Milk Messenger: March/April 2021

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MARCH / APRIL 2021

VOL. 103

/ NO. 5

It Takes a Team BENTHEM BROTHERS DAIRY NAMED 2021 MSU DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

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MMPA HOSTS HYBRID ANNUAL MEETING

NATIONAL DAIRY QUALITY AWARD WINNERS milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

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features

14 MMPA Hosts Annual Meeting Webinar

MMPA recently hosted the 105th Annual State Delegate Meeting on March 25.

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MMPA DAIRY FARMERS SHINE IN NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD PROGRAM

Fifteen MMPA dairy farms were recently awarded National Dairy Quality Awards by the National Mastitis Council.

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BENTHEM BROTHERS DAIRY NAMED 2021 MSU DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

The team at Benthem Brother Dairy relies on each other to continuously maximize efficiencies and find areas of improvement.

milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

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contents

MICHIGAN’S FOOD PROCESSING AND AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE THE COVID-19 VACCINE AS OF MARCH 1.

USDEC PRESIDENT AND CEO TOM VILSACK TO SERVE THE COUNTRY ONCE AGAIN AS U.S. AGRICULTURE SECRETARY.

05 EDITOR’S NOTE 06 MILK MINUTE

24 U.S. ANNUAL MILK PRODUCTION DATA

Sharing Solutions at the MMPA Annual Meeting

08 QUALITY WATCH

How do you keep cows comfortable in the heat?

10 NEWS & VIEWS 12 LEGISLATIVE WATCH 13 MMPA ELECTION RESULTS 17 MSU STUDENTS RECEIVE AWARDS FROM MICHIGAN

26 YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK IN MICHIGAN AND INDIANA

28 FREELINERS & CLASSIFIEDS 29 FARM SUPPLY STORE 30 STAFF 31

MEMBER MOMENT

DAIRY MEMORIAL AND SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

“MMPA dairy farms continue to excel in milk quality and we are proud of their efforts toward continuous improvement.” BEN CHAPIN, MMPA MANAGER OF FIELD SERVICES (PAGE 18)

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VOL. 103

/ NO. 5

Milk Messenger (USPS # 345-320) is published bimonthly by the Michigan Milk Producers Association, 41310 Bridge Street, Novi, MI 48376-8002. Periodicals postage paid at Novi and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. President and Chief Executive Officer Joe Diglio Managing Editor Sheila Burkhardt, Senior Director of Member and Government Relations

Editor’s Note BY EMILY KITTENDORF

As a cooperative, MMPA relies on the contributions from each of its individual members. Annually, I’m reminded of this as we move through the local meetings in December to the district meetings in February, and finally to the Annual Meeting in March. The cyclical nature and the achievements celebrated at each meeting are the roots of MMPA that are also shared in this issue.

Editors Allison Stuby Miller, Communications Manager Emily Kittendorf, Communications Coordinator Advertising Emily Kittendorf, messenger@mimilk.com, 248-474-6672, ext. 234 Publication Designer reZüberant! Inc., Stacy Love rezudesign.com Printing Foresight Group, Stacey Trzeciak staceyt@foresightgroup.net

I had the chance to catch up with Jason and Kyle Benthem of Benthem Brothers

Publication Office MMPA Milk Messenger P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

Dairy to discuss their success as MSU Dairy Farmers of the Year. Their operation

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924

was recently expanded in 2016 and they shared their insights and growth from the

e: messenger@mimilk.com

experience with me. Most impressively, their farm is completely transitioned and

w: mimilk.com

every family member is still involved. That’s a feat!

Established in 1916, MMPA is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

On the Cover

Also Inside More accomplishments are inside. Find members awarded National Dairy Quality

An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D

Awards (page 18), meet OYDC finalists the Adamics (page 16) and learn more about

Subscriptions: mimilk.com/subscribe MMPA members - 50¢ per year Non-members - $5 per year

the Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarship Foundation and the students awarded scholarships (page 17). Turn to page 14 to catch up on Annual Meeting happenings and learn how MMPA is sharing solutions as we progress through 2021. I hope you receive this issue as appreciation for all that you do on your operation for MMPA. While you may not be involved directly in MMPA’s leadership, the

Circulation: 2,600 (ISSN 0026-2315)

efforts you take on your farm every day make a difference. I wish you a happy and safe planting season! milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

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MILK MINUTE

Sharing Solutions at the MMPA Annual Meeting BY DOUG CHAPIN, MMPA BOARD CHAIRMAN

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MPA recently hosted our 105th Annual State Delegate Meeting. In my virtual speech, I reflected on our last annual meeting, one year ago. The last large function held at the Lansing Center, we just were beginning to experience some of the unprecedented challenges and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic. None of us thought then, that a year later we still couldn’t be together. It was during this early time that we saw dairy cases in grocery stores empty. We saw restaurants and schools close, forcing the dairy industry to adjust from providing for food service, to more at-home use. As producers, we know the risk of producing a product as perishable as milk. It doesn’t take much to affect the markets. However, we were seeing massive challenges and markets tumbled.

DOUG CHAPIN

At MMPA, we faced these challenges and continued to serve our members. But the biggest thing MMPA did was market ALL of our members’ milk. So, what are we seeing today? The pandemic challenges remain. However, exports have rebounded so well, that 2020 ended as a record year. And 2021 has certainly started strong in dairy exports. The food service and restaurant industries should continue to improve throughout 2021 as we see the country opening up. We have several vaccines that have been developed and are being distributed. These vaccines should hasten the recovery process as people become more comfortable returning to normal. Two takeaways I have from 2020 are: first, 2020 called us to utilize all of our relationships. We worked with government leaders, customers, stakeholders and partners in the industry. Second, the pandemic highlighted that dairy and dairy farmers are valued and respected by the marketplace and consumers. The pandemic showed our bond with American consumers is one that other food categories are envious of. We truly are essential! We continue to work together on shared solutions for sustainability. Last year, leaders in the dairy industry put forward the Net Zero Initiative for the dairy industry. Simply put, this is a goal to be neutral on carbon emissions and improve water quality and use by 2050. This initiative was done in response to the concerns of both our consumers and customers. Today, with the new administration, it is clear that government wants to play a larger role on the climate agenda. Fortunately, agriculture is unique in the carbon discussion. We can sequester carbon and several other industries are looking to us for answers. Not only do we want to be at the table as these decisions are made, we want to be leaders at that table. We want food production and dairy to offer answers. It’s crucial that we stay involved. Furthermore, the MMPA Board of Directors formed the Farmer Sustainability Advisory Committee, or FSAC. FSAC’s role is to disseminate information from the industry and make recommendations to the board. This committee has met virtually with customers and other stakeholders and made recommendations. This committee puts producers in the discussion, and the board is excited to see how this develops. In closing, I would like to thank our President and CEO Joe Diglio and all of our employees for their work and effort this past year, whether at our plants, in the field or in Novi. It’s important to recognize that the pandemic brought challenges on top of their normal responsibilities. I would also like to thank the Board of Directors. They never missed a step this last year. Their dedication to members is evident and served as their motivation. This next year could be just as challenging as 2020 was, but I believe our relationships will get us to shared solutions. But most of all, the relationships with our members will matter the most. For more information about the 2021 Annual Meeting, see page 14.

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SOLUTIONS FOR DAIRY CATTLE AT ALL STAGES OF LIFE

SELECT BAC Healthier gut, better performance

Maximize immunity for better profits

Increases intestinal surface area

Reduces effects of challenged feedstuffs

Boosts rumen development

Increases performance and reproductive health

Supports gut structure

Boosts milk quality

Contact your local Alltech representative or visit www.alltech.com/dairy to learn more. Matt Neumayer 989-310-6013 | mneumayer@alltech.com

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AlltechNaturally

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QUALITY WATCH

How do you keep cows comfortable in the heat? WE ASKED THE EXPERTS:

Steve Lehman

Aluel Go

MMPA Member Representative

Michigan Farm Energy Program, MSU Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

Over the past 50 years, there have been many changes in methods of keeping cows comfortable. The days of cows acting as a heat source to keep the barn warm have given way to designing facilities for maximizing cow comfort and increasing production. Major improvements have been in eave height, sidewall openings and air movement. Curtains and fans allow for better airflow through buildings, improving conditions that lead to respiratory and mastitis problems. One relatively new method to improve cow comfort in the Great Lakes area has been the use of sprinkler systems, both in feeding areas and in holding pens. Improvements in nozzle design and control technology have come a long way from early methods of water distribution. While the evaporative cooling offered by these systems is an efficient way to cool cows, care must be taken to minimize the amount of water used, especially in the holding pen. Water is an excellent vector for the movement of bacteria, which can be detrimental to udder health and bacteria counts. Keeping cows comfortable through building design and the use of modern technology is more proof of the adage, “if you take care of the cows, the cows will take care of you.”

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During the early years of MMPA’s partnership with the Michigan Farm Energy Program (MFEP) to conduct energy audits, Mike Marvin, retired MMPA field staff supervisor, noticed that some of the audited dairy farms had between a 10 to 15 percent decline in milk production during the summer months. With Mike’s prodding, we looked into MMPA’s monthly total production over five years to see if this summer production dip was a statewide occurrence - it was not. If you observe a significant summer production dip, that means your operation is losing money during a period when it does not have to. Make sure you have adequate and uniform ventilation. Clean and maintain your fans since dust and grime build-up on the blades and motor reduces performance and energy efficiency. Use automated control systems based on humidity and temperature for your ventilation system. After measuring wind speed in several barns and patiently observing cows and flies, five miles per hour wind circulation is the minimum wind circulation speed I recommend. Bottom line the cost of regular maintenance, upgrading or enhancing your ventilation system to reduce summer heat stress and the potential production dip more than pays off in increased production and greater energy efficiency savings.

Darcy Green MMPA Member Last year, our farm installed a sprinkler system in our freestall barn to help our cows keep cool in the summer heat and to increase conception rates during the summer months. At first, we were concerned about adding water to our manure system, but we were able to find a sweet spot where the cows are comfortable without too much extra water. The project replaced our old fans with larger, variable speed, more efficient fans that increased wind speed in the barn. COVID-19 delayed equipment installation so we haven’t seen the full effects of the project yet, but during August and September, feed intake didn’t drop as much in the upgraded barns compared to barns that we haven’t upgraded yet. There is also a noticeable difference when you walk through the updated barns. The cows are more comfortable, eating or laying in the freestalls chewing their cud, and they are no longer bunched up at the end of the barn. The potential is there for this to be a great asset to the farm, but the jury is still out until we have a full year under our belt. We are already planning on it being a worthy investment and have ordered equipment to upgrade a few more free stall barns.


Your cooperative farm supply source, now available online mimilk.com/farm-supply-store

ONLINE PRODUCTS INCLUDE Sanitation Chemicals

Udder Care & Milk Prep

Minerals & Milk Replacers

Hoses & Filters

Inflations & Rubber Parts

Testing Equipment & More

Shop the Farm Supply Store online! •

Browse a wide variety of products available at competitive pricing and just a click away.

Minimum order for direct shipments reduced to $250. Flat-rate shipping of $5 on orders under $250. The MMPA Farm Supply Store sells products only to customers in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin.

The store is a cooperative resource, returning all profits back to member-owners every February along with cash patronage refunds.

1996 Gover Pkwy, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 989-317-8370 » fssonline@mimilk.com www.mimilk.com/farm-supply-store milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

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NEWS & VIEWS

MMPA producers scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings DOUBLE-B DAIRY* GARY & CORY NIELSEN* JEFF & LARRY NIELSEN* FISK FARMS* BYMA FARMS LLC* TJERK OKKEMA STONEY HILL FARM INC KENNETH LESEMAN SUNGLOW DAIRY LLC LAKESIDE DAIRY LLC JERRY D LEHMAN* MAYNARD F MILLER* ANDREW E MAST LAVERN C MILLER LAVERN JR YODER CLAYTON D YODER JOSEPH E MILLER RICHARD R WARDIN* SANBORN & SONS LLC* MICHAEL L FABUS* WADELL DAIRY FARM LLC* HOUSKA FARMS INC* KENNETH & SANDRA WYRICK KEITH & WENDY BOTT WILSON CENTENNIAL FARM LLC

From Donations to Vaccinations, Dairies Lead Throughout Pandemic

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hough the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, some light seems to be appearing at what may be the end of a very long tunnel. Vaccinations are moving ahead; caseloads have fallen dramatically from winter; and even if a better “new normal” isn’t quite here yet, “more normal” seems achievable, perhaps in just a few months. Dairy farms, as always, are doing their part to serve, and to lead. It’s part of the cooperative spirit that defines the sector, one that, for all the talk of consolidation, remains dominated by family farms. Today, 95 percent of U.S. dairy farms are family-owned and operated. Many of them of multigenerational; all are critical contributors to rural economies. Dairy farmers and the cooperatives they own have contributed to those communities throughout the pandemic. In 2020, farmers and dairy companies partnered with local food banks to deliver 469 million pounds of dairy – including milk, cheese and yogurt – to families in need through Feeding America alone. This doesn’t count the thousands of acts that go unrecorded, but not unnoticed, by those affected. Dairy farmers and their co-ops also, by supplying a nutritious product 24/7, 365-days-a-year, have helped keep food supply chains operating while supporting an industry

that, in total, supports roughly three million jobs, one million directly and two million indirectly. As challenges have evolved, so has dairy’s ability to respond. Federal coronavirus legislation includes a dairy donation program that should make dairy-related food assistance even more readily available to those who need it. And dairy cooperatives are lead in new challenges, such as vaccinations. The National Milk Producers Federation has published a “Dairy Farmers Guide to the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout,” with links to every state’s efforts as well as advice on vaccine programs for farmers and farm workers that’s tailored to their needs. These efforts supplement other NMPF-led materials created to navigate the crisis, ensuring that the U.S. dairy sector remains an example of positive, proactive response in domestic and international agriculture. Traveling through the tunnel sometimes means leading the way. Doing its part – and leading – on agriculture’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, from local acts to global impacts, has been dairy’s mission throughout the crisis. It’s consistent with its other areas of leadership – from sustainability to nutrition to support for science-based rigor. And that focus will continue, until the brighter days return. SOURCE: NMPF

FOWLER DAIRY LLC DENNIS & WESLEY WOLFE JAMES R RICHARDSON KURNCZ FARMS INC ORVA R HERSHBERGER STANLEY L YODER LEVI E MILLER DOUGLAS L GEISSINGER JAMES J & SARAH D DELAGRANGE MARLIN HOOVER THADDEAUS CONING ORLA F MILLER PHILIP D BONTRAGER MICHAEL M GRABER STEVEN M MARTIN GERALD M MARTIN DEAN J YODER RUFUS B ZIMMERMAN *100 percent

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MMPA Distributes Cash Patronage Refunds MMPA recently distributed members’ cash patronage refund covering the earnings of MMPA’s operations for the past fiscal year. These payments represent 25 percent of the marketing earnings and 100 percent of the member merchandise (MMPA Farm Supply Store) earnings based on business between October 1, 2019 through September 30, 2020. MMPA paid out nearly $1.4 million in cash patronage refunds. This payment, in combination with the additional $3.9 million allocated to Equity Capital Retains, resulted in a total $5.3 million allocated to members from business conducted in fiscal year 2020. The Farm Supply Store earnings are paid only to those members who purchased supplies (sanitizers, calf milk replacer, cleaners, etc.) from the MMPA Farm Supply Store. This year the cash patronage refund on the Farm Supply Store amounts to approximately 2 percent on all member purchases. Despite the volatility of the past year, MMPA retained strong balance sheets while returning value to members. MMPA members received MMPA’s annual report in February which contained information about MMPA’s financial position, key financial indicators and other financial details regarding fiscal year 2020. In April, the Board of Directors has authorized the return of additional cash in the form of equities from prior allocations.


Advisory Committee DISTRICT 1 Dan Minnis, Dansville...................517-719-5894 Scott Ferry, Litchfield....................517-214-3298 Art Riske, Hanover........................517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH...........419-466-4471 Brian Preston, Quincy...................517-376-1350

DISTRICT 2 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek...........269-660-2229 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN......574-825-2454 Danny Ransler, Gobles...................269-998-3802 Josh Gamble, New Carlisle, IN.......574-360-7828 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN....574-202-5198

DISTRICT 3

Michigan’s Food and Agriculture Workers Encouraged to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine Michigan’s food processing and agricultural workers are encouraged to receive a COVID-19 vaccination appointment as eligibility includes Michiganders working in the food and agriculture sector.

Gary Nelsen, Grant........................231-834-7610 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland...................616-520-5143 Burke Larsen, Scottville................231-425-8988 Jonathon Acker, Sand Lake............616-648-7037 Arlyn Walt, Coopersville................616-837-8247

DISTRICT 4 Matt Noffze, Hillman.....................989-255-2184 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth...........425-533-8106 Ron Lucas, Posen..........................989-379-4694 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard..............906-630-1957 Paul Ponik, Posen..........................989-464-5924

DISTRICT 5

“Throughout the pandemic, Michigan’s food and agriculture workers have been the backbone of our food supply chain and our rural economy,” said Gary McDowell, director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. “I am pleased Michigan food and agricultural workers are now eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine because getting the vaccine is essential for their health and safety, the safety of their communities, and the stability of our food supply chain in Michigan.”

Every Michigander 16 and older will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in April 2021. All American adults are expected to become eligible to receive the vaccine by May 1, 2021. All COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Vaccinations are ongoing, and Michiganders are still encouraged to practice preventative measures including wearing a mask, social distancing, and frequent handwashing. For more information or to register for the vaccine, go to www.michigan.gov/ covidvaccine or call the COVID-19 Hotline at 888-535-6136.

Robert Lee, Marion.......................231-743-6794 John Black, Howard City................231-846-7252 Jack Jeppesen, Stanton.................989-330-1905 Bruce Benthem, McBain................231-920-1615 Mark Bontekoe, Marion.................231-510-0764

DISTRICT 6 David Reed, Owosso......................989-274-8147 Mike Halfman, St. Johns................989-640-1962 Steve Thelen, Fowler.....................989-640-1075 Ken Wieber, Fowler.......................989-292-1187 Renee McCauley, Lowell................616-283-6411

DISTRICT 7 John Bennett, Prescott..................989-345-4264 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning............989-302-2299 Tracy House, Mt. Pleasant.............989-621-6610 Philip Gross, Weidman..................989-289-0670 Jason Elenbaum, Mayville.............989-274-1974

DISTRICT 8 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing...........989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin....................810-706-2955 Mike Noll, Croswell.......................810-404-4071 Jeremy Sharrard, Peck...................810-404-5076 Bryan Schulte, Ruth......................989-551-8200

SOURCE: MDARD, STATE OF MICHIGAN

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

USDEC Commends Senate Confirmation of President and CEO Tom Vilsack as U.S. Agriculture Secretary

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he U.S. Dairy Export Council commends the Senate’s confirmation of USDEC President and CEO Tom Vilsack to serve the country once again as U.S. Agriculture Secretary. “I want to congratulate Secretary Vilsack and thank him for the great work he has done for America’s dairy farmers through his leadership at the U.S. Dairy Export Council,” said Thomas Gallagher, CEO of Dairy Management Inc. (DMI), USDEC’s parent organization. “The Secretary has been a driving force in continuing to create viable global markets for dairy through USDEC, and he will continue to be a strong voice for agriculture in his role at USDA.” Vilsack oversaw USDA for all eight years of the Obama Administration. He took the helm of USDEC in January 2017, and now leaves USDEC to join the Biden Administration’s Cabinet. With Vilsack’s departure, Gallagher announced the promotion of Krysta Harden from USDEC chief operating officer to USDEC president and CEO. Before joining USDEC, Harden was executive vice president of global environmental strategy at DMI, where she helped steer the U.S. dairy industry’s sustainability initiatives. At USDEC, Harden will continue to be active in global organizations, including the World Economic Forum, World Federation of Exchanges, Global Child Nutrition Foundation, and the upcoming U.N. World Food Systems Summit. Vilsack ends his USDEC tenure after a banner year for U.S. dairy exports. U.S. dairy suppliers shipped more than 2 million tons of milk solids overseas

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for the first time. That means more U.S. milk crossed national borders in 2020 in the form of cheese, dairy ingredients and other products than ever before. A trade organization, USDEC paves the way for its member companies’ global growth by advancing trade policy, providing regulatory guidance and expanding global marketing, among other services.

Summary of accomplishments during Secretary Tom Vilsack’s 2017-2021 tenure at USDEC: Established nearly a dozen partnerships in key target markets with organizations including Singapore Polytechnic’s Food Innovation & Resource Centre and China’s Jiangnan University to deepen U.S. engagement in foreign markets, demonstrate U.S. dairy expertise to overseas customers, and raise the profile of the United States as a committed global dairy supplier. Opened the U.S. Center for Dairy Excellence in Singapore, giving the U.S. dairy industry its first shared physical presence in a key growth market outside the United States. Invested in new people in USDEC’s network of overseas offices to cultivate supplier-customer relationships and provide deeper, on-the-ground insights on the unique dairy and nutritional needs of specific regions. Oversaw a series a new programs and promotions, including creating the USA Cheese Guild, the USA Cheese Specialist™ Certification Program and more than 20 social media channels in key markets, to build demand for U.S. cheese by engaging and educating culinary professionals, retailers and consumers on U.S. cheese quality, tastes and applications.

Helped bring dairy-positive trade agreements across the finish line, most prominently the Phase 1 deal with China and the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, a pact containing groundbreaking measures to reform Canada’s tradedistorting pricing system and protect common cheese names in Mexico. Successfully concluded a decade-long effort to convince China to approve permeate as an ingredient for use in human food and beverage products, opening a brand new and potentially major market for U.S. dairy suppliers. Expanded staffing to take a larger, proactive leadership role in international standard-setting bodies such as the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the World Organization for Animal Health to minimize potential barriers to dairy trade and support the adoption of science-based standards. Communicated the United States unparalleled approach to sustainabilit to global markets, emphasizing U.S. dairy’s longstanding commitment to healthy people, a healthy planet and healthy communities at a time when overseas businesses and consumers are increasingly prioritizing the environment, animal health and packaging waste in food-purchase decisions. Increased collaboration with international organizations such as the Pan American Dairy Federation and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture to promote and defend the essential role of dairy in the global food system, support science-based policymaking and highlight the benefits of international trade in economic development. SOURCE: USDEC


MMPA Election Results As a democratically controlled cooperative, MMPA members elect leaders from among their peers, establish annual policy resolutions and are responsible for approving changes to MMPA bylaws. At the District Delegate Meetings and the Annual State Delegate Meeting, members elected representatives to serve on the MMPA board of directors and district officer positions. In addition to voting on resolutions and the at-large position on the MMPA Board of Directors, delegates voted to approve bylaw amendments proposed by the MMPA board of directors. The amendments were primarily designed to provide more flexibility in various meeting and committee requirements.

District 5 Chairman: Mike Rasmussen Vice Chairman: John Black Secretary: Gordon Dick Credentials Committee: Tyler Wilson Resolutions Committee: Bruce Benthem, John

Black, Jack Jeppesen, Tyler Wilson Advisory Committee:

Bruce Benthem, Jack Jeppesen, Mark Bontekoe

District 6 Chairman: Ken Weiber

MMPA Board Member Election Results

MMPA District Officer Election Results

MMPA delegates recently elected five members to serve on the MMPA board of directors. At the 105th Annual State Delegate Meeting on March 25, one director-at-large position was up for election. Delegates relected the following member to serve a three-year term:

MMPA delegates elected officers and committee members during the District Delegate Meetings held virtually in February 2021.

Director-at-Large: Carlton Evans of Litchfield, Michigan

Board members elected to serve threeyear terms during District Meetings in February are:

District 1 Chairman: Brian Preston Vice Chairman: Scott Ferry Secretary: Art Riske Credentials Committee: Dan Williams Resolutions Committee: Clark Emmons, Scott

Ferry, Brian Preston, Art Riske Advisory Committee:

Art Riske, Clark Emmons, Brian Preston

District 1:

District 2

Hank Choate of Cement City, Michigan

Chairman: Danny Ransler

District 4:

Vice Chairman: Jesse Ramer

Corby Werth of Alpena, Michigan

District 7: Eric Frahm of Frankenmuth, Michigan

During the board’s reorganizational meeting, held after the annual state delegate meeting, the following officers were elected:

Board Chairman: Doug Chapin

Board Vice Chairman: Tony Jandernoa

Treasurer:

Secretary: Richard Thomas Credentials Committee: Richard Ultz Resolutions Committee: Josh Gamble, Mike

Martin, Danny Ransler, Richard Thomas Advisory Committee:

Danny Ransler, Josh Gamble, Richard Thomas

District 3 Chairman: Glen Sparks Vice Chairman: Dan Mauer

Resolutions Committee: Jonathan Acker, Darren

Resolutions Committee: Ken Wieber, Renee

McCauley, John Hufnagel, David Reed Advisory Committee:

Steve Thelen, Renee McCauley, Ken Weiber

District 7 Chairman: John Bennett Vice Chairman: James Weber Secretary: Rod Fowler Credentials Committee: John Bennett Resolutions Committee: John Bennett, Chris

Daniels, Jason Elenbaum, Rod Fowler Advisory Committee:

Phil Gross, Jason Elenbaum, Tracy House

District 8 Chairman: Darwin Sneller Vice Chairman: Mike Noll Secretary: Sara Lee Credentials Committee: Jeremy Sharrard Resolutions Committee: Mike Noll, Gary Protzman,

Bryan Schulte, Jeremy Sharrard Advisory Committee:

Mike Noll, Jeremy Sharrard, Bryan Schulte

MMPA Districts MMPA Districts

Coffey, Arden Eadie, Dan Mauer

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MMPA Districts

Advisory Committee:

President and CEO:

District 4 Chairman: Marvin Rubingh Vice Chairman: Matt Noffze

Sheila Burkhardt

Secretary: Kimberly Pirman

Assistant Treasurer:

Credentials Committee: Jonathan Miller

Josep Barenys

Credentials Committee: Leroy Schafer

Credentials Committee: Glen Sparks

Burke Larsen, Jonathan Acker, Arlyn Walt

Secretary:

Secretary: Steve Thelen

Secretary: Burke Larsen

Eric Frahm Joe Diglio

Vice Chairman: Stephanie Schafer

Resolutions Committee: Richard Fettig, Jonathan

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5

7 6

2

8

1

Miller, Matt Noffze, Marvin Rubingh

General Counsel:

Advisory Committee:

Todd Hoppe

Ron Lucas, Dave Folkersman, Paul Ponik

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ANNUAL MEETING

MMPA Hosts 105th Annual State Delegate Meeting WEBINAR

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MPA recently hosted the cooperative’s 105th Annual State Delegate Meeting on March 25. Featuring a hybrid approach, MMPA produced a webinar that was accessed virtually by attendees, including MMPA delegates at eight small gatherings in their districts. The meeting format was modified in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, with a focus on conducting the essential delegate business of the association.

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MMPA Board Vice Chairman Tony Jandernoa called the meeting to order and led a brief moment of silence for friends and family members lost to COVID-19 over the last year.

MMPA Board Chairman Doug Chapin provided perspective of the association’s activities over the past year, insight on what may lie ahead and the sustainability landscape. “I believe our relationships will get us to shared solutions,” Chapin said. “But most of all, the relationships with our members will matter the most.” The meeting also included an address from MMPA President & CEO Joe Diglio, who discussed MMPA’s strategic relationships across the supply chain through uncertainty.

DOUG CHAPIN, MMPA BOARD CHAIRMAN

“I believe our relationships will get us to shared solutions. But most of all, the relationships with our members will matter the most.”

“Reaching out to others that share common concerns and needed solutions becomes a source of hope. The power of collaboration became to influence outcome which ultimately shaped the directions we headed,” Diglio said. “We worked with customers, legislators, trade associations and employees on ideas on how best to work through the challenges in order to develop a strategy to move forward.”


JOE DIGLIO

A special guest speaker, Jim Mulhern, President & CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation, provided market and policy insight from a national perspective. Pointing to the effect of government support and dairy donation programs, Mulhern estimated U.S. Department of Agriculture direct payments to farmers for lost milk incomed totaled up to $2.46 per hundredweight last year while dairy product purchases added another $2.70 per hundredweight on the average all milk price in 2020.

“Mulhern estimated U.S. Department of Agriculture direct payments to farmers for lost milk incomed totaled up to $2.46 per hundredweight last year while dairy product purchases added another $2.70 per hundredweight on the average all milk price in 2020.” “This is what saved our industry. Make no mistake about this,” Mulhern said. “Your senator, Debbie Stabenow, who is now the chairwoman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, was key last year. Your organization’s support in helping our organization work with Senator Stabenow and her staff was instrumental in getting this level of support. It wouldn’t have happened without that level of engagement.”

JIM MULHERN

MMPA Treasurer Eric Frahm noted the value of MMPA plant operations in allowing the cooperative to adapt through rapidly changing markets. “Over the last year, due to the disruption in the milk market created by the pandemic, our cooperative had to manage significant customer demand volatility between our fluid milk business and our manufacturing ingredients,” he said. “As a result, we processed over 100 million more pounds of milk at MMPA’s facilities.” Frahm also reported on the financial results of the cooperative over fiscal year 2020, including $5.3 million in net savings and $21.5 million paid in producer incentive premiums. “These financial results should help all of us conclude our cooperative continues to be financially strong and successful,” he said. The meeting included a special recognition of 35- and 50-year MMPA members (see list at right), Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators and the Top Quality Award Winner Gross Farms Registered Holsteins. Delegate business including the election of Carlton Evans of Litchfield, Michigan, as director-at-large, plus the approval of policy resolutions and bylaw amendments. See page 13 for full election results.

DOUG CHAPIN

35-Year Members Neil A. Weidmayer Saline-Ann Arbor Local District 1 Lori L. Laing Kalamazoo Local District 2 Paul Ponik Hillman Local District 4 Steven M. Thelen Mid-Michigan Local District 6 Edward A. Adamic Deford/Clifford-Mayville Local District 7 Scott Stough Clare-Mt. Pleasant Local District 7

50-Year Members Frederic L. Halbert Barry-Eaton Local District 2 Bernard Baker Kalamazoo Loca District 2 Donald L. Bever Kalamazoo Local District 2 Gordon H. Behrenwald Alma Local, District 5 Kenneth P. Nobis Mid-Michigan Local District 6

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15


OYDC FINALISTS

STEVEN AND GRACE

ADAMIC

Hometown: North Branch Local: Deford/Clifford-Mayville District: 7

A power couple from North Branch,

Michigan, Steven and Grace Adamic prioritize efficiency to yield farm improvement. From soil testing to ditch setback to no till land, they incorporate sustainability into their every practice – especially when chasing improved farm profitability. Their goal of affording their two children, Logan (5) and Jacob (2), the chance to continue the legacy of family farming drives them forward every day.

Q&A: Q: You need help finishing harvest. Who do you call? Depends on the day and time. Usually, it’s whoever answers the phone. Q: What’s your ultimate cow? 565 (named Jumpy Squirrel after the squirrel on Curious George) is my favorite cow. Steven tolerates her for me and the fact she gives so much milk. Q: What’s your dream farm? One that comes with a vacation without the wheels falling off the proverbial bus either while you’re gone or as soon as you come back. Q: Why should fellow young cooperators run for OYDC? It helps increase your involvement knowledge of the co-op. Q: Describe your farm management style in three words. We’ll get there. Q: Why do you milk cows? I ask myself that every morning. It’s something we both have done for all of our lives and cows come with a lot less drama than people! Q: What are you known for on the farm? S: I’m the go-to guy when you need something. G: The boys joke I have all the power since I do the hours. They know I don’t sign their checks, but I tell the person who does what they get. 16

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ON THEIR FARM If you get the chance to head to North Branch, on Steven and Grace’s farm you’ll find 85 Holstein cows being milked in a double 4 autoflow. And while you’re there, ask them about their experiences serving as 2020 OYDC finalists.


MSU Students Receive Awards from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation for 2020-21 The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation has awarded nearly $100,000 in scholarships to 28 Michigan State University (MSU) students pursuing dairy industry-related programs of study for the 2020-21 academic year. The following students were awarded a named Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation scholarship. Named scholarships are established endowments within the MDMSF that each have specific criteria related to the individual the scholarship is named after. The 2020-21 MDMSF named scholarship recipients include:

The following six MSU students were awarded $3,500 scholarships from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation:

Three veterinary students were awarded the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Scholarships worth $2,000:

• Katie Butler, a senior in Animal Science and Microbiology

• Emmy Schuurmans, a 2nd year student

• Kelsee Boecher, a senior in Animal Science

• Katie Osborne, a 4th year student

• Glenn & Anne Lake Scholarship, $7,500: Lynn Olthof, a senior in Agribusiness Management

• Kelsey Pasch, a junior in Animal Science

• Russel Erickson Scholarship, $5,000: Hanna Dutcher, a senior in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Education • Donald and Valera Murray Scholarship, $4,000: Kristen Burkhardt, a senior in Agribusiness Management • John and Barbara Dilland Scholarship, $4,000: Aaron Fahrner, a senior in Agribusiness Management • John and Barbara Dilland Scholarship, $4,000: Darren Kulicamp, a senior in Agribusiness Management • Archie Studer Scholarship, $4,000: Joseph Marsh, a senior in Animal Science

• Caitlin Henne, a senior in Agribusiness Management

• Rajrsri Raghunath, a junior in Food Science and Human Nutrition • Rebecca Herzog, a senior in Animal Science Five students pursuing a two-year certificate in the MSU Institute of Agricultural Technology (IAT) dairy management program each earned $2,000 scholarships from the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation: • Rachael Bosse • Mikayla Bowen • Abby VanDyk

• Nick Bellows Scholarship, $4,000: Kelsie Letts, a senior in Animal Science

• Katie Wilson

• George and Shirley Hazle Scholarship, $4,000: Miriah Dershem, a senior in Agribusiness Management

One first-year student was awarded the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Freshman Scholarship worth $1,500:

• Red and Edna Cotter Scholarship, $4,000: Monika Dziuba, a 2nd year student in Veterinary Medicine • Harold and Lillian Gremel Scholarship, $4,000: Kyle Longcore, a 3rd year student in Veterinary Medicine • Velmar Green Scholarship, $4,000: Kassidy Thelen, a 2nd year student in Ag Tech Dairy Management • Gary and Carolyn Trimner Scholarship, $4,000: Jared Sanderson, a 2nd year student in Veterinary Medicine

• Devin Haywood

• Rebecca Havelka, Animal Science

• Ellen Launstein, a 3rd year student

Two veterinary students were awarded the Jack and Betty Barnes International Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships worth $1,000, to pursue educational workshops enriching their preparation for veterinary careers: • Jared Sanderson, a 2nd year student • Orlando Ochoa, a 2nd year student Thanks to the generous support of donors, the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation oversees the largest scholarship program in the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and one of the largest at MSU. The MDMSF was established in 1957 through contributions made in honor of individuals who have served the dairy industry. Income from the endowment has generated scholarships for deserving students who want to pursue careers associated with the dairy industry.

FOR INFORMATION ON MAKING CONTRIBUTIONS TO HONOR MEMBERS OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY OR TO SUPPORT STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS, PLEASE CONTACT THE MSU COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES EXTERNAL RELATIONS AT 517-355-0284. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MICHIGAN DAIRY MEMORIAL AND SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION, CONTACT DR. MIRIAM WEBER NIELSEN IN THE MSU DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE AT 517-449-7941.

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DAIRY QUALITY AWARDS

THE TEAM AT WILSON CENTENNIAL FARM. (COURTESY OF CARLA WARDIN AND HOARD’S DAIRYMAN)

MMPA DAIRY FARMERS SHINE IN NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD PROGRAM

F

ifteen MMPA dairy farms were recently awarded National

Dairy Quality Awards by the National Mastitis Council (NMC). Recognized during the virtual NMC 60th Annual Meeting,

these MMPA members were among 46 nationally recognized farms in the annual award program. 18

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One MMPA farm earned the highest honor, which was granted to only six dairy farms in the U.S. The platinum award winner was Wilson Centennial Farm in Carson City, Michigan. MMPA farms won seven gold awards, eight silver awards, plus one honorable mention. “MMPA dairy farms continue to excel in milk quality and we are proud of their efforts toward continuous improvement. This year’s representation in the National Dairy Quality Awards, along with reaching record average quality test results is yet another a testament to maintaining excellence,” Ben Chapin, manager of field services said. MMPA offers a portfolio of member services to help members produce the highest quality milk possible, with field representatives working closely with

each member to achieve quality goals. MMPA also offers a quality premium incentive for its members producing higher quality milk. Overall, MMPA members’ milk quality continued to improve through the year, with record low somatic cell counts (SCC), a key milk quality indicator. MMPA offers its own quality award program and this year presented awards to 368 member farms for the production of outstanding quality milk over the last fiscal year. MMPA’s large representation in the NMC National Dairy Quality Award Program further underscores the hard work of the cooperative’s farms while competing against other well-performing farmers across the country. NDQA judges considered many criteria when reviewing finalists’ applications. In addition to milk quality indicators,


judges looked at specific details about each operation, including milking routine, cow comfort, udder health monitoring programs, treatment and prevention programs, strategies for overall herd health and welfare, and adherence to drug use and record keeping regulations. This year’s NDQA sponsors included Boehringer Ingelheim, GEA, Ecolab, IBA Inc., Conewango, Cargill, Hoard’s Dairyman and NMC. NMC is an international professional organization, based in Minnesota, devoted to reducing mastitis and enhancing milk quality.

Million returned to members. Patronage is the result

Million returned Million to members. returned to members. of our members’ shared success and a reflection of the great things

PLATINUM • Wilson Centennial Farm LLC, Carson City, MI

GOLD • Beattie Farms (Don Beattie), Holton, MI • Crandall Dairy Farms LLC (Brad, Mark and Larry Crandall), Battle Creek, MI

• Evergreen Dairy Farm LLC (Kris and Carla Wardin), Saint Johns, MI

• Raterink Dairy Farm (Dennis, Brenda and Mike Raterink), Zeeland, MI

• Larsen Farms (Burke and Lisa Larsen), Scottville, MI

• Van Polen Farms (Ken, Duane, Laurie, Mike and Beth VanPolen), Marion, MI

SILVER • Bon Dale Farm (Dale A. Brinks), McBain, MI • Bosscher Dairy (Michael Bosscher), McBain, MI • De Grins Oer Dairy (Tjerk and Ramona Okkema), Blanchard, MI

accomplished together.

This year’s record breaking $105 million is going back

to our members March, Patronage is the in result because #PartnershipPays. of our members’ shared success andisathe reflection Patronage result 800-444-FARM of the great things of our members’ shared

accomplished together. success and a reflection This year’s of the greatrecord thingsbreaking $105 million istogether. going back accomplished to our members March, This year’s recordinbreaking because #PartnershipPays. $105 million is going back to our members in March, 800-444-FARM because #PartnershipPays.

800-444-FARM

• Clemens Dairy Farm Inc. (Eric and Shelly Clemens), West Branch, MI

• Lambarth Farms LLC (David and Kat Mageean), Ann Arbor, MI

• Koppenol Dairy Farms, Inc. (Alan and Deborah Koppenol, and Ken Raterink), Coopersville, MI

• Rubingh’s Dairyland LLC (Marvin Rubingh), Ellsworth, MI

HONORABLE MENTION

www.greenstonefcs.com

• Tacoma Dairy Inc (David and Rick Tacoma), Falmouth, MI

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DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

20

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It Takes a Team BENTHEM BROTHERS DAIRY NAMED 2021 MSU DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR. BY EMILY KITTENDORF

W

orking with family on the farm allows for everyone to use their strengths to better the business. For Benthem Brothers Dairy,

the 2021 MSU Dairy Farmers of the Year, they rely on each other to continuously maximize efficiencies and find areas of improvement. “There’s five of us on the farm. We all do something different. We all manage something different. There isn’t one guy running the whole show. It’s five guys,” Kyle Benthem said. “This allows you to see what goes on in every aspect of the farm every day.” Originally started in 1940, the Benthem homestead in McBain, Michigan, became Benthem Brothers Dairy in 1981 when brothers, Doug and Bruce Benthem took over the family business with 30 cows and a stanchion barn. Since then, Doug’s son, Jason, and Bruce’s sons, Ryan and Kyle, became involved in the business. As part-owners, each of the Benthems manage a different area of the farm, while also contributing to the grunt work. “Every one of us have day to day chores,” Kyle said. “Whether it’s small or big, we show up to the farm every day. We try to take work off of our employees.” The active participation in what happens on the farm makes the Benthems strategic planners. During quarterly meetings with the entire family, they discuss the farm’s cost of production and plans for the future, including succession planning.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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DAIRY FARMERS OF THE YEAR

TO PREVENT AROUND THE CLOCK MILKING WITH THE DESIRE TO CONTINUE GROWING, THE BENTHEMS INSTALLED A WAIKATO MILKING SYSTEMS 60-STALL ROTARY PARLOR IN 2016.

Embracing the Future “We’ve been meeting with a transition person for at least 10 years,” Jason said. “That’s been a real good thing because it gets everybody at the table.” Kyle added, “It’s important to start talking about that stuff really early, because otherwise it takes a long time for people to wrap their head around it.” The Benthems’ progressive approach to transitioning the farm to the next generation comes from Doug and Bruce, the farm patriarchs. “They want to see the farm carry on. That’s their number one goal,” Kyle said. “Doug and Bruce have been really openminded, and we’ve been thankful for that,” Kyle said. “They could have done whatever they wanted, it is their farm after all, and they were gracious enough to come to good terms and make it so it’s not a burden on us, and yet, they get paid for what they worked for their whole life.”

22

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Having a transition plan early on is part of what has led to the farm’s success today. They were able to take steps during the transition to ensure that everyone who wanted to be a part of the farm would be able to make a living there. Those changes included an expansion and installation of a 60-stall rotary parlor in 2016 that allowed their herd to grow to the 3,000 cows it is today.

Expanding for the Future “The rotary parlor has been working really well,” Jason said. “When the cows get on the rotary, they go through a detect system that forestrips every quarter, tests for abnormalities in the milk and stimulates the cow so everything’s the same every time. It’s hard to teach everybody to be the same all the time and with this, it’s automatic so we get great stimulation and milk letdown.”

“The rotary parlor has been working really well... It’s hard to teach everybody to be the same all the time and with this, it’s automatic so we get great stimulation and milk letdown.” They also credit the rotary parlor, along with their detect system, for being the reason that their somatic cell count is down, their milk production is up and there is less employee turnover. For the family, that’s all accessory compared to the changes that they’ve seen in their own lives.


“It seems like when we were smaller, it was so much harder to get away from the farm,” Jason said. “You were there every weekend and late at night and got up early the next morning. Now, we’re able to get away for some vacation with our family and have a few weekends off. It’s really nice.” While it may be nice now, Jason also is quick to point out that expansion comes with growing pains and the first couple of years weren’t easy. Despite the challenges, they are now to the point where everything is going well and their plans for the future revolve around making their farm sustainable.

A Sustainable Future “Greenhouse gasses is a huge thing. Sustainability is the way of the future. That’s the way the world’s going,” Kyle said. “Everyone is hounding dairy that our cows create the most gas. Being carbon neutral is the next thing in seven to ten years on these large dairies, I believe.”

Ultimately though, their future plans are always up in the air because “the opportunity generally opens itself, so we have no idea what’s next,” Kyle said. While that may be true, the Benthems take steps to ensure those opportunities become available by being involved in their community.

While they’re not certain what that looks like yet for their farm, they’ve recently started draglining their manure to improve efficiencies and get one step closer to the future they envision. The draglining process, which involves the manure being pumped to a field and put in a hose that’s drug behind a tractor, has reduced their manure hauling costs.

“If there’s a need in the community, we try to help and be involved in it,” Kyle said. “Opportunities that come about are generally due to being good neighborly people and people that own ground and want to sell ground, want to see it done well and I think that’s helped us out quite a bit.”

“We’re always looking for efficiencies,” Kyle said. This year, their plans include installing more irrigation to mitigate the risk of dry growing seasons while taking advantage of the high corn prices.

“Greenhouse gasses is a huge thing. Sustainability is the way of the future. That’s the way the world’s going.”

Doing things right is how you become successful. Despite the ups and downs with owning a business with family, the Benthem family make it look easy and their success is a consequence of five guys relying on each other to continue the legacy of their farm and their family. “We truly love what we do. We might get frustrated, but it’s fun advancing and making our farm cutting edge,” Kyle said. “I’m most proud that we’re able to provide a good way of life not just for ourselves, but for our employees, and we’re all proud of the entire dairy itself.”

ABOVE: BENTHEM BROTHERS DAIRY RECEIVED NUMEROUS MMPA QUALITY AWARDS AND WAS AWARDED SILVER NATIONAL MASTITIS COUNCIL NATIONAL DAIRY QUALITY AWARDS IN 2019 AND 2020. TOP: DURING THE RENOVATION PERIOD OF ADDING THE ROTARY PARLOR, THE BENTHEMS INSTALLED 13 DIFFERENT TYPES OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EQUIPMENT, INCLUDING LOW-ENERGY LIVESTOCK WATERERS, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR LED LIGHTING RETROFITS AND NEW CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR LED LIGHTING.

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ANNUAL MILK PRODUCTION

2020 U.S. Milk Production 223 BILLION POUNDS OF MILK (+2.2% OVER 2019)

24

RANK

STATE

TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION (MILLION POUNDS)

PRODUCTION CHANGE OVER 2019

NUMBER OF MILK COWS (THOUSAND HEAD)

PRODUCTION PER COW (POUNDS)

1

CALIFORNIA

41,282

1.7%

1,721

23,987

2

WISCONSIN

30,730

0.5%

1,259

24,408

9.4 MILLION

3

IDAHO

16,241

3.9%

645

25,180

MILK COWS

4

NEW YORK

15,337

1.4%

626

24,500

5

TEXAS

14,831

7.1%

595

24,926

6

MICHIGAN

11,683

2.6%

430

27,170

23,777

7

PENNSYLVANIA

10,276

1.7%

482

21,320

AVERAGE PRODUCTION PER COW

8

MINNESOTA

10,149

2.3%

447

22,705

9

NEW MEXICO

8,169

-0.2%

330

24,755

10

WASHINGTON

6,817

0.5%

280

24,346

11

OHIO

5,618

3.6%

254

22,118

12

IOWA

5,374

1.6%

218

24,651

13

COLORADO

5,150

7.1%

197

26,142

14

ARIZONA

4,889

2.5%

199

24,568

15

INDIANA

4,330

6.2%

183

23,661

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+0.5% PRODUCTION CHANGE OVER 2019

+2.6% PRODUCTION CHANGE OVER 2019

+3.6% +6.2%

PRODUCTION CHANGE OVER 2019

PRODUCTION CHANGE OVER 2019

States in the MMPA milkshed MICHIGAN

OHIO

INDIANA

WISCONSIN

#6

#11

#15

#2

IN TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION

IN TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION

IN TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION

IN TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION

#1

#21

#16

#12

IN PRODUCTION PER COW

IN PRODUCTION PER COW

IN PRODUCTION PER COW

IN PRODUCTION PER COW

WITH THE HIGHEST PRODUCTION PER COW, MICHIGAN PRODUCES MORE MILK WITH LESS COWS THAN BOTH PENNSYLVANIA AND MINNESOTA! milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Dairy Checkoff Continues Focus on Nutrition Education CRISIS CONTENT CORNER

NATIONAL DAIRY CHECKOFF UPDATES

In each issue of 2021, we will focus on a different aspect of crisis preparation. For further information, or to set up a planning meeting for your farm, contact your state staff below:

Online milk* sales grew vs. 2019 (*refrigerated)

Michigan: Jolene Griffin - jolene@milkmeansmore.org, 224-567-1894 Indiana: Allie Rieth - rieth@winnersdrinkmilk.com, 317-443-2296

through foodservice Average pizza servings grew more than 10% among checkoff pizza partners

110 million additional pounds fresh milk directed to Feeding America

• Find your farm on Google Maps or use an aerial photo to identify buildings, label them for emergency vehicles. Keep copies around the farm and give a copy to each member of your farm management team and family. • Keep extra supplies of water, non-perishable food, batteries, etc. on-hand. Stock up for weather events and resist the urge to use them on normal work days.

PIZZA HUT LAUNCHES DETROIT-STYLE PIZZA

Potential reach of 40 million educators, parents and students through “Fuel Up to Play 60” Homeroom

helped Pizza Hut launch handcrafted Detroit-Style pizza nationwide. Joshi, vice than a similar rectangular pizza on the chain’s menu. DMI said the Pizza Hut team and franchise owners also are appreciative of Joshi’s commitment to this project, which joins a line of innovative items such as Original Stuffed Crust and Original Pan.

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74% of U.S. milk production adopts Innovation Center’s U.S. Dairy Stewardship Commitment

Dairy Management Inc. (DMI) scientist Nitin Joshi, known widely as “Dr. Cheese,” president of product development, said the new offering has 50% more cheese

12.5 million organic video views through Gen Z-focused barnstorming pilot project with Minecraft star users

• Crisis magnets - provide a quick list of who to call, including farm team, milk hauler, veterinarian, power company, etc; visible to all members of the farm. Call ADAI or UDIM for additional copies. • Animal Ag Alliance - both UDIM And ADAI are members of this organization and have access to activist notifications and crisis planning resources, call us and we can gather that information for you.

9% increase in trust for dairy farmers among consumers after seeing Undeniably Dairy content

RESOURCES:

21,000 stores participate in Subway partnership with Undeniably Dairy to support food insecurity

• Contact local checkoff staff to set up a crisis planning meeting. We will walk you through many crisis situations to create a personalized plan for your farm.

milk messenger

122%

Source: IRI e-market insights

GETTING STARTED:

26

11 new product/promotion launches

No one wants to think about a crisis on the farm, but they can happen when you least expect it. And where do you even start to plan? United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) and American Dairy Association Indiana (ADAI) are your checkoff organizations and equipped to help you plan and handle a crisis. With past experiences, year-round trainings and future insights through national networks, we are here to help you prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

41 National Dairy Council peerreviewed articles published

U.S. Dairy Export Council opens

U.S. Center for Dairy Excellence in Singapore to grow export sales


UNITED DAIRY INDUSTRY OF MICHIGAN

CLASSROOMS “ADOPT A COW” FOR SCHOOL In a new partnership with the Center for Dairy Excellence, ADAI is supporting 1,942 classroom and homeschool connections through a sponsorship to get a cow in the classroom. Classes are sent a photo and profile of a dairy calf in their state as they follow through her daily life, learning about dairy farming and foods. Teachers receive resources for lesson planning and monthly events to incorporate into the program, growing interest and trust in dairy farming from a young age.

DIGITAL CAMPAIGNS - MEETING CONSUMERS ONLINE During Q1 at UDIM we continue to use targeted digital marketing to share dairy messages with consumers who are searching for specific information. With the continued interest in at-home workouts we are delivering plants + dairy and milk nutrition messages digitally, targeting health and wellness-minded adults. They will see ads on related fitness apps and websites and are specifically targeted if they have recently purchased workout equipment. Another digital campaign is aligned with MilkPep’s new “But First, Milk” initiative. They have identified breakfast meal as the biggest opportunity to increase milk consumption. The messaging hits on milk’s nutrition for young children and reminds parents that milk is the perfect beverage for kids to start the day off right. We targeted parents of school-aged children and look for our social media posts to reinforce the message.

HYBRID APPROACH TO UDIM DIETETIC INTERN TRAINING PROGRAMS

YOUTH WELLNESS NUTRITION EDUCATION PROJECT

ENGAGING ADVOCATES AT MSU DAIRY CLUB

UDIM connected with dietetic education programs through a hybrid approach of cooking demonstration training, using online video training to provide the education component and small group COVID-19-compliant hands-on activities.

Partnering with Young Minds Inspired, the nation’s leading provider of free educational outreach programs, both UDIM and ADAI developed five new classroom curriculum pieces for Michigan and Indiana teachers. The Michigan content focused on milk from farm to table for grades 2-4. Indiana focused on grades K-3 with new lesson plans on healthy eating and the importance of breakfast.

In January the UDIM team hosted a virtual communication workshop for the MSU Dairy Club. During the workshop, we shared consumer research about sustainability, reviewed sustainability messages, asked them to “annotate” on the slide to show which messages they felt most comfortable talking through and discussed techniques for difficult conversations. The students practiced the messages in virtual breakout rooms, receiving feedback from the trainers. The workshop ended with the students indicating how they will tell the sustainability story.

We trained 24 dietetic interns from Eastern Michigan University and Beaumont Healthcare programs, highlighting the important and irreplaceable role that dairy plays in a healthy and sustainable diet. The hands-on demo training portion helps to educate interns on topics such as how dairy enhances nutrition in plant forward diets and affordable highquality protein for healthy meals on a budget. Through our Grocery Store Tour training virtual program interns learn tips for healthy shopping in all areas of the grocery store, including facts on dairy’s superior nutrition when compared to alternative milk beverages.

From both teaching kits, students will learn why dairy is an important part of a balanced diet, how milk goes from local farms to their kitchen table, and how dairy farmers use technology, science and sustainable practices to help keep their cows healthy and protect the environment. Each ki adheres to academic standards and includes a teacher’s guide, activities and poster. Find the new curriculum pieces online: MICHIGAN: HTTPS://YMICLASSROOM.COM/ LESSON-PLANS/MILKMEANSMORE/ INDIANA: HTTPS://YMICLASSROOM.COM/ LESSON-PLANS/ADAI/

In the survey they were asked how they would answer when asked about dairy sustainability, here is one example:

“Farmers strive to be sustainable, they recycle water, recycle manure, and care about how much they tend the land whether it would be plowing fields, rotating crops, and how they fertilize fields.” milk messenger / MAR-APR 2021

27


FREELINERS AND CLASSIFIEDS

freeliners

TO SUBMIT ADS, CONTACT MMPA VIA EMAIL AT MESSENGER@MIMILK.COM OR VISIT MIMILK.COM/FREELINER-CLASSIFIED.

Freeliners Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise—at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication.

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

FOR SALE: 550 MILK COW FARM, 150 acres, double-8 expandable to 12, right angle boumatic parlor (new in 2005), 400-cow barn (new in 2012), 4,000-gallon milk tank. House, shop and storage buildings. Call Dawn at 989-329-1913. 2009 NEW HOLLAND H7450 DISCBINE, drawbar swivel hitch, good rolls, one owner, $15,300. Call 989-305-2659.

LELY A3 NEXT ROBOT - $55,000. Chisel Plow 9 shanks $4,000. Milk Compressors 5 horse 2012 models 1,000 each. Call 989-313-7323. SPRINGING DAIRY HEIFERS – DHIA records available. Call 810-724-8825. CUBE COOLER - $375. Call 810-724-8825. WEAVER DOUBLE 8 HERRINGBONE STAINLESS STEEL STALLS - Like new condition, $3,000. Call Dan at 810-241-8999.

DELAVAL 78 VACUUM PUMP - 7 1/2 HP, single phase with oil reclaimer. $300. Call Dan at 810-241-8999 .

WANTED: USED SAND/SAW DUST BEDDING TOOL, skidloader ready. Call 574-202-0288.

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BREEDING BULLS. Call 810-724-8825.

HIGH MOISTURE CORN RUN THROUGH ROLLER MILL. 7000 bu. 20% moisture. $160/ton. Ovid area. Call 989-277-7741.

2019 SV280 CASE SKID STEER with a cab, HVAC, 500 hours, EH controls, high flow package, heavy duty rear door, new tires, four-year inclusive warranty. $42,000 or $607 monthly lease payment. Call 989-493-1663.

WANTED: PATZ 305 MIXER FOR PARTS. Call 231-347-9534.

LEGENDAIRY. No bull.

Co-Products Menu

Soybean meal, canola meal, hominy, oat hulls, wheat midds, citrus pulp, malt sprouts, beet pulp, soybean hulls, cereal feed, cottonseed, distillers, gluten feed, wet feeds and more!

Non-GMO

products available

Contact merchandisers at ZFS, Inc: MI/IN/OH: 866.888.7082 WI: 800-523-6760 www.zfsinc.com/divisions/ingredients

PTO and Automatic Start Generators 1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419 www.hamiltondist.com

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classifieds Classifieds Policy Cost for classifieds is $25 for the first 35 words and then $5 for each additional word. Payment due with order. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Milk Messenger.

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: No water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3 operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. 800-554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/texturing provides high quality traction in new and old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC. FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Special on 2000 gal. Muellers for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112. STRAW & DRY HAY (large & small bales). Feed Oats, Feed Barley and Corn Silage. Delivery Available. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. ALFALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122. HOOF TRIMMING - 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Also doing fly control and cement grooving. Gibson Hoof Care (Tom) 989-239-6843.

Flowpatch is now available in a 10# pail! Flowpatch is an easy to mix, pourable material for quick repairs to level concrete surfaces. It is fiber reinforced, very strong and hardens quickly. It may be used for both interior and exterior applications. Flowpatch is quite easy to prepare, you simply mix three parts Flowpatch powder with one part water. Once a smooth consistency has been produced, you can simply pour the product onto the damaged area. When mixed properly, it will self-level and need minimal troweling. It will set at temperatures as low as 40° Fahrenheit (F) and can be used for repairs up to 4” deep. This is an easy-to-use product but like all floor patch products, does require some surface preparation. The area to be repaired should be clean and free from oil and contaminants. Loose debris should be removed, and the surface wire brushed. While the concrete to be repaired can be damp, it should not be wet. Flowpatch cures rather quickly and can withstand foot traffic after 30 minutes and forklifts after two hours (providing the temperature is 60° to 70° F). For small repairs, Flowpatch is now available in a 10# pail. Each pail will cover about one square foot at 1” depth. STOCK #

DESCRIPTION

MEMBER PRICE

5526

FLOWPATCH 10# $35.46

5522

FLOWPATCH 55# $156.13

THREE WAYS TO ORDER MMPA MERCHANDISE FROM THE FARM SUPPLY STORE 1 Order online at www.mimilk.com/farm-supply-store 2 Call in your order: Main Line: 989-317-8370 Toll Free: 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi): 800-572-5824 then dial 2 3 Fax in your order: 989-317-8372

CHEMICAL, SANITIZER AND TEAT DIP CONTACTS These are SERVICE personnel only. Order your supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB

1500 4X6 CLEAN, FEED-QUALITY, ROUND STRAW BALES stored in a barn. Call 586-530-1619.

24-Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026

SEED CORN - "Minnesota 13" Open Pollinated 85 Day Yellow Field Corn Seed. High Protein, High Yield, High Fat, Fast Drydown. Great Digestibility! 80,000 graded seeds $100.00 JanksSeeds.com 989-284-5052

Service Representatives:

Service Message Center: 1-800-392-3392 » Pat Mitchell – 517-403-0928 - 7273 N. Rollin Hwy., Addison, MI 49220 » Jason Wolfe – 540-553-5755 - 1890 Canter Drive, Riner, VA 24149

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MMPA STAFF

MMPA Field Staff

Novi Headquarters

Dean Letter, Newaygo, Member Services Director.................. 231-679-0337

Main Office Local line..............................................................................248-474-6672 Toll free................................................................................800-572-5824

Steve Lehman, Ithaca, Raw Milk Compliance.............................989-330-1638 Ben Chapin, Remus, Field Services Manager........................... 989-289-0731 Christy Dinsmoore, Vassar, Supervisor....................................248-513-7920 Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI......................................................... 906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington, Animal Care.......................................231-519-2455 Courtney Gordon, Mt. Pleasant...................................................248-756-2062 Laura Gucwa, Bad Axe.................................................................248-826-6294 Ashley Herriman, Herron............................................................269-245-6632 Sarah Michalek, Dewitt, Sustainability Supervisor.................248-305-0537 Deb Gingrich, Leroy, Animal Care/Sustainability......................248-520-3580 Lindsay Green, East Lansing, Animal Care /Sustainability ......989-488-8159 Dave Brady, Grass Lake, Supervisor.........................................517-937-9061 Rachel Brown, Charlotte............................................................. 248-826-7243 Alyssa DeWitt, Elkhart, IN...........................................................269-967-7351 Brandon Ewers, Coldwater, Sustainability.................................231-414-4539 John Lehman, Elsie, Bulk Tank Calibration................................248-444-6775 Joe Packard, Manchester, Animal Care......................................248-520-3481 Brittni Tucker, Eagle.....................................................................248-880-3785

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.)

In Michigan...........................................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free............................................................................... 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)............................................. 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................................800-391-7560

Farm Supply - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer, Mt. Pleasant Main Line..............................................................................989-317-8370 Toll Free................................................................................877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................................... 800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax........................................................................................989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor

Katie Pierson, Mt. Pleasant................................................. 989-289-9686 Farm Supply Sales Representative

Jake Riley, Mt. Pleasant....................................................... 248-912-5070

President and Chief Executive Officer Joe Diglio.......................................................................................ext. 202 Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys...............................................................................ext. 240 Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt...........................................................................ext. 208 Operations Darren Standorf....................................................................248-321-3656 Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell...........................................................................ext. 304 Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula.................................................................................. ext. 219 Quality Sudeep Jain...................................................................................ext. 249 Manufacturing Kaylan Kennel......................................................................248-880-5413 Member Services Emily Keranen...............................................................................ext. 203 Human Resources Kelly Kerrigan................................................................................ ext. 301 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt........................................................................... ext. 210 Communications Allison Stuby Miller.......................................................................ext. 296 Emily Kittendorf............................................................................ext. 234 Corporate Controller Jeannie Strain................................................................................ ext. 311 Supply Chain Therese Tierney..............................................................................ext. 217 Member Relations Jessica Welch................................................................................ext. 303

Manufacturing Plants Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager...................................................269-435-2835

Ovid, Michigan Kaylan Kennel....................................................................... 989-834-2221 Middlebury Cheese Company, Middlebury, Indiana Bela Sandor, Plant Manager...................................................574-825-9511

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/field-staff and searching by your producer number.

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Board of Directors Officers Doug Chapin, Board Chairman Tony Jandernoa Board Vice Chairman Eric Frahm, Treasurer Joe Diglio, President and CEO Sheila Burkhardt, Secretary Josep Barenys, Asst. Board Treasurer Todd Hoppe, General Counsel Directors-At-Large Carlton Evans, Litchfield 517-398-0629 Aaron Gasper, Lowell 616-291-4092 Bruce Lewis, Jonesville 517-869-2877 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Kris Wardin, St. Johns 989-640-9420 District Directors 1 Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2 Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3 Bill Stakenas Freesoil 231-425-6913 4 Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5 Doug Chapin Remus 231-349-4059 6 Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7 Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8 Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135


MEMBER MOMENT

Submit your Member Moment to messenger@mimilk.com

A divine promise lights the sky, arched and bold a rainbow shines. On this day, the pot of gold? A country scene to behold. Calves tucked in safe and dry waiting for the sun to shine. Greening fields against the gray, a perfect country spring day. PHOTO BY: BRYCE FRAHM, REESE, MI WORDS BY: EMILY KITTENDORF

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P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376

PHOTO CREDIT: KATHERINE WEBER, VASSAR, MICHIGAN

Prepare your Best Shots! mimilk.com

The 2021 MMPA Photo Contest will be opening soon. Interested applicants are encouraged to continue taking photos that are reflective of what encompasses our cooperative and capture a wide variety of the dairy farm lifestyle. Photos can include but are not limited to cattle, crops, equipment, dairy events and families working together. The submission deadline will be July 1, 2021.

For more information, visit www.mimilk.com/photo-contest.