All proposals were required to identify anticipated benefits to Michigan animal agriculture and to align with the annual priorities of one or more of the following animal agriculture stakeholder organizations: Michigan Allied Poultry Industry, Michigan Cattlemen’s Association, Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Michigan Farm Bureau, Michigan Horse Industry, Michigan Meat Association, Michigan Milk Producers Association, Michigan Pork Producers Association and Michigan Sheep Breeders Association. Evaluation criteria included: • Relevance to the Michigan animal agriculture industry and annual priorities • Potential long-term impact • Technical merit and feasibility • Investigator qualifications • Mechanisms to deliver research information generated to relevant commodity groups • Leverage of external and other funding sources and extent of partnering with Michigan animal agriculture industries • Plans for future extramural funding and importance of seed funding to future success “We appreciate MSU's dedication of research funds for animal agriculture programs and the opportunity for the M-AAA partners to work collaboratively with MSU in determining research priorities,” MMPA President Ken Nobis said. “Funding of animal ag research will help the agriculture industry continue to grow and expand our safe and affordable food supply.” Fifteen projects—totaling $605,159—were selected for funding. The proposals address issues related to nutrient management, animal health and welfare, public perception, and sustainability and profitability across beef, dairy, horse, poultry, sheep and/or swine industries. Ray Hammerschmidt, MSU Extension interim director, calls M-AAA grant funding a valuable tool in helping expand the knowledge of Michigan’s food producers. “This gives our educators an opportunity to multiply the great work they already do,” he said. “This helps ensure that the good research we do around the state gets into the hands of the farmers who can put it into practice on their farms.” For more information on M-AAA, visit agbioresearch.msu.edu.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

FROM FARM to TABLE for

100 Years

GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY, THIS MILK HAULER JOINED THE FOURTH OF JULY PARADE IN DETROIT ONE YEAR.

BY MELISSA HART

Milk trucks are a fixture on the dirt roads and highways across the nation carrying a valuable, yet perishable product for farmers and consumers alike. Milk haulers are the link from the cow that produces that white, power packed nutritional punch to the consumer who enjoys it. Milk quality is unsurpassable in today’s market but it hasn’t always been that way and we have the evolution of milk transportation to thank for it.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016

A

century ago, when MMPA was a budding cooperative, milk was picked up in cans and transported to the processing plants by truck or by rail. The cooling systems were crude involving cold water passing over a can of milk to cool it to 60 degrees. It wasn’t until the early 1920s when the Board of Health in various cities around the state demanded that their milk providers construct a milk house on their farm to ensure a higher quality product.


In an article in the Milk Messenger, August of 1920, authored by editor R.C. Reed, the following advice was given: One may build it [a milk house] as cheaply or elaborately as desired. We have seen milk houses that answered every demand of the Board of Heath and which did not cost, for new material, more than fifteen dollars. This was in a time when lumber was somewhat cheaper than it is now, but make the calculation for yourself. Use the same apparatus for cooling which you use now; put over it a little house seven feet wide by eight feet long, with the roof nine feet high on one side and seven feet on the other; paper it within, overhead and on the sides, with any kind of remnants that can be obtained of house paper, and if necessary cover it with roofing on the sides and top. If possible place it under a shade tree and this as a temporary structure, until the time comes when you can build a permanent one, will satisfy the demands of the Board of Health. I recently saw one of this kind which had been built by a man and his wife and it took the two but a little over a day and a half and they had a clean place, free from germs and dust, away from the heat of the sun, and had as nice a quality of milk as could have been produced or kept in a milk house costing one hundred times the amount this one cost.

But by May of 1931, the Milk House Requirements for the Detroit markets were hard and fast for producers, requiring them to have a milk house that could be used year round and completely sealed on the inside. If they did not satisfy these requirements, they would not be issued a permit. MILK HAULERS FACE DIFFICULT SITUATIONS ESPECIALLY WHEN THE WEATHER TURNS. HERE KENNETH AND RALPH PECKENS OF HOWELL PULLED THEIR MILK HAULER, KEITH HUCK, THROUGH THE MUD IN THE WET SPRING OF 1960.

CANS OF MILK WERE TAKEN TO MILK STATIONS AND THEN PICKED UP BY TRUCKS TO TAKE TO PROCESSING PLANTS.

While milk house rules were changing, the path from farm to the plant was the same. According to former MMPA leader Jack Barns, the movement of milk went directly to processing plants in the secondary markets but almost all of the milk for the Detroit processors was delivered in cans to MMPA receiving stations across southern Michigan. From the receiving stations, the milk was loaded into over-the-road tankers for shipment to the processing plant. The first milk trucks had no cover or protection for the milk. That changed in the 1930s when insulated trucks came on the scene and cans were hauled by muscle bound milk men slinging eighty pound milk cans from the truck into the plant. In the1950s bulk trucks came on the scene and suddenly routes changed, more milk could be hauled by one truck and milk quality improved exponentially. Because milk haulers frequented farms, they were almost like family to the farmer. The same hauler came down the same routes, picking up the same farmers milk, sometimes for decades. Christmas, Easter, Thanksgiving, snow, rain, ice, sleet, the day didn’t matter because the milk had to be hauled.

The Traver family of Williamston was an example of this longevity. The Travers were in it for the long haul with four generations of milk haulers in the family. Hailing from Williamston, George Traver hitched up his horse and buggy and began hauling milk in 1904. In 1927, George passed the route on to his son Marc Traver who experienced several decades of MMPA history. When The Great Depression arrived, times were tough everywhere. Marc Traver and other milk haulers around the state had the responsibility of delivering milk checks to the producers. In one instance in 1933, the banks in Detroit closed before the farmers checks were delivered. Traver had cashed his check in Fowlerville and when he delivered the ‘bad checks’ to the farmers he was able to give them each a small loan until their checks were cashed. According to Traver, the milk checks backed by MMPA were always good. From tornado trashed routes to impassable snow drifts that made roads impassable, to muddied drives that required tractors for extrication from the farm yard, milk haulers continue to be an invaluable asset from farm to table. A century of MMPA could only happen with a century of reliable transportation taking the farmers’ hard-earned product to a broad population in need of nature’s nutrient-dense delight: Milk.

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2015 MMPA Quality Awards Continued from the January 2016 issue. Bronze quality awards are presented to MMPA members who met both quality premium categories (10,000 or less raw bacteria and 20,000 or less PI count) and maintained a somatic cell count of 250,000 or less for nine or more months out of the previous fiscal year. Silver quality awards are presented to those members who met the same criteria as in the bronze award category for 12 months out of the previous fiscal year. Gold quality awards are presented to members who met the same criteria as in the silver award category and averaged a somatic cell count of 100,000 or less during the previous fiscal year. ADRIAN LOCAL Silver Matthew Smith Bronze Gier Dairy ALMA LOCAL Silver Pine Hills Dairy LLC Jered Litwiller Bronze Central Michigan Milk Production LLC BARRY-EATON LOCAL Bronze Dan & Lynda Walden Slocum's Livestock Farms

Bronze Maplebranch Farms Inc. Andrew E. Mast Wilbur J. Kuhns Elmer L. Schrock Douglas L. Geissinger David M. Bontrager Willis E. Miller Martin Yoder Jr. Justin Meyers John W. Yoder Mervin A. Bontrager Joe & Jerry Stutzman Orva & Naomi Hershberger Gerald M. Martin Steven D. Post Ferman & Ruby Hostetler DAIRYLAND LOCAL

CHIPPEWA COUNTY LOCAL Bronze Folkersma Farm LLC CLARE-MT PLEASANT LOCAL Bronze Stough Farms LLC Le Var Farms LLC Raymond Buchholz David J. Yoder CONSTANTINE LOCAL

Gold Leroy O. & Ella M. Zimmerman Stephen Burkholder Bronze Christensen Farms Diller Farms EVART LOCAL Silver Keith A. DeRuiter

Gold Carl Zook

Bronze Dennis & Eliza Anderson Eddie & Arlene Keim

Silver Milton D. Bontrager Daniel D. Yoder

GRAND RAPIDS LOCAL Bronze Swift Dairy Farm Inc.

POWER of the Past.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


HILLMAN LOCAL Bronze LTD Dairy Ervin Lee Yoder HILLSDALE-LITCHFIELD LOCAL Silver Ted & Jonathan Keenan Bronze William L. Bowerman Amos & Joseph Schwartz INGHAM COUNTY LOCAL Bronze Greg & Lynn DeForest KALAMAZOO LOCAL Silver Leaky Faucet Dairy MID-MICHIGAN LOCAL Bronze Schneider Dairy LLC Leroy & Stephanie Schafer Thelen Dairy Inc. MID-SANILAC LOCAL Silver Allen, Dan & Herbert Whitwam Rick L. Sutton Bronze Radloff Dairy LLC Gary A. Schultz MID-THUMB LOCAL Bronze Robert & Mary Kate Creutz David & Steven Spencer MUSKEGON LOCAL Bronze Buth Greenvale Farms Inc. Davey Dairy Farm LLC Robert T. Wackernagel E-D Farms SUNRISE LOCAL Silver Gallagher Dairy Farm Inc Bronze Hidden Creek Farm WEST MICHIGAN LOCAL Silver Woodbridge Dairy Farm LLC

VISION for the Future.

Control Butyric Acid and Maximize Every Bite!

SilagePro® with CATALYST

5 enzymes

• 4-day fermentation • 5% more silage at feed-out • Increased rate of fiber digestion tion • Higher starch retention More milk per ton of silage fed

Available through MMPA Merchandise

Over one million tons treated last year alone!

American Farm rm P Products rod ducts ucts Arlin Koglin • 989-553-3370 FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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Pursuing the Dream of Generations MMPA TOP TEN OYDC RUEBEN NELKIE BY ALLISON STUBY

Pulling up the drive of Lemajru Dairy Farm, a stately sign proclaims the dairy farm’s mission: “to pursue the dream of generations.” And with that mission taken to heart, Top Ten OYDC Reuben Nelkie works alongside his family on a farm striving to bring opportunity to present and future generations.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY DECEMBER2016 JANUARY 2016 2015

Reuben’s great-grandfather founded the farm in 1938 and in keeping with “pursuing the dream of generations,” the Nelkies have adapted their farm to the times. Most notably, the Nelkies have implemented an automated milking system. The two Lely Automatic Milkers, installed three years ago, help reduce labor needs, increase production and assist the farm in adjusting to the

changing dairy industry. Prior to the robotic milkers, they relied on outside labor and each member of the family had a set shift to milk their 120 cows twice-a-day in a double four herringbone parlor. “Now we have more time to focus on other things. However, there’s a learning curve to operating a dairy with robotic milkers,” Reuben attests.


Their productivity has increased with the robotic milkers as the cows are milked an average of three times per day, with fresh cows being milked four to five times. And while quality decreased slightly at first, they have since learned how to improve. This year, the farm won an MMPA quality award. With an eye on the future, Reuben has plans to expand the dairy and even add two additional robotic milkers. His five-year and tenyear plans involve reducing debt, replacing outdated infrastructure and machinery and increasing the herd size.

Rueben Nelkie

“I hope to expand in two steps, first we can build to 180 cows and then work up to 240 cows in two 120-cow freestall barns with four robotic milkers and a feeding automation system,” he explains. Lemajru Dairy Farm is also verified in the Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP) in livestock and cropping operations. Though they already had a lagoon on their property, verification involved adding in a settling bay behind their heifer barn and finalizing their Certified Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP). Doing his part to uphold the farm’s mission, Reuben works hard alongside his family, feeding cows and heifers, managing planting and fixing machinery. “I enjoy dairy because there’s always something to do and it’s hard to get bored. I don’t mind putting in a 12 hour day because I like working until I feel like I’m done,” he reveals.

of Lemajru Dairy Farm Sunrise Local, District7

Herd size: 120 milking, 310 total Acres farmed: 550 Crops grown: Corn, hay, oats Milking regime: Automated milking system (two robotic milkers) Sustainable practices: Reclaimed plate cooler water, CNMP Breeding program: AI, clean-up bull Certifications/Training: FARM Program, MAEAP verified in livestock and cropping Education: Rueben has a high school degree from Ogemaw Heights High School and obtained certificates in diesel technology and agriculture technology from the University of Northwestern Ohio Ag, dairy and community involvement: Reuben is involved in the Pioneer Power Antique Tractor Engine show

LEFT: REUBEN FEEDS HAY TO LEMAJRU DAIRY FARM’S HEIFERS. THE FARM’S INSTALLATION OF TWO AUTOMATED MILKERS HAS CUT DOWN ON LABOR NEEDS, ENABLING HIM TO FOCUS HIS ATTENTION ON OTHER TASKS.

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Grants Available to Promote Michigan’s Dairy Industry

A

re you or someone from your farm hosting a farm tour, representing dairy at a community event or talking at a local school about dairy? UDIM wants to help you provide dairy information and products to those in your area. From January 1 through December 1, 2016, the UDIM Dairy Promotion Grant Program is available to provide funding for Michigan dairy producers, dairy farm employees or dairy cooperative employees to conduct promotional events in support of the dairy industry. The promotional activity must take place during the 2016 calendar year. The funding cycle is open year-round for the UDIM Dairy Promotion Grant Program, but funds are awarded on a first come, first served basis. Individuals may apply for multiple grants; however, no more than $1,500 can be received in a grant year by a single farm entity (which includes family members and dairy farm employees). A maximum of $1,500 annually can be awarded for the purchase of dairy products, with up to $500 of that amount to fund event support items (includes items such as signage, banners, coolers, and ice).

Promotional events must focus on at least one of the following criteria: • Enhancing awareness of the nutritional and health benefits of including dairy products as part of a balanced diet • Increasing knowledge about and awareness of the dairy industry; and/or • Advancing the image of the dairy industry and fostering public trust.

Grant funds may not be used for prizes or gifts. A maximum of $1,500 will be awarded in support of any single promotional event. Grant money cannot be used to purchase items for resale or to be used at profit-generating or political events. To review information on the grant submission process, eligibility and the reimbursement process, please visit www.milkmeansmore.org/dairy-producers/grant-program/ grant-application. All Michigan dairy farm families are eligible to apply for the grant, to help spread dairy information and knowledge to our communities. If you apply for and receive a grant, we encourage you to look through the promotional items UDIM has available to pass out at your event. The inventory includes activity books and crayons for kids, nutrition information handouts for parents, pens, pencils, posters, banners, etc. We have a dairy item for every event!

Past Grant Activities Each grant is unique to the farm applying for the funding and the community in which the event takes place. Here are some examples of how your peers across the state have used the grants to share dairy’s story in their community: • Hosting a dairy open house for the community • Providing dairy products after local races or auto shows • Organizing a milk donation program for a local food bank • Representing the dairy industry in an information booth at a community event • Hosting an “I milked a cow” exhibit • Passing out dairy products during a community parade IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS REGARDING THE DAIRY PROMOTION GRANT PROGRAM, PLEASE CALL UDIM AT 1-800-241-6455.

HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS ENJOYED MILK AND ICE CREAM DURING THEIR SENIOR PARTY, THANKS TO A UDIM DAIRY PROMOTION GRANT.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


MERCHANDISE

M1 Teat Dips In past articles we have mentioned the teat dips we will be mixing with the M1 system. We now have the pricing information available, detailed below. Please feel free to contact us at the warehouse if you have questions on the following products. Ecoplus SA Concentrate:

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise

This iodine concentrate is a product that mixes through the Optima II pump. It mixes at a 1:3 ratio and produces a 1 percent RTU (ready to use) dip with a 10 percent emollient package. This is the same as our Legend but is NPE free. As a result, we will be replacing Legend with this product. Stock #

Description

Package Size

Member price

5969

Ecoplus SA Concentrate

15 gallon

$459.38

5970

Ecoplus SA Concentrate

55 gallon

$1661.25

supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026

Ecoplus SA 505:

This is a 0.5 percent iodine RTU dip with a 5 percent emollient and skin care package. It can be dipped or sprayed and is probably best used as a pre-dip. It is similar to Teat Gard 50 but with more emollients. As a result, it will be the replacement for Teat Gard 50. It can also be a RTU alternative to Optima concentrate. It is NPE free. Stock #

Description

Package Size

1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives:

5972

Ecoplus SA 505

15 gallon

$65.63

Ecoplus SA 505

55 gallon

$217.50

Stan Palmer

Ecoplus SA 1010:

This is also a NPE free RTU dip. It is 1 percent iodine with 10 percent emollients and skin conditioners. It can be sprayed or applied with a dip cup. It will be replacing Teat Glo Spray. Description

Package Size

Member price

5974

Ecoplus SA 1010

15 gallon

$121.88

5975

Ecoplus SA 1010

55 gallon

$423.75

2105 Fohl Street SW Canton, OH 44706 330-407-0220 Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr.

Ecoplus SA 1012:

This product will be replacing Teat Glo dip in the 15 gallon and 55 gallon sizes. It is a 1 percent iodine post dip with 12 percent emollients and skin conditioners. Of course it is also NPE free. It should not be sprayed due to the thickness of the dip. While it is replacing Teat Glo in the larger containers, original Teat Glo will still be available in five gallon containers. Stock #

Ecolab Service Message Center

Member price

5973

Stock #

For Service, call the

Description

Package Size

Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell

Member price

7273 N. Rollin Hwy.

5976

Ecoplus SA 1012

15 gallon

$140.63

Addison, MI 49220

5977

Ecoplus SA 1012

55 gallon

$492.50

517-403-0928

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order: Duane Farmer, Supervisor .....................................................989-317-8370 Toll Free .................................................................................... 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi) .................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2 3. Fax in your order: MMPA Merchandise fax .......................................................... 989-317-8372

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PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below........... +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000 .......... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000 ...............+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000 ...........+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000 ..........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000 ............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000 .........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000 ....... -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000 ............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000 ........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000 ......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater. -$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 750,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures ..........................................................................$12 • Bacteriology Cultures..........................................................................$13 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR ........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA .......................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR ........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows ........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank ........................................................................................ $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows ........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank ........................................................................................ $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA ................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

ANTEL-BIO TESTING Loc/Hlr/Producer # ________________________________ Sample Date _____________________________ Member name ______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID _________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA _________

Johne’s ELISA ___________

Johne’s PCR ___________ Pregnancy ____________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by Antel-Bio to avoid potential service charges.

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FREELINERS To place your freeliner ad please call 1-800-572-5824, ext. 202, or fax 248-426-3412, or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com.

Bulls Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

Dryhill liquid manure pump 5’ 8” DH230 with fill pipe. $3,000. LaDine Farms/David Bivens, Bellevue, MI 269-758-3980 or dsdairy1@aol.com. Aaladin Eliminatior waste/used oil burner/heater with a 55 gal. oil screening barrel. $1,500. LaDine Farms/David Bivens, Bellevue, MI 269-758-3980 or dsdairy1@aol.com. Europa 75 Multifuel Heater, burns wood pellets, corn, wheat, barley & cherry pits Heats 2500 sq. ft. $2,000. LaDine Farms/David Bivens Bellevue, MI 269-758-3980 or dsdairy1@aol.com.

Dairy Equipment

condition, $15,000. Bou-Matic variable speed vacuum pump 7.5 hp. $4,000. 10 Bou-Matic 4200 automatic takeoffs $300 each. 10 Bou-matic pulsators with controller $500. 3” low line with receiver and milk pump $800. Vandale CD-3000 silo unloader 20’ center drive excellent condition $700. Houle 3” 12 ft. electric pump for milk house waste water $1,000. Bradford White 75 gal. commercial LP gas water heater $800. Call 517-331-4475. DeLaval Superflo claws $30 ea., 06 shells $4 ea., & SST2 Take off flow sensors 100 ea. LaDine Farms/David Bivens Bellevue, MI 269-758-3980 or dsdairy1@aol.com. Used Single 10 treated cow parlor, heavy duty homemade butt pan, bomatic pulsators and bottom unload claws, newer pulasator control, 7.5 hp. lobe vacuum pump. $6,900 obo. 517-749-9112.

Surge 1250 gallon bulk tank with 2 compressors. 231-206-7720.

Misc.

Haylage, corn silage, snalplage. Delivery available. 231-250-8592.

H & S 370 Apron Chain Manure Spreader, tandem axle, single beater, $7,200 obo. 231-425-8825.

7.5 HP Tuthill Oilless vacuum pump Mod. #003-22R2 w/filter and vacuum regulator $1,500. Zero 600 gal. bulk tank w/5 HP Copeland compressor, washer and extra parts $1,000. Delaval Milking system - 7 Deltron 200 SC pulsators, large flow claws, receiver jar and pump, 240’ of 2” milk line, 240’ of 2.5” vacuum line, 22 dual stall cocks $3,500. Will sell as package or will separate. 810-304-0413.

1993 Peterbilt 379 short hood with B model cat, 15 speed transmission, $9,500 obo. 231-425-8825.

1999 Dari-Kool 2000 gal. Bulk Tank with 2012 5 hp. compressors (2), washer and Thermo-Stor free heater, excellent

Holstein Breeder Bulls with herd average of 33,000+lbs. of milk. LaDine Farms/David Bivens, Bellevue, MI 269-758-3980 or dsdairy1@aol.com.

Equipment 2008 FP240 with processor and both heads, excellent condition. 231-206-7720.

43 Head Holstein Dairy Cattle Farm Auction Friday, March 4th. Farm machinery, draft horses, hay & haylage. For more info and brochure contact Yoder Bros. Auction Service 989-386-9082.

Wanted Registered Holsteins. Call Brent at 989-551-0681. Herd of milk cows or bred heifers to buy on a milk check assignment. 616-889-0769.

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise—at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. •

It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office.

• Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication. Example: To be included in the April issue, the freeliner must be at the MMPA office by March 10.

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

27


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL:

Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small

your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed

bales) and Barley for feed.

grooves, no hammering or cracking

989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381.

DELAVAL PLATE COOLER MODEL MP3DE-81 SS, stainless steel, 81 plates, $2,100. Call 231-920-8025.

DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: No water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. Three operators will travel Michigan and other states. No

FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1

interest payment terms. Established since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361.

CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com

A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality

Concrete Grooving and Texturing

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

Cell: 1-716-353-1137

www.hamiltondist.com

traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-25002000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK TANKS, complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112.

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION! A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

GREEN MEADOW FARMS WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, Sunset & Mueller, 1-800-558-0112.

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

www.greenmeadowfarms.com


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative. If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

If… 1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurances within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN DECEMBER 2015 Market Statistics Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

National Trends*

This Month

Year Ago

% Change

Total Class 1 Sales

547,506,002

545,316,376

+0.40

Production

Total Class 2 Sales

167,306,623

248,433,718

-32.66

Total Class 3 Sales

581,715,398

591,608,555

-1.67

Total Class 4 Sales

278,456,138

283,948,184

-1.93

Total Production

1,574,984,161

1,669,306,833

-5.65

34.8%

32.7%

(million pounds) 2015

2014 % Change

California

3,366

3,471

-3.0

Wisconsin

2,477

2,363

+4.8

New York

1,203

1,162

+3.5

Idaho

1,168

1,155

+1.1

Pennsylvania

904

904

+0.0

Michigan

876

836

+4.8

Texas

853

879

-3.0

Minnesota

807

784

+2.9

New Mexico

624

665

-6.2

Washington

548

546

+0.4

Ohio

458

458

+0.0

Indiana

348

336

+3.6

Total U.S.

16,362

16,256

+0.7

Butterfat Price /lb ........................................................................................... $2.9057

U.S Y-T-D

195,378

193,171

+1.1

Other Solids Price /lb ....................................................................................$0.0355

*For 23 States

Class 1 Utilization

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers ..................................................................................................... 5,497 Avg. Daily Production per farm ..................................................................... 9,242 Avg. Protein Test ....................................................................................................3.16% Avg. Butterfat Test .............................................................................................3.80% Avg. Oth Solids Test ...........................................................................................5.73% Avg. SCC - MMPA ............................................................................................ 151,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb ................................................................................................ $1.3599

Class III Price @ 3.5% .........................................................................................$14.44 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt .....................................................................$1.49 Uniform Price @ 3.5%........................................................................................ $15.93 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000 ................................................................. $0.00079

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb............................................................................................................... 1.5719 Butter /lb................................................................................................................2.5709 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb ...........................................................................................0.7893 Dry Whey /lb.......................................................................................................0.2336

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MESSENGER | FEBRUARY 2016


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff*

Novi Headquarters

Northwest Area Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard................................................................... 989-289-0731

Main Office Local line ........................................................................................248-474-6672 Toll free ...........................................................................................800-572-5824

Energy Auditor Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI........................................................ 906-250-0337

General Manager Joe Diglio ................................................................................................... ext. 200

Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.................................................................. 231-519-2455 Deb Gingrich, Leroy ........................................................................248-520-3580 Sarah Michalek, Portland..............................................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard............................................................. 248-756-2062

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys ......................................................................................... ext. 240 Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt ..................................................................................... ext. 208

Northeast Area

Quality Amandeep Dhillon ................................................................................. ext. 305

Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove ......................................................248-513-7920

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson ................................................................................................ext. 229

Animal Care Coordinator, Energy Auditor Lindsay Green, East Lansing .......................................................989-488-8159

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula................................................................................................ext. 219

Animal Care Coordinator Drew Rupprecht, Clio..................................................................... 269-986-6793

Member Services Dean Letter ................................................................................... 989-289-9251

Ben Butcher, Durand ........................................................................248-514-5273

Sales Michael Morrissey ..................................................................................... ext. 213

Ashley Herriman, Alpena ............................................................. 269-245-6632 Angie Kirsch, Harbor Beach ..........................................................231-414-4539

Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch ...................................................................................................ext. 244

South Area

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt......................................................................................ext. 210

Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers ............................................................... 269-967-7351 Krista Beeker, Topeka, IN.............................................................. 269-986-6792 Dave Brady, Grass Lake .......................517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte ....................................................................810-701-6460 Joe Packard, Kalamazoo ............................................................... 248-520-3481 Emily Smith, Bronson..................................................................... 269-535-0822

Other Services Bulk Tank Calibration Gary Best, Lapeer ..............................810-664-4984 or (c) 586-484-9279 Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca......................... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Sustainability Coordinator Lynn Nagengast................................................................................ 248-444-6775 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson, Coleman .................................................................989-289-9686

Data Processing Gregory Schulkey .................................................................................... ext. 237 Communications Allison Stuby .............................................................................................ext. 296 Human Resources Cindy Tilden ...............................................................................................ext. 220 Member Relations Jessica Welch ........................................................................................... ext. 303

Manufacturing Plants Constantine Dave Davis, Plant Manager ................................................... 269-435-2835 Ovid Colt Johnson, Plant Manager .............................................989-834-2221

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan .................................................................................... 800-572-5824 Toll Free........................................................................................... 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.) ....................................................989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.) .....................................800-391-7560

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line.................................................................................................989-317-8370 Toll Free ................................................................................................877-367-6455

*If you are unable to

reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area.

Orders (Novi) ............................................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax.............................................................................................................. 989-317-8372

FEBRUARY 2016 | MESSENGER

31


YOU HAVE ROBOTS? We have feeding solutions that work.

ADM has the experience and products The Dick family, owners of Dick Haven Farm in McBain, MI, are nationally recognized for producing high-quality milk.

that will help you meet important robot feeding objectives—nutritional integrity, pellet durability and alluring palatability, but don’t just take it from us. Ask those that really matter—our customers.

“Product consistency and a firm pellet with no feed refusals is important. The ADM pellets flow well in our system and our cows clean it up,” reports Dale Dick.

The Westendorp family, owners of Westvale-Vu Dairy & Mooville

Whether it’s an ADM . . . • customized pellet specially tailored to your operation • product manufactured with our patented cold pelleting technology that allows higher inclusion rate of liquid palatants • or standard, pelleted, robotic feed, ADM can help your cows provide you with the best returns on your robotic milking investment. For more information on ADM robotic milking system products, contact Bill Earley at 800-777-7692 or email bill.earley@adm.com

Creamery in Nashville, MI, produce high-quality products from healthy, comfortable, productive cows. “We demand high-quality, palatable pellets that work in our robotic system. With ADM pellets, the quality is right and the price is competitive,” says Carlyle Westendorp.

www.admani.com • 800-777-7692


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