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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 9 | MARCH 2017

INSIDE: Maintaining Market Share Means EXCELLING

IN UDDER HEALTH

Eighteen Michigan

DAIRY AMBASSADORS Prep for Year of Dairy Promotion

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©2015 Ecolab USA Inc. All rights reserved.


MARCH 2017 FEATURES

On the Cover

MARKET SHARE MEANS 16 | MAINTAINING EXCELLING IN UDDER HEALTH

Cows on a Harbor Beach, Michigan farm munch on their feed inside a sand-bedded freestall barn. In this issue, learn how

18 | 2017 MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADORS

the next generation of dairy is promoting the industry and how shining in udder health keeps your farm competitive.

High milk quality and standards for acceptable udder heath are continuously becoming more rigorous and dairy producers who wish to remain competitive must meet or exceed these evolving standards, according to Dr. Pamela Ruegg of the University of Wisconsin.

Eighteen Michigan dairy youth gathered at the Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference for a daylong leadership training to prep for a year of dairy promotion in the state.

10 OYDC SNAPSHOT: 20 | TOP GARY AND RENEE HUFNAGEL

The Hufnagels, of Stony Creek Dairy, offer a peek into their family and farm in Westphalia, Michigan. The couple was part of the 2016 class of Top 10 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

3


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®


CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS

“Being involved in the Dairy Ambassador

Eight Spirited Exchanges of

program leads to connections for young

Ideas and Information

8

people looking to start their careers in

QUALITY WATCH

the dairy world.”

FARM 3.0: Continuous Improvement for the Care of our Animals

– CHARLENE MCALVEY (PAGE 18)

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

14

TWO DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE POSITIONS TO BE FILLED AT THE MMPA 101ST ANNUAL STATE DELEGATE MEETING YC CONFERENCE

Top 6 Reasons Why to Attend

25

MERCHANDISE

26

QUALITY PREMIUMS

27 POLICIES

21 24

DEPARTMENTS

28 FREELINERS 29 CLASSIFIEDS

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

30

MARKET REPORT

Andre Drummond Partners with UDIM,

31 STAFF

Becomes Milk Means More Ambassador

MMPA CORE VALUES:

»

QUALITY

»

INTEGRITY

Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor..................................................................Allison Stuby Miller Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation.......................................................................................2,814 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

»

PROGRESS

»

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

LEADERSHIP

»

COMMUNITY

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

Eight Spirited Exchanges of Ideas and Information BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

A major change was made in the structure of MMPA’s local annual member meetings this year in an effort to better inform MMPA members about issues that affect the dairy industry and our co-op. We have been challenged to deliver in-depth information in the traditional local meeting structure, because there is just not enough time once members have completed the necessary elections and reports that are essential to each local annual meeting. After discussing various methods that would allow more time for discussion of MMPA matters and the dairy economy, the board settled on a different approach this year. Two types of meetings took place. The first was the traditional local meeting with the local officers carrying out the business of the co-op and the district director providing a basic overview of issues that face our co-op. In addition, we held eight informational meetings in locations that were scattered around our membership area. At these meetings, we provided a far more detailed discussion of MMPA’s present and future direction.

“By limiting the number of informational meetings to eight, we could devote more resources to the effort. Our field staff in each area was present as well as staff members from our Novi office that don’t normally have the opportunity to interact with members.”

Our traditional local annual member meeting structure generally allotted 20 to 30 minutes for a presentation and discussion, and that is simply inadequate to provide anything but a very broad overview of MMPA’s business. When we added the eight area informational meetings, we intentionally built no time constraints into the program. We announced at the beginning of each meeting that we were staying until the last question was answered. This year’s meetings lasted from three to four hours, the average being a little north of three and half hours. But it was more than just time. By limiting the number of informational meetings to eight, we could devote more resources to the effort. Our field staff in each area was present as well as staff members from our Novi office that don’t normally have the opportunity to interact with members. We had a basic three-person team at each meeting made up of Carl Rasch, Director of Milk Sales, Sheila Burkhardt, Director of Member and Government Relations, and myself.  I often refer to Carl as a “walking encyclopedia” because of his knowledge of milk marketing and all things MMPA. I think maybe “search engine” is a better comparison nowadays since, unlike Carl, encyclopedias appear to be going the way of the dinosaurs. Carl had the time to share some of his knowledge at the informational meetings. But it was more than just time and resources.  We didn’t approach the meetings with the idea that we would inundate our audiences with 100 slides and one-way presentations.  Our goal was to promote in-depth discussions with our members by being there to listen and to respond to the concerns and issues that were raised.  We feel that our objective was accomplished, because it was a spirited exchange of ideas and information - not a presentation- that we experienced at each location. At the end of this year’s meeting season, the MMPA board and our management staff reviewed the new format that included the redesigned local meeting supplemented by an area informational meeting.  The overall consensus was that the change in our meeting structure was successful.  That doesn’t mean it was perfect, but we think it is something to build on in the future.  We discussed some tweaks we could consider, and we welcome any comments from our members that will help us meet our goal to keep members well informed about our ongoing efforts toward fulfilling our co-op mission, “to market our members’ milk to the greatest advantage possible.”

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MESSENGER | MARCH 2017


101ST ANNUAL STATE DELEGATE MEETING WHEN:

March 23, 2017 Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., meeting is called to order at 10:00 a.m.

WHERE:

Lansing Center 333 East Michigan Avenue, Lansing, Michigan 48933

» » » » »

ON THE AGENDA: Consideration of policy statements and resolutions Election of two director-at-large positions on the MMPA Board of Directors Recognition of MMPA’s 35 and 50 year members Announcement of MMPA Quality Award recipient Introduction of the MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators

Business will only be conducted by accredited delegates, but all members are welcome to attend.

#MMPA17

03/23


QUALITY WATCH

FARM 3.0: Continuous Improvement for the Care of our Animals BY LYNDSAY EARL, MEMBER REPRESENTATIVE

As discussed in a previous Quality Watch article, there are some significant changes being rolled out in FARM 3.0. These changes stem from the ever-growing concern for the care of our animals by consumers who are typically more than two generations removed from modern agriculture. The newest revision of the program—enacted Jan. 1, 2017—is intended to promote the continuous improvement of best management practices, while staying current with the hot button topics within the industry. The most significant changes that you will notice with FARM 3.0 is the addition of the Continuous Improvement Plans (CIP). CIP’s, previously known as Action Plans, help to identify opportunities for improving animal care on your farm and establish a timeline in which these items should be completed. There are two priority areas within the CIP’s: Phase I and Phase II priority areas. This article will focus on the Phase I Priority areas. Stay tuned for the Quality Watch article in April for a discussion on the Phase II priority areas.

“Continuous Improvement Plans, previously known as Action Plans, help to identify opportunities for improving animal care on your farm and establish a timeline in which these items should be completed.”

Phase I Priority Areas are the minimum criteria for FARM program participation. These areas include the following:

• The farm must have a signed Veterinary Client Patient Relationship (VCPR). This form must be signed by the owner/herd manager and Veterinary of Record (VOR) and must be updated annually. • All employees with animal care responsibilities must sign a Dairy Cattle Care and Ethics Training Agreement when hired and subsequently on an annual basis. Employees should receive training on their job responsibilities in their understood language and should understand the negative consequences of not following the animal care policies on your farm. • The practice of tail docking is no longer allowed. Dairy producers may no longer dock tails nor allow another agent, such as a heifer raiser, to perform the practice on their behalf. If when completing the FARM 3.0 evaluation the farm does not have the items listed above, a Mandatory Corrective Action Plan (MCAP) will be triggered. The FARM evaluator will create an MCAP and set a timeline for reevaluation of the designated items not to exceed one year. The one year timeline does not apply to tail docking, as this practice must already be discontinued. The MCAP can be reviewed and completed any time prior to the deadline, so it would be in your best interest to complete the items as soon as possible so it does not get put on the back burner. If after one year the farm does not comply with the items on the MCAP, the farm will be placed on probationary status. This would put the farm at risk of losing their FARM enrollment status as well as their market with MMPA. We, as member representatives and members of the animal care team, are here to help! We can provide you with the documents necessary to comply with the phase one priority areas prior to the deadline of your MCAP. The FARM website can also be a valuable tool for producers looking for more information and resources regarding the documents necessary to comply with FARM 3.0. Visit nationaldairyfarm.com and look under the “resource” tab, then “resource library” for more information.

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MESSENGER | MARCH 2017

M M M


MILKER Training Scho MILKER Training School MILKER Training School R Training MILKER School Training School

MMPA Milker Training School MMPA Milker Training School

Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA me milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to me employees. Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their Strategies to help members achieve this goal include: employees. Milker Training Schools aim to help improve marketability of MMPA members’ milk byprocedures. providing • Relaythe proper milking techniques and milk quality milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their • this Present the big-picture mastitis milk and milk quality. Strategies to help members goal ols aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing Milker Training Schools aim toachieve help improve theinclude: marketability ofscience MMPA of members’ by providing employees. Give a and chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniqu • Relay proper milking techniques milkmembers quality procedures. mal stockmanship knowledge, tools stockmanship and training •and toknowledge, members and their milk quality and animal tools training to members and their • mastitis Improve stockmanship •employees. Present the big-picture science of and milk quality. and animal care while supporting National Dairy Strategies to help members achieve this goal include: • Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. •Strategies Relay milking techniques and milk quality procedures. Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. embers achieve this proper goal include: to help members achieve this goal include: Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Educa •• Present the big-picture science of mastitis and milk quality. ing techniques and milk quality procedures. Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. •• of Give members a chance to try-on practice proper milking techniques and procedures. icture science mastitis quality. Present theand big-picture science of and mastitis and milk quality. Partnership » milk Quality » animal Animal Care Consistency » Education »requirements. Affirmation • Improve stockmanship and care while supporting National Dairy FARM chance to try-on andmembers practice a proper milking techniques and procedures. • Give chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. nship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. March 15 requirements. April 2 February 15supporting • Improve stockmanship and animal care while National Dairy FARM 10:00 a.m. -»3:00 p.m. 10:00 a 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education Affirmation DeMotts Aplex Alvin15 & Dorothy Hochstetler’s April March 20 West Park Inn February 15 uality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation 440a.m. W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Wo 26671 Perrin Road 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 - 3:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Sandusky, MI Alpena Sturgis,West MI Park Inn DeMotts Aplex - Alpena Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s March April 20 February 15Road 440 W. 15 Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 26671 Perrin 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 10:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m. - 15 2:30 p.m. Sandusky, Alpena, MI Sturgis, MI March 15 April 20MI April 13 - 3:00 p.m. February 21 p.m. March 15 April 20 February DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex Alpena Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. --3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. A $10 pe 440 W. Rd. Inn 701 Woodward Road DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex - West Alpena hstetler’s 26671 Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter Inn Park April 13Sanilac February 21 DeMotts Aplex - Alpena Ave. Alvin &Perrin Dorothy Hochstetler’s be deduc Sandusky, MI Alpena, MITech.registration Sturgis, 440 a.m. W.MISanilac 701 Woodward Ave. Career Center 100 N.Sanilac Lafayette Rd. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 - 3:00 p.m. 440 W. Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 26671 Perrin RoadRd. A $10 per person fee will cover lun Sandusky, Alpena, MI 9901 E. Greenville, Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter Inn Sandusky, MI MI Alpena, MI13th Sturgis, MI MI be deducted fromSt. your milk check to April February 21 Cadillac, MImaterial costs. Career13 Tech. Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd. cover lunch and 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. A $10 per person registration fee will 9901 E. 13th St. Greenville, MI April 13 April 13 February 21 A $10 Inn per person registration fee will be deducted from your milk check to cover lunch and material costs. Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter Cadillac, be$10 deducted fromregistration your milk check to 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. m. 10:00 - 3:00registration p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. A $10a.m. perMI person fee will A per person fee will Career Tech. Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd. ISD To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewsk Wextford-Missaukee cover lunch and material costs. Wextford-Missaukee ISD Winter Inn be deducted from your milk check to be deducted from your milk check to 9901 E.Tech. 13th St. Greenville, MI Center P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376 Career Tech. Career Center 100 N. Lafayette Rd. cover lunch and material costs. cover lunch and material costs. Cadillac, MI To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com 9901 E. 13th 9901 E. 13th St. Greenville, MI St. P.O. Box 8002, Novi, Cadillac, MI Cadillac, MI MI 48376

MMPA Milker Training School r Training School MMPA Milker Training School

To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER P.O. Box 8002, Novi,»MI 48376 Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com To register, contact: Marianne Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376 P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376

9


NEWS & VIEWS

Powering Michigan Agriculture Conference Are you looking for ways to reduce your farm’s energy costs? Have you considered harnessing the natural energy of the wind, sun, water or energy crops? Make plans to attend the Powering Michigan Agriculture Conference on Thursday, March 9 at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center in East Lansing, Michigan. During this day-long conference farmers will learn about various renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency practices, identify the most suitable technologies and practices that meet their energy management goals, and then obtain the resources and tools necessary to implement those technologies and practices on their farms.

Glanbia, DFA, MMPA and Foremost Farms announce plans for new Michigan cheese and whey facility Glanbia plc, Dairy Farmers of America, Inc., MMPA and Foremost Farms USA

announced in late January that they are in advanced discussions to create a new stand-alone joint venture to build and operate a new cheese and whey production facility in the State of Michigan, USA. Upon completion, the plant is projected to process 8 million pounds of milk per day. It is proposed that 50 percent of the joint venture will be owned by Glanbia and the 50 percent balance will be owned by DFA, MMPA and Foremost Farms. As part of the proposed joint venture DFA, MMPA and Foremost Farms would supply all milk required by the plant while Glanbia will have full responsibility for all commercial, technical and operational aspects of the business. If the project proceeds as planned, commissioning of the new facility is expected to take place in the second half of 2019. “Glanbia is delighted to announce this exciting proposed project in the state of Michigan with DFA, Michigan Milk Producers Association and Foremost Farms,” said Brian Phelan, CEO of Glanbia Nutritionals. “Consistent with Glanbia’s growth strategy, this proposed venture will build on our position as the number one producer of American-style cheddar cheese and simultaneously expand our global position as a supplier of advanced technology whey protein to the nutritional sector. This proposed joint venture is a strategic move by all the partners to benefit from the growing, large-scale milk pool in the State of Michigan.” “In the dairy industry, we value the opportunities provided by working together—from farmers with fellow farmers to co-ops with fellow co-ops. By enhancing synergies between cooperatives, we can effectively serve our members with this joint venture,” said MMPA General Manager Joe Diglio. “Michigan is home to a quality milk supply with increased needs as production continues to grow. This cheese and whey facility will provide a strategic solution for the region moving forward.” 10

MESSENGER | MARCH 2017

MEET GLANBIA Glanbia is a global nutrition company, grounded in nature and science, dedicated to providing better nutrition for every step of life’s journey. Glanbia actively serves the nutritional needs of consumers directly through a range of branded products and as an ingredient partner to the wider food industry. Headquartered in Kilkenny, Ireland, Glanbia has a turnover of over ¤3.7 billion per year and 6,000 employees in 32 countries worldwide. Glanbia is the world’s leading producer and marketer of quality performance nutrition consumer products supporting active lifestyles. Its success as a global ingredients provider has been built on Glanbia’s expertise in nutritional solutions supported by significant investment in research and development. Glanbia has deep roots in the dairy industry in both Ireland and the USA. Glanbia is the largest dairy processor in Idaho, USA and through its joint venture; Glanbia Ingredients Ireland, is Ireland’s number one dairy processor. South West Cheese based in Clovis, New Mexico is one of the largest and most successful cheese and whey protein manufacturers in the world and is joint venture between Glanbia plc and the Greater Southwest Agency, Inc.


Upcoming Events March 22 State Resolutions Committee Meeting, Lansing

March 23 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting, Lansing April 7 Young Cooperator Conference, Frankenmuth April 11 Dairy Communicator Meeting, East Lansing

Producers Scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Dick Haven Farms LLC Buning Dairy Farm LLC* Harold / Ruth Ann Dodde Leon Hamming Michael Bosscher * Garrett Beef Farm Green Meadow Farms Inc Green Meadow Farms Inc * *100

Advisory Committee DISTRICT 1 Bruce Lewis, Jonesville.........................517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester....................734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover..................................517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH.................419-466-4471

DISTRICT 2 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.................269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton..................................269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue........................269-660-0498

January Milk Prices Announced Correction: Congratulations to MMPA Bronze Quality award winner Terri Hawbaker in the Mid-Michigan Local. In the reprint of the February quality awards listing, this entry was mistakenly not included.

The USDA said that January’s Class III milk price is $16.77 per cwt., down 63 cents from December’s price, but $3.05 above January 2016. The Class IV price was $16.19, up $1.22 from December, and $2.88 more than January 2016.

DISTRICT 3 Tim Butler, Sand Lake............................269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland...........................616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville........................231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil............................231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant.................................231-834-7610

DISTRICT 4 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron...........................989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard....................906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke..............................989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen....................................989-379-4694

DISTRICT 5 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...................989-304-0233 Robert Lee, Marion................................231-743-6794 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain.......................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy..................................231-388-0496

DISTRICT 6

26th Annual Farm Women’s Symposium

David Reed, Owosso..............................989-723-2023

This year’s Farm Women’s Symposium will be held in

Kris Wardin, St. Johns............................989-640-9420

Port Huron, Michigan at the Blue Water Convention Center on March 8-10.

The annual Farm Women's Symposium is an educational, 3-day conference offering new and deepening friendships and a huge support system of like-minded women in agriculture from Michigan and beyond. Consider attending all or part of this exciting 3-day event!

Jamie Meyer, Ionia..................................989-640-3372 Aaron Gasper, Lowell............................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler.............................989-682-9064

DISTRICT 7 John Bennett, Prescott.........................989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin...............................989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar..............................989-652-6500 Philip Gross, Weidman..........................989-289-0670 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning.................989-302-2299

DISTRICT 8 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin.............................810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell....................810-404-2140

For more information please visit: farmwomenssymposium.com

Patrick Bolday, Emmett........................810-395-7139 Michael Noll, Croswell..........................810-404-4071

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

Dairy Trade in the Trump Era BY JIM MULHERN, PRESIDENT AND CEO, NATIONAL MILK PRODUCERS FEDERATION (NMPF)

“For the U.S. dairy sector, the challenge and the opportunity going forward will be reminding policy makers that trade – and the ability to export our products – is essential to the future of our farms, as well as our cooperatives and proprietary processors.”

O

n his first Monday in the White House, President Donald Trump signed an executive order officially abandoning the Trans-Pacific Partnership. This action raised as many questions as it answered about the future of trade policy in the new administration. It certainly signals that America’s approach to trade will undergo a serious re-examination, and face a more critical assessment than at any point in the past five decades. For the U.S. dairy sector, the challenge and the opportunity going forward will be reminding policy makers that trade – and the ability to export our products – is essential to the future of our farms, as well as our cooperatives and proprietary processors. It wasn’t that long ago our industry maintained a “Fortress America” mentality that some in today’s dairy industry can still recall. We exported very little, and employed import quotas to minimize competition from the rest of the world.  The catalytic effect since the 1990s of the passage of NAFTA and other regional trade agreements, the establishment of the World Trade Organization, the formation of the U.S. Dairy Export Council, and the advancement of NMPF’s trade policy initiatives, all have led to the U.S. becoming an integral, indispensable part of global dairy trade.  One day’s worth of all the milk produced in the U.S. each week is exported, and because of our industry’s incredible productive capacity we need more – not fewer – opportunities to boost that ratio even higher.  The U.S. dairy sector has been a clear winner from global trade, as improved policies and a focus on export marketing has opened new doors for “Made in America” dairy foods. As I noted in a letter sent to the new President after the November election, our dairy exports are worth more than $5 billion annually, generating 120,000 jobs in dairy farming, manufacturing

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MESSENGER | MARCH 2017

and related sectors. Any disruption in exports of dairy would have a devastating ripple effect on our farms and beyond, to workers in processing, transportation, and countless other sectors whose jobs are supported by exports.  The valuable economic relationships we have with countries such as Mexico, Japan, South Korea, and China when it comes to our dairy exports must be preserved.  We saw what happened to our domestic milk prices in 2009, and again in 2015, when the U.S. lost market share in the global dairy trade.  For dairy and much of agriculture, many of our future growth opportunities reside outside of our borders.  We will need the right combination of market development, favorable exchange rates, and the negotiation of new agreements – as well as strict enforcement of existing ones – to keep fueling the economic health of the dairy sector. In January, NMPF and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) urged President Trump to pursue new, viable trade deals with countries in the Pacific Rim, and emphasized the critical importance of protecting our trade with Mexico. For the U.S. dairy industry, Mexico represents our number-one market, totaling $1.2 billion in 2016. Any policy or action that disrupts our trade with Mexico would cause severe, immediate harm to U.S. dairy farmers and processors. So, as a re-examination of NAFTA gets underway, our industry will be working closely with the Administration and Congress to demonstrate the importance of Mexico to rural America, and at the same time evaluate how to improve NAFTA by renegotiating trade provisions with Canada, a country that has recently worked to undermine dairy trade. Clearly what’s needed for dairy and all of U.S. agriculture is a pragmatic approach to trade policy: working to fix the problems that need to be fixed, while preserving and enhancing opportunities that are already working.  We’re looking forward to working with the new administration to put such an approach into action.


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Not only are all of these sires in the breed’s top 10 for GTPI, they are part of our industry-leading gender SELECTed lineup. We offer a large number of sexed sires, that are truly our very best. When creating more heifers for your herd, why not use the best the industry has to offer? Call your local Select Sires representative today to place an order for these elite gender SELECTed sires!

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MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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POSITION 1 CANDIDATES

Two Director-atLarge Positions to be Filled at the MMPA 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting Delegates at the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting will elect

Rod Daniels Rod Daniels has served on the MMPA board of directors since 2006 and is currently seeking another term. Daniels has held a variety of leadership positions within MMPA, including on the advisory committee, resolutions committee, credentials committee, nominating committee and as the Sunrise Local vice president. He also is on the UDIM board of directors, Dairy Market Committee, District 7 Holstein Association board of directors and the NorthStar advisory committee. Daniels is a member of the Sunrise Local in District 7. He farms with his family on the 500-cow W-R-L Daniels Farm, LLC in Whittemore, Michigan. Daniels and his wife, Anne, have five children. “Since I began dairy farming I have had an interest in how my milk is marketed. Becoming an official member in 1976, I have served in some capacity ever since. Having served on the board since 2006, I believe I have proven myself to be a fair-minded, forward thinking member who is willing to listen to the membership and represent their interests.”

two at-large members to the MMPA board of directors. There are four candidates* vying for the two open three-year terms: Jim Reid, Kris Wardin, Rod Daniels and Mark Iciek.

*

ALL CANDIDATES COMPLETED APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITIONS AND WERE SUBMITTED FOR CONSIDERATION AFTER AN INTERVIEW WITH THE MMPA STATE NOMINATING COMMITTEE.

Kris Wardin Kris Wardin is seeking a position on the MMPA board of directors. Wardin is currently active in MMPA leadership positions on the advisory committee, as the Mid-Michigan Local Secretary/Treasurer, and District 6 chairman. He and his wife, Carla, were named the 2012 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators and served on the National Milk Producers Federation’s Young Cooperators Council as the Chaircouple. Outside of MMPA, he is on the UDIM board of directors, Michigan Farm Bureau Natural Resources Advisory Committee, and a United Producers State Delegate. He just completed terms on the MSU Extension dairy advisory committee and the Michigan Farm Bureau state resolutions committee. He graduated from the MFB ProFile leadership program in 2010, won the MFB State Discussion meet in 2011, and was honored with the MFB Young Farmer Achievement Award in 2010. Wardin has a degree in biosystems engineering from Michigan State University. He is a member of the Mid-Michigan Local in District 6. Evergreen Dairy is in St. Johns, Michigan, where they milk 400 cows. He and Carla have three boys, Ty, Cole, and Max. “My grandfather was on the MMPA board, and I grew up with a sense of loyalty and pride for this co-op. I’ve been involved since the day I came back to our own dairy, and I truly enjoy the membership and relationships this co-op affords. I am ready to take this to the next level and help lead this co-op into the future.”

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POSITION 2 CANDIDATES James Reid James Reid is running for another term on the MMPA board of directors as an at-large director. Prior to serving on the board, Reid was on the advisory committee, and was chairman of the Capac/Yale Local. He also participated in the Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator Program with his wife, Pam, in the 1980s. Jim is the president of UDIM and is on the board of directors for the United Dairy Industry Association. He serves on the St. Clair County Farmland Preservation board of directors and was on the St. Clair County Farm Bureau board of directors and Grant Township board. He was named MSU Dairy Farmer of the Year in 2012 and NorthStar Cooperative Progressive Dairy Producer of the Year in 2009. He operates Reid Dairy Farm with his son Jeff, a 220-cow farm in Jeddo, Michigan. Reid is a member of the Mid-Thumb Local in District 8. He and Pam have three children. “We have many challenges facing us in this industry. MMPA has had to deal with the industry challenges in general and Michigan specifically. Michigan is unique because of the growth in production and the various producer groups operating within the state. I would like to continue to be part of guiding MMPA to be the leader in shaping the dairy industry for Michigan’s future.”

Mark Iciek Mark Iciek is also seeking a position on the MMPA board of directors. Iciek is a local delegate and a member of the MMPA advisory committee. In the past, he served the position of president on the Clare Gladwin DHIA, Gladwin County Farm Service Agency, St. Stanislaus school board, St. Stanislaus Paris Council and St. Stanislaus administrative committee. He attended Western Michigan University and obtained an bachelor of science in industrial supervision, a master’s degree in business management and took coursework toward a masters in manufacturing management. Iciek is a member of the Clare-Mt. Pleasant Local in District 7. He farms on Tara Anthon Cattle and Management, 640-cow dairy in Gladwin, Michigan. Iciek and his wife, Becky, have seven children. “The dairy industry in Michigan and the country face current and future challenges both domestically and in the international markets. MMPA faces additional challenges in the state of Michigan. It is critical to the membership that these challenges are anticipated and addressed in ways that assure long-term success.”

Membership has its rewards. This March, $33 million of our net profits are headed straight back to our cooperative members. Patronage is just one way GreenStone reinvests in our customers, their businesses, and our communities. To discover the many rewards of membership, contact your local GreenStone branch.

800-444-FARM

www.greenstonefcs.com

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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The definition of “high milk quality” and standards for acceptable udder health are continuously becoming more rigorous and dairy producers who wish to remain competitive must meet or exceed these evolving standards. Dr. Pamela Ruegg, a professor and extension milk quality specialist from the the University of Wisconsin shared her expertise on excelling in milk quality at the recent Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference in Frankenmuth, Michigan. “Producing high quality milk is absolutely required to market milk globally,” Dr. Ruegg emphatically stated. The U.S. Dairy industry is increasingly dependent on exports. “The dynamics of our industry has changed remarkably, we went from almost no dependence on export to a stable fourteen percent of all the U.S. dairy products moving outside the U.S.” She continued, “And most of that is moving to Mexico.”

MAINTAINING

MARKET SHARE MEANS EXCELLING IN

UDDER HEALTH BY MELISSA HART

Because of this increase in exports, the criteria for acceptable milk quality has been set by the export requirement of less than 400,000 Somatic Cell Count (SCC). Dr. Ruegg reminisced that in 1984 when she was in a private veterinary practice the legal SCC limit was 1.5 million. She remarked, “That’s the change that has happened in the length of my career, and in 2015 less than three percent of the U.S. milk did not meet the export quality standards.” She continued, “In order to maintain the competitiveness of our farms, we have had to adapt and we have.” The national SCC trend has been consistent at about 200,000 while

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MESSENGER | MARCH 2017


Michigan is slightly lower at about 158,000. Ruegg made the point that while a low bulk tank cell count is a result of improved milking management and culling of chronic cows, there is a higher rate of clinical mastitis. And that is a much more complex problem to address. “The high clinical case rate is a consequence of more intense management.” Ruegg mentioned higher yielding cows in freestall barns with bedding that supports bacterial growth and exposure to environmental pathogens are also common causes of a higher rate of clinical mastitis cases. “We need to keep bacteria away from teats.” Ruegg continued, “Minimizing mastitis is never the result of a single decision but is the cumulative result of many decisions.” Production of high quality milk is based on good management of cows, people and environment. Several Wisconsin farms enrolled in a survey that followed the result of using six management practices that were aimed at raising milk quality. The six management practices were: use of automatic take-offs, removal of udder hair, complete milking routine, always wearing gloves, keeping of mastitis records and use of the CMT. Ruegg reported that in every instance, the herds producing higher quality milk had higher adoption of every one of these practices.

» Second Action:

» The Fourth Action:

To reduce bacterial exposure of teats of high risk cows. “Choice of bedding has an enormous influence on milk quality,” Ruegg pointed out. While sand is a popular option, many dairies are moving toward manure solids to manage the environmental restrictions. She commented on a study of 325 herds in Wisconsin using sand, mattresses or recycled manure products. The study revealed that herds using sand had much less mastitis and produced more milk. Bedding should be more than seventy-five percent dry matter and cows should not be calving in areas that you would not feel comfortable lying down.

Use antibiotics only on cows that will benefit. Only about 40-50 percent of the clinical cases of mastitis will benefit from use of antibiotics.

» The Third Action: To develop and keep a professional work force. While it may sound simple, a vital truth is that people who work with cows should be people who like cows. Most welfare issues have been the result of poorly trained workers who are insufficiently managed, don’t have appropriate tools and should have never been hired. Ruegg maintains that training the work force and having a routine milking time will yield a lower rate of clinical mastitis.

» The Fifth Action: To think about eating lamb chops. Ruegg commented, “We need to look at every management practice like you are about to eat a lamb chop.” Sharing the story of when her son first realized lamb chops came from young lambs, Ruegg said we need to keep in mind what the consumer is thinking and make sure we are confident that we can defend all of our management practices to the public. She offered a list of considerations including; Are our animals free of pain? Are they free of fear? Do they have sufficient dry resting space? Do they have good quality of life? And are producers comfortable explaining to a non-ag friend why we do what we do? Ruegg concluded, “Producing high quality milk is only going to be more important in the future, it’s the cost of maintaining market access.” BELOW: PAMELA RUEGG SPOKE IN FEBRUARY AT THE GREAT LAKES REGIONAL DAIRY CONFERENCE IN FRANKENMUTH, DETAILING ACTION STEPS FOR PRODUCERS TO ACHIEVE EXCELLENT UDDER HEALTH.

Ruegg has developed her top five actions at excelling at udder health.

» First Action: To cull chronically infected cows. This would include all cows diagnosed with mycoplasma bovis infection or with chronic staph aureus infections, cows with multiple quarters affected by mastitis, cows with more than two clinical cases in one lactation and cows that maintain high SCC over two lactations. MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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Eighteen Michigan Dairy Ambassadors Prep for Year of Dairy Promotion EIGHTEEN MICHIGAN YOUTH WERE NAMED MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADORS AFTER GATHERING AT THE 2017 GREAT LAKES REGIONAL DAIRY CONFERENCE (GLRDC) FOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING, COMMENCING A YEAR OF DAIRY PROMOTION AND OUTREACH IN MICHIGAN. THE PROGRAM WELCOMES STUDENTS IN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TO HONE IN ON THEIR SKILLS AND LEARN HOW TO COMMUNICATE ABOUT THEIR PASSION IN DAIRY.

“The 2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassador program gives youth with a special interest in dairy the opportunity to connect with consumers and share their ‘dairy story,’” said Jessica Welch, a member of the Dairy Ambassador planning team and MMPA member relations coordinator. “Our goal is to equip each Michigan Dairy Ambassador with the communication skills and tools to represent the dairy community and industry in a positive way.”

Next up for the ambassadors is a communications training at UDIM in March and representation at industry events throughout the year, including Dairy Day at the Capitol, Michigan Livestock Expo Sale‐abration, Michigan 4‐H Dairy Days Awards Banquet, Breakfast on the Farm and the MMPA Leaders’ Conference.

“Through various dairy events and speaking seminars my greatest asset I attained through the Dairy Ambassador program is public speaking skills, and more specifically speaking to those who come from a non-dairy background. Volunteering at dairy events across the state was a huge part of the Dairy Ambassador

The Dairy Ambassadors began their year with a day-long leadership training and the opportunity to earn a scholarship on Feb. 3 in Frankenmuth, Michigan. Throughout the day, ambassadors took part in dairy promotion brainstorming, learned about United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) promotion resources from UDIM’s Jolene Griffin and harnessed their “Youth Voice” with Sara Keinath from MSU Extension. Welch and Griffin lead the ambassadors throughout the day, guiding them through engagement activities and challenging them to try new things such as starting conversations with new people. Kristen Burkhardt, 2016 Junior Dairy Ambassador Representative, and Charlene McAlvey, 2016 Senior Dairy Ambassador were also at the leadership training to embrace the next class of dairy ambassadors. Ambassadors will take part in further trainings and represent the dairy industry at promotional and outreach events throughout the year. 18

MESSENGER | MARCH 2017

2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassadors Junior Ambassadors Addy Battel, Cass City; Morgan Mrozinski, Sterling; Jessie Nash, Elsie; Miriah Dershem, St. Johns; Connor Nugent, Clarksville; Chrissy Polzin, Saline; Elysa Zimmerlee, Bellevue; Ashton Geutink, Zeeland; Jessica Parrish, Caledonia

Senior Ambassadors Steven Wilkinson, Kingston; Riley Smith, St. Louis; Lindsey Sharrard, Peck; Alex Taylor, St. Johns; Allison Schafer, Westphalia; Hope McAlvey, Lansing; Mason Horning, Manchester; Julia Chamberlain, Okemos; Lindsay Larsen, Adrian


program,” Charlene McAlvey, 2016 Senior Dairy Ambassador Representative, explained.

Dairy Ambassador Representatives

“My favorite event this past year was helping at a ‘Family Fun at the Farm’ event. I was with the calves during the day—my favorite place on a farm—to teach the community about the hard work that goes into calf management,” McAlvey continued. “Even though farmers have a lot on their plates, hosting these kinds of events is very important for consumers to be able to see the integrity and wholesomeness of our dairy community.”

In addition to training, two scholarships recipients were selected on Feb. 3. Candidates were evaluated on their interview, application and pick-a-question answer. The junior and senior representatives will receive a $1,000 and $1,500 scholarship, respectively, after their year of service as dairy ambassadors.

The ambassadors and representatives were announced the evening following the ambassador training at the GLRDC Michigan Dairy Industry Recognition Night on Feb. 3. The Michigan Dairy Ambassador program is administered by the GLRDC.

JESSIE NASH

“I strongly recommend high school and college aged kids to apply for this program,” McAlvey attested. “Being involved in this program leads to connections for young people looking to start their careers in the dairy world, meeting other young people with the same passions and upholding the reputation of our industry to dairy consumers.” Looking onward to the rest of the year, the newly minted Dairy Ambassadors are prepped for the activities and promotion opportunities ahead. “This is a year-long program, starting at the Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference, where a junior and senior will be selected as Dairy Ambassador Representatives and receive a scholarship. The 2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassador Leadership and Scholarship conference was a great success and we look forward to the year ahead,” Welch concluded.

LINDSAY LARSEN AND JESSIE NASH

2017 JUNIOR MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADOR REPRESENTATIVE Hometown:

Elsie, Michigan

Education:

Nash is a junior at Ovid-Elsie High School.

Agriculture and Dairy Involvement: Nash has been involved in her family dairy farm, the Michigan State Dairy days, the National Dairy Conference, the North American International Livestock Expo Dairy Quizbowl Contest, the Clinton County fair, the Shiawassee County Fair, the Michigan Dairy Conference and the All-American Dairy Show Management Contest. Goals: After

high school, Nash intends to go to college and pursue a career as a ruminant nutritionist. She aspires to eventually return to her family farm.

LINDSAY LARSEN 2017 SENIOR MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADOR REPRESENTATIVE Hometown: Scottville, Education: Larsen

Michigan

is a junior at Siena Heights University pursuing a degree

in biology. Agriculture and Dairy Involvement: Larsen is a manager at her family farm and was involved in 4-H since 2002, winning various awards such as 5-time Grand Champion Supreme Milk Cow, multiple first place awards in showmanship and breed classes and 3-time Dairy Showperson of the Day Legacy Award. Larsen was a Breakfast on the Farm Committee Member and Volunteer at Stakenas Farms, she also managed Western Michigan Fair Milk Booth and participated in 4-H Veterinary Science Kettunen Center Teen and Adult Leader Workshop. Larsen leads the Siena Heights University Beta Beta Beta Biological Honors Club and Greenlight Club. Goals: After graduating from Siena Heights University, Larsen plans on either attending Veterinary Medicine School or finding a job in the dairy industry. A long-term goal is to return to her family’s farm and continue the family legacy. She envisions growth on the farm not only in the number of cows and pounds of milk but also in public weekly farm tours, a new parlor, an on-site processing plant and a farm store.

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OYDC SNAPSHOT

TOP 10

OYDC 2016 Gary and Renee Hufnagel Stony Creek Dairy Westphalia, Michigan Mid-Michigan Local, District 6

Our kids:

How we stay positive:

Wade (13), Megan (10) and Alison (8)

We remind ourselves that we get up 365 days a year to not only support our families but the many lives that are consuming the products we produce every day from our farm. It is hard these days to stay positive when you have outside sources trying to tell you how to run your farming operation, but there has always been these ups and downs in the dairy industry. At all lengths, we try to stay optimistic and positive.

Our farm: Stony Creek Dairy was founded in the 1800s and is a partnership between us and John and Frances Hufnagel.

Our herd: We are milking 220 cows and have 450 total head. We milk twice a day in a double five herringbone parlor.

Our land: We grow alfalfa, corn and rye on 510 acres.

Our mission: To produce the highest volume and quality of milk at the most effective and efficient way possible while producing a profit.

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What’s next: Hopefully, we will grow the size of our herd and be an even more cost effective producing herd, which is often a grueling challenge.


The Top

6

Reasons Why YOU Should Attend the 2017 YC Conference BY BARBARA SIEMEN, 2016 OUTSTANDING YOUNG DAIRY COOPERATOR

Spring Getaway! The 2017 Young Cooperator Conference is almost upon us! Join us Friday, April 7, 2017 at the Bavarian Inn and Conference Center in Frankenmuth, Michigan for a “Spring Getaway.” Here’s six reasons why you should attend this year’s conference:

1

Bring your “A” game for a hilarious round of Farms Against Humanity.

Win prizes by playing our take on this popular card game. “Daddy, why is Mommy crying?” “Jimmy Kimmel has mistaken a steer for a cow, again.”

2

Prepare your questions in advance for industry professionals.

MMPA President Ken Nobis and MMPA General Manager Joe Diglio will present cooperative issues and current market conditions and projections. UDIM CEO, Sharon Toth, will give an overview of statewide dairy promotions.

3

Learn how to position your dairy for success in these economic times.

The agriculture industry is in a major economic transition. What will be the emerging trends impacting agriculture and rural America in the long and short run? Featured keynote speaker Dr. David Kohl, Professor Emeritus from Virginia Tech, will guide YC’s through how to position their dairies for the economic reset.

4

Tour a brand-spanking new robotic dairy farm.

K&K Kern Farms LLC, is opening their barn doors and inviting us for a tour of their farm. Learn about their transition from an old free-stall barn and parlor to four Lely robotic milkers in an all new facility.

5

Laugh the night away.

Comedian Cameron Zvara will entertain us with his engaging magic, props, tricks, and stunts. Don’t make too much eye contact though, or you might end up part of his show!

6

Leave your lederhosen at home.

We’ll enjoy a casual night out in Frankenmuth. There’s never too much fun in Michigan’s “Little Bavaria” and we won’t even make you drink warm beer out of your own boot.

Conference registration is free to MMPA members and MMPA member employees. RSVP details were enclosed in the February 17 milk check or you can register online at mimilk.com/events and click on Young Cooperator Conference. Make hotel reservations by March 17, 2017 and mention MMPA to receive the discounted rate. Call the Bavarian Inn & Conference Center in Frankenmuth, MI at 844-264-9023 for hotel reservations.

For more information, please contact the MMPA Member Relations Department at 248-474-6672 MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Andre Drummond Partners with United Dairy Industry of Michigan, Becomes Milk Means More Ambassador At Mary McCloud Bethune Elementary Middle School in Detroit, All-Star Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond announced he joined the Milk Means More campaign. As part of his work with the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM), Drummond will promote milk to athletes of all ages via special appearances and social media.

D

rummond celebrated joining UDIM’s team of professional athlete ambassadors with a special NBA Fit Clinic. At the clinic, kids in grades 7 and 8 heard about the importance of nutrition to athletes, had a chance to workout like Andre, and enjoyed a nutritious snack. “Nutrition is important, especially to athletes,” Drummond said. “I enjoy strawberry milk after workouts and games because it’s the perfect fuel for my recovery. The protein, carbs, and nutrients in milk set me up for success every time I hit the court.” Three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods are recommended every

day for people 9 years of age and older. Dairy is the number one source of dietary protein and calcium, both vital to growing bodies. “We are thrilled to have Andre join the Milk Means More team,” said Sharon Toth, registered dietitian and chief executive officer of UDIM. “His reputation on and off the court, combined with his commitment to community, make Andre the perfect ambassador.”

Drummond joins world champion athletes Allison Schmitt and Lindsay Tarpley, and professional runner Leah O’Connor as a Milk Means More ambassador.

ANDRE DRUMMOND, UDIM “MILK MEANS MORE” AMBASSADOR

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MERCHANDISE

Barrier Dips Believe it or not, spring is right around the corner. When the temperatures warm up, we are all happy to see the snow and ice melt, bringing with it the promise of green grass and budding trees. Less welcome however is the prospect of cows wading through the mud and muck. When the cow’s environment becomes less than desirable, barrier teat dips can be an important tool in the fight against mastitis causing organisms. A barrier dip differs from other conventional teat dips in the fact that it forms a film at the teat end surface after application. The idea is that sealing off the teat end will help prevent mastitiscausing organisms from entering the teat canal in between milkings. It is sometimes very helpful when the cows are in a less than perfect environment, and it can limit the chances of mastitis occurrence until the cow’s environment can be improved. In normal, healthy conditions, these dips are still a good choice due to 12 percent skin conditioners and very effective organism killing agents. The merchandise warehouse now carries three barrier dip options manufactured by Ecolab. Their characteristics and prices are listed below.

Protect This post-dip is a 1 percent iodine with 12 percent skin conditioners. Protect forms a flexible, non-tacky film on the teat and closes the teat orifice to help prevent bacteria from entering the teat canal between and after milking. It is a very fast, broad-spectrum bacterial kill that promotes lower SCC’s. Protect also provides excellent teat skin conditioning, brown color for good visibility, and non-dripping liquid application that stays on the teats. It is easily removed during udder prep thus preventing iodine residue in the milk. ITEM PROTECT – 15 GAL.

STOCK # 3526

MEMBER PRICE $270.70

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives:

Ideal Ideal is a 1 percent iodine post dip containing 12 percent emollients with a Polymeric Barrier System. Ideal also forms a film over the teat end to prevent micro-organisms from entering the teat canal between milkings. It provides excellent skin conditioning and broad-spectrum bacteria kill. Dipping leaves a brown coloring on the skin tissue for good visibility with easy removal during udder prep. ITEM IDEAL – 5 GAL. IDEAL – 15 GAL. IDEAL – 55 GAL.

STOCK # 6052 6982 6078

MEMBER PRICE $88.75 $252.94 $831.39

Masticare Film This is the barrier version of the popular Masticare dip line. Its unique antimicrobial technology includes salicylic acid combined with other ingredients, providing for an excellent kill of broad spectrum pathogens, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. It also contains 24 percent of a special blend of 6 skin conditioning agents. ITEM MASTICARE FILM 5GAL. MASTICARE FILM 15 GAL.

STOCK # 3552 3553

MEMBER PRICE $83.41 $247.71

— DUANE FARMER, MERCHANDISE SUPERVISOR

Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928 Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor............................................................. 989-317-8370

Toll Free.............................................................................................877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)............................................................ 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax...................................................................989-317-8372

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #____________________________________ Sample Date__________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA__________

Johne’s ELISA_________

Johne’s PCR_________

Pregnancy_________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs to avoid potential service charges.

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POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.*

3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature.

In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and,

4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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FREELINERS

To place a freeliner, fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication.

« Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. » Visit www.mimilk.com/michigan-milk-messenger/advertise/ freeliner-and-classified-ads

Bulls

Cows & Heifers

Registered Holstein Bulls:

30 Holstein milk cows. Averaging 110

We now have a nice selection of

SCC and 92 lbs. of milk. Will sell in

service age bulls, sired by top

groups as well, first come first pick.

AI sires. Green Meadow Farms,

734-776-0285.

Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-6228548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

Equipment Kinze 3000 No-Till Corn Planter, six row w/Interplant. 810-724-8825. New Holland 195 manure spreader, hydraulic end gate, upper beater, heavy single chain, float tires, very good, $11,500. 810-338-5265. John Deere 6420 front wheel drive with 740 loader, premium cab, 1400 hrs. as new, $64,500. 810-338-5265.

Misc. PolyDome Calf House. Electric heat, used only one winter. We built a heated calf barn and no longer need it. Great for getting them dry, warm and started. $400 Prescott, MI 989305-0143.

Wanted Portable vacuum pump and Delaval or Surge bucket milker with claw and pulsator for family cow. 260-705-8185.

28

MESSENGER | MARCH 2017


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. Three operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC. FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Spring special 2000 gal. Muellers for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112.

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1 ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. CALF JACKETS. Keep your calves warm this winter. Very durable, water repellent, Cordura outer shell, with double faced quilted Thinsulate lining. No Velcro. $25 each. 517-543-2415.

FOR SALE: 2012 NH FP230 Chopper with kernel processor, 2 row corn head, 9ft hay head $35,000. Gehl 940 & Gehl 970 16ft Chopper Wagon, 12 ton gear $3,000. Gehl 980 Chopper Wagon 18ft, 12 ton gear $4,500. NH 499 Haybine 12ft $6,000. Case JH 600 Blower $2,000. JD 466 Round Baler net/twine wrap $8,000. 1976 Allis Chalmers 7040 $5,000 OBO. 1952 JD 60 $4,000 OBO. 24ft Big Jim Silo Unloader, very good condition, best offer. Call Mark at 989 737 2389 - Frankenmuth area.

JUNE CLOVER SEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122. MICHIGAN CERTIFIED OAT SEED & SPRING BARLEY SEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

WANTED: DELAVAL OR SURGE BUCKET MILKER with portable vac pump to milk family cow. 260-705-8185.

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

PTO and Automatic Start Generators 1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419 www.hamiltondist.com

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION! A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

GREEN MEADOW FARMS 6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary

| FOR MILK MARKETED IN JANUARY 2017

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

National Trends* (million pounds) 2017

2016 % Change

California

3,413

3,432

-0.6

Wisconsin

2,541

2,515

+1.0

This Month

Year Ago

% Change

Total Class 1 Sales

559,011,080

548,479,574

+1.92

Total Class 2 Sales

358,900,459

346,811,209

+3.49

Total Class 3 Sales

522,295,142

517,813,545

+0.87

Total Class 4 Sales

301,918,847

291,713,516

+3.50

New York

1,261

1,215

+3.8

1,742,125,528

1,704,817,844

+2.19

Idaho

1,191

1,179

+1.0

32.1%

32.2%

Pennsylvania

927

909

+2.0

Mideast Federal Order #33

Michigan

927

896

+3.5

Total Producers............................................................................................................. 5,188

Texas

995

835

+19.2

Minnesota

828

814

+1.7

New Mexico

679

589

+15.3

Washington

553

555

-0.4

Ohio

466

469

-0.6

Indiana

359

352

+2.0

Total U.S.*

16,999

16,553

+2.7

U.S.* Y-T-D

16,999

16,553

+2.7

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

Avg. Daily Production per farm............................................................................10,832

Production

Avg. Protein Test.........................................................................................................3.19% Avg. Butterfat Test......................................................................................................3.88% Avg. Oth Solids Test...................................................................................................5.74% Avg. SCC - MMPA.................................................................................................... 162,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb........................................................................................................$2.1768 Butterfat Price /lb....................................................................................................$2.5253 Other Solids Price /lb.............................................................................................$0.2503 Class III Price @ 3.5%................................................................................................. $16.77 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt..............................................................................$0.38 Uniform Price @ 3.5%............................................................................................... $17.15 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000............................................................................. $0.00085

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb.................................................................................................................... 1.7011 Butter /lb...................................................................................................................... 2.2568 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb................................................................................................... 1.0229 Dry Whey /lb................................................................................................................ 0.4421

30

MESSENGER | MARCH 2017

* For 23 States


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff Northwest Area

Novi Headquarters

Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 202

Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Herron...................................269-245-6632 Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

Southwest Area Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Krista Schrock, Orland, IN..................................269-986-6792 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822 Brittni Tucker, Wyoming....................................248-880-3785

Southeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Andrea Meade, Finley, OH.................................248-880-4113 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481

Board of Directors

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Officers

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Operations Ed Jaquay............................................................... ext. 248 Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251 Milk Sales Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210 Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304 Communications Allison Stuby Miller................................................. ext. 296 Suppy Chain Therese Tierney....................................................... ext. 217

Ken Nobis, President

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Directors-At-Large Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 202 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830 District Directors 1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032

Other Member Services

Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303

Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775

Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771

Manufacturing Plants

3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid, Michigan Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221 Deutsch Käse Haus, Middlebury, Indiana Elsie Raber, Plant Manager............................ 574-825-9511

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson.....................................................989-289-9686

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/ field-staff and searching by your producer number.

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-2106 6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

MARCH 2017 | MESSENGER

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Profile for Michigan Milk Producers Association

Michigan Milk Messenger: March 2017  

Michigan Milk Messenger: March 2017  

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