Michigan Milk Messenger: April 2017

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 10 | APRIL 2017

RISE — TO THE —

TOP

How consistency elevated Koppenol Dairy Farm to Top Quality Award Winners

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APRIL 2017 FEATURES

On the Cover

14 | RISE TO THE TOP

Alan Koppenol and his daughter Robin Liszewski are part of the award-winning team on Koppenol

Koppenol Dairy Farm in Coopersville, Michigan was named Top Quality Award winner at the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting, thanks to a dedication to consistency in their operation.

18 | WHO YA GONNA CALL?

Dairy Farm, this year’s MMPA Top Quality Award Winner.

If a crisis happens on your farm, will you be prepared? Explore the importance of planning ahead and how a crisis plan will help your farm navigate a crisis that can plague your dairy.

THE MMPA MILK 22 | MOBILIZING MARKETING MACHINE

The dairy farmer members of MMPA own two vital cogs in the co-op’s milk marketing machine: the Ovid and Constantine, Michigan plants. As the region has swelled in milk production, the dairy ingredient plants have enhanced their processing capabilities.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

3


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CONTENTS

6

MMPA MATTERS

“I’m confident this research and outreach will help in boosting the sustainability, efficiency and profitability of the Michigan animal agriculture industry.”

Not Nuts, Not Beans, Not Coconut, Not Hemp

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10 12 17 20

26

QUALITY WATCH FARM 3.0: Phase Two Priorities for Continuous Improvement

– GEORGE SMITH, MSU CANR AND AGBIORESEARCH (PAGE 26)

NEWS & VIEWS

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

DEPARTMENTS

2017 DISTRICT OFFICERS ELECTED OYDC SNAPSHOT 2016 Top 10 OYDC Dan and Sarah Minnis

M-AAA TO MORE THAN DOUBLE RESEARCH, OUTREACH INVESTMENT IN MICHIGAN’S ANIMAL AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY

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NATIONAL MILK PRODUCTION RESULTS RELEASED

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

MMPA CORE VALUES:

»

QUALITY

»

INTEGRITY

Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor..................................................................Allison Stuby Miller Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation.......................................................................................2,814 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

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MERCHANDISE

30

QUALITY PREMIUMS

31 POLICIES 32 FREELINERS 33 CLASSIFIEDS 34

MARKET REPORT

35 STAFF

»

PROGRESS

»

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

LEADERSHIP

»

COMMUNITY

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

Not Nuts, Not Beans, Not Coconut, Not Hemp BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

Do you think that anybody connected with the dairy industry agrees that plant-based beverages should be allowed to include the word “milk” in their label? If so, I have yet to meet that person. Dairy producers, in particular, disapprove of connecting milk with plant-based beverages, such as those derived from soy. Now we are receiving some support for our position from our leaders in Washington. It turns out that soy beverage has been around much longer than I realized. A simple internet search led me to a site that discussed its history, where I learned that the oldest evidence is found on an ancient Chinese mural depicting a scene that shows soy beverage and tofu being made in China during the period A.D. 25-220. The oldest written record appeared in 1500, also in China. The first reference to soy milk in the United States was in 1896 in the American Journal of Pharmacy, according to the same web site.

Soy was our big concern in 2000, but by 2010 when the NMPF again petitioned the FDA, the field of plantbased imitators had expanded dramatically. Now in 2017, with no action from the FDA, misuse of the term “milk” has spread from plant-based “milk” to “cheese” and “yogurt.”

Still, it was in 1979 when soy beverage was first marketed in the United States that the march of the plant-based beverages that today cover the alphabet from almonds to walnuts – and a plethora of others in between – began. Should it bother dairy farmers to see the word milk connected to these plant-based products? Do we really have a beef? I believe that we have a legitimate concern. Notably, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as written in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) defines milk as the “lacteal secretion, practically free from colostrum, obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy cows.” It is clear to me that milk has to come from cows, not nuts or beans or coconut or hemp. Our concern isn’t that plant-based products are an available choice for consumers. Our concern is with permitting the inaccurate identification of these products as being dairy. We are not asking for new or added rule-making; we just want the FDA to enforce the definition of milk it already has on the books. The dairy industry has been trying for many years to get the FDA to enforce its own definition of milk. The first time the National Milk Producers Federation petitioned the FDA to crack down on the misuse of the term “milk” was in 2000. Soy was our big concern in 2000, but by 2010 when the NMPF again petitioned the FDA, the field of plant-based imitators had expanded dramatically. Now in 2017, with no action from the FDA, misuse of the term “milk” has spread from plant-based “milk” to “cheese” and “yogurt.” Past attempts for enforcement have come from the dairy industry, but this time around we have help coming from the U.S. Congress. In December 2016, a bipartisan group of 32 members of Congress signed a letter to the FDA asking the agency to make enforcement of dairy standards a priority. Then in January 2017, Senator Tammy Baldwin from Wisconsin introduced the Dairy Pride Act. The Act requires FDA to enforce the rule that to be labeled milk, the product has to come from a cow. The action in the Senate was followed by a companion bill introduced in the House making the same request. We’ve never had traction like this in Congress to clarify the definition of milk. So I have just one ask: if you feel that action on this issue is good for the dairy industry, get involved. Contact your Representative and ask for support on this issue. Your voice can make a difference.

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2017



QUALITY WATCH

Farm 3.0: Phase Two Priorities for Continuous Improvement BY LYNDSAY EARL, MEMBER REPRESENTATIVE

In continuation of the three-part series on FARM 3.0, this article will focus on the Phase Two priority areas of the Continuous Improvement Plans (CIP) which are part of the newest version of the FARM program. These areas will be identified and discussed during your FARM 3.0 evaluation and if necessary, will require follow up prior to your next regularly scheduled FARM evaluation three years later. Although the FARM program allows up to three years to make these changes, effective January 1, 2017, MMPA members that ship their milk to Leprino Foods plants must already comply to these areas. All farms shipping to Leprino Foods plants must have completed the Leprino Quality Animal Care (LQAC) checklist which coincides with the CIP areas of the FARM program. As milk supplies change, you may be asked to complete items on your CIP more quickly to ship to a Leprino Foods plant. Phase Two Priority Areas are management practices that have been identified as areas requiring immediate attention. These areas include the following: IF YOUR FARM DOES NOT COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS WHEN COMPLETING THE FARM 3.0 EVALUATION, A CIP – CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN – WILL BE TRIGGERED. THE ITEMS DESIGNATED ON THE CIP WILL BE REVIEWED AT YOUR NEXT REGULARLY SCHEDULE FARM EVALUATION THREE YEARS LATER. FORWARD PROGRESS MUST HAVE BEEN MADE TOWARD COMPLETING THE ITEMS DESIGNATED ON THE CIP TO AVOID BEING PLACED ON PROBATIONARY STATUS. PROBATIONARY STATUS WOULD PUT THE FARM AT RISK OF LOSING THEIR FARM ENROLLMENT STATUS AS WELL AS THEIR MARKET WITH MMPA.

» Written Herd Health Plan (HHP) The HHP must be developed in consultation with

your herd veterinarian and include the following protocols: • Newborn and milk-fed dairy calves - Topics relevant to calves include colostrum management, navel dipping, identification and record keeping, vaccination schedule, dehorning, as well as protocols for handling and movement of calves. • Pain management - including protocols for dehorning, extra teat removal, and castration. • Non-ambulatory animal management - including the use of special equipment to move non-ambulatory animals, allowing access to feed, water, shelter and protection from predators, and prompt medical care when warranted. • Euthanasia The written HHP must also include topics in addition to this list, however, only the absence of these items will trigger a CIP when completing the FARM 3.0 evaluation. The additional topics will be discussed during the FARM 3.0 evaluation. 95 percent of the lactating and dry cows must score a 2 or less on the FARM Locomotion scorecard. A cow with a locomotion score of a 2 or less would have a normal posture and gait, or may favor a limb when she is walking. 95 percent or more of lactating and dry cows must score a 2 or less on the FARM Hock and Knee Scorecard. A cow with a hock and knee score of a 2 or less will have hair loss the size of a quarter or smaller and have no swelling present. 99 percent of all age classes of animals score a 2 or more on the FARM Body Condition Score Scorecard. HHP templates are available to assist you in meeting these requirements. We will continue to work with you prior to your next FARM evaluation to offer any assistance needed to correct the items on the CIP. The FARM website can also be a valuable tool for producers looking for more information and resources regarding the documents necessary to comply with FARM 3.0. Visit www. nationaldairyfarm.com and look under the “resource” tab, then “resource library” for more information.

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

M M M


MILKER Training School MILKER Training School MILKER Training School MILKER MILKER Training Training School School

MMPA Milker Training School Milker Training SchoolsTraining aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing MMPA Milker School milk qualityMilker and animalTraining stockmanshipSchool knowledge, tools and training to members and their MMPA employees. Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing milk quality animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members Strategies toand help members this goal MMPA MMPA Milker Milker Training Training School School Milker Training Schools aim toachieve help improve theinclude: marketability of MMPA members’and milktheir by providing employees. • Relay proper milkingstockmanship techniques and milk quality procedures. milk quality and animal knowledge, tools and training to members and their •employees. Present theMilker big-picture science oftomastitis andthe milk quality. Milker Training Schools Training aim Schools to helpaim improve help the improve marketability marketability of MMPA members’ of MMPA milk members’ by providing milk by providing Strategies to help members achieve this goal include: • Give aanimal chance to try-on and practice proper techniques milkmembers qualitymilk andquality and stockmanship animal stockmanship knowledge, knowledge, tools and training toolsmilking and to training members toand members theirand andprocedures. their •Strategies Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. employees. employees. Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. to help members achieve this goal include: •• Present the big-picture science ofand mastitis and milk quality. Relay proper milking techniques milkthis quality procedures. Strategies Strategies to help members to helpachieve members this achieve goal include: goal include: •• Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. Present the science of mastitis milk quality. • Relay proper • big-picture milking proper techniques milking techniques and milk Care quality and and milk procedures. quality procedures. »Relay Quality » animal Animal Consistency » Education »requirements. Affirmation ••Partnership Improve stockmanship and care while supporting National Dairy FARM • Present •thePresent big-picture the big-picture science of mastitis science of and mastitis milk quality. and milkmilking quality. Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper techniques and procedures. • Give members • Giveamembers chanceand toa try-on chance and tocare try-on practice and proper practice milking proper techniques milking techniques andDairy procedures. and procedures. • Improve stockmanship animal while supporting National FARM requirements. •

Improve• stockmanship Improve stockmanship and animaland careanimal while supporting care while supporting National Dairy National FARMDairy requirements. FARM requirements.

Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation March 15 April 20 February 15 Partnership » »Quality Animal Care Consistency »»Education » Affirmation Partnership Partnership Quality» »» Quality Animal »Care Animal Care Consistency » Education Education » Affirmation Affirmation 10:00 a.m.Consistency - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. -»3:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex - Alpena Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s March April 20 February 15Road 440 W. 15 Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 26671 Perrin 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI Sturgis, MI April 13 April 20 April AprilMarch 13 15 April 2020 February 15 DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex Alpena Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m.10:00 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 9:30 a.m. - 2:3010:00 p.m. a.m.10:00 - 3:00a.m. p.m.-10:00 3:00 p.m. - 3:00 a.m. p.m. - 3:00 p.m. p.m. 440 Sanilac Rd. Inn Aplex - Alpena 701 Woodward 26671 Wextford-Missaukee Wextford-Missaukee ISD Aplex --Alpena AprilW. 13ISD February 21Road DeMotts West Park Aplex Alpena Ave. Alvin &Perrin Dorothy Hochstetler’s Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI Ave.registration Sturgis, MI - 3:00 Career Career Center Tech. Center 701 Ave. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 701 Woodward 10:00 p.m. Tech. 440 W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 26671 a.m. Perrin Road A Woodward $10 per person fee will 9901 E. 13th 9901 St. E. 13th St. Alpena, MI Alpena, MI Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter Inn Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI Sturgis, MI be deducted from your milk check to Cadillac, MI 13 April February 21 Career Tech. Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd.Cadillac, MI cover lunch and material costs. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. A $10 per person registration fee will 9901 E. 13th- 3:00 St. p.m. Greenville, MI April 13 February 21 A $10 Inn perAperson registration fee will be deducted from your milk check to cover lunch andcosts. material costs. Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter $10 per person A $10 registration per person fee registration will be deducted fee will from be deducted your milk from check your to milk cover check lunch to and cover material lunch costs. andfrom material Cadillac, MI- 3:00 p.m. be deducted your milk check to 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. A $10 per person registration fee will Career Tech. Center ISD 100 N. Lafayette Rd. cover lunch and material costs. Wextford-Missaukee Winter Inn be deducted from your milk check to 9901 E.Tech. 13th St. Greenville, MI Career Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd. cover lunch and material costs. To register, To contact: register, contact: MarianneCadillac, Gasiewski Marianne »Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com gasiewski@mimilk.com MI To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » »gasiewski@mimilk.com 9901 E. 13th St. Greenville, MI P.O. Box 8002, P.O. Box Novi,8002, MI 48376 Novi, MI 48376 P.O. Box 8002, Novi, Cadillac, MI MI 48376 To register, contact: To register, contact:

Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER P.O. Box 8002, Novi,»MI 48376 Marianne Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376

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NEWS & VIEWS February Milk Prices Announced The USDA announced that the February Class III milk price is $16.88 per hundredweight, up 11 cents from January, and $3.08 above February 2016. The Class IV price, at $15.59, was 60 cents lower than last month’s price, but $2.10 more than February 2016.

Producers Scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Enos Graber Harley Mast John Weaver Dennis Yoder Verlin Miller Henry Mullett Bon-Tek Operations LLC Gramer Farms LLC Corner Oak Farm H & H Dairy LLC Ritter Farms LLC Bebow Dairy Inc. Central Michigan Milk Production LLC Charles/Jeffory Misenhelder Friesen Legacy Farm LLC Drummond Dairy Corp Jared Litwiller* *100 percent

Upcoming Events April 7 Young Cooperator Conference, Frankenmuth April 11 Dairy Communicator Meeting, East Lansing May 2 Advisory Committee Meeting

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

Nobis Receives Honorary Alumnus Award From CANR The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) at Michigan State University (MSU) honored 12 leaders in agriculture and natural resources for leadership at the community, state and/or national levels during the annual Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) Week luncheon at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center March 7. Ken Nobis received an Honorary Alumnus Award. Nobis has shown outstanding dedication and commitment to Michigan State University over the years, serving on MSU Extension, Department of Animal Science and AgBioResearch committees. Nobis is the president of the Michigan Milk Producers Association as well as co-partner at Nobis Farms.

MMPA PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS (CENTER) ACCEPTED THE HONORARY ALUMNUS AWARD FROM COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES DEAN RON HENDRICK (LEFT) AND CANR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT BRIAN DEVINE (RIGHT).

MMPA Returns $1.6 Million in Cash Patronage Refunds to Members MMPA recently paid $1.6 million in cash patronage refunds to its dairy farmer member-owners. This cash allocation represents 100 percent of the farm supply earnings and 25 percent of the milk marketing earnings. All members who marketed milk through MMPA for fiscal year 2016 received a portion of the allocation. MMPA members received other cash payments in April 2016 of $4 million through retirement of half of the cooperative’s 2007 equities. With the current payment of $1.6 million, cash payments in the last 10 months total over $5.6 million. “The nearly $6 million in patronage refunds and equity retirements we’ve recently returned to our member-owners speak to the financial viability of MMPA,” Joe Diglio, MMPA general manager said. “The earnings generated by the cooperative demonstrates our commitment to returning value back to its dairy farmer member-owners.” Cash patronage funds and equity allocations are based on the amount of milk each individual member farm marketed and on the supplies purchased through the cooperative during the year in which the earnings were achieved. Under the current board policy, the non-cash balance of the equity allocation will be revolved back to the members in future years.


MMPA Board Member Election Results During the annual and district meetings, MMPA members elected and reelected board members. At the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting on March 23, the following three-year director-at-large positions were filled: • Kris Wardin of St. Johns • Mark Iciek of Gladwin

Advisory Committee DISTRICT 1

During district meetings in February, three district directors were reelected to three-year terms:

Brad Hart, Clayton..................................517-445-2649

• District 2: Tim Hood of Paw Paw

Bruce Lewis, Jonesville ........................517-869-2877

• District 3: David Pyle of Zeeland • District 6: Tony Jandernoa of Fowler More information about the Annual Meeting will be included in the May issue of the Michigan Milk Messenger.

Josh Lott, Mason.....................................517-740-9981 Art Riske, Hanover..................................517-524-6015 Jeff Horning, Manchester....................734-428-8610

DISTRICT 2 Danny Ransler, Gobles..........................269-628-4218 Dan Ritter, Potterville............................517-645-7318 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......574-825-5198 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.................269-660-2229

DISTRICT 3

Deadline to apply for the 2017 Michigan Youth Livestock Scholarship is June 1

Bill Stakenas, Free Soil...........................231-425-6913 Burke Larsen, Scottville........................231-425-8988 Gary Nelsen, Grant.................................231-834-7610 Tim Butler, Sand Lake............................269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland...........................616-875-8162

Since 2000, the Michigan Youth Livestock Scholarship Fund has awarded more than $458,000 in scholarships and educational awards to outstanding youth who have exhibited at the premier livestock events in the state of Michigan. To be eligible for either the MYLSF general scholarship or the statewide scholarship, the applicant must be a resident of Michigan and a graduating high school senior or a high school graduate continuing their education at an accredited institution in the year in which they are applying. For the general MYLSF scholarship, the applicant must be a youth exhibitor at the Michigan Livestock Expo, the Michigan Dairy Expo or the former Michigan State Fair, for a minimum of three calendar years prior to the year of application. For the statewide scholarship, an applicant must be a youth exhibitor at a local, county, or statewide exhibition for a minimum of three years prior to the year of application.

DISTRICT 4 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard....................906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke..............................989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen....................................989-379-4694 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Alpena...........................989-464-4022

DISTRICT 5 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain.......................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy..................................231-388-0496 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...................989-304-0233 Robert Lee, Marion................................231-743-6794

DISTRICT 6 Aaron Gasper, Lowell............................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler.............................989-682-9064 Kris Wardin, St. Johns............................989-640-9420 David Reed, Owosso..............................989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia..................................989-640-3372

DISTRICT 7 Scott Kleinhardt, Clare..........................989-386-8037 Philip Gross, Weidman..........................989-289-0670

Applications and qualification requirements are available online at www.michigan.gov/mda-mylsf. Applications must be postmarked no later than June 1, 2017. If you have any questions, please contact Jeff Haarer, Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development’s Producer Security Section Manager, at 517-284-5642 or Ernie Birchmeier, Michigan Farm Bureau’s Livestock & Dairy Specialist, at 517-323-7000.

Jason Elenbaum, Mayville...................989-274-1974 John Bennett, Prescott.........................989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin...............................989-426-5655

DISTRICT 8 Mike Noll, Croswell.................................810-404-4071 Mike Bender, Croswell..........................810-404-2140 Nick Leipprandt, Pigeon......................517-897-4155 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin.............................810-706-2955

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

NMPF Recommends Changes to Margin Protection Program to Make It a Viable Safety Net for Farmers The National Milk Producers Federation Board of Directors unanimously approved a series of recommended changes to the dairy Margin Protection Program (MPP) that will restore several key elements first proposed by NMPF during development of the 2014 Farm Bill. These changes to the MPP will ensure an effective safety net for the nation’s dairy farmers – if the recommendations are adopted by Congress. The recommendations range from changing the way dairy feed costs are calculated, to providing farmers greater flexibility in signing up for coverage and using other risk management tools. The four-point plan was developed by NMPF’s Economic Policy Committee, and reflects feedback from dairy producers, economists and members of Congress. It reflects several features originally proposed by NMPF that were subsequently weakened or eliminated as the 2014 farm bill was finalized. “Improving the MPP to make it a more realistic, effective safety net is a key focus for our membership in 2017,” said NMPF Chairman Randy Mooney. “For dairy farmers to have confidence in the MPP, we need Congress to make these corrections as soon as possible.” As the conversation about the 2018 farm bill begins to take shape on Capitol Hill, Mooney said that NMPF is hoping for congressional action to implement its proposed changes at the earliest opportunity. Correcting the current program’s deficiencies “will require legislative changes,” he said. 12

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

The overall concept of a margin insurance program was developed by NMPF in response to the dairy financial crisis of 2009. The MPP allows farmers to insure against low margins – the gap between milk prices and feed costs – with participants paying higher premiums for higher levels of coverage. Congress incorporated the margin insurance program into the 2014 farm bill, but made several significant alterations that reduced the degree of financial protection farmers can obtain from the MPP, especially as another wave of depressed milk prices hit in 2015-2016. NMPF’s proposal includes a series of adjustments that will affect the way both feed prices (including corn, alfalfa and soybean meal) and milk prices are calculated. The most needed improvement is restoring the feed cost formula to the one originally developed by NMPF. During Congress’s deliberations on the 2014 farm bill, it implemented a 10 percent cut to the weightings of all three feedstuff components of the MPP feed

cost formula, based on an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office. The resulting feed formula understates the price to farmers of producing 100 pounds of milk, thereby overstating the real margins farmers are experiencing. In addition to changing the overall feed formula, NMPF also recommends changing the data source for how USDA determines the individual monthly prices of corn, soybean meal and alfalfa hay, as well as how it measures the national average price farmers receive for milk. Another element in need of change involves the accuracy and affordability of MPP premiums. NMPF is asking for an adjustment to premiums paid into the program for coverage above the basic, $4 margin level. This is necessary to incentivize additional participation by farmers. Other recommendations include determining margins monthly, rather than bimonthly, and issuing payments on a more frequent basis when margins drop. NMPF is also suggesting to place the deadline for annual enrollment toward the end of the year prior to the calendar year for which they want coverage. Finally, NMPF recommends that the Livestock Gross Margin (LGM) program be expanded and that producers be allowed to use both the MPP and LGM simultaneously. NMPF will be sharing these recommendations with members of the Senate and House Agriculture committees, and urging them to implement these improvements as soon as possible.

SOURCE: NMPF


80TH ANNUAL

MMPA 4-H

MILK MARKETING TOUR JUNE 27-28

WHAT:

WHY ATTEND?

MMPA/4-H Milk Marketing Tour two days of dairy & milk marketing tours, presentations and activities

WHO:

15 to 18-year-olds (as of Jan. 1, 2017) 4-H/FFA members or other students interested in dairy or milk marketing

WHEN:

June 27-28, 2017

WHERE:

MMPA Office, Novi, Michigan

» Meet other students interested in dairy » Tour a dairy processing plant » Meet leaders in the Michigan dairy industry » Earn the chance to attend the National 4-H Dairy Conference in Madison, Wisconsin

SPACE IS LIMITED TO THE FIRST 30 STUDENTS Contact Jessica Welch at MMPA for more information at 248-474-6672 or jwelch@mimilk.com. Students who have already participated in the Milk Marketing Tour are not eligible to attend.

REGISTRATION FORM - MMPA 4-H MILK MARKETING TOUR PARTICIPANT INFORMATION ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name ________________________________________________________________________________________ Street Address ________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ________________________________________________________________________________________ County Phone Affiliation:

4-H

FFA

Other

Age:______

Gender:

Male

Female

ADULT CHAPERONE INFORMATION ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name

DUE MAY 26 Mail completed form to: Melissa Elischer Michigan State University Anthony Hall 474 S. Shaw Lane Rm 1287H East Lansing, MI 48824

________________________________________________________________________________________ Street Address ________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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Rise to the Top HOW CONSISTENCY ELEVATED KOPPENOL DAIRY FARM TO TOP QUALITY AWARD WINNER BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER

KOPPENOL DAIRY FARM WAS NAMED THE TOP QUALITY AWARD WINNER AT MMPA’S RECENT ANNUAL MEETING. MEMBERS OF THE TEAM INCLUDE (L-R): ROBIN LISZEWSKI, HOLDING 18-MONTH-OLD LOGAN LISZEWSKI, ALAN AND DEBORAH KOPPENOL. IN FRONT IS 3-YEAR-OLD JACK CARLSON AND 4-YEAR-OLD EMMA LISZEWSKI, THREE OF THEIR ALMOST 10 GRANDCHILDREN.

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MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


It’s three o’clock in the morning. The sun has not yet risen, and 500 acres of Coopersville, Michigan cropland waiting to cultivate forages for voracious dairy cattle are concealed by the dark of night. Inside, florescent lights illuminate the milking parlor, the stage set to begin a twice-daily routine …

The sort gate opens and with it, the first group of cows are ushered into the parlor. Their hoofs clatter on the concrete as they line up to be milked, five on each side of the parallel set up. Down below in the milkers pit, Alan Koppenol and his team begin working with each cow. Their booted feet shuffle across blue and white checkered mats. Their gloved hands meticulously clean the udders, prep and strip the teats, and apply the milking machine. Soon enough, milk pulsates through the network of hoses and pipes. For dairy farmers, it’s a familiar scene. Yet this parlor, these farmers and the 195 cows on Koppenol Dairy Farm bring in something exceptional: the highest quality milk in MMPA. At the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting on March 23, Koppenol Dairy Farm was announced the MMPA Top Quality Award winner.

KOPPENOL DAIRY FARM’S

Five Tricks of Attaining High Quality Milk 1

With a somatic cell count (SCC) of 49,750 cells per milliliter, preincubated bacteria count of 1,250 cells per milliliter and raw bacteria count of 1,000 cells per milliliter, the Coopersville farm beat out all 1,167 MMPA members to achieve the highest quality milk in fiscal year 2016. When considering milk quality, lower somatic cell and bacteria counts indicate good animal health and a better-tasting, shelf stable product. MMPA members begin receiving premium payments and are eligible for quality awards for milk averaging less than 250,000 SCC. The competition is stiff. Five hundred and twelve quality awards were earned by MMPA members in 2016, 38 of which were gold awards for members maintaining an SCC average of less than 100,000. Yet Koppenol Dairy Farm, like the cream in their milk, rose to the top. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 16)

PREVENTION FIRST It’s better to prevent mastitis than to have to work harder on treatment.

2 KEEP IT CLEAN Cleanliness can be hard to achieve on a dairy farm, but it’s key to keeping your counts low.

3 IT’S WHO YOU KNOW Work with a network of knowledgeable people you can rely on and go to with questions.

4 STAY MODERN Modern technology has changed how cows are housed and milked to encourage quality milk production.

5 CONSISTENT FEEDING Ensure high quality feed is provided to the cows all year round.

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

15


ROBIN LISZEWSKI AND ALAN KOPPENOL DISCUSS THE DAYS' BUSINESS IN THE MILKING PARLOR AT KOPPENOL DAIRY FARM.

RISE TO THE TOP – CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

The Koppenols’ milk averages 3.82 percent butterfat and 3.22 percent protein, plus production averages of 85 pounds of milk per cow per day. The farm’s quality figures today are the result of a steady decrease in counts, though producing high quality milk is not a new endeavor. Last year, Koppenol Dairy Farm produced the second-highest quality milk in the coop. Five years ago, their SCC was an impressive 70,500. Ten years ago, it was a respectable 106,667. As on most farms producing high quality milk, consistency is key. “We start at the same time every day. And we remember to stick to the details,” says Alan Koppenol, owner of Koppenol Dairy Farm. Koppenol works alongside his wife, Deborah, partner, Ken Raterink, secretary and daughter, Robin Liszewski, and six employees. 16

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

In the milk parlor, that consistency dictates the milking procedure. First, they clean off the udder and teats with a cloth rag and pre-dip with a sanitizing pre-milking solution. Then they dry the teats with a cloth before applying the milking unit which milks the cow until it pops off the teats with automatic take offs. Finally, they post dip with Derma-Sept to condition and protect the teat ends. According to Koppenol, their quality breakthrough is hard to define. “There are a lot of things we’ve done, but the improvements didn’t always show immediately after each step. Some shifts were in changing inflations once a month and switching to using individual towels. It was a lot of little things,” he admitted. Inflations—the soft inner liner of the milking unit—are changed every 30 days by a specialist who comes to

inspect the milking system to ensure it is working properly. The Koppenols monitor SCC when stripping the milk by examining the sample for chunks or abnormal milk. “Years of experience” back their decision making and in knowing how to address any problems. They are diligent in treating dry cows with a 60-day dry period and monitor their fresh cows throughout the calving process and when they return to the herd. In cases of mastitis—they usually see two per month—the farm addresses the problem immediately and cull if there is no improvement. Koppenol took over from his parents in the 1980s. Then, they milked 45 cows in a stanchion barn. The herd has increased since that time to 195 milking cows. Sixteen years ago, they built a freestall barn and then the current parlor a year later.


The stalls in the barn feature a mat of crushed rubber. Every night, they sweep each stall and apply 4 pounds of lime and top with sawdust. While the sawdust increases cow comfort, it also allows environmental bacteria to grow so the lime works to counteract the growth. Lime bedding contributes to lower somatic cell counts. Allowing the cows time to spend relaxing in these stalls is a priority. “We keep our cows comfortable by giving them time to lay and keep the milking time down to the shortest possible,” Koppenol adds. The farm grows hay, corn, soybeans and wheat on 500 acres to feed their cattle. One of the drivers of their highquality milk according to Koppenol is in providing consistent, high quality feed year-round.

MMPA District Officers 2017 ELECTED DURING MMPA DISTRICT MEETINGS HELD IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH 2017.

DISTRICT 1

DISTRICT 5

Chairman: Jim Marvin, Clayton

Chairman: Mike Rasmussen, Edmore

Vice Chairman: Scott Ferry, Litchfield

Vice Chairman: John Black, Howard City

Secretary: Art Riske, Hanover

Secretary: Gordon Dick, McBain

State Credentials Committee: State Credentials Committee: Josh Lott, Mason

Tyler Wilson, Carson City

State Resolutions Committee:

State Resolutions Committee:

Carlton Evans, Litchfield; Bruce Lewis,

Bruce Benthem, McBain; John Black,

Jonesville; Jim Marvin, Clayton; Art Riske,

Howard City; Tom Jeppesen, Stanton;

Hanover

Tyler Wilson, Carson City

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 6

“When we had the cows in a pasture and during the winter, their feed intake was inconsistent. Now, whether its June or January, things are more consistent. This has improved our quality.” Koppenol said.

Chairman: Jerry Koebel, Jr., Three Oaks

Chairman: Kris Wardin, St. Johns

Vice Chairman: Mike Oesch, Middlebury, IN

Vice Chairman: David Reed, Owosso

Secretary: Richard Ultz, Burr Oak

Secretary: Steve Thelen, Fowler

State Credentials Committee:

State Credentials Committee:

Richard Ultz, Burr Oak

Jim Slavik, Ashley

State Resolutions Committee: John Adam,

State Resolutions Committee:

Goshen, IN; Brad Crandall, Battle Creek;

Mike Halfman, St. Johns; Jamie Meyer, Ionia;

However, Koppenol advises fellow farmers the most important way to achieve high quality milk is by stressing prevention. He says it’s harder to treat high counts and mastitis than it is to prevent an issue from starting.

Jerry Koebel Jr., Three Oaks; Mike Oesch,

David Reed, Owosso; Ken Wieber, Fowler

When three o’clock in the afternoon rolls around, the second milking of the day will begin on Koppenol Dairy Farm. Though their diligent routine in the parlor brings forth quality milk, the way they farm and the way they care for the animals all contribute to their achievements. Soon milk will fill up the bulk tank, awaiting the next step in the supply chain, where high quality milk is prized.

Middleburry, IN

DISTRICT 7 DISTRICT 3

Chairman: John Bennett, Prescott

Chairman: Glen Sparks, Fremont

Vice Chairman: Leslie Daenzer, Frankenmuth

Vice Chairman: Bill Stakenas, Freesoil

Secretary: Rod Fowler, Chesaning

Secretary: Sharron Powers, Pentwater

State Credentials Committee:

State Credentials Committee:

John Bennett, Prescott

Sharron Powers, Pentwater

State Resolutions Committee: John Bennett,

State Resolutions Committee:

Prescott; Leslie Daenzer, Frankenmuth, Rod

Russ Acker, Sand Lake; Tim Butler,

Fowler, Chesaning; Keith Wood, Kingston

Sand Lake; Glen Sparks, Fremont, Bruce Riffle, Custer

DISTRICT 4 Chairman: Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth Vice Chairman: Paul Ponik, Posen

DISTRICT 8 Chairman: Darwin Sneller, Sebawaing Vice Chairman: Mike Noll, Croswell Secretary: Mike Bender, Croswell State Credentials Committee:

Secretary: Jeremy Werth, Alpena

Dale Phillips, Marlette

State Credentials Committee:

State Resolutions Committee:

Paul Ponik, Posen

Mike Bender, Croswell; Bill Blumerich,

State Resolutions Committee:

Berlin; Mike Noll, Croswell; Jeremy Sharrard,

Ron Lucas, Posen; Paul Ponik, Posen, Marvin

Peck

Rubingh, Ellsworth; Jeremy Werth, Alpena

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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WhoYa Gonna Call?

“Things can spin out of control really fast.” Gertie van den Goor knew this from experience from a simple post on Facebook. The Goma Dairy owner of Marlette, relayed the story of posting a positive video on her Facebook page and how she was shocked when it was viewed 64,000 times. While this video was positive and well received by viewers, van den Goor explained, “This was scary. It was the first time I realized what it really meant to have social media take over and there is nothing you can do about it.” A positive video has traction but a negative video sprouts wings and flies through social media newsfeeds affecting simple perceptions of an industry resulting in consumer activism that can force changes from farm to fork. “All of us underestimate the power of social media like Facebook,” van den Goor claimed. After that experience, van den Goor knew she wasn’t prepared if a crisis happened on their 3,000-head dairy farm and instead of waiting to react, she decided they would be proactive. She had listened to speakers present about crisis planning but when United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) invited her to their Crisis Drill and Skill Planning Session, she signed up. “I knew I needed to learn more about crisis planning so when UDIM put together a meeting I wanted to participate.”

CRISIS PREPAREDNESS A NECESSITY FOR FARMS BY MELISSA HART

18

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

A detrimental video is just one kind of crisis that can plague a dairy. Jolene Griffin of UDIM lists several more potential unfortunate situations, “A crisis can occur on dairy farms in a number of ways: loss of a team member, contaminated feed, fire, environmental issue such as a drought or a horrendous snow storm.” While one of the first calls a producer needs to make in a crisis is to their MMPA field representative, UDIM has also developed a crisis plan designed specifically for dairy producers to react when any kind of crisis hits.


“As dairy farmers we have plans for everything, milking protocols, how we apply manure on our fields, newborn calf care, etc. A crisis plan includes the information you, your family and your farm team will need to work through and ultimately recover from a crisis” explained Griffin.

“Crisis planning isn’t something we want to think about and while a plan won’t ensure a crisis doesn’t ever happen on your farm, it will help your team work through a crisis if one does occur.” Griffin continued, “It will ensure all team members have the information they need, and know the steps to take.” One of the keys to a successful plan is to engage all team members from the start to ensure they know their roles during a crisis. Meeting with the crisis team to create the initial plan and then meeting regularly will help to include all necessary components into a crisis plan. “If you have a larger staff, not all of them will be involved in the response during a crisis, but they all need to know there is a plan in place and who they should contact if they have questions,” Griffin explained.

UDIM’S CRISIS DRILL ON DEC. 15, 2016 CHALLENGED PARTICIPANTS TO ASSUME ROLES AS EITHER A DAIRY PROCESSOR, MILK MARKETING COOPERATIVE OR DAIRY FARM TO PRACTICE THE REAL-WORLD DECISION MAKING NEEDED FOLLOWING AN ON-FARM CRISIS. (PHOTO CREDIT: UDIM)

Communication with people outside the farm is a key component. Griffin commented, “The entire farm team should also know what the crisis team wants them to say if asked by outside individuals about the crisis. For example, if a media contact stops at the farm, they should know who to direct this person to. And, if they are asked by a family or friend about the situation, they should know what to say so rumors aren’t started.” MMPA members can rely on their co-op staff for assistance in communicating with the media and developing strategies to answer questions.

Some of the key components of a crisis plan include: • A list of crisis team members, their contact information and their specific roles during a crisis. Including someone who is not intricately involved in the dayto-day farming operation may be helpful as they can answer calls, respond to requests, etc., while the farm team tries to continue caring for animals. • A list of resources that can help during the crisis, including your MMPA field representative and UDIM. • A pre-determined location to meet after a crisis. • A draft farm statement that expresses concern or sympathy for the situation and a list of the steps being taken to address the situation and contact information if the media has additional questions.

The crisis drills are designed to bring real-life situations to participants to allow for practice before a real life crisis explodes. “Crisis drills are eye-opening for those who attend. We put participants through a real-life scenario and let them determine what steps will be made to work through the situation, how they will respond to media requests, what they will say on social media and then challenge them with information and requests that continue to flood in.” Griffin continued, “At the end of the drill, we want participants to leave knowing there is a team who can help, resources they can use and new learnings they can incorporate into their operations.” Griffin concluded, “Through UDIM, we have trainings available that we can host for dairy farmers to help them create their crisis plans. We can host these trainings for farmers who are interested in gathering their neighbors to learn more.” FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE UDIM CRISIS SEMINARS, CONTACT JOLENE AT JOLENE@MILKMEANSMORE.ORG. IN THE EVENT OF A FARM CRISIS, CONTACT MMPA.

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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OYDC SNAPSHOT

TOP 10

OYDC 2016 Dan & Sarah Minnis Clona Farms Dansville, Michigan Ingham County Local, District 1

Our kids:

Our mission:

Cassa (6), Raegan (5) and Jordi (2)

The mission on our farm is to pay our bills and have a little left over.

Our farm: Clona Farms is an LLC with us and [Dan’s] parents as partners. The farm began in 1851 and we have been at the current location since the early 1900s. We still use the same barn that my great grandfather would have milked his 10 cows in as part of our parlor complex. I’m the sixth generation to farm here.

Our herd: We are milking 320 cows and have 700 head total. We milk three times a day in a double 8 parallel parlor.

Our land: We farm 800 acres, growing corn, alfalfa, wheat, soybeans and triticale. 20

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

Best part of being a dairy farmer: The best part of being a dairy farmer is working from home allowing for ample family time.

What’s next: Our future goals would include manure storage and a new dry cow/transition barn.


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APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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OVID AND CONSTANTINE:

Mobilizing the MMPA Milk Marketing Machine BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER

I

n 2015, MMPA member milk marketed totaled record amounts never before seen in the cooperative’s history. The unwavering cows across member herds in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin had furnished a 4.2 percent increase in milk production over 2014 to reach 4.6 billion pounds.

Originally structured as “balancing plants” to handle fluid milk not sold to bottlers, the dairy ingredient plants now serve a key position in driving returns for members. The plants process over 43 percent of all milk marketed by MMPA. Ovid alone processed 1.8 billion pounds of the total 4.8 billion marketed in fiscal year 2016.

Then again in 2016, those hard-working bovines gave members an additional 4.3 percent increase on top of the prior year’s record volumes.

“During the year, we made some enhancements to our processing effort within our manufacturing operations. These enhancements allowed us to process more milk at both facilities and were critically important in the peak milk production season,” remarked MMPA General Manager Joe Diglio. “Thinking progressively provides opportunities and assistance in getting more of our member milk to market.”

Yet in 2016, the market for dairy was challenging with reduced premiums and continued pricing pressures. While MMPA management worked tirelessly securing new customers, expanding current outlets and seeking new investment opportunities, an important driver in MMPA success was found in its current assets. The dairy farmer members of MMPA own two vital cogs in the co-op’s milk marketing machine: the Ovid and Constantine, Michigan plants.

22

For the plants, these enhancements have improved communication and increased production in every day operations. In Ovid, Plant Manager Colt Johnson says they strive for continuous improvement across the operation to

increase output. He says they first try to increase output without spending capital to maximize value for members. For powder, Johnson says they are improving Clean in Place (CIP) time by working with the tower operators to reduce the time the tower dryers are down for cleaning. With less down time for cleaning, they can increase powder input. This starts by collaborating with workers to improve their procedures. “We want to make sure our staff have the tools they need to improve,” he explained. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 24)

POUNDS PROCESSED PER DAY

MILK TANKERS RECEIVED EACH DAY

PLANT EMPLOYEES

OVID: 5 MILLION

OVID: 70

OVID: 121

CONSTANTINE: 2 MILLION

CONSTANTINE: 40

CONSTANTINE: 60

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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Other recent initiatives focused on the sixth effect evaporator. Johnson says they lowered the operating temperature for greater control and improved the Rowland Index number. The Rowland Index number is a protein indicator and some customers require product to be produced within a certain range. The improvements have helped MMPA meet customer needs and improve production processes. Moving forward, Johnson hopes to reapply the improvements made to the sixth effect to their fifth effect evaporator. “I want to make sure we explore all opportunities for improvement in the day to day operations without spending more capital,” Johnson said. “At the same time, we are going to look at the way we do business to achieve the greatest efficiencies.” One hundred and thirty-five miles southwest, the Constantine plant is also boosting its production capabilities. The plant brought another separator on line last spring to accommodate the needs of a growing milk supply. Dave Davis, Constantine plant manager, says it also positions the plant well for new opportunities in the future. Constantine had already owned the separator, but added a pre-heating system and new silos to put it into use. Constantine added a Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) pre-treatment system. The system reduces the amount of wastewater being sent to the THE CONSTANTINE PLANT HAS ADVANCED ITS PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES OVER THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS THROUGH ENHANCEMENTS SUCH AS THE DAF PRE-TREATMENT SYSTEM, NEW SEPARATOR AND THE REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM (PICTURED RIGHT).

24

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

municipality. In turn, Constantine can process more milk. Further, Constantine has also purchased land surrounding the plant in anticipation of new opportunities that may arise in the future. They put in a new employee parking lot, increased cold butter storage and have additional acreage available for other endeavors. Both plants are a hub of activity each day, welcoming haulers ready to supply the plants with member milk. Ovid and Constantine each receive around 70 and 40 milk tankers per day, respectively, with many carrying up to 100,000 pounds of milk. Keeping these haulers abreast of the plants’ fluctuating needs is a challenge.

Constantine maintains a hauler hotline with daily recorded messages available for haulers to call in and receive an update on the plant’s production schedule. Ovid recently implemented a messaging system that sends out alerts to haulers via text, email or voice recording. The alerts—around 8 to 10 per day— contain information as it happens about the schedule, any wait times and road conditions. In 2015, the Ovid plant added a sampling station separate from the receiving bay to increase efficiency. By the time a tanker enters the receiving bay, their milk has already been sampled and sent off for testing, so the hauler only needs to unload the tank.


THE OVID PLANT HAS INCREASED EFFICIENCIES IN EVERYDAY PROCESSES, SUCH AS RECEIVING (PICTURED RIGHT) AND POWDER PRODUCTION (PICTURED ABOVE).

In Constantine, butter is what makes them shine. Davis and Marc Hopkins, Constantine production manager, attribute the success of their butter in the World Dairy Expo Championship Dairy Product Contest each year to the good quality milk brought in from members and dedicated butter churn operators. “There’s no secret recipe to our butter, but we have a good milk shed as a starting point,” Hopkins said.

In addition to milk received at the plant for immediate processing, Constantine often serves as a “mini transfer station” to help market more member milk. For some loads, tankers often stop at Constantine—just six miles from the state line—for testing and reloading before going to out of state to destinations like Wisconsin. Keeping these milk marketing machines running are the dedicated staff—181 in total—diligently working at MMPA ’ s dairy ingredient plants. “They are the heartbeat of the operation,” Davis revealed about the Constantine staff. The plant is close to reaching five and half years without a loss-time accident, which he attributes to their employees. “It takes teamwork and dedication to safety to reach that achievement.”

Ovid reached three years without a loss time accident and Johnson also points the accomplishment to their employee’s commitment to safety. Both plants continually evaluate systems to provide staff with a safe work environment. Yet what keeps these plants moving forward is their ability to produce high quality products for MMPA ’ s customers. They are both Kosher and Halal certified and have attained Safe Quality Foods (SQF) Level 3 certification with excellent ratings. Their products are also awardwinning. Ovid and Constantine produce dairy ingredients such as butter, milk powder and condensed milk. These products are sold to a variety of customers and used to make end-user products such as salad dressing, ice cream, yogurt, candy and infant formula.

“We have good churn operators and it comes down to the whole workforce to produce an award-winning product,” Davis added. “But it starts at the farm level. We can’t improve the milk quality that comes in, so from there we are able to make a high quality, great tasting product.” When production increases flooded the Midwest, MMPA relied on the capabilities of its dairy ingredient plants to continually market member milk to the greatest advantage possible. As the region continues swell in milk production, Ovid and Constantine are there to manage the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. “We are positioning ourselves well for whatever comes next. No one know what way the market will move, but we are ready to capitalize on the market where it lands,” Hopkins said.

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Alliance to More Than Double Research, Outreach Investment in Michigan’s Animal Agriculture Industry

The Michigan Alliance for Animal Agriculture (M-AAA) has announced it will invest nearly $1.5 million in 2017, more than twice the amount of previous years, to support research and outreach to benefit the animal agriculture industry in Michigan. Eighteen projects have been selected for funding through a competitive grant process. “We’re pleased with the quality of the grant applications submitted this year, and though the selection process was difficult, I’m confident this research and outreach will help in boosting the sustainability, efficiency and profitability of the Michigan animal agriculture industry,” said George W. Smith, associate dean for research for the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and associate director of MSU AgBioResearch. The alliance works to enhance economic impact and sustainability of animal agriculture in Michigan and addresses critical issues facing the industry such as antimicrobial resistance, emerging infectious diseases and animal welfare. The following work, conducted by MSU faculty and/or MSU Extension staff members, focusing on the dairy industry have been selected: 26

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017

James Pursley, professor of reproductive management of dairy cattle – Impact of body condition loss during early lactation on embryonic survival following first and subsequent artificial insemination services. Robert Tempelman, professor of

statistical genetics and animal breeding – Use of mid-infrared spectral data to improve milk nutritional value, reproduction and health outcomes in Michigan dairy cattle. Michael Allen, distinguished professor

of dairy cattle nutrition – Modulating metabolic stress in early postpartum period through dietary strategies; Hepatic metabolism of propionate in relation to the control of feeding behavior of dairy cows in postpartum period. Michael Vandehaar, professor of dairy

nutrition and metabolism – Increasing the profitability and efficiency of protein use of lactating dairy cows; Feed intake prediction system to identify inefficient cows on commercial farms. Adam Lock, professor of dairy cattle

nutrition – How does long-term feeding of palmitic acid to post-peak dairy cows impact milk production, body weight gain, lipolysis and inflammation?; Does the interaction between supplemental amino acids and fatty acids alter nutrient efficiency and the yield of milk components of dairy cows? Stanley Moore, senior Extension dairy educator – Monitoring cow performance during milking to evaluate and improve worker training, cow udder health and milk quality. Ronald Erskine, professor of large animal

clinic sciences – Herd-specific employee education and training for milk protocols.

M-AAA — a partnership of the Michigan Allied Poultry Industry, the Michigan Cattlemen’s Association, Michigan Farm Bureau, the Michigan Horse Industry, the Michigan Meat Association, the Michigan Milk Producers Association, the Michigan Pork Producers Association, the Michigan Sheep Breeders Association, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and MSU — was formed in 2014 to address critical and emerging issues limiting the state’s animal agriculture industry. Because of increased support from the state of Michigan, M-AAA was able to more than double project funding this year compared to $600,000 per year in 2014-2016. “This unique collaboration, while relatively new, is making progress and showing impacts on a major sector of Michigan’s agriculture industry,” Smith said. “When you look at external grant funding, animal agriculture typically receives less than 1 percent. Fortunately, we’ve been able to garner additional support to make further strides on behalf of the state’s animal agriculture producers.” Ron Bates, director of agriculture and agribusiness for MSU Extension, said that the funding provided by the M-AAA has a direct effect on Michigan’s economy. “This year’s grant cycle allowed us to offer job training in several areas — specifically, for the dairy and meat industries,” he said. “That means that existing dairy farm employees and meat cutters can learn ways to do their jobs more effectively, and it allows us to train new people who may be interested in jobs in these important economic sectors.” The economic impact of the Michigan animal agriculture industry — dairy, cattle, sheep, turkeys, chickens, swine, eggs and horses — is estimated at $5.7 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


2016 ANNUAL MILK PRODUCTION RELEASED

Michigan Ascends to Top Five Dairy State

2016 Milk Production (in millions of pounds) Rank

State

Production

Change

1

California

40,469

-1.0%

2

Wisconsin

30,123

+ 3.8%

3

New York

14,765

+ 4.8%

he USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) recently released annual milk production data by state. Michigan remains near the top of the production per cow ranking, placing second with an annual production of almost 26,000 pounds per cow. Michigan grew by 6 percent over 2015 and now ranks fifth nationally in terms of total milk production.

4

Idaho

14,665

+ 3.9%

5

Michigan

10,876

+ 6.0%

6

Pennsylvania 10,820

+ 0.2%

7

Texas

10,773

+ 4.6%

Wisconsin remains the second highest producer of milk in the nation behind California. Ohio is just outside the Top 10 rank at 11th place, with production totaling 5.5 billion. Indiana ranked 14th with 4.2 billion pounds produced in 2016.

8

Minnesota

9,666

+ 2.2%

9

New Mexico

7,711

- 1.5%

10

Washington

6,650

+ 0.7%

T

The annual production of milk for the United States during 2016 was 212 billion pounds, 1.8 percent above 2015. Annual total milk production has increased 14.4 percent from 2007.

11

Ohio

5,532

+ 0.7%

Production per cow in the United States averaged 22,774 pounds for 2016, 378 pounds above 2015. The average annual rate of milk production per cow has increased 12.7 percent from 2007.

14

Indiana

4,151

+ 3.1%

The average number of milk cows on farms in the United States during 2016 was 9.33 million head, up 0.2 percent from 2015. The average annual number of milk cows has increased 1.5 percent from 2007. In Michigan, the number of milk cows was 419,000, an increase of 11,000 head from 2015.

Milk Production Per Cow

Wisconsin + 3.8% Michigan + 6.0%

Indiana

Ohio

+ 3.1%

+ 0.7%

Ave. Milk Per Cow

Rank

State

1

Colorado

25,980 pounds

2

Michigan

25,957 pounds

3

Idaho

24,647 pounds

4

New Mexico

24,479 pounds

5

Arizona

24,429 pounds

6

Washington

24,094 pounds

7

New York

23,815 pounds

8

Iowa

23,634 pounds

9

Wisconsin

23,552 pounds

10

Nebraska

23,317 pounds

17

Indiana

22,560 pounds

28

Ohio

20,875 pounds

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

More than 200 students teamed up with Detroit Lions players at Fuel Up to Play 60 Rally at Ford Field

T

o help create life-long dairy consumers, your team at the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) works in schools to drive excitement among the students to eat healthy, including dairy products, and be physically active each day for 60 minutes through the Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP 60) program. Students from 33 Michigan elementary schools traveled to Ford Field in Detroit for the 7th Fuel Up to Play 60 Rally for School Health Event in February. They returned to school armed with leadership skills and nutrition information, as well as inspiration to encourage fellow students and school leaders to adopt healthier eating habits and add more physical activity to their day. Five Michigan dairy farmers joined the students to guide them through the day. “After seeing the Jump with Jill and Fuel Up to Play 60 programs first hand, we realize that kids and adults must be reminded that what goes into our bodies during the day keeps us energized all day long and the kids see that firsthand through these programs,” said Bill and Terri Stakenas, Freesoil, Michigan dairy farmers.

A highlight for students was hearing their school name called to run through the tunnel onto the football field. There they spent the next hour with Detroit Lions offensive guard Laken Tomlinson and Lion legend Jason Hanson learning new exercises to “Play 60.” They also learned from Detroit Lions running back Ameer Abdullah how to eat healthy, be active and show their dance moves through the “Bone Rap” lead by the Detroit Lions Cheerleaders. Detroit Lions tight end Cole Wick lead the students through an interactive trivia game testing their knowledge about nutrition. The day provided an opportunity to try new foods and food pairings, including yogurt parfaits and whole grain yogurt muffins for breakfast. A “taste test” lunch of nutritious wraps allowed students to try all flavors and vote for their favorite. Dairy had a presence at every meal and break throughout the day.

Middle school teacher Kim Campbell taught the audience the importance of combining interactive games into school lessons to help students absorb the information and to help their brains continue to develop. Motivational speaker Kevin Laue shared how he rose to be the first player missing a limb to play NCAA Division 1 basketball and to become one of the top high school basketball players in California. His humor and honesty reminded students they can make an impact. This year’s Fuel Up to Play 60 Rally for School Health event was presented by the Detroit Lions, Michigan State University Extension, the Michigan Fitness Foundation, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), the Michigan Department of Education (MDE), the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), and the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM).

ABOUT FUEL UP TO PLAY 60: FUEL UP TO PLAY 60 IS A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE AND THE NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL IN COLLABORATION WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. THE PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO EMPOWER YOUNG PEOPLE TO BECOME AGENTS OF CHANGE AS THEY WORK WITH KEY STAKEHOLDERS AND DECISION MAKERS TO DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT STRATEGIES FOR INCREASING ACCESS TO AND CONSUMPTION OF HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES, AS WELL AS THE AMOUNT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OPTIONS AVAILABLE IN THEIR SCHOOL DISTRICT.

“If you have the chance to see Jump with Jill or Fuel Up to Play 60 in action, by all means go. It is well worth the time to see the students learning about dairy, you won’t be disappointed.” — BILL AND TERRI STAKENAS, FREESOIL, MI DAIRY FARMERS

28

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


MERCHANDISE

Maxibac and Source E Maxibac Calf Gel is a concentrated gel containing billions of specialized lactic acid bacteria and a yeast culture specially formulated for monogastric animals.

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information

It is used at birth to populate the gut with beneficial bacteria that can protect the animal from the overgrowth of harmful organisms.

These are service personnel only.

Maxibac - Scours prevention and recovery

The yeast helps protect the animal from harmful organisms and make the gut environment more “friendly” for the digestive bacteria. Give Maxibac at birth and when calves face environmental stresses such as transporting, environmental changes and change in feeding. When a calf scours, Maxibac will restore the level of beneficial bacteria in the gut and restore gut Ph to levels that will inhibit harmful organisms. Each 80cc syringe provides 8 doses. ITEM MAXIBAC 80CC MAXIBAC 300C

STOCK # 830 830

MEMBER PRICE $12.80/EA $32.63/EA

Source E - Rapid rehydration for quick recovery Source E is an extremely aggressive electrolyte supplement for the rehydration of calves who are scouring or have insufficient water intake.

Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center

In conjunction with Source E, use Maxibac to return gut pH and digestive bacteria to normal.

1-800-392-3392

Source E contains a “plasma specific buffer” that corrects acid conditions in the blood without raising gut pH or interfering with milk absorption.

or one of the following

Source E contains no sodium bicarbonate, therefore, milk and milk replacer feedings can continue as normal. It is extremely high in both energy content and electrolyte concentration for quick results. ITEM SOURCE E 20/40 OZ SOURCE E 10# SOURCE E 25#

STOCK # 8308 830 8310

MEMBER PRICE $72.00 $121.13 $255.00

service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636

— DUANE FARMER, MERCHANDISE SUPERVISOR

Pat Mitchell

$25 Coupon – Redeemable towards the purchase of any Masibac and Source E Combination One coupon per farm. Good through April 30, 2017. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME __________________________________________________________________________________________________ DAIRY NAME ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ MAILING ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ EMAIL

Arlin Koglin » 989-553-3370 » American Farm Products, Inc. » afpltd.net

7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928 Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor............................................................. 989-317-8370

Toll Free.............................................................................................877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)............................................................ 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax...................................................................989-317-8372

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

29


PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #____________________________________ Sample Date__________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA__________

Johne’s ELISA_________

Johne’s PCR_________

Pregnancy_________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs to avoid potential service charges.

30

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.*

3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature.

In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and,

4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

31


FREELINERS

To place a freeliner, fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication.

« Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. » Visit www.mimilk.com/michigan-milk-messenger/advertise/ freeliner-and-classified-ads

Bulls

Equipment

Registered Holstein Bulls:

New Holland 195 manure spreader, hydraulic end gate, upper beater, heavy single chain, float tires, very good, $11,500. 810-338-5265.

We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-6228548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

John Deere 6420 front wheel drive with 740 loader, premium cab, 1400 hrs. as new, $64,500. 810-338-5265.

Misc. PolyDome Calf House. Electric heat, used only one winter. We built a heated calf barn and no longer need it. Great for getting them dry, warm and started. $400 Prescott, MI 989305-0143. Clean, Bright Wheat Straw. 3x3 large square bales. Loading and delivery available. 810-710-6504. Australian Shepard Puppies. Parent’s good farm and family dogs. Four colors to choose from. Ready April 15. $350 - $550 each. Clare, Mich. 989-386-3679. Haylage and Corn Silage. Trucking available. Call 231-250-8592. Complete Herd Dispersal. 58 Holstein cows. 50+ years A.I. breeding. Freestall trained, 4.1 B.F., 300 P.T., 78 SCC. Frank Bowman, Rockford, Mich. 49341, 616-874-9016 or Joel Bowman 616-890-5260. Complete herd of 175 cows. 155 milking, 82 pound average on 2x. 30 dry cows and 35 heifers due soon. Willing to sell after they freshen. 517281-8855.

Wanted Portable vacuum pump and Delaval or Surge bucket milker with claw and pulsator for family cow. 260-705-8185. 32

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. Three operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC. FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Spring special 2000 gal. Muellers for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112.

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

JUNE CLOVER SEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122.

FOR SALE: 2012 NH FP230 Chopper with kernel processor, 2 row corn head, 9ft hay head $35,000. Gehl 940 & Gehl 970 16ft Chopper Wagon, 12 ton gear $3,000. Gehl 980 Chopper Wagon 18ft, 12 ton gear $4,500. NH 499 Haybine 12ft $6,000. Case JH 600 Blower $2,000. JD 466 Round Baler net/twine wrap $8,000. 1976 Allis Chalmers 7040 $5,000 OBO. 1952 JD 60 $4,000 OBO. 24ft Big Jim Silo Unloader, very good condition, best offer. Call Mark at 989 737 2389 - Frankenmuth area.

MICHIGAN CERTIFIED OAT SEED & SPRING BARLEY SEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. ELECTRIC MOTOR 3 PH 5 HP 3000 RPM $100. Klenzade tank washer $100. (2) Double side wash vats $100. (2) 3hp R-22 compressor units $500. Faist Farms Inc. 517-769-2299. HOOF TRIMMING - 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Also doing fly control and cement grooving. Gibson Hoof Care (Tom) 989-239-6843.

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

PTO and Automatic Start Generators 1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419 www.hamiltondist.com

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION! A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

GREEN MEADOW FARMS 6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary

| FOR MILK MARKETED IN FEBRUARY 2017

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

National Trends* (in millions of pounds) 2017

2016 % Change

California

3,122

3,299

-5.4

Wisconsin

2,323

2,374

-2.1

This Month

Year Ago

% Change

Total Class 1 Sales

510,602,744

518,037,384

-1.44

Total Class 2 Sales

325,641,402

305,527,018

+6.58

Total Class 3 Sales

475,931,394

497,116,591

-4.26

Total Class 4 Sales

297,504,707

280,915,532

+5.91

New York

1,146

1,144

+0.2

1,609,680,247

1,601,596,525

+0.50

Idaho

1,095

1,125

-2.7

Pennsylvania

858

864

-0.7

Mideast Federal Order #33

Michigan

859

849

+1.2

Total Producers............................................................................................................. 5,083

Texas

928

826

+12.3

Minnesota

768

773

-0.6

New Mexico

637

591

+7.8

Washington

502

532

-5.6

Ohio

424

436

-2.8

Indiana

331

334

-0.9

* Total U.S.

15,654 15,817

-1.0

Protein Price /lb.......................................................................................................... $2.235

* U.S Y-T-D

32,653 32,370

+0.9

Butterfat Price /lb...................................................................................................... $2.427

* For 23 States

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

31.7%

32.3%

Avg. Daily Production per farm............................................................................11,056

Production

Avg. Protein Test.........................................................................................................3.16% Avg. Butterfat Test......................................................................................................3.83% Avg. Oth Solids Test...................................................................................................5.76% Avg. SCC - MMPA.................................................................................................... 154,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33

Other Solids Price /lb............................................................................................... $0.299 Class III Price @ 3.5%................................................................................................. $16.88 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt...........................................................................($0.16) Uniform Price @ 3.5%............................................................................................... $16.72 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000.................................................................................. $0.001

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb.......................................................................................................................1.687 Butter /lb.........................................................................................................................2.176 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb......................................................................................................0.993 Dry Whey /lb...................................................................................................................0.489

34

MESSENGER | APRIL 2017


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff Northwest Area

Novi Headquarters

Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 202

Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Herron...................................269-245-6632 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Officers

Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Southwest Area

Operations Ed Jaquay............................................................... ext. 248

Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251

Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Krista Schrock, Orland, IN..................................269-986-6792 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822 Brittni Tucker, Wyoming....................................248-880-3785

Milk Sales Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244

Southeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Andrea Meade, Finley, OH.................................248-880-4113 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481

Board of Directors

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210 Communications Allison Stuby Miller................................................. ext. 296 Supply Chain Therese Tierney....................................................... ext. 217

Ken Nobis, President

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Directors-At-Large Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 202 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830 District Directors 1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032

Other Member Services

Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303

Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775

Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771

Manufacturing Plants

3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid, Michigan Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221 Deutsch Käse Haus, Middlebury, Indiana Elsie Raber, Plant Manager............................ 574-825-9511

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson.....................................................989-289-9686

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/ field-staff and searching by your producer number.

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-2106 6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

APRIL 2017 | MESSENGER

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MMPA DAIRY FARM FAMILIES SHAPING THE FUTURE

Together

At MMPA, our dairy farm families work with pride and care every day to produce wholesome, nutritious dairy products for your table. Serving the Great Lakes Region, these farmers are shaping the future together as a leading member-owned cooperative.

mimilk.com

Siemen family Harbor Beach, Michigan

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 41310 Bridge Street, Novi, MI 48376

»

248-474-6672