Page 1

SEPT

/ OCT

2019

VOL. 102

/ NO. 2

The Power of Ownership JAMES WEBER, 2019 OUTSTANDING YOUNG DAIRY COOPERATOR

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS ARE IN!

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MORE FOOD, MORE OFTEN, TO MORE PEOPLE

30

FAMILY DRIVEN WITH AN EDUCATIONAL MISSION


L-457HD+ Alfalfa AdvAntAges: More Milk produced per acre More Protein produced per acre More Forage produced per acre More Persistent stands

equals MORe PROFIt PeR ACRe on your alfalfa fields

Call DF Seeds, your Michigan distributor, for more information.

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features

14 More Food, More Often, to More People

MMPA partners with the Food Bank Council of Michigan to fight hunger with nearly 55,000 gallons of donated milk each year.

20

THE POWER OF OWNERSHIP

30

FAMILY DRIVEN WITH AN EDUCATIONAL MISSION

The recently selected 2019 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator, James Weber, re-opened Weber Family Dairy and is driving its success with his tenacity and prudence.

MMPA members, John and Cynthia Adam, received the 2019 Indiana Dairy Farmer of the Year Award for their unique efforts in using their robotic dairy farm to educate their community about dairy.

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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contents

CONTEST-WINNING PHOTO BY CASSIE PACKARD OF CLARE, MICHIGAN

FIGHTING HUNGER WITH 250,000 GALLONS OF MILK (PAGE 14)

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26

MORE THAN COWS AND RIBBONS

Michigan Dairy Expo teaches youth about learning, growing, networking.

28

THE SEVEN COOPERATIVE PRINCIPLES

34

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK IN INDIANA

35

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK IN MICHIGAN

EDITOR’S NOTE

06

MILK MINUTE

A Co-op Full of Leaders

08

QUALITY WATCH

What is the importance of employee training?

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

36

FREELINERS & CLASSIFIEDS

13

LAB PASTEURIZED COUNTS: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS

37

FARM SUPPLY STORE

18

14

38 STAFF YOU GAVE US YOUR BEST SHOTS! 2019 PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

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MEMBER MOMENT

“I want you as an individual to succeed, but I want all of us to do well and help each other along the way.” CATHY FRY, ISABELLA COUNTY 4-H LEADER (PAGE 26)

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019


VOL. 102

/ NO. 2

Milk Messenger (USPS # 345-320) is published bimonthly by the Michigan Milk Producers Association, 41310 Bridge Street, Novi, MI 48376-8002. Periodicals postage paid at Novi and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. President and Chief Executive Officer Joe Diglio Managing Editor Sheila Burkhardt, Senior Director of Member and Government Relations

Editor’s Note BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER, MMPA COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

In the summer of 2015, while schools were out and the need for food assistance was greater, MMPA donated nearly 23,000 gallons of milk to the Food Bank Council of Michigan. MMPA announced that first milk donation in Battle Creek, Michigan, where I watched a tanker full of milk destined for the donation depart a member farm. This summer, I witnessed the food bank hand our members’ milk, bottled just the day before, directly to people in need. It was humbling to see firsthand how our co-op is continuing to aid the one in seven food insecure Michiganders. Leaders at the food bank say MMPA’s first milk donation in 2015 created a “ripple effect” and taught the food bank system how to effectively distribute milk, one of the most requested food bank items, on a larger scale. Though summer is over, the food bank’s battle with hunger continues and MMPA is proud to be part of that effort. Learn more about our partnership with the Food Bank Council of Michigan on page 14.

On our cover For James Weber, 2015 was the year he started up his own dairy farm after returning home to Michigan. Weber, the 2019 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC), is featured on our cover this issue. We visited his farm just days after the judges made their selection. Witty and welcoming, he talked to us about how he’s eager for the opportunities that come with being an OYDC. Learn more about Weber’s approach to starting his own dairy on page 20.

More stories inside In this issue, we also feature MMPA members John and Cynthia Adam, who were named the 2019 Indiana Dairy Farmers of the Year (pg. 30). And though summer is now officially over, many kids across the Great Lakes region can hopefully look back on a successful summer at their fair. We caught up with two county teams who competed at Michigan Dairy Expo (pg. 26). Finally, as October is National Cooperative Month, reflect on the seven co-op principles that guide MMPA and all co-ops worldwide on page 28.

Editors Allison Stuby Miller, Communications Manager AMiller@mimilk.com Emily Kittendorf, Communications Coordinator EKittendorf@mimilk.com Advertising Manager Nancy Muszynski Muszynski@mimilk.com Publication Designer reZüberant! Inc., Stacy Love rezuberantdesign@gmail.com Printing Foresight Group, Stacey Trzeciak staceyt@foresightgroup.net Publication Office MMPA Milk Messenger P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002 p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com Established in 1916, MMPA is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio. An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Subscriptions: MMPA members - 50¢ per year Non-members - $5 per year Circulation: 2,600 (ISSN 0026-2315)

The Milk Messenger will continue featuring the stories of our members and partners. If you have any story ideas, reach out to us at messenger@mimilk.com. milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

5


MILK MINUTE

A Co-op Full of Leaders

BY KRIS WARDIN, MMPA BOARD CHAIRMAN

W

hen I was growing up, I was blessed with two great role models named ‘grandpa’. One was a dairy farmer, and one built and ran a golf course. Although these were two different worlds, my grandfathers had a lot in common. They didn’t just tell us what to do – they showed us what to do. They didn’t lecture us on how to act – they acted that way, and we followed. We’ve all had examples of great leaders in our lives, and in this co-op, we’re fortunate to work with many leaders with the same hardworking, forward-thinking mindset. Our co-op management and staff may live very different lives, but I can assure you that they have many of the same hard-working values that we have on the farm.

KRIS WARDIN, MMPA BOARD CHAIRMAN

This issue of the Milk Messenger is filled with great examples of leadership throughout our co-op. First, I want to recap the special delegate meeting we had in late August. The board of directors took an important step in moving MMPA through our current leadership transition to set a successful course for the future. I now have the title of Board Chairman and Doug Chapin will be called Board Vice Chairman. Joe Diglio now has the title of President and CEO. This terminology is by far the most commonly used throughout the dairy industry as well as co-ops and corporations outside of the industry. This didn’t change any job responsibilities in the bylaws. The board still has ultimate responsibility for oversight of the co-op and the President and CEO. These new titles clarify our structure to our business partners and reinforce our position as a modern, progressive co-op as we build toward the future. I want to personally thank the delegates for their time during this busy season. We appreciated the opportunity to give a short co-op update to these leaders as well. Further on the topic of leadership, we’ve just completed another year of the Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator contest. Congratulations to James Weber, this year’s winner, and to Brad and Nicole Wren, the runners-up. As you read a little more about them in this issue, I’m sure you’ll agree they will represent us well the next couple years. It was a pleasure getting to know all the future leaders that participated. The OYDC program has now been a part of our co-op for almost 70 years, and I would argue it is one of the premier leadership development programs in the dairy world. The OYDC finalists have the opportunity to learn about the co-op, improve communication skills, plus network with co-op staff and other young farmers. For the winners and runners-up, national development opportunities await at the NDB/NMPF/UDIA joint annual meeting. I would encourage every young member to consider this leadership opportunity in the future. The legacy of the OYDC program is equally impressive. The OYDC picnic this year was held Labor Day weekend at the farm of Brian and Carrie Preston. I always enjoy the stories of how past OYDC leaders shaped the history of MMPA in their own ways. In closing, I’d like to thank you all for being leaders on your farms, in your communities and other organizations in which you serve. Together we also use these leadership skills to continue a co-op legacy of leadership. Have a safe and successful harvest, and I’ll look forward to seeing many of you at the Leaders’ Conference this fall!

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Thank you dairy buyers at the 11th Annual

MICHIGAN LIVESTOCK EXPO

SALE-ABRATION SUPREME CHAMPION DAIRY COW Anna Moser, Dansville, Mich.

SUPREME CHAMPION DAIRY HEIFER Ashton Geurink, Zeeland, Mich.

SUPREME CHAMPION DAIRY SHOWPERSON Katie Wilson, Blanchard, Mich.

SUPREME CHAMPION CHEESE Old Europe Cheese, Benton Harbor, Mich.

Supporters of Michigan Dairy Youth raised $35, 500 at the Michigan Livestock Expo Sale-abration on July 16, 2019. The money raised will be used to provide scholarships and support dairy youth activities such as the Michigan Dairy Expo and other dairy youth education programs. Calder Dairy Caledonia Farmers Elevator CentralStar Cooperative Inc. CliftonLarsonAllen LLP CoBank Dairy Farmers of America Foster, Swift, Collins & Smith, P.C. GreenStone Farm Credit Services Golden Elm Dairy Hudson Dairy Ken and Liz Nobis Michigan Milk Producers Association MMPA Management Team Mooville Creamery United Dairy Industry of Michigan

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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QUALITY WATCH

What is the importance of farm employee training? “THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN TRAINING YOUR EMPLOYEES AND HAVING THEM LEAVE IS NOT TRAINING THEM AND HAVING THEM STAY.” – HENRY FORD

WE ASKED THE EXPERTS:

Lindsay Green

Paola Bacigalupo Sanguesa

Jody Sharrard

MMPA Member Representative

MSU Extension Dairy Educator

Sharrard Family Farm

Employee education and training is key to the success and sustainability of a dairy farm. Just as employees receive training on animal handling, milking procedures and multiple other areas, they should be trained on worker safety.

Employee training - those two words can bring a host of emotions and reactions to everyone. Some groan at the thought of training new employees and even those new employees tremor with worry that expectations will be so high that they will never please their employer.

Did you know that only two percent of employees working on dairies have had previous experience with cattle before coming to work on a dairy farm? This is why proper training and continued education is crucial for our on-farm employees to safely carry out their duties and care for our animals. There is also added emphasis on employee training in the National Milk Producers Federation, Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (F.A.R.M.) animal care program. The F.A.R.M. program requires that all employees have annual training provided to them. This training can be either formal or informal and delivered by yourself, a herdsman or the herd veterinarian on-farm. You may also wish to send employees to the MMPA Dairy Care Academy, MSU Extension classes or other off-farm trainings that will provide them with further knowledge and understanding of their job duties. All we ask as your MMPA field staff is that you keep record of when the trainings occur, who conducted the training and the topic employees are trained on. You can find a printable training log under ‘FARM Resources -Animal Care Evaluation Prep’ at www.nationaldairyfarm.com, or ask your field representative for a copy of the helpful document.

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Written protocols are the basis for training related to topics such as milking and vaccination. Similarly, a written safety plan that is frequently updated and available to the employees is the basis for worker safety. From fall and injury prevention to silage safety, all safety topics are important and should be included in the farm’s safety plan. Safety training, like any other training, should be provided at least once a year for each relevant topic. All employees, including family workers, should go through safety training. The training of new employees is especially important since they are not familiar with the facility and might come from a non-farm background, which can be a risk factor for their safety. We know from safety experts that accidents around the farm are preventable. Providing training to raise awareness of the dangers and the precautions that must be taken when working at a farm and around animals can keep your team of employees safe from accidents.

As dairy farmers, most of us wear so many hats and have so many other obligations elsewhere on the farm that we have to rely on at least some employees to spend their time milking our cows. In my opinion, training new employees and providing refresher courses should be embraced on all dairies. Customers care more than ever about having access to quality products and knowing how our animals are treated. One of the best ways to show that we understand consumers’ concerns about producing a high-quality product from well-cared for animals is to regularly train our employees about the best practices in the industry. If we don’t show and train our employees how to care for and milk our cows in a manner that will result in a high-quality product, in the most efficient method possible, we are not only affecting our bottom line, but we are letting everyone down.


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NEWS & VIEWS

UPCOMING

EVENTS Sept. 26 Advisory Committee Meeting, Novi

Sept. 28-Oct. 3 National 4-H Dairy Conference and World Dairy Expo, Madison, WI

Nov. 4-6 NDB/NMPF/UDIA Joint Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA

Nov. 22 Leaders’ Conference, East Lansing

MMPA producers scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Glenn Hochstetler Haveman Farms LLC Mark / Elizabeth Ponstein Pyle Dairy Farm Inc. * Dennis Raterink Timothy Baker Webers Meadow LLC * Rolling Acres Dairy Farm LLC * Hammond Dairy Farm LLC * Daniel Walden * Chase Crest Hill Farms LLC B & K Farms LLC Endsley Dairy Farms LLC * Pixley Dairy Farm LLC * Jonathan Hochstetler * James Huggett * Ritter Farms Chris/Kristina/Hans/Patricia Langmaack * Graber Dairy * Ivan Mast *100 percent

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Introducing the MMPA Farm Supply Store: The Tools You Need with Cooperative Benefits

M

MPA’s Merchandise Program has a new name: the MMPA Farm Supply Store. To offer the best service to MMPA members and the community, the Farm Supply Store is now offering new benefits including cooperative stops and a reduced minimum order requirement for free direct delivery of $250. The Farm Supply Store supplies many of the needs of MMPA’s farms and the public. Started in the early 1970s, the merchandise program was added to help member farms have a consistent and reliable source for cleaning supplies and parts. It has since grown to add many product lines and options for members to order. As an added benefit, the Farm Supply Store returns all profits back to member customers every February along with cash patronage refunds. The Farm Supply Store

has also negotiated with suppliers to offer more competitive pricing on select products. MMPA designated Jake Riley, who has worked for the merchandise program for 18 years, as a dedicated sales representative. He is visiting member farms to build awareness of MMPA Farm Supply services and can be reached directly at 248-912-5070. Depending on the product and customers’ preference, orders can be shipped via UPS, delivered by hauler or directly shipped by the MMPA delivery truck (minimum order for direct shipments: $250). MMPA is also adding cooperative stops, where farms can pool their orders with neighbors in their geographic area to deliver at a specified location. TO ORDER PRODUCTS OR SET UP A COOPERATIVE STOP, CONTACT THE FARM SUPPLY STORE AT 989-317-8370 OR MERCH@MIMILK.COM.

“We work with our vendors to make sure we supply our farms with high quality, reliable products. Our team regularly assesses our product lineup to make sure we carry a wide variety to service our members. Our goal is to provide the tools our farms need to produce top quality milk.” — Duane Farmer, Farm Supply Supervisor

MMPA Delegates Retitle Cooperative Leadership Positions

MMPA to Send Michigan 4-H Youth to National 4-H Dairy Conference

In an effort to update bylaw language, a special delegate meeting was held on August 21 to approve modifications to the MMPA bylaws. The bylaw amendments primarily updated titles used for MMPA officer positions. Delegates overwhelmingly approved changing the title of ‘CEO’ to ‘President and CEO’ and the titles of ‘President’ and ‘Vice President’ to ‘Board Chairperson’ and ‘Board Vice Chairperson,’ respectively.

Five participants of the MMPA 4-H Milk Marketing Tour were awarded a sponsored trip to the National 4-H Dairy Conference in Wisconsin, Sept. 29 – Oct. 2. The five youth are: Adalee Thelen, Clinton County; Kassidy Thelen, Clinton County; Madison Halfman, Clinton County; Hope Shilling, Branch County and Joshua Tripp, Ottawa County. The alternates are Ian Black, Clinton County and Corbin Redman, Gratiot County.


OYDC CONFERENCE ATTENDEES (L-R):STAN MOORE, LYNDA HORNING, REGINA COFFEY, DARREN COFFEY, KYLIE SCHUH, JAMES WEBER, BRAD WREN, NICOLE WREN, JILL DEMANN, JASON ELENBAUM, BRIAN DEMANN, ERIC CARSON, BRITTANY CARSON, ROSS DANIEL WILLIAMS, JEREMY KARSTEN, PAUL PYLE, NANCY PYLE AND SCOTT LAMB.

OYDC Conference Gives Younger Members a Close Look at their Co-op

O

utstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC) finalists converged in Novi, Michigan for a two-day conference on August 13 to 14 held annually as part of MMPA’s leadership development initiatives. Hosting this year’s conference were the 2018 OYDCs, Paul and Nancy Pyle. This year’s judges – MMPA District 8 Director Scott Lamb, MMPA member and former OYDC Lynda Horning and Michigan State University Extension Educator Stan Moore—joined the OYDCs throughout the process to make their selection of the individuals receiving the titles of 2019 winner and runner-up OYDC. James Weber of Vassar, Michigan was selected as the state winning OYDC, while Brad and Nicole Wren of Prescott, Michigan were selected as runners-up.

The state OYDC Conference, held at MMPA headquarters in Novi, provides participants with information about milk marketing activities, cooperatives, milk testing procedures and other current events within the dairy industry.

“I see the OYDC program advancing leadership opportunities by giving the exposure to the whole working order of the co-op. The program has advanced my ability to make better decisions now at a local level, and hopefully be able to at other levels and areas within the co-op as well, in the future.” — Brian DeMann, OYDC finalist, Martin, Michigan LEARN MORE ABOUT 2019 OYDC JAMES WEBER ON PAGE 20 OF THIS ISSUE. VISIT WWW.MIMILK.COM/ MEMBERSHIP/MEMBER-INVOLVEMENT/YOUNGCOOPERATORS/ FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE OYDC PROGRAM.

2019 OYDC Finalists

Andrew and Rebecca Bahrman Skandia, Michigan U.P West Central Local, District 4 Eric and Brittany Carson Hesperia, Michigan Muskegon Local, District 3 Darren and Regina Coffey Allegan, Michigan West Michigan Local, District 3 Brian and Jill DeMann Martin, Michigan Kalamazoo Local, District 2 Jason Elenbaum Mayville, Michigan Deford/Clifford-Mayville Local, District 7 Jeremy Karsten Posen, Michigan Hillman Local, District 4 Marie Marion Saline, Michigan Saline-Ann Arbor Local, District 1 James Weber Vassar, Michigan Frankenmuth Local, District 7 Ross Daniel Williams Homer, Michigan Hillsdale-Litchfield Local, District 1 Brad and Nicole Wren Prescott, Michigan Sunrise Local, District 7 milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

USMCA Delivers New Opportunities for U.S. Dairy

T

om Vilsack, president and CEO of the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC), testified before the Senate Finance Committee and urged Congress to swiftly ratify the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and usher in the benefits it promises to deliver to America’s dairy sector, as well as the wider food and agricultural community.

“NAFTA has paid tremendous dividends to America’s dairy industry by creating our top export market, Mexico, which consumed $1.4 billion in U.S. dairy exports last year.”

Advisory Committee

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“NAFTA has paid tremendous dividends to America’s dairy industry by creating our top export market, Mexico, which consumed $1.4 billion in U.S. dairy exports last year. USMCA makes key improvements, such as new Canadian dairy market access and other upgrades, that will modernize NAFTA, boost returns to farmers and food manufacturers across the country and support the hundreds of thousands of American jobs that are reliant on North American food and agricultural trade,” he testified. “Looking ahead, USMCA also has the potential to serve as a catalyst that springboards our nation onto a productive trade agenda that delivers results for American agriculture and the American people.” Vilsack, who served as the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture from 2009 to 2017, detailed how the trade pact will bring important benefits for dairy farmers and businesses.

In addition to locking in a zero-tariff relationship with Mexico and increasing market access to Canada, USMCA also reforms unfair pricing practices in Canada and addresses other nontariff barriers, like Geographic Indication requirements, that threaten U.S. sales. All told, USMCA will provide a $314 million-a-year boost to the dairy industry, according to the U.S. International Trade Commission. “Speaker Pelosi and Ambassador Lighthizer are working closely together to address any outstanding concerns surrounding the implementation of USMCA,” he added. “I encourage the Senate to play a constructive role in these talks in order to produce a final agreement that can be quickly passed and signed.”

Tell Congress to Support Passage of USMCA Members of the dairy community are working to inform Congress of the need to pass USMCA. Call or write to your senator and congressperson to demonstrate support for USMCA. To look up your elected officials and find their contact information, visit contactingcongress.org.

DISTRICT 3

DISTRICT 6

Bill Stakenas, Free Soil........................231-425-6913 Burke Larsen, Scottville......................231-425-8988 Arlyn Walt, Coopersville......................616-837-8247 Tim Butler, Sand Lake.........................269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland.........................616-520-5143

John Thelen, Westphalia.....................989-587-3951 Renee McCauley, Lowell......................616-283-6411 Steve Thelen, Fowler...........................989-682-9064 David Reed, Owosso............................989-723-2023 Mike Halfman, St. Johns......................989-640-1963

DISTRICT 1

DISTRICT 4

DISTRICT 7

Art Riske, Hanover..............................517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH.................419-466-4471 Brian Preston, Quincy.........................517-376-1350 Scott Ferry, Litchfield..........................517-214-3298 Jeff Horning, Manchester....................734-428-8610

William Pirman, Skandia.....................906-869-4515 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard....................906-630-1957 Paul Ponik, Posen ...............................989-464-5924 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................425-533-8106 Jeremy Werth, Alpena.........................989-464-4022

Scott Kleinhardt, Clare........................989-386-8037 Philip Gross, Weidman........................989-289-0670 Jason Elenbaum, Mayville...................989-274-1974 John Bennett, Prescott........................989-345-4264 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning..................989-302-2299

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 5

DISTRICT 8

Danny Ransler, Gobles.........................269-628-4218 Dan Ritter, Potterville.........................517-645-7318 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN..........574-202-5198 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.................269-660-2229 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN ...........574-825-2454

Tom Jeppesen, Stanton.......................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain......................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy..............................231-388-0496 Robert Lee, Marion.............................231-743-6794 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore....................989-379-4694

Mike Noll, Croswell.............................810-404-4071 Jeremy Sharrard, Peck.........................810-404-5076 Bryan Schulte, Ruth............................989-551-8200 Bill Blumerich, Berlin..........................810-706-2955 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................989-977-3718

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019


Lab Pasteurized Counts: The Devil is in the Details BY BEN CHAPIN, MANAGER OF FIELD SERVICES

In the world of milk quality, standards are always evolving. For several years the focus has primarily been on raw bacteria counts (RBC), preliminary incubated counts (PIC), and somatic cell counts (SCC). But there is a fourth quality test that is increasingly being used in industry: the Lab Pasteurized Count (LPC).

L

ab pasteurized counts measure the bacteria that survive pasteurization. These bacteria are thermoduric bacteria, or heat resistant. LPCs are often used in the industry to improve the shelf life of dairy products. Some strains of thermoduric bacteria are “spore forming” and can be capable of cold storage growth that leads to spoilage of product. The dairy industry is always striving to improve quality to deliver the safest, best tasting and longest lasting product. LPCs are becoming an important part of that process.

What is a good count? If you have your milk tested for LPC, the numbers reported are the actual counts and there is no need to add zeros as for SCC, RBC, or PIC. An LPC of 200 cell per mL is okay, 100 is better, 50 is excellent and 10 or less is best. Anything over 100 (some customers set this level at 50) should be looked into, but where do you look?

cleanliness. If all milk contact surfaces are clean, the next step is to dig deeper into the details and inspect all porous parts within a milking system. This includes inflations, pipeline gaskets, milk hoses, claw gaskets, take-off sensors and diaphragms. Vacuum lines and traps can be another source for an elevated LPC. These should be checked regularly for cleanliness or sour odors. Over time, the vacuum line may become soiled with milk that is drawn up the hose and into the line. For bucket systems, this would also include the vacuum hoses connecting the bucket and the vacuum line. Thermoduric bacteria are present in manure and dust, so parlor cleanliness and cow hygiene are other very important factors in keeping a low LPC. Other areas

to inspect and watch are air blow valves, pinch valve drains, valve seats and leaking pump seals. Milk filters can play a large part in preventing elevated LPCs as well. On farms with long milking hours, we recommend changing the milk filter(s) a minimum of every four hours because they can become an excellent home for the bacteria to grow. Any place you see milk leaking in a milking system, should be inspected and corrected. If milk is able to leak out, bacteria is able to get in.

Testing for LPC? In the near future, MMPA will begin LPC testing each member’s milk at least once a month. The test results are for information purposes. There is no premium or deduction for this count at this time. If you have an elevated LPC or monitor this count more often through the month, you can request your milk hauler take LPC “special” samples at any time. When an LPC is ran with a PIC and RBC on the same load of milk, it helps paint a picture of the wash cycles, cooling, equipment condition, etc. LPC testing is a great tool offered by the MMPA lab for milk quality management. If you have further inquiries regarding LPCs, contact your member representative today.

How do I address an elevated LPC? It is common to have excellent RBCs and PICs, and have an elevated LPC on the same sample. RBC and PIC are typically measurements related to equipment cleanliness and cooling. LPCs however, are not only related to equipment cleanliness but can also come from equipment condition and events within the milking process. When investigating an elevated LPC, one of the first places to look is equipment milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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POWERFUL PARTNERSHIPS

More Food, More Often, to More People .....................

MMPA PARTNERS WITH THE FOOD BANK COUNCIL OF MICHIGAN TO FIGHT HUNGER WITH 250,000 GALLONS OF MILK BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER

T

hink about all the problems you solve in a typical

day. There’s the electric bill to pay, creative solutions to uncover at work and finding time for that dentist appointment. If you’re a parent, you might help your child navigate endless math homework. If you’re a dairy farmer, you might spend time thinking about how to nudge down your quality results.

But what if resolving all these problems was clouded by one thing? What if you didn’t know where your next meal would come from? “When you’re hungry, you only have one problem. You don’t have seven problems. And until you solve that, your mind is not free to think about those seven problems,” Dr. Phil Knight said. After experiencing a life upset several years ago, Knight found himself struggling to feed his family. “I did everything right. I worked two jobs. I have a doctorate.” Yet he couldn’t make ends meet. Knight is not alone. There are 1.4 million people struggling with hunger in Michigan. Today, he’s the executive director of the Food Bank Council of Michigan (FBCM) and helping bring food to people in need every day, just like the support he once received. Made up of seven regional Feeding America food banks, FBCM alleviates hunger statewide through food distribution and advocating on behalf of their network.

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“If I hadn’t had people and programs to get alongside me, I don’t know how I would have survived,” he said. MMPA has partnered with FBCM since 2015 and distributed almost 250,000 gallons of milk across their network. In recognition of this relationship, MMPA honored the non-profit with the Valued Partner award earlier this year.

Helping the One in Seven Across the United States, one in eight people are food insecure. In Michigan, it’s one in seven. Food insecurity, as defined by Feeding America, is a household’s inability to provide enough food for every person to live an active, healthy life. Many of these people turn to the food bank for emergency assistance and they come from all walks of life. For FBCM, 47 percent have someone in the home who is employed, 27 percent are children, 19 percent are senior citizens and 4 percent are homeless.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


FOOD BANK COUNCIL OF MICHIGAN REGIONAL FOOD BANKS: • GREATER LANSING FOOD BANK • GLEANERS COMMUNITY FOOD BANK OF SOUTHEASTERN MI • FORGOTTEN HARVEST • FOOD GATHERERS • FOOD BANK OF SOUTH CENTRAL MI • FOOD BANK OF EASTERN MI • FEEDING AMERICAN OF WEST MI

milk messenger messenger / SEP-OCT SEP-OCT 2019 2019 milk

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POWERFUL PARTNERSHIPS

“That’s 97 percent of our network,” Knight says. “That changes your perspective. It’s not people who are abusing some system. It’s people who are doing things right, people who are working but they have more month than they have money.” Knight says the individual effect of FBCM covers four areas: stability, empowerment, health and economic impact. Living under food insecurity brings “toxic stress” to the household and prevents people from thinking about solving any problem except hunger. A reliable source of food brings stability and leads to empowerment. “Because their mind is free, they can think about other challenges and opportunities,” he said. Food banks today provide fresh, healthy foods like fruits, vegetables and dairy. Food bank clients aren’t just eating to satisfy an empty stomach, they’re being nourished and becoming healthier individuals. Compounding the power of stability, empowerment and health, the economic impact has lasting benefits. With inadequate resources, people often need to make sacrifices when choosing where to spend their limited money. Food—or at least healthy, nutritious food—is an area that often suffers. “The health issues, the unemployment issues, the mental health issues. All those problems are ungodly expensive to solve on the backside,” Knight said. “So why don’t we solve these problems with healthy, nutritious food and people can start to solve these problems on their own?”

It Starts in the Field Food banking is different than when the system started around 40 years ago. Knight says that back then, any food solved hunger. Today, they’re focused on the quality of food. FBCM helps their member food banks procure food through a centralized, efficient system. In 2018, they distributed 200 million pounds of food, 80 million of which was fresh. In many cases, FBCM procures fresh food through partnerships with farmers and food companies. Through the Michigan Agricultural Surplus System (MASS), they created a secondary market for produce that won’t be accepted by grocery stores due to size and shape. MASS is a grant program funded by the State of Michigan which allowed them to source over 12 million pounds of food last year, at a cost of only 12 cents per pound. Kath Clark, FBCM director of food programs, works directly with farmers and donors to funnel food to the regional food banks based on the needs of their populations. When the food can’t be used in Michigan within its shelf life, FBCM collaborates with Feeding America to distribute it out of state. This helps fight hunger elsewhere in the nation while supporting Michigan farmers. “Our hungry neighbors here in Michigan are taken care of first. Then we want to take care of our farmers,” Knight said. “Solving hunger starts in the field.”

“Our hungry neighbors here in Michigan are taken care of first. Then we want to take care of our farmers. Solving hunger starts in the field.” Clark says the food bank clients, who may not have access to fresh food on their own, love when produce or fresh milk is distributed. In one case, a senior citizen was amazed after FBCM was able to procure excess cherries. “She hadn’t had fresh produce in years because her budget didn’t allow it,” Clark said. “Some people had dropped cherries and she was picking it up off the ground. She said, ‘That’s good food, I’m not going to let that go to waste.’”

A Milk Ripple Effect For food banks in Michigan and across the country, milk continues to be one of the most requested items. But with a short shelf life and refrigeration needs, it can be a challenge to get milk in the hands of those in need. In the summer of 2015, MMPA made the cooperative’s first large-scale statewide donation of milk—22,700 gallons to be exact. Since then, MMPA has made multiple donations of milk and more recently, cheese, all to FBCM. Determined to make the donation possible, FBCM found solutions to keep the milk cool and efficiently distributed across Michigan.

Among people who turn to the food bank for emergency assistance:

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47%

27%

19%

4%

HAVE SOMEONE IN THE HOME WHO IS EMPLOYED

ARE CHILDREN

ARE SENIOR CITIZEN

ARE HOMELESS

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KATH CLARK, FBCM DIRECTOR OF FOOD PROGRAMS AND DR. PHIL KNIGHT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FBCM

“It was a learning process for everyone. If MMPA wasn’t willing to donate the milk, we wouldn’t have learned. You made us better,” Knight says. In the years since that first donation, FBCM and their member food banks have developed strong systems to accept and distribute milk, along with other needed items like eggs and cheese. Gleaners Community Food Bank, covering Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Monroe counties, is one of FBCM’s member food banks. When Gleaners Chief Operating Officer Julie Beamer came aboard five years ago, she says they weren’t distributing any milk. But after the MMPA’s milk donation initiative and a partnership with the United Dairy Industry of Michigan, they recognized the need to provide their clients with dairy and learned how to navigate the logistical challenges of distributing milk.

Gleaner’s has a refrigerated van and 24foot box truck—both with Undeniably Dairy imaging to boot—dedicated to dispensing milk at mobile food pantries all over Southeast Michigan. “Gleaners has distributed a total of 342,000 gallons of fresh milk through all our channels, which is just about 8 truckloads per month,” Beamer said of a recent 10 month period. Beamer says many people served by Gleaners have limited access to affordable or good-quality fresh food, either because of transportation or economic challenges. Milk can be hard to come by or is often expensive and nearing the expiration date. With proximity to Michigan Dairy in Livonia, Gleaners can distribute milk directly to communities often the day after it leaves the plant. While Gleaners serves Southeast Michigan, hunger isn’t restricted by zip code. FBCM’s distribution model serves

people in all 83 counties of Michigan, including rural communities. Knight says rural areas bring unique distribution challenges. While “vastly different” than the urban centers, food banks still seek solutions to bring food to people in need. One method involves mobile distribution centers like the ones used by Gleaners. “It’s a very effective way to distribute the food without a brick and mortar location,” Clark explained. Through FBCM’s network, they can ensure food is distributed to every corner of Michigan. Hunger threatens every community and puts added stress on our neighbors, our communities and our economy. With every gallon of milk, MMPA helps FBCM inch closer to solving hunger. “We want more food, more often, to more people. No one can do that better than the members of the Food Bank Council,” Knight said. milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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PHOTO CONTEST

1ST PLACE CASSIE PACKARD “LIFE ON THE FARM”

YOU GAVE US YOUR BEST SHOTS 18

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Selected from more than 50 entries, the five winning photographs from MMPA’s second annual photo contest capture exactly what it means to live the dairy lifestyle. In this year’s contest, there were five awards given: first, second and third place judged by a panel of judges, along with a People’s Choice Award determined by public voting and a Staff Choice Award, an additional honorable mention, to the favorite photo among MMPA employees. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• FIRST PLACE

The first-place winner was Cassie Packard of Clare, Michigan, with her photo titled “Life on the Farm”. The photo was taken on her family’s farm, Packard Farms, and is the perfect setting for a prize-winning photo. Capturing the picturesque red barn and beautiful black and white Holsteins awarded Cassie a $100 gift card to MMPA’s Farm Supply Store.


SECOND PLACE

Cassie also took home second-place with her other photo entry titled “Enjoying the Michigan Sunshine”. Everyone knows that sunshine wasn’t something easy to come across this past spring, but Cassie snapped this photo on one of those rare sunny days. As recognition for her impressive photography skills, Cassie will also receive an additional $50 gift card to MMPA’s Farm Supply Store.

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THIRD PLACE

Placing third was Stephanie Weil, of Goodrich, Michigan, with her photo “Enchanted Sunrise”. Taken on Weil Dairy Farm, the photo could be a painting with how beautifully it captures the first rays of sunlight peaking across a dewy field. Stephanie will receive a cheese box from Heritage Ridge Creamery to acknowledge her success.

SECOND PLACE: “ENJOYING THE MICHIGAN SUNSHINE” BY CASSIE PACKARD, CLARE, MI

3

PEOPLE’S CHOICE

The People’s Choice Award was given to “The ‘Pick Up’,” captured by Jacob Niederman of Hamilton, Ohio, on Emmons Farm LLC. With the bright blue sky and gorgeous flower beds in front of a stark white barn, it caught the eye of the general public receiving over 20 percent of all the votes in the People’s Choice contest. Jacob will receive a $25 gift card to MMPA’s Farm Supply Store.

THIRD PLACE: “ENCHANTED SUNRISE” BY STEPHANIE WEIL, GOODRICH, MI

PC

PEOPLE’S CHOICE: “THE ‘PICK UP’ ” BY JACOB NIEDERMAN, HAMILTON, OHIO

STAFF CHOICE AWARD

Last but not least, honorable mention goes to Lisa Gildner of Alpena, Michigan, for her photo titled “Best Furry Friends.” The touching combination of a dog and calf spending quality time together on ButterWerth Dairy won the hearts of MMPA’s employees earning Lisa the Staff Choice Award. Lisa’s photo rounds out the best of the best of the 2019 MMPA Photo Contest.

SC

STAFF CHOICE: “BEST FURRY FRIENDS” BY LISA GILDNER, ALPENA, MICHIGAN

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THE POWER OF OWNERSHIP

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JAMES WEBER, 2019 OYDC, ON OWNING WEBER FAMILY DAIRY WITH TENACITY AND PRUDENCE

The Power of Ownership BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER

James Weber is ambitious, yet cautious. In 2015, not long after graduating from California Polytechnic State University, he did something you don’t hear too often anymore: he started a dairy farm.

O

n former pastureland in Vassar, Michigan, Weber erected a double 10 parallel milking parlor, sheltered by a solar panel covered roof. Just a short walk away, he built a hoop barn to house 130 Jersey cows trucked in from Battle Creek, Michigan. He’s a new player in the dairy community, but he’s cognizant of the current dairy economy and strategically managing his farm with insight from mentors and family legacy. In recognition for his achievements, Weber was recently named the 2019 MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator by a panel of judges represented by leaders in the Great Lakes dairy industry. Owner of Weber Family Dairy, he milks 130 cows and farms 800 acres as an MMPA member of the Frankenmuth Local in District 7.

Owning Weber Family Dairy Before starting the farm, Weber received a dairy management certificate from Michigan State University. An internship sent him to work on a California dairy farm and he stayed out West for a few years working on a few dairy farms. He eventually graduated from California Polytechnic State University with a bachelor’s degree in dairy science. When he returned to Michigan, he knew he wanted to stay a part of the dairy community. But Weber didn’t want to just work on or for a dairy farm, he wanted to own it. “It always came back to ownership. I don’t like being told what to do or how to do it. And I have that freedom with my own farm,” he said. “When I get it in my mind that I’m going to do something, I’m going to do it.” The dairy side of the business is one of four entities owned by Weber and his family, alongside Weber Farms, Weber Land and Weber Equipment. Weber’s dad managed Weber Farms with around 40 Holstein cows until selling them in 2011. CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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THE POWER OF OWNERSHIP

WEBER FAMILY DAIRY, BUILT ON FORMER PASTURELAND, FEATURES A NEW HOOP BARN AND MILKING PARLOR WITH SOLAR PANELS ON THE ROOF.

Owning the Outcome Weber’s tenacity pushes him forward, but his prudence is driving his success. He keeps his production costs low, makes his decisions based on numbers and uses what he’s learned from mentors to his benefit. Weber credits much of his knowledge and passion for dairy to his family, his core teachers at MSU and the families he lived with on dairies in California. “I know that I wouldn’t be where I am without their support and influence,” Weber said.

“MMPA was the co-op my grandparents joined, the one my dad was with. When I started this farm, there was never any thought of a different co-op, it was, ‘Who do I call at MMPA?’ ” 22

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

While working on Tollcrest Dairy, a dairy farm in California, Weber developed the skills he’s now using to manage his own farm. “That was my biggest influence and role model. The owner started his farm off on his own. I learned a lot from him and I’m trying to use what I learned out here.” Though the buildings are new, the parlor is new, and the farm itself was recently restarted, Weber didn’t go overboard with all the latest gadgets. Instead, he made strategic decisions about where he spent his money and how to sustain his farm with a lower cost of production. “The only automation we have in the parlor is the detachers. We don’t do individual cow milk weights. We don’t have herd management software. I manage the cows on a breeding wheel and excel sheets. It works on small scale,” he said. If he undergoes an expansion or shifts away from personally managing the cows, Weber says there’s technology he would like to implement. The first step would be to grow his herd to around 400 and then upward from there. When

JAMES WEBER ALONGSIDE HIS SUPPORTIVE GIRLFRIEND, KYLIE SCHUH.

developing the property, he planned out the current structures with an idea of where the next barns would go. But for the moment, he’s waiting until the numbers make sense. “Following my gut and what I think is right has proven to work for me,” Weber said. The farm’s mission, Weber says, is to produce a safe, nutritious product. Beyond that, he wants to ensure his employees are happy and that they are protecting the farm’s natural resources. Weber is continually thinking about how he can efficiently produce quality milk and have a sustainable farm. For example, the cows rest on beds of


recycled manure solids. Weber says one day while thinking about his next move and considering how to store his manure for a potential expansion, he noticed his compost pile. “I was just looking out at the compost pile. With 130 cows, it was three and a half feet deep. I realized, well there’s my bedding for a future freestall barn right there,” Weber said. While he ended up putting his expansion plans on hold, his bedding and manure storage solution stuck. And it works without damaging his milk quality results. “My cows lay on their own manure. It’s not a low pathogen environment, yet we’re able to achieve good milk quality,” Weber said. “That’s through understanding the relationship to the animal, her health and how somatic cell comes into play.” An MMPA bronze quality award winner last year, Weber Family Dairy is continually improving its quality, measured in part by low somatic cell counts.

“When I get it in my mind that I’m going to do something, I’m going to do it... Following my gut and what I think is right has proven to work for me.”

Owning MMPA While Weber leads his farm, as a member of MMPA, he also has an ownership stake in the co-op, something he doesn’t take lightly. He’s a delegate for Frankenmuth Local and has served on the resolutions committee and the District 7 nominating committee. As an OYDC, Weber is hoping it will lead to greater involvement in MMPA. OYDCs often go on to hold leadership positions within their community and their cooperative.

Weber attended the initial OYDC conference in August with fellow OYDC finalists. They had an opportunity to look into their cooperative through discussions with co-op leaders and a tour of the offices and milk testing laboratory. Moving forward, Weber will represent MMPA at national dairy meetings, serve an honorary term on the MMPA Advisory Committee and influence the MMPA Young Cooperator program. Weber says he’s looking forward to representing MMPA, along with enjoying fellowship with members and forging relationships with industry contacts. “My focus has always been on the farm, being efficient,” Weber said. “So what do you do after you accomplish the things you want on your farm? Well, how do you influence the survivability of your farm beyond just what’s on your farm? You go out and you work in the industry in whatever capacity you can.”

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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What the Checkoff is doing to drive demand for beef.

BEEF DEMAND Strong consumer beef demand is expected to continue through 2019 with the USDA predicting consumers in the United States will eat 8.9% more beef this year than in 2015. Much of beef’s demand is driven by ground beef and loin cuts, which are particularly popular with consumers at the grocery store.

NUTRITION & HEALTH The Beef Checkoff participated in the 2019 NBC4 Health & Fitness Expo in Washington D.C., the nation’s largest gathering of health and fitness professionals in the U.S., to educate consumers on the nutritional value of beef.

SAFETY The Beef Checkoff congregated at the 8th annual Antibiotic Symposium, attracting nearly 150 stakeholders from the “one health” community – including experts from animal health, human health and environmental health – to discuss antimicrobial resistance in the human population, and how our food plays a role in that issue.

INNOVATION EXPORT GROWTH Through support from the Beef Checkoff ’s subcontractor, U.S. Meat Export Federation, U.S. beef exports grew 15% in 2018 to more than $8 billion, adding more than $320 per head of fed cattle.

The Beef Checkoff recently launched Chuck Knows Beef, an all-thingsbeef personality powered by Google Artificial Intelligence. Chuck Knows Beef can be found on the web and mobile devices and through smart speakers by Amazon Alexa and Google Home. Chuck can provide all information found on the “Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.” website.

CONSUMER TRUST Team BEEF is a Beef Checkoff project which enlists athletes around the country to spark conversations and provide beef education to consumers and other athletes at running and fitness events regarding beef’s unique nutritional benefits.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, November 2018  USDA ERS Livestock & Meat Domestic Data; USDA WASDE, July 2018  Tonsor, Schroeder, Creating and Assessing Candidate Food Service and Retail Beef Demand Indices, January 2017. IRI/Freshlook, Total US MULO ending 10/26/18; Categorized by VMMeat System  USDA data compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation

Read about these and other successes at

DrivingDemandForBeef.com. 24

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019


What helps increase beef exports to Brazil by 50%?

*

See how your dollar improves global consumer perceptions — adding value to your operation. Sign up for your free newsletter at DrivingDemandForBeef.com. * Figures based on USDA data compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation.

Funded by The Beef Checkoff.

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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MICHIGAN DAIRY EXPO

COWS & RIBBONS MORE THAN

BY MELISSA HART

Michigan 4-H youth took time out of their summers to compete at the Michigan Dairy Expo held at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, July 15-19. The gathering of 4-H’ers from counties across the state showcase youth who love to learn and have a passion to win.

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

The event features a collection of dairy contests that tests the youths’ knowledge and problem-solving skills. Teams from a variety of counties were decked in matching team shirts showing their county pride and preparing to give it their all. The clusters of color were scattered throughout the MSU Pavilion as teams met in preparation for the contests they had spent months studying for. “Participating in the Michigan Dairy Expo teaches kids life skills that they will need for the rest of their lives: time management, confidence, sportsmanship, communication. There’s a lot that is to be learned from one week at the MSU Pavilion,” Melissa

MICHIGAN DAIRY EXPO TEACHES YOUTH ABOUT LEARNING, GROWING, NETWORKING Elischer, MSU Extension youth dairy educator, said. “For some kids, they also learn how to accept defeat gracefully, learning that even when you put in all the work ahead of time, there will always be factors outside of your control that can result in you not doing as well as you hoped.” This spirit of giving and caring for others is in the air at the Michigan Dairy Expo as youth practice good sportsmanship while competing in dairy quiz bowl, management, judging and showing competitions. For most youth at the event, training begins early, meeting every other week months in advance to learn new information and sharpen their dairy


knowledge. “We usually start practicing right after the holidays, kind of slowly, but as we get closer to spring, we increase our meetings and start visiting farms,” said Cathy Fry, coach of a multicounty team based in Isabella County. “We teach a lot about cow care, diseases and management.” Coaches often glean dairy materials from MSU, Virginia Tech and other online resources. These materials help teach youth more about the dairy industry while improving the many skills it takes to be successful in this kind of competition. The Allegan County group of kids have varying backgrounds. “Some of them come from farms, some don’t and others get dragged along by their friends. It’s really a mixed group,” Bev Berens said. Berens is an 18-year veteran 4-H leader and quiz bowl coach in Allegan County. Isabella County’s group is the same. “I have kids on the team who are homeschooled who don’t get out much and I have kids who are outgoing, but they all seem to bond and work well together. Not all of them are coming off of dairy farms, they just like cows, which is really cool too,” Fry said. Sam Geerlings from Allegan County is not from a farm but has a family cow and loves to learn while Sage Scripps, also from Allegan, has absolutely no farm background but was dragged into the group by coach Robyn Wixom. Scripps placed second in the management contest. For some youth, they see the fruition of their hard work as it pays off during the Michigan Dairy Expo. The Tucker tribe, Caleb, Katrina and Colby Tucker from Allegan County, raise dairy steers and show sheep but have a deep dairy pedigree from their maternal grandparents. “It’s fun to compete and win,” commented Colby.

4-H EXHIBITORS HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO COMPETE IN DAIRY QUIZ BOWL, MANAGEMENT, JUDGING AND SHOWING COMPETITIONS AT THE MICHIGAN DAIRY EXPO. PHOTOS BY: MELISSA ELISCHER, MSU EXTENSION

Olivia Coffey, a senior member of Allegan County this year, enjoyed winning the quiz bowl competition, “We work hard through the year but have a lot of fun. And then to win the contest is a sweet reward to the work we put in.” Another member of the winning senior quiz bowl team is Shannon Good who comes from an organic dairy farm. Her parents have been breeding Registered Red and Whites for years. “Our team is like family. We do a lot together through the year.” Teams feeling like family is common among the groups exhibiting at the Michigan Dairy Expo. For Fry, when asked about what it’s like to watch friendships flourish between the youth she coaches, she shared, “It’s awesome. I don’t even know how to put it in words. It’s one of my favorite parts.” Once youth who were involved in the competition age out, many come back to coach or help their county’s team in other ways. Everyone wants everyone to win and volunteers and alumni want to make sure it happens so that today’s youth get the same experiences that they did when they were young.

“Participating in the Michigan Dairy Expo teaches kids life skills that they will need for the rest of their lives: time management, confidence, sportsmanship, communication.”

Is winning the only goal? “Absolutely not. Winning is just the victory lap,” Elischer explained. “Sometimes it’s nice to walk away with a blue ribbon or a backpack, but that’s not what the journey is about. It’s about learning, growing, networking and leaving as a better person than what you came.” The youth that participate in the Michigan Dairy Expo embody every word that Elischer shared. Winning with pride and losing with grace, 4-H’ers involved with the dairy industry understand what it means to represent themselves and their county at the event. “I really emphasize that we are a group,” Fry said. “I want you as an individual to succeed, but I want all of us to do well and help each other along the way.” This spirit of teamwork and sportsmanship can easily go unseen at such a large event, but those closely associated with the Michigan 4-H program and the dairy industry know what it means to attend the Michigan Dairy Expo. “The Michigan Dairy Expo is so much more than just cows and ribbons,” Elischer said. “Youth take a week out of their summer and spend time at the MSU Pavilion, building their knowledge, creating lasting friendships and truly learning what it means to be a part of the dairy industry.” milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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CO-OP MONTH

The Seven Cooperative Principles Founded by farmers and owned by farmers, MMPA is one of almost 30,000 cooperatives nationwide. Though credit unions, housing co-ops, retail stores and milk marketing cooperatives don’t appear to have much in common, cooperatives around the world operate according to the same set of core principles and values. Cooperatives trace the roots of these principles to the first modern cooperative founded in Rochdale, England in 1844.

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co.op.er.a.tive | \ koh-op-er-uh-tiv \

cooperative noun

Here’s the seven cooperative principles that guide MMPA and fellow cooperatives:

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

1

Voluntary and open membership

2

Democratic member control

3

Members’ economic participation

4

Autonomy and independence

5

Education, training, and information

6

Cooperation among cooperatives

7

Concern for community

Cooperative membership is open to all who are able to use its products/ services and willing to accept the responsibility of membership.

Cooperatives are controlled by their members who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions.

Members contribute equally to the capital of the cooperative. This benefits members in proportion to the business they conduct with the cooperative.

Each cooperative is managed by an independent board elected from its membership, and decisions are made that democratically benefit its members.

Cooperatives provide education and training for members, managers, and employees, as well as information to the general public about the benefits of cooperatives and the products and services they provide.

Cooperatives serve their members by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.

While focusing on member needs, cooperatives work for the sustainable development of communities through policies and programs accepted by the members.


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DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

T

ucked away in America’s heartland—over hills, through winding roads

and past Amish buggies—lies the homestead of the 2019 Indiana Dairy Farmers of the Year: John and Cynthia Adam. Although the Adam family is surrounded by a slower pace of life in Goshen, Indiana, their first-generation farm is bustling, integrating technological innovation with agricultural education. The farm’s uniqueness paired with the couple’s community involvement most recently awarded them the title Indiana dairy farmers dream of: Indiana Dairy Farmer of the Year. The success came as a surprise to John and his family, but served as a form of recognition of the hard work they have put in. The award is the result of their efforts to share their dairy story with their community and implement technology as a solution to the issues they face on their farm. “It was a shock. It was a surprise. It was quite an honor,” John said, reflecting on the title awarded at the Indiana Dairy Producers Forum earlier this year by Indiana Dairy Producers. “I don’t feel that we’re any different than anyone else out there, but I do appreciate receiving the award. It makes all of the hard work and everything else you do pay off when you get an award like that.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

As the first generation on Knollbrook Farm, John and Cynthia have grown their operation from 30 Holstein cows to 240 mostly Jersey cattle in a 30-year time span. Today, along with dairying, they also raise corn, soybeans and hay on 450 acres of land. Throughout the years, while John and Cynthia continued to establish their land base and increase their herd size, they were also raising their four kids in one of the best ways possible. “Dairy farming allows us to have family time and have the opportunity to teach our kids work ethics and, of course, Christian principles,” John said. “Although we are busy and we don’t get to everything that we like, when the kids are here and they want to see you, they just come out to help you.”

KNOLLBROOK FARM’S UNIQUE GEOGRAPHICAL PLACEMENT ALONG A CREEK REQUIRES THEM TO USE A BEDDED PACK FOR THEIR COWS INSTEAD OF USING LIQUID MANURE STORAGE. THIS BEDDING SYSTEM, COUPLED WITH THE ADDITION OF ROBOTIC MILKERS, PROVIDES IMPRESSIVE COW COMFORT.

To spend more time off the farm as a family and as a solution to a shortage of labor, John and Cynthia chose to install two robots on their farm over five years ago. The robots were a welcomed addition, allowing for more family time and improved cow care – a notion the Adam family doesn’t take lightly. With John and Cynthia’s emphasis on cow comfort, the robots take center stage in their milk house, where they are shadowed by an antique Pioneer Dairy Feeds sign reading, “In this barn, every cow is a lady… treat her with kindness.” Originally given to John by his brother, the sign hangs there with a purpose, because according to the Adams, “it hits home pretty good with what happens here.”

“Dairy farming allows us to have family time and have the opportunity to teach our kids work ethics and, of course, Christian principles.”

With John and Cynthia’s emphasis on cow comfort, the robots take center stage in their milk house, where they are shadowed by an antique Pioneer Dairy Feeds sign reading, “In this barn, every cow is a lady… treat her with kindness.”

An Educational Mission Just like every other dairy farmer passionate about their cows, John and Cynthia love the dairy products that they work hard to produce. However, Cynthia’s seven years of higher education gives her the extra qualifications to support milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy product promotion even more as a registered dietician. With Cynthia’s professional position off the farm and as a National Dairy Board member, she is fortunate to work every day promoting the good that dairy products can provide in a diet. She also invites the interns at her work’s facility to visit Knollbrook Farm where she provides hands-on education about the nutrition of dairy products. “I really like to broaden the interns’ horizons through handson education about the reality of livestock management,

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“We want to educate people about the farm, our

perception of a lot of farms are. It’s actually what a real dairy farm is. It’s your family, you’re all working together and you have your cows you’re taking care of.”

love of animals, how we take care of the cows and how we’ve grown our family on this farm.”

milk production and farm field production because most individuals, even in dietetics, don’t have any experience with how food gets made,” Cynthia said. “I’m trying to get the next generation of up and coming dieticians to have an accurate representation of agriculture.” Educating future dieticians isn’t where the Adam family stops though. Their farm welcomes six thousand visitors every fall to get lost in a corn maze, pick a pumpkin and most importantly, learn about the dairy industry through touring their farm and asking questions. During the weekdays in the fall, two to three school groups or classes visit their farm every day and enjoy hands-on educational programming delivered by Cynthia and her family. It’s an educational wonderland for teachers seeking sciencerelated curriculum in a field trip setting. “Visitors experience five different education stations,” Cynthia explained. “They have an opportunity to come in the barn and learn about milking cows, pet calves and learn about cattle in an animal petting area, participate in hands-on education about pumpkins and basic agronomy, and then they go through the hayride and spend time in the corn maze.” Even in the corn maze though, visitors have the chance to engage in educational programming around the topics of bible, history or agricultural trivia. Instead of getting lost in the maze, the goal is to find all the signposts with questions scattered throughout and be able to have answers to all of the questions found. This unique variety of education provided on the farm attracts school groups, youth groups, scouting groups and families, keeping the Adam family busy with a constant flow of eager visitors on the farm during the fall months. While it’s a lot of work for each of them, it’s all for the noble cause of promoting the dairy industry they love. “We want to educate people about the farm, our love of animals, how we take care of the cows and how we’ve grown our family on this farm,” John said. “It’s not what the perception of a lot of farms are. It’s actually what a real dairy farm is. It’s your family, you’re all working together and you have your cows you’re taking care of.”

This This season season and and beyond. beyond.

Each season brings new challenges and GreenStone is committed to supporting agriculture through them all, partnering Each season brings new challenges and with producers and supporting their GreenStone is committed to supporting evolving needs today, tomorrow and agriculture through them all, partnering beyond. To discuss custom solutions for with producers and supporting their your business, connect with your local evolving needs today, tomorrow and GreenStone office today. beyond. To discuss custom solutions for your business, connect with your local 800-444-FARM GreenStone office today.

800-444-FARM

www.greenstonefcs.com www.greenstonefcs.com GreenStone FCS is an equal opportunity provider and employer. GreenStone FCS is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Slices of Summertime Summer is a busy time of year on the farm and in the community, and it’s no different at the American Dairy Association Indiana (ADAI)! We were excited for several months of non-stop activities connecting people with dairy farmers and foods. Check out these “Slices of Summertime” that brought out thousands of people around the state! Following the June Dairy Month Kickoff at Union Go Dairy, farm tours were held at both ends of the state. In their inaugural farm open house, the Beekman family in Huntington welcomed the community with farm tours, flapjacks and face painting. The Lindauer family in Ferdinand opened their barn doors for the fourth annual farm tour, leading visitors through every part of the farm. These farm tours drew hundreds of curious consumers at each location and strengthened their understanding of dairy farming. We continued the celebration at Monumental Marketplace, a food and local product festival in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. Visitors made their own smoothies with our Blender Bike and increased their trust in the nutritional benefits of milk, yogurt and other dairy products by speaking with Registered Dietitians at the event. Lucky for us, National Ice Cream month follows June, so we kept the party going by throwing a big one! Our 30th Annual Ice Cream Social on the Circle saw volunteers and local celebrities serving up giant ice cream sundaes with all the toppings on Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. All donations for the sundaes went to Second Helpings, which takes donated

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DAIRY FARMER KELLY MACKINNON (LEFT) AND OLYMPIC DIVER AMY COZAD-MAGAÑA (RIGHT) CAN’T BELIEVE THEIR EYES AS THEY JUDGE THE ULTIMATE GRILLED CHEESE CONTEST AT THE INDIANA STATE FAIR

perishable and overstocked food to prepare nutritious meals for thousands of hungry children and adults. Dairy farmers are always paying it forward in their communities, so we were proud to “scoop it forward” for a well-deserving organization, the Indianapolis Boys & Girls Club. By sharing the joy of dairy with them, we are helping to foster life-long dairy lovers. ADAI was honored to combine the taste of rural Indiana dairy farms with the positive economic influence ice cream has on Indiana each year. It’s just not summer without the State Fair, and the Dairy Bar in Indiana was as busy as ever! Celebrity servers like Olympic diver Amy Cozad-Magaña and HGTV “Good Bones” star Karen Laine of Two Chicks and a Hammer asked for contributions to the Great

American Milk Drive, which gets the most requested item, milk, into local food banks. Over $3,000 was raised, thanks to the celebrity servers and farmers that gathered the donations. The crowds were wowed by the Ultimate Grilled Cheese Contest, oneton cheese sculpture and delicious dairy foods thanks to our dairy farmers! The Dairy Bar remains a staple of State Fair experiences for many fairgoers, and further connects consumers with dairy as a local, nutrient-rich food with options for everyone! CONNECT WITH US: SEE WHAT ADAI IS DOING NEXT! FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WE SHINE A SPOTLIGHT ON DAIRY THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. HAVE A FARM OR STORY WE SHOULD BE FEATURING? PLEASE CONTACT ALLIE RIETH (RIETH@ WINNERSDRINKMILK.COM) TO SHARE AND SPREAD THE WORD!

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019


UNITED DAIRY INDUSTRY OF MICHIGAN

“You do, I do, We do” “You do, I do, we do” is a message Aaron Scott, Youth Wellness Consultant in Detroit, learned from his father, an Infantry Drill Sergeant, and puts into place as he works with Detroit youth. On behalf of United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM), Scott shares his passion for health and wellness with youth across the city, encouraging them to eat healthy, be physically active and become leaders.

positive environment around eating and allow the students to learn from what he does.

As a child, Scott participated in baseball, basketball, track and field and anything that involved running. As an adult, he is still driven to be physically active through his role as a certified personal trainer and strength coach. He also participates in CrossFit, which is where he met a UDIM team member Melissa Gerharter.

While his initial invitation into each school is usually through the athletes or a coach, he focuses on all students by rotating tables in the lunchroom and eating with everyone. Scott is at the school throughout the day, so he has a presence within the entire school day.

As Gerharter, Executive Director of Youth Wellness at UDIM, talked with Aaron at the UDIM chocolate milk table she was overseeing at a CrossFit event, she picked his brain about working in Detroit, an area of focus for UDIM.

Scott wants the students to see him enjoy the food available to them at school. He shared, “I want them to know it’s perfectly fine to eat school meals and that they don’t have to be embarrassed because the meal is free. I want them to see the high quality food that’s ready for them each day.”

His goal with youth is for them to enjoy eating, to understand how food fuels their bodies for sports and their

schoolwork, and to enjoy the meal and not feel rushed, judged or bullied. When asked what drives him each day as he works with the students, Scott replied “seeing the ah-ha moment in a kid and watching them actually enjoy food.” His best success story is going into a school and seeing a lunchroom filled with students eating, not just on phones or avoiding the food. “Aaron’s knowledge, experience and passion educating and training students is exactly why he is a great fit to guide us to success in Detroit,” said Gerharter. “Aaron grew up in Detroit, was educated in Detroit and Detroit is lucky to have him helping to change the lives of youth.” TO LEARN MORE ABOUT DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAMS VISIT WWW.MILKMEANSMORE.ORG.

“When Detroit succeeds, the state succeeds,” said Gerharter. “We knew we needed a steady cadence working with our students to make an impact.” There are barriers within the schools, some unknown to us, that discourage students from eating and set a tone against school meals. Not only does Scott talk to students and give lessons, he shows them what to eat. He removes those barriers. Often students will mirror what Scott selects from the cafeteria line. Scott visits Detroit middle and high schools each week, with the goal to set a

AARON SCOTT, YOUTH WELLNESS CONSULTANT, DETROIT, MICHIGAN

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FREELINERS AND CLASSIFIEDS

TO SUBMIT ADS, CONTACT MMPA VIA EMAIL AT MESSENGER@MIMILK.COM OR FAX 248-426-3412 OR VISIT MIMILK.COM/FREELINER-CLASSIFIED

freeliners Freeliners Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise—at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication.

FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Special on 2000 gal. Muellers for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112. STRAW & DRY HAY (large & small bales). Feed Oats, Feed Barley and Corn Silage. Delivery Available. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. ALFALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122. HOOF TRIMMING - 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Also doing fly control and cement grooving. Gibson Hoof Care (Tom) 989-239-6843. 800 GALLON MUELLER BULK TANK WITH WASHER and 3 year old compressor, $1,000. 269-793-3306 or karenfifelski2016@gmail.com.

SERVICE AGE HOLSTEIN BULLS. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548. 2010 KUHN KNIGHT 360 CU FT. REEL MIXER $14,000 OBO. Call with questions 989-297-1850 HOULE AP-L 42 LAGOON PUMP, AR steel, only used twice like new, $18,000 or best offer. US Farm Systems slope screen separator and 30 ft. elevator, best offer. 25 Calf tel hutches, $100 your choice or $80 each if you buy all, also some wire cages for hutches, best offer. Don’s Easy Chute hoof trimming chute, needs new boards, $500. AI24 rumination heat detection collars and system. Rohn gates 12-18 ft., good condition, best offer. Double 8 Germania all stainless rapid exit Protime 1 Herringbone parlor without takeoffs. 2012 Deere 326D skid steer, about 4000 hours, 2 speed, open cab hand and foot controls, new pump 2 years ago, $20,000. 2016 Deere 328E skid steer 1400 hours, cab, hand and foot controls, 2 speed, $35,000 810-348-5500

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

classifieds Classifieds Policy Cost for classifieds is $25 for the first 35 words and then $5 for each additional word. Payment due with order. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Milk Messenger.

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3 operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. 800-554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

LEGENDAIRY. No bull.

Co-Products Menu

Soybean meal, canola meal, hominy, oat hulls, wheat midds, citrus pulp, malt sprouts, beet pulp, soybean hulls, cereal feed, cottonseed, distillers, gluten feed, wet feeds and more!

Non-GMO

products available

Contact merchandisers at ZFS, Inc: MI/IN/OH: 866.888.7082 WI: 800-523-6760 www.zfsinc.com/divisions/ingredients


FARM SUPPLY STORE

Disposable Gloves A variety of disposable gloves are now available at the MMPA Farm Supply Store. These gloves, made of latex or nitrile, are not just essential in the milking parlor, they are useful for many other tasks around the farm. Please see the grid below for the stock number, material and size of glove that interests you the most.

PTO and Automatic Start Generators 1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419 www.hamiltondist.com

DESCRIPTION

SIZES

STOCK NUMBER

MATERIAL

MEMBER PRICE

DIAMOND GRIP POWDER FREE

XLG 5019 LG 5018 MED 5017 SM 5016

6 MIL./LATEX

$11.38

NEW 6110 BEST POWDER FREE BIODEGRADABLE

XLG 5084 LG 5083 MED 5082 SM 5081

4 MIL./NITRILE

$8.19

GREEN GLOVES POWDERED

XLG 5001 5 MIL./NITRILE LG 5000 MED 4999 SM 4998

$10.13

COBALT POWDER FREE

XLG 5046 LG 5045 MED 5044 SM 5043 XSM 5042

4 MIL./NITRILE

$9.63

FREE FORM POWDER FREE

XLG 5068 LG 5067 MED 5066 SM 5065

5 MIL,/NITRILE

$14.40

If you have any questions about these or other products, please call 989-317-8370.

Test results that drive business results Improving bottom-line results depends on herd health and productivity. Here at Solo Farms we use IDEXX tests and provide rapid results that keep our customers informed. The result? Timely, confident decisions that drive business forward.

THREE WAYS TO ORDER MMPA MERCHANDISE FROM THE FARM SUPPLY STORE 1 Place your order through your milk hauler 2 Call in your order: Duane Farmer, Supervisor: 989-317-8370 Toll Free: 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi): 800-572-5824 then dial 2 3 Fax in your order: 989-317-8372

Ask for these IDEXX pregnancy and herd health tests: Pregnancy (Milk $3.75/Blood $2.75) Johne’s Disease ELISA (Milk and blood $5.75)

Mention this ad and get 50% off your next order. Exceptional turnaround time and low-cost supplies for our customers. Call 1-989-464-5737 or visit solofarms.net.

CHEMICAL, SANITIZER AND TEAT DIP CONTACTS These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24-Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 Service Message Center: 1-800-392-3392 Service Representatives:

Test with Confidence © 2019 IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved. • 2232108-00 All ®/TM marks are owned by IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. The IDEXX Privacy Policy is available at idexx.com.

» Pat Mitchell - 517-403-0928 7273 N. Rollin Hwy., Addison, MI 49220 » Jason Wolfe - 540-553-5755 1890 Canter Drive, Riner, VA 24149

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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MMPA STAFF

MMPA Field Staff

Novi Headquarters

Manager of Field Services Ben Chapin, Blanchard.................................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line......................................................................248-474-6672 Toll free....................................................................... 800-572-5824

Northwest Area Supervisor Sarah Michalek, Dewitt................................................248-305-0537 Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy..................................................... 248-520-3580 Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI.......................................... 906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington...............................................231-519-2455 Elyse Martin, Charlotte................................................. 810-701-6460 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.............................................. 248-756-2062 Brittni Tucker, Eagle.....................................................248-880-3785

East Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Vassar........................................... 248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing........................................989-488-8159 Ashley Herriman, Herron............................................ 269-245-6632 Laura Gucwa, Bad Axe................................................. 248-826-6294 Emily Peacock, Otisville...............................................248-826-7243

South Area Supervisor Dave Brady, Grass Lake................................................. 517-937-9061 Joe Packard, Manchester.............................................. 248-520-3481 Anna Tucker, Mt. Gilead, OH.........................................248-533-2288 Brandon Ewers, Coldwater............................................231-414-4539

Other Member Services Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers...............................................269-967-7351 Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie..................................................... 248-444-6775 Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Byron Center..................................... 248-880-4234 Raw Milk Compliance Manager Steve Lehman, Ithaca................................................... 989-330-1638

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan.................................................................. 800-572-5824 Toll Free....................................................................... 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)...................................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.)..........................800-391-7560

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line...................................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free........................................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)............................................ 800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax.................................................................................989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson...............................................................989-289-9686

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milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

President and Chief Executive Officer Joe Diglio...............................................................................ext. 202 Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys.......................................................................ext. 240 Hedging and Business Development Aaron Beak............................................................................ext. 256 Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt...................................................................ext. 208 Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell...................................................................ext. 304 Sales James Feeney........................................................................ext. 258 Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula.......................................................................... ext. 219 Quality Sudeep Jain...........................................................................ext. 249 Manufacturing Kaylan Kennel..............................................................248-880-5413 Human Resources Kelly Kerrigan........................................................................ ext. 301 Member Services Dean Letter...................................................................989-289-9251 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt................................................................... ext. 210 Communications Allison Stuby Miller...............................................................ext. 296 Emily Kittendorf....................................................................ext. 234 Controller Shelly Sowers........................................................................ext. 259 Supply Chain Therese Tierney......................................................................ext. 217 Member Relations Jessica Welch........................................................................ext. 303

Manufacturing Plants Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager..........................................269-435-2835

Ovid, Michigan Ron Steinhorst, Plant Manager....................................989-834-2221 Middlebury Cheese Company, Middlebury, Indiana Bela Sandor, Plant Manager......................................... 574-825-9511 If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/field-staff and searching by your producer number.

Board of Directors Officers Kris Wardin, Board Chairman Doug Chapin, Board Vice Chairman Eric Frahm, Board Treasurer Joe Diglio, President and CEO Josep Barenys, Asst. Board Treasurer Todd Hoppe, General Counsel Directors-At-Large Kris Wardin, St. Johns 989-640-9420 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Carlton Evans, Litchfield 517-398-0629 Mark Iciek, Gladwin 989-387-4767 Aaron Gasper, Lowell 616-291-4092 District Directors 1 Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2 Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3 David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512 4 Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5 Doug Chapin Remus 231-349-4059 6 Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7 Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8 Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135


MEMBER MOMENT

Submit your Member Moment to messenger@mimilk.com

Morning’s first sign of light reveals an autumn gleam. The field that was once golden is now covered with winter’s sheen. The tractor’s waiting to ignite to continue harvest’s routine: field after field until midnight when darkness intervenes. WORDS BY: EMILY KITTENDORF PHOTO BY: ASHLEY KENNEDY, BAD AXE, MICHIGAN

milk messenger / SEP-OCT 2019

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P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376

“Our team regularly assesses our product lineup to make sure we carry a wide variety to service our members. Our goal is to provide the tools our farms need to produce top quality milk.”

Contact merch@mimilk.com or 989-317-8370

–DUANE FARMER, FARM SUPPLY STORE SUPERVISOR

Profile for Michigan Milk Producers Association

Milk Messenger: September/October 2019  

Milk Messenger: September/October 2019  

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