Michigan Milk Messenger: January 2017

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 7 | JANUARY 2017

INSIDE:

SUSTAINABILITY and the Value of the Data We Produce Above and Beyond for Flint

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JANUARY 2017 FEATURES

On the Cover Snow blankets the rural countryside as farmers in the Midwest work through another winter season and welcome the new year. PHOTO BY MISTY MORNING PHOTOGRAPHY, MISTY-MORNING-PHOTOGRAPHY.COM.

10 OYDC SNAPSHOT: 16 | TOP AMANDA CAREY

The 2016 class of Top 10 OYDCs includes Amanda Carey of Morley, Michigan. Carey offers a peek into her farm and her goals for the future.

AND THE VALUE 18 | SUSTAINABILITY OF THE DATA WE PRODUCE

What is sustainability? What does the word mean for farmers and can it be used as a tool? MMPA’s new sustainability coordinator, Kendra Kissane, explores opportunity for members through sustainability.

20 | ABOVE AND BEYOND FOR FLINT

It’s been 365 days since MMPA stepped in and donated milk to the Flint, Michigan community. But milk doesn’t rain down from heaven, so how did that donation process really happen?

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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January 25-26, 2017 Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort Mt. Pleasant, MI

Marketing and Business Management: • Options and Futures to Advanced Marketing Tools Bryan Doherty, Stewart-Peterson, West Bend, Wisconsin • Blending Crop Insurance with Marketing Plans Mike Mock, Mock Consulting LLC • Corn Farmers and the Next Farm Bill, Making Your Voice Heard Sam Willett, National Corn Growers Association Agronomy – Corn and Soybeans: • Nitrogen and Sulfur on Corn Dr. Kurt Steinke, Michigan State University • Manure as Fertilizer for High Yields Dr. Kurt Steinke, Michigan State University, Farmer panel: George Zmitko, Bill Hunt, Pat Feldpausch • Tackling the Limiting Factors for Corn Yield: Rotations, residues, nutrients and microbes Stephanie Smith, Eastern U.S. Regional Mgr 360 Yield Center • Diversity is Key to Stopping Soybean Cyst Nematodes Dr. Palle Pedersen, Syngenta, Greensboro, North Carolina • Critical Factors for Soybean Yields AJ Woodyard, BASF Agronomy – Wheat: • Stripe Wheat Rust of 2016, Moving Forward Dr. Martin Chilvers and Martin Nagelkirk, Michigan State University Extension • Principles and Practices of Intensive Wheat Management John Whittaker, NorthernSTAR Integrated Services, Grayling • Nitrogen Management on Wheat Dr. Kurt Steinke, Michigan State University

TOPICS

Technology: • Next Generation Biotech Traits Dr. Kevin Folta, University of Florida • Beyond Color Maps: What else can you do with yield data? Dennis Pennington, Michigan State University Extension • Yield Monitors: Improving data quality John Fulton, Ohio State University • Variable Seeding Rates of Corn and Soybeans Lessons learned from a farmer panel • What Can Drones do on Your Farm in 2017? Chad Colby, Colby AgTECH, Peoria, Illinois • Remote Sensing, What’s the Big Deal? Chad Colby, Colby AgTECH, Peoria, Illinois • Ag-Tech Incubator: How to take a great on-farm idea to commercialization Becky Huttenga, Great Lakes Ag-Tech Business Incubator Emerging Issues, Educating Consumers, Social Media: • Behind the Scenes of the Peterson Farm Bros. Social Media Greg Peterson, Peterson Farm Brothers, Assaria, Kansas • Finding Your Media Niche to Ensure Agriculture Has an Intentional Presence Kim Bremmer, Ag Inspirations, Wisconsin • Consumer Trends on Farms and Foods: A panel of millennial consumers Moderated by Elaine Bristol, Michigan Ag Council Wildlife Management: • Deer & Wildlife Management James DeDecker, Michigan State University; Ashley Autenrieth & Monique Ferris, MI DNR; Tim Wilson, USDA Wildlife Services

10 RUP credits, 10 CCA credits, and 1 MAEAP credit available for attendance.

Register online at: www.GreatLakesCropSummit.com


CONTENTS

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MMPA MATTERS

“Our century-long partnership with MMPA is meaningful and durable. We’re looking forward to century number two.”

Changing Producers, Changing Co-ops, Changing Consumers

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10 12 14

QUALITY WATCH FARM 3.0: Affirming a Positive Animal Care Story for 2017 and Beyond

— MSU CANR DEAN RON HENDRICK

NEWS & VIEWS LEGISLATIVE WATCH

DEPARTMENTS

CHARGING AHEAD TO 2017 Members Learn ‘What’s Going On’ at the MMPA Leaders’ Conference

17 22

29

MERCHANDISE

GREAT LAKES REGIONAL DAIRY CONFERENCE SLATED FOR FEB. 2-4 IN FRANKENMUTH

30

QUALITY PREMIUMS

MMPA 2016 QUALITY AWARD WINNERS

32 FREELINERS

26

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

28

LOCAL MEETING DATES

MMPA CORE VALUES:

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QUALITY

31 POLICIES

33 CLASSIFIEDS 34

MARKET REPORT

35 STAFF

»

INTEGRITY

Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor...............................................................................Allison Stuby Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation.......................................................................................2,814 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

»

PROGRESS

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41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

LEADERSHIP

»

COMMUNITY

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

Changing Producers, Changing Co-ops, Changing Consumers BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

Celebrating MMPA’s 100th anniversary last year caused us to reflect on the massive changes that have taken place since our co-op was formed. I hope you all made good use of the opportunity to read the many snippets of our history published in the Messenger this past year. Maybe it is because we are living it, but to me the shifts we’ve seen since the beginning of the 21st century might just be the most impactful of those 100 years. The changes in just three categories - producers, co-ops, and consumers - blow you away. Technology has touched all three categories, with technology on the farm affecting everything from the seeds we select to the equipment we use to plant and harvest them. Robotic milking equipment has gained a foothold that will continue to grow.

“One thing that hasn’t changed as we look ahead to year 101 is the focus to fulfill our co-op’s mission, which is to market our members’ milk to the greatest advantage possible.”

We’ve also seen some technologies introduced and then banned in our Michigan marketplace, for example rBST. This product was safe for the cow and the consumer, but it wasn’t accepted by a public that sometime tends to shy away from our scienceproven advancements. Consumers have become even further distanced from production agriculture in recent years. We haven’t always done an adequate job of informing them about how their food is produced and how we use products and practices to produce a safe, nutritious, affordable food supply. In earlier years, there was a family connection to agriculture that doesn’t exist today. When the connection existed, consumers knew animal care and environmental responsibility were everyday considerations for farmers. With that connection gone, our industry today recognizes the need to have not only written protocols but also third party audits of those protocols to assure our consumers we are following acceptable practices. MMPA’s market has changed in other ways, too. Historically our market area has experienced very good fluid consumption when compared to the volume of milk produced. However, with milk production growing so rapidly and fluid consumption declining, we’ve lacked the balance of product mix we need to keep our producers’ prices competitive. The one category that needs to be expanded is cheese production. We have been working diligently and are cooperating with other entities to fill that void in our product mix. With the myriad of changes going on around us, MMPA continues to evolve. MMPA’s customers seek to provide even higher quality, longer shelf life products to their customers. This in turn requires even higher quality standards for our producers. Our member representatives work with customers to understand their needs while helping them understand what is possible and what is not, and they work with our members to assist them with any problems. The MMPA staff has always worked closely with our customers, but in today’s environment, that relationship is stronger than ever. So far, the cooperative effort among our customers, MMPA staff and our member producers has been very successful. Every decision made by the board and staff is dedicated to improving incomes for our members. That job hasn’t gotten any easier with the impact of the global economy and other factors on our profitability, as we all noted in 2016. Our business will always be cyclical, but the decisions made today will hopefully reduce some of the volatility tomorrow. One thing that hasn’t changed as we look ahead to year 101 is the focus to fulfill our co-op’s mission, which is to market our members’ milk to the greatest advantage possible.

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MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017



QUALITY WATCH

FARM 3.0 – Affirming a Positive Animal Care Story for 2017 and Beyond BY DEAN LETTER, DIRECTOR OF MEMBER SERVICES

By the time you read this, the National Dairy FARM Program will have completed its sixth year. The intent of the program was to provide a meaningful way for dairy farmers to assure processors and customers of the good and proper care their cows get every day. The non-farming community is often generations removed from the farm and has difficulty understanding the purpose of certain husbandry practices. Therefore, the FARM Program utilizes key metrics for farmers to use to help satisfy some of the hot button issues of consumers. Members re-enrolling in the National Dairy FARM Program after January 1, 2017 will have their animal care practices reviewed under the third revision of the program otherwise known as FARM 3.0. There are not a lot of changes between FARM 2.0 and FARM 3.0, but the changes that exist are significant. I will provide a general review of the changes below; the next two Quality Watch columns will review the changes in more detail. Tail Docking

“The non-farming community is often generations removed from the farm and has difficulty understanding the purpose of certain husbandry practices. Therefore, the FARM Program utilizes key metrics for farmers to use to help satisfy some of the hot button issues of consumers.”

As announced last fall, tail docking has been disallowed. Without scientific data supporting the practice and both AVMA and AABP withdrawing their support, the NMPF Board of Directors decided that they needed to follow suit. The board made this decision several years ago, and FARM 3.0 puts this decision into practice. Since this issue has been discussed by the dairy community for a significant period of time, science does not support the practice, and FARM 3.0 disallows it, MMPA members may no longer dock tails nor allow another agent, such as a heifer raiser, to perform the practice on their behalf. Other key areas are split into two categories: Phase One Priority Areas and Phase Two Priority Areas. What’s the difference? Phase One Priority Areas Three items are covered in the phase one priority areas: tail docking noted above, dairy cattle care ethics and training agreements which is signed by all farm employees with animal care responsibilities annually, and a Veterinarian Client Patient Relationship (VCPR) which is signed annually by the farm’s regular veterinarian otherwise known as the veterinarian of record (VOR). With the exception of tail docking, if members do not have these other items in place for their FARM 3.0 evaluation, the animal care team can help members assemble the proper documentation. FARM 3.0 allows farms up to a year from the date of the initial FARM 3.0 evaluation to complete these items. Phase Two Priority Areas The phase two priority area includes a written herd health plan (HHP). The HHP would include protocols for newborn and milk-fed calves, pain management, non-ambulatory animal management and euthanasia. In addition to the HHP, cows need to meet minimum program targets for lameness, body condition, and hock/knee health. FARM 3.0 allows farms up to three years from the date of the initial FARM 3.0 evaluation to address these items. Many members whose milk goes into the Leprino Foods plants needed to comply with the Leprino Quality Animal Care Program (LQAC) effective January 1, 2017. FARM 3.0 does not change the need for LQAC compliance. However, members that achieve LQAC compliance should already meet the FARM 3.0 requirements. As we move into 2017 and the changes of FARM 3.0 take effect on your farm, I want to thank you for your commitment and dedication to helping us assure our customers and consumers that our farms provide superior animal care.

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MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


MILKER Training School MILKER Training School MILKER Training School

MMPA Milker Training School MMPA Milker Training School MMPA Milker Training School

Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing Milker Training to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’and milktheir by providing milk quality andSchools animal aim stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing employees. employees. milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their employees. Strategies to help members achieve this goal include: Strategies to help members achieveand thismilk goalquality include: • Relay proper milking techniques procedures. •Strategies Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. help members achieve goaland include: • Present to the big-picture science of this mastitis milk quality. Present the big-picture science of mastitis and milk quality. • Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. •• Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. Present big-picture and science of mastitis and milk quality. Improvethe stockmanship animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. • Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. • Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements.

Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation Partnership » Quality » Animal Care Consistency » Education » Affirmation

February 15 February 9:30 a.m. - 15 2:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. February 15 Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s

April 20 April 10:00 20 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 - 3:00 p.m. April 20 Aplex a.m. - Alpena

DeMotts West Park Inn Aplex - Alpena 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 440 W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. 440 W. Sanilac Rd. 701 Woodward Ave. DeMotts Aplex - Alpena Sandusky,West MI Park Inn Alpena, MI Sandusky, MI Rd. Alpena, MI 440 W. Sanilac 701 Woodward Ave. Sandusky, MI Alpena, MI April 13 April 10:00 13 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. A $10 per person registration fee will 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.ISD A per person fee will April 13 Wextford-Missaukee be$10 deducted fromregistration your milk check to Wextford-Missaukee ISD 10:00 - 3:00 p.m. be deducted from your milk check to Careera.m. Tech. Center A $10 per person registration fee will cover lunch and material costs. Career Center ISD Wextford-Missaukee 9901 E.Tech. 13th St. cover lunch and material costs. be deducted from your milk check to 9901 E.Tech. 13th Career Center Cadillac, MI St. cover lunch and material costs. Cadillac, MI St. 9901 E. 13th Cadillac, MI Marianne Gasiewski » 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com Marianne Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi,»MI 48376 P.O. Box 8002, Novi,»MI 48376 Marianne Gasiewski 248-442-7597 » gasiewski@mimilk.com P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376

Alvin &Perrin Dorothy Hochstetler’s 9:30 - 2:30 p.m. 26671a.m. Road 26671 Perrin Road Alvin & Dorothy Hochstetler’s Sturgis, MI Sturgis, MI Road 26671 Perrin Sturgis, MI 21 February February 10:00 a.m. 21 - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. February 21 Winter Inn - 3:00 p.m. Winter Inn - 3:00Rd. 10:00 p.m. 100 N.a.m. Lafayette 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Winter Inn MI Greenville, Greenville, MI 100 N. Lafayette Rd. Greenville, MI To register, contact: To register, contact: To register, contact:

March 15 March 15 - 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. March 15West DeMotts Park Inn

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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NEWS & VIEWS Class III Price Rises by $1.94 The USDA announced November’s Class III price is $16.76 per cwt., up $1.94 from October and $1.46 above November 2015. The November Class IV price is $13.76, up 10 cents from October but $3.13 below a year ago. The Sept.-Oct. MPP margin was $9.16, the highest level of 2016.

Become a Breakfast on the Farm Host! Breakfast on the Farm is continually accepting applications for host farms. Any farmers with a desire to open their doors to the public are encouraged to apply to be hosts. To apply, visit breakfastonthefarm.com and download an application. Applications should be submitted to your local MSU Extension educator. Following selection, host farms will receive guidance every step of the way from MSU Extension staff and a local planning committee that will be formed to provide assistance. For more information about becoming a host, contact Ashley Kuschel, event coordinator, at 586-4697616 or kuschela@anr.msu.edu, or Mary Dunckel, MSU Extension ag literacy educator, at 989-354-9875 or dunckelm@anr.msu.edu.

Producers Scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Clunis Dairy* William Maasch Calvin Bodeis Glen & Dale Phillips Farms Carrie Delong Perry & Angie Heckman * Delong’s Dairy Farm David Shoemaker Hornbacher Farms H W R Farms Reba Zimmerman & Sons *100 percent 10

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

MSU Extension Dairy Winter Program: Focus on the First 24 Hours The first 24 hours of a calf’s life can significantly influence its longevity and productivity in the herd. This 2017 MSU Extension dairy winter program is designed for dairy farm owners, herd managers and agribusiness professionals to learn about the latest research and strategies to improve long-term health and growth of dairy replacements from the first day. Newborn calves must consume ample quantities of high quality colostrum shortly after birth to ensure successful passive transfer. The meeting will focus on the dam’s ability to produce high quality colostrum based on vaccination protocols and nutritional management during the dry period. Other colostrum quality factors to be highlighted are timing of colostrum harvest (first milking) and avoiding bacterial contamination of colostrum. Managing the maternity pen to minimize stress for the cow and to provide a clean environment for the calf and the dam will be reviewed. Ways to reduce stillbirths will be discussed including genetic selection and appropriate intervention during calving. Techniques for handling the newborn calf to minimize any additional stress following birth will be discussed. Special considerations for handling calves during the winter will be covered. DATES AND LOCATIONS: January 24

St. Johns (Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizer)

January 26

West Branch (Forward Conference Center)

January 31

Hamilton (Trestle Stop)

February 14

Falmouth (Falmouth Community Center)

February 15

Hillsdale (Hillsdale Co. MSU Extension Office)

February 16

Bad Axe (Franklin Inn)

Meeting times for all locations are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. Registration details can be accessed at: events.anr.msu.edu/First24Hours For more information about registration, contact Nicole Walker at 989-224-5241 or walke628@anr.msu.edu, or your area MSU Extension dairy educator.

2017 Direct Deposit Schedule The MMPA direct deposit program automatically deposits members’ net milk proceeds into their bank accounts using a secure electronic funds transfer system. This system assures the timely deposit of funds on the dates listed below and eliminates the need for monthly trips to the bank. The direct deposit service is free to MMPA members. All members still receive a monthly check statement by mail. The direct deposit stub of the statement indicates the amount transferred into the members’ bank account. » January 17 and 26 » February 17 and 27 » March 17 and 27 » April 17 and 26 » May 17 and 26 » June 16 and 26

» July 17 and 26 » August 17 and 25 » September 18 and 26 » October 17 and 26 » November 17 and 27 » December 18 and 26


Upcoming Animal Care Training Webinars for FARM 3.0

Upcoming Events

The Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (FARM) Program is continuing to offer informational webinars with Merck Animal Health as part of the FARM Version 3.0 rollout.

January

WEBINAR DATES, TOPICS AND PRESENTERS: January 12, 2017

Cattle Marketing

Dr. Lowell

January 26, 2017

Preparing for the Unexpected

Rick Jackson

February 9, 2017

Emerging Issues

Jamie Jonker

Recorded webinars from the series are available to watch online, focusing on these topics: • Dairy Stockmanship Skills • Calf Care • Euthanasia Guidelines • Handling Non-Ambulatory Cattle

Local Meetings continue

February District Meetings

February 1-2 Indiana Dairy Forum, French Lick, IN

February 2-4

• Pain Management

Great Lakes Regional

• Record Keeping & Drug Residue Prevention: An Industry Opportunity

Dairy Conference,

• Building Strong Herd Health Programs

Frankenmuth

For more information, visit nationaldairyfarm.com/merck-training-materials.

Bovine TB Identified in Alpena County and Montmorency County Herds

USDA to Measure Financial Well-Being of the Dairy Sector

Bovine tuberculosis was recently confirmed in a dairy herd in Alpena County and a beef herd in Montmorency County during annual surveillance testing. These are the 67th and 68th herds identified with bovine TB in Michigan since 1998.

Beginning in January, representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will visit dairy farms across the nation, as the agency begins collecting data for the final phase of the 2016 Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS).

Both herds are located within the USDA-designated bovine TB Modified Accredited Zone, which encompasses Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda counties. Annual surveillance testing of herds and testing cattle before movement is required in this area to prevent the spread of disease. Within the MAZ, bovine TB is endemic in the free-ranging white-tailed deer population, and any shared contact between deer and cattle can be a potential source of infection. MDARD, Michigan State University Extension, Alpena Conservation District, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services and local producers are working together on a voluntary Enhanced Wildlife Risk Mitigation program for high risk herds in the MAZ to help cattle producers strengthen their herd’s protection against wildlife interactions and bovine TB.

All dairy farmers selected to participate in 2016 ARMS will be notified by mail. After that, trained enumerators will visit the participating farms to gather the information through personal interviews. These visits will begin in late January and will continue through early April..

Find more information about bovine TB at www.michigan.gov/bovinetb JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

» STRICTER ENFORCEMENT OF MILK LABELING STANDARDS

Dairy Organizations Applaud Congressional Letter to FDA

A

new congressional effort to prod federal regulators to crack down on the inappropriate labeling of products designed to imitate milk drew support today from the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) and the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), which thanked lawmakers for speaking out on the issue. In a letter written by Reps. Mike Simpson (R-ID) and Peter Welch (D-VT), and cosigned by a bipartisan coalition of 32 other members of the House, lawmakers urge U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Robert Califf to more aggressively police the improper use of dairy terms, which are used on the labels of many products that have no real dairy ingredients. Federal standards of identity stipulate that milk and related foods have to be made from animal sources to use these established dairy terms. Thus, plantbased foods and beverages made of nuts and grains are “misleading to consumers, harmful to the dairy industry, and a

violation of milk’s standard of identity,” the letter said. “We request that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exercise its legal authority to investigate and take appropriate action against the manufacturers of these misbranded products.” Dairy organizations have voiced similar concerns in the past, urging FDA to restrict the use of dairy terms on labels of plant-based imitation products such as milk, cheese and yogurt. “You haven’t ‘got milk’ if it comes from a seed, nut or bean,” said Jim Mulhern, President and CEO of NMPF. “In the many years since we first raised concerns about the misbranding of these products, we’ve seen an explosion of imitators attaching the word ‘milk’ to everything from hemp to peas to algae. We don’t need new regulations on this issue, we just need FDA to enforce those that have been on the books for years.”

Michael Dykes, president and CEO of IDFA, said that while “imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, dairy imitators do not naturally provide the same level of nutrition to the people buying them as milk does.” He noted that non-dairy beverages “can mislead people into thinking these products are comparable replacements for milk, when in fact most are nutritionally inferior.” The congressional letter points out that while consumers are entitled to choose imitation products, “it is misleading for manufacturers of these items to profit from the ‘milk’ name. These products should be allowed on the market only when accurately labeled.” Welch and Simpson noted that the European Union offers an example of how product terminology can be altered to make it less misleading. Regulators in the EU allow the use of the term “soy drink,” but prohibit “soy milk.” Addressing this issue, the letter concluded, “will provide consumers with the accurate information they expect.”.

SOURCE: NMPF AND IDFA

2016 MMPA Advisory Committee

12

District 1 Bruce Lewis, Jonesville....................................................517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester.................................................734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover...........................................................517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH............................................419-466-4471 Jeff Alexander, Hanover...................................................517-740-9981

District 5 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...............................................989-304-0233 Lyle Vanderwal, Lake City................................................231-328-4926 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton....................................................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain...................................................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy............................................................231-388-0496

District 2 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........................................574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.............................................269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN......................................574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton............................................................269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue....................................................269-660-0498

District 6 David Reed, Owosso........................................................989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia...........................................................989-640-3372 Kris Wardin, St. Johns......................................................989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell.......................................................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler........................................................989-682-9064

District 3 Tim Butler, Sand Lake......................................................269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland.......................................................616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville....................................................231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil......................................................231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant..........................................................231-834-7610

District 7 John Bennett, Prescott.....................................................989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin..........................................................989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar........................................................989-652-6500 Philip Gross, Weidman.....................................................989-289-0670 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning..............................................989-302-2299

District 4 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth................................................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron......................................................989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard................................................906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke.......................................................989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen............................................................989-379-4694

District 8 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing..............................................989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin........................................................810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell.................................................810-404-2140 Patrick Bolday, Emmett....................................................810-395-7139 Michael Noll, Croswell......................................................810-404-4071

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


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Charging Ahead to 2017 MEMBERS LEARN ‘WHAT’S GOING ON’ AT THE MMPA LEADERS’ CONFERENCE Before the local meetings and district meetings and even the Annual State Delegate meeting, MMPA members in leadership roles gather every fall for the MMPA Leaders’ Conference. On Nov. 21, 2016, these leaders—including local officers, district officers, dairy communicators and OYDCs—met in East Lansing, MI to begin the next few months of member gatherings. This year’s conference gave attendees an update on the various changes in the dairy industry, political landscape, university and MMPA.

What’s going on at the university? Starting off the morning program, MMPA members heard from two new leaders in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) at Michigan State University (MSU). First, Dr. Ron Hendrick, the new dean of CANR, described his vision for the college. One goal mentioned was the need to increase accessibility for more potential students, even as the college is growing near a 40-year high in enrollment.

“We are currently placing over 90 percent of our graduates into jobs or advanced study,” Hendrick stated. “We have high employability, but we need to improve affordability and accessibility for more students.”

Hendrick also called attention to the relationship between the college and MMPA. “Our century-long partnership with MMPA is meaningful and durable. We’re looking forward to century number two,” Hendrick concluded. MSU Extension Executive Director Dr. Jeff Dwyer, who assumed this position in early 2016, followed Hendrick, going into greater detail about the programs and mission of Extension. Dwyer reflected on the importance of their 4-H and youth programs. MSU Extension is also asserting its need to be active in communities to respond quickly when there is a crisis. According to Dwyer, their presence in communities enabled MSU Extension to be a “rapid response” force for issues such as Bovine Tuberculosis, foreclosure prevention and the Flint Water Crisis. Throughout 2016, MMPA received three awards from MSU Extension. Dwyer noted the Key Partner award MMPA received recently: “This award reflects that we couldn’t ask for more out of an organization, a partner or a friend.” 2016 OUTSTANDING YOUNG DAIRY COOPERATORS (OYDC) DARRIN AND BARBARA SIEMEN LEAD THE LUNCHEON PROGRAM, WHICH FOLLOWED CONNER’S PRESENTATION. THE SIEMENS INTRODUCED THEIR FELLOW OYDCS AND 10 MSU STUDENTS RECEIVING SCHOLARSHIPS FROM MMPA IN THE 2016-2017 ACADEMIC YEAR.

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MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


What’s going on at MMPA? In the afternoon, members focused on what’s going on with their cooperative. First, MMPA General Manager Joe Diglio spoke frankly with the group and explored the results of the 2016 fiscal year.

CHUCK CONNER, NCFC

What’s going on with national ag policy? Chuck Conner, president and CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, offered an update on food and agricultural policy. He highlighted the need to be active in national policy to ensure the needs of farmers are addressed. “In ag, we’re about the longterm,” Conner described. “We are long term investors in land and livestock, so we need to be long-term investors in Washington, D.C. as well.”

Conner, a former Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, explored five key issues expected to be impacted by the incoming administration: immigration, infrastructure, tax reform, the Affordable Care Act, regulatory reform and trade.

The year—spanning Oct. 1, 2015 to Sept. 30, 2016—was characterized by “headwinds and tailwinds” which included the massive milk flush which resulted in depressed milk and commodity prices. However, Diglio emphasized how MMPA found growth and new sales opportunities, capitalized on butter and cream sales, and collaborated with other dairy cooperatives to achieve goals. Diglio also noted some of MMPA’s accomplishments including reaching $5.8 million net savings and paying out more than $25 million to members in producer incentive premiums. Diglio then introduced Greg Soehnlen from Superior Dairy, an MMPA customer based out of Canton, Ohio. Soehnlen gave MMPA members an overview of their company and its drive to make changes through innovation. MMPA President Ken Nobis was the last speaker of the day. He addressed national and global issues such as worldwide milk production, Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) and the dairy Margin Protection

Program (MPP). Nobis relayed the need for program improvements on MPP and noted some members of Congress are currently looking to change or modify the program. Nobis continued his discussion with a closer look at MMPA and the coop’s ongoing examination of feasible expansion opportunities. “We are well positioned for the future,” Nobis asserted. “We have processed record volumes through our plants, we have an expanding customer base and we have a strong employee team.”

Following Nobis’ presentation, Diglio and Soehnlen returned to the stage for a question and answer session to allow members to learn a little more. After another challenging year, the Leaders’ Conference prepped MMPA leaders for the following months of local, regional, district and the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting. District 8 Earns Donation to Charity through MMPAC Challenge District 8 had the highest percentage of members contribute to the Michigan Milk Producers Political Action Committee (MMPAC) during the fundraising campaign. They will receive a matching gift of up to $1,000 designated toward the district’s choice of one of five charities. MMPAC provides bipartisan support to state and federal candidates who demonstrate a willingness to work on behalf of dairy and agricultural interests.

Conner recognized immigration was a hot topic during the 2016 presidential election, even as many farmers rely on labor from immigrant workers and the agriculture industry has unique challenges related to this issue. Further, Conner noted in regards to infrastructure improvements, a challenge will be to “ensure rural America receives its fair share of any new initiative.” Conner concluded by drawing attention to the 2018 Farm Bill: “The farm bill is within our grasp and we have reason for optimism moving forward.”

MMPA PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS (LEFT) WITH LEADERS FROM DISTRICT 8, DARWIN SNELLER (CENTER) AND MICHAEL BENDER (RIGHT).

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

15


OYDC SNAPSHOT

TOP 10

OYDC 2016 Amanda Carey Carey Farms Morley, Michigan Alma Local, District 5

Our farm:

Carey Farms is a partnership between my father and I in Morley, Michigan. My role on the farm is to manage the dairy side of our operation. I also do the book keeping.

How I stay positive:

We milk 140 cows with around 300 head total on the farm. We milk twice a day in a double eight herringbone.

Honestly, I’m still working on how to remain positive through all the changes in the dairy industry. At the end of the day, I just remind myself that I’m doing the best that I can and that I just have to ride the waves. My dad warned me before I entered into farming that there’s highs and lows. I got to ride the high of 2014 and now I’m riding my first low. It’s all a learning experience.

We farm 960 acres of corn, soybeans, and alfalfa. Our mission:

The mission of our farm is to remain profitable at an economic level while generating enough revenue to support full time employment of multiple generations.

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

My favorite part about being a dairy farmer is working with the cows. I love that dairy farming allows me to be so hands on every day.

Our herd:

Our land:

16

The best part of being a dairy farmer:

What’s next:

Our future goals are to maintain herd size while increasing my share of ownership and starting down the path of generational transfer of ownership.


Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference

Slated for Feb. 2-4 in Frankenmuth Focuses On Preparing Producers for Dairying in 20! the Future Early registration ends January

T

he 15th annual Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference Feb. 2-4, 2017, at the Bavarian Inn and Conference Center in Frankenmuth, Michigan, will focus on the latest in milk quality, hoof care, antimicrobial drug use, consumer transparency and market outlooks to help dairy producers remain successful today and into the future. The conference kicks off Thursday with a pre-conference session in which Michigan producers, managers and employees will discuss progress and pitfalls of antimicrobial drug use in Michigan herds, gained from a study funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. Next, producers will hear from Thomas Bailey, the vice president dairy analyst with Rabobank Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory dairy team, as he shares his insights into where the dairy industry is headed globally. Bailey will give producers a chance to discuss what these changes mean to their bottom line. Following the global discussion, the conference will shift its focus and hear from Charlie Arnot with the Center for Food Integrity and Chad Frahm with the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy as they help producers understand consumer demands and explore what is needed to build trust with consumers and processors to ensure a transparent food supply. Producers will have the opportunity to have a dialogue with

these experts about the challenges they face, and discuss what can be done to reduce confusion and find a common ground for all.

Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference The afternoon will wrap up with a detailed look at dairying Down Under with James Mann of Donovan’s Dairy.

The Exhibitor Showcase, Dairy Challenge Presentation, Great Lakes Commercial Heifer Extravaganza XII Sale and an entertaining night of Loos Tales with comedian Trent Loos round Bavarian and Conference Center out the Inn evening.

February 2–4

Frankenmuth, Michigan The conference continues Friday

» Q&A With a Producer Down Under

Producers will learn more about Donovan’s

Dairy and Mann’s management strategies in morning when attendees hear Greg a question-and-answer workshop. Bethard of G&R Dairy Consulting talk With the current state of milk prices and ever-increasing consumer demands, about the economics of dairying today » In-Depth About Hoof dairy producers are facing a volatile environment. AttendDiscussion this year’s Great Health With Karl Burgi and the most critical economic and Attendees will take a closer at Lakes Regional Conference to arm yourself with the knowledge,look tools societal factorsDairy for the future. Then the details of keeping hoofs healthy: andparticipants strategies will to help ensure discover newyour toolsfuture and in dairy. understanding basic hoof anatomy, preventing claw horn diseases through techniques to bring hoof health care into functional and therapeutic hoof trimming, Checkout on: Karl Burgi of the the nextsessions decade with using timed hoof trimming, preventing Dairyland Hoof Care Institute. University digital dermatitis foot rot, managing • Understanding everything from global markets to production costs andand learning from the a of Wisconsin Pamyour Ruegg, challenges othersprofessor face to help operation survive successful and thrivehoof bath and setting up a lowaction plan. veterinarians Mark Fox decade and Dr.regarding Roger hooflameness • Moving your herdDr. into the new and udder health with new tools, Thomson,and andmanagement Michigan producers Milk Components: Opportunities for techniques practices to improve » reproduction and longevity, and Maximizing Farm Gate Returns will share their research and real-life produce higher profits Adam Lock, Michigan State University and experiences to helpveterinarians expand producers’ • Learning from faculty, and producers whoother will experts share their expertise on how in excelling in milk quality to Maximizing milk components has historically toskill excelsets in milk quality with evolving standards been one of the biggest challenges of dairy meet the evolving standards of today • Discovering what’s happening Down Underand in dairy from an Australian management. Milk producer component yield (not tomorrow. The formal program will wrap milk volume) continues be the key driver • Understanding consumers and building trust in today’s food supply throughtotransparency up with inspiring and challenging words of dairy profitability. The workshop will • Finding your competitive edge through feed, nutrition emphasize and milk component strategies influences on milk components, from Mike Hutjens, University of Illinois

professor emeritus, on the four feeding pillars of 2017.

both fat and protein, during production with input from economics.

www.glrdc.msu.edu • 517-884-7089 • honkemeg@msu.edu The Jersey Association will conduct Friday afternoon, attendees will have the choice of three educational workshops to attend:

their annual meeting on Saturday starting at 10 a.m.

INDIVIDUAL (ADULT), STUDENT AND FARM REGISTRATION OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE. REGISTRATIONS RECEIVED BEFORE JAN. 20, 2017, WILL SAVE UP TO $25 PER DAY. ONLINE REGISTRATION CLOSES JAN. 29, 2017, AT MIDNIGHT. ON-SITE REGISTRATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. VISIT WWW.GLRDC.MSU.EDU TO GET THE COMPLETE CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OR TO REGISTER ONLINE. PARTICIPANTS CAN ALSO REGISTER BY PHONE BY CALLING 517-884-7089.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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AND THE VALUE OF

THE DATA WE PRODUCE BY KENDRA KISSANE, MMPA SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR

Consider the word ‘sustainability.’ Let’s start by asking if the word sustainable is meaningful to you? Could sustainability be used as a tool? Or does the term dishearten you because you associate the word sustainability with no direct return on investment? Perhaps you feel it is just a trendy marketing word followed by this generation’s lists of fads?

I IL IB

TY

EC ON O M IC

H

EN

IP

SUSTAINABLE AGRICTULTURE

ILITY AB VI

SOCIAL RES PO NS

W

hile you are debating the above issue, it’s not whether the dairy industry is being pessimistic or optimistic on this hot button topic. The agriculture industry has shifted as opportunists and collectively we have come together to drink from that glass, instead of join in the debate.

This article will begin to discuss topics discussed at this year’s Sustainable Agriculture Summit, the history of sustainability, the industry’s outlook in 2017 and lastly what we are doing as a co-op to lead the way in our sustainability efforts.

Here at MMPA we are taking every opportunity to address the growing concerns of our consumers. As always, we are keeping our main mission front and center: marketing our members milk to the greatest advantage possible.

Sustainability is nearing the top of consumers lists in a growing concern on how farmers have been contributing to care for mother nature. Farmers, agriculture leaders, doctors, notable food bloggers, nutritionists and many others in the agriculture industry came together in November 2016 at the Sustainable Agriculture Summit in Atlanta, Georgia to address sustainability issues.

ENTAL STEW AR NM DS RO VI

With leadership and the support of our members, our sustainability commitment is defined through the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. The definition focuses on three pillars (shown in the model at left): social responsibility, economic viability and environmental stewardship.

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MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

Sustainable Agriculture Summit 2016

This group of leaders magnified the agriculture industry’s gap with consumers. Through low milk prices, global warming concerns, research and


statistics, the agriculture industry is developing a united front to prove the need to address sustainability concerns sooner rather than later. You may have heard 98 percent of consumers are now a few generations removed from the farm. The Sustainable Agriculture Summit led the way with presenting research efforts that highlighted technological tools and resources available to provide producers the opportunity to record data that can later be scientifically translated and accredited for our consumers. Many leaders on discussion panels during the summit described sustainability to be a romantic word tied to consumers. The speakers also discussed the growing demand co-ops are seeing in customer sustainability questionnaires and surveys.

Origins of Sustainability If we start from the beginning, we can gauge and interpret the true value of the meaning behind this excessively progressive word, “Sustainability.” The word ‘sustainability’ began its use for business terms in the early 1990’s. This means the word is still “undefined” in terms of a sustainable agriculture era. This is a great opportunity we are discussing here and for a start we can begin to develop a threshold of data to be interpreted by our consumers. Data is creditable research and to this growing generation having the data before an issue arises will mitigate future risks. Data to millennials is the truth behind misleading videos and articles popping up on social media. Data also shows us trends and areas for concern in the agriculture industry. In agriculture, mitigating risks can provide a huge economic incentive for the entire food chain. As you can see, sustainability's history is short in the business world. But farmers

have cultivated that word day after day working to provide the very food we nourish ourselves with. For over 200 years, American farmers have been sustainable and now we are defining this term on an even larger scale to paint a picture for our consumers.

The Industry in 2017- Millennials, Data and Technology Blink and we’ve all woken up in the millennial generation that pushed us into the technology era. Better known as the “Instant Social Data Era” this is where we allowed social data to negatively impact our industry. Now we need our own data to measure how successful our farmers have always been. Can you see the consumers gap? Our gap is we have never gathered data on a farmer per farm level. That data from the farmer level can help the industry better implement best practices, to save the farmer money, recognize regional pest trends, soil nutrients, water scarcity and resources. We can even use this data to make more relevant claims in animal care efforts to win our consumers back. If you are feeling weary of releasing your practices being used on the farm, have confidence in knowing that this sustainability process has occurred before in other industries. Take for example our healthcare system and most major technology companies that have access to our personal data already. That data is securely reviewed. In healthcare, data is reported to the Center for Disease and Control, the World Health Organization and other organizations to mitigate risks. You can begin to see the value in collecting on farm data and using it as a tool moving forward. Industry leaders and farmers are working together to develop metrics to measure data at the farm level. Once metrics are developed

we will begin to communicate this information to our members for feedback. After communication of metrics, program verification, and implementation in the next year, we will continue down the path of sustainability. The end goal is for our industry leaders to make better decisions on how to mitigate world risks, aggregate data, disperse funding efforts, and to continue to address the worlds growing concern on sustainability in the agriculture sector.

Our member’s opportunity In 2017, MMPA is working on implementing a sustainability program, reporting concerns on behalf of our members, and engaging our consumers to educate and learn from one another. In return these efforts will positively reflect our commitment to social responsibility, economic viability, and environmental stewardship. This is our chance to build a transparent bridge for our consumers to show how safe and sustainable the U.S. food system truly is. In context, building a literal, transparent bridge of data is a daunting task. It will show some of our flaws, but every industry has them. For our members, we need to address these issues head on, in continued efforts to build a viable future. Our opportunity moving forward is transparency of farmer practices measured and recorded into data that educates this millennial generation socially. We cannot afford to miss this next step in moving forward in connecting the consumer back to their food nor ignore the growth of this nation by 2020. The efforts we make today will in return leave this social, removed, ag consumer, with a taste of nostalgic dairy bliss.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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Above and Beyond for Flint BY MELISSA HART

It’s been nearly 500 days since the news broke about the Flint Water Crisis and residents are still not able to trust the water supply as the State of Michigan replaces the water pipes. It’s been 365 days since MMPA stepped in and delivered the first of three loads of 12,000 gallons of milk. But milk doesn’t rain down from heaven, so how did that donation process really happen?

O

n September 24th, 2015 a press conference was held in Flint, after the discovery of elevated lead levels in the residents of the impoverished city due to a poor water supply. The Flint Water Crisis had emerged as a daily headline on every level as the story of an unsafe water supply went viral and the political blame game began. As state and national officials began to unravel the mystery of the unsafe water supply, MSU Extension led by then interim Director Dr. Jeff Dwyer released valuable research that calcium, iron and vitamin C were the immediate solution in mitigating the effects of lead in the body as they play a key role in blocking lead absorption. MMPA President Ken Nobis and Senior Director of Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt were at a meeting with Dr. Jeff Dwyer when he outlined the findings of the role calcium played in blocking lead absorption and emphasized that milk was what the residents of Flint needed. After the meeting Nobis and Burkhardt had the same idea: a milk donation. They left the meeting that January afternoon of 2016 with the intention to get the ball rolling on donating a large quantity of milk to the residents of Flint. “Flint had warehouses full of bottled water but what they really needed was milk,” explained Nobis. “By the next morning, Sheila called me and said the deal was all but finished and I said, ‘Wait, I still need to get the board’s approval!’” Two hours later Nobis had everyone on board, ““There was no hesitation on the part of any board member about this donation. They knew it was the right thing to do.” Carl Rasch, Director of Milk Sales contacted the longtime friend of MMPA, Kroger Company of Michigan, and they were elated to donate the processing and packaging costs of the milk while Quickway Carriers took

20

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

care of transportation costs. “Within 24 hours of that meeting with Dr. Dwyer we had the deal done and within 96 hours, 12,000 gallons of two percent milk was sitting in the cold storage of the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan,” commented Nobis. Initially Nobis was concerned with the storage and distribution of the milk, “We wanted to make sure the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan had enough room for 12,000 gallons of milk and that the milk went to the families in need.” He continued, “As it turned out, we hardly made a dent in their cold storage and the food bank staff knew exactly where the need was.” A media event was held to spotlight the milk donation at the suggestion of Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, Director of Pediatrics at Hurley Children’s Hospital, the doctor credited with uncovering the lead poisoning in Flint residents. Hanna-Attisha wanted to make this a nutritional learning opportunity for people to become informed at the difference good nutrition makes in combatting lead poisoning. The initial donation snowballed into two more donations of 12,000 gallons each to the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan where, according to Burkhardt, they were very appreciative and thrilled to get the donation into the hands of the families in Flint. She commented, “Each time we donated milk in 2016, (12,000 gallons at a time) the milk was distributed to the families within seven days. That’s a lot of milk and a lot of need.” While Flint families were finally getting the power packed goodness of milk, dairy producers were being met with a downward spiral of milk prices. Nobis knew the MMPA membership would never shrink back from helping those in need, but he had no idea the reception he would receive when he stood at an MMPA local meeting just days after making the donation decision. “When


I stood in front of the members of the Hillsdale/Litchfield local and told them about donating 12,000 gallons of milk it was silent and then suddenly they began to applaud. It was a great moment.” Jamie Clover Adams, the Director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development was at that same local meeting and recalls, “What struck me then and stays with me even now was the genuine pride and delight I saw in that room from the claps to the expressions on their faces that they were helping people.” She continued, “Their reaction reminded me why I love agriculture and why I am so honored to have the opportunity to serve Michigan agriculture. Agriculture is made up of the most genuine, down to earth, caring people.” Burkhardt was amazed at how quickly and smoothly the donation project came together, “It was exciting to see from the initial board approval to the commitment from Kroger to donate processing and packaging to Quickway donating the transportation.” She continued, “Within just over 24 hours of hearing how calcium helps mitigate the impact of lead in the body, everyone was on board to make the donation happen.” Burkhardt concluded, “It made me very proud to be a part of an organization that was willing to step up and do their part to help the citizens of Flint as the water crisis unfolded. The entire MMPA family from members to employees were proud of this project.”

MMPA’S THREE DONATIONS OF MILK TO THE CITY OF FLINT WAS KICKED OFF WITH A PRESS CONFERENCE ONE YEAR AGO, AT THE FOOD BANK OF EASTERN MICHIGAN. TOP: MMPA PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS WAS INTERVIEWED BY LOCAL MEDIA OUTLETS ABOUT THE DONATION MADE BY MMPA DAIRY FARMERS. MIDDLE: DR. JEFF DWYER, MSU EXTENSION, UNDERSCORED THE NEED FOR NUTRITION FOR THE FAMILIES GRAPPLING WITH THE IMPACTS OF THE FLINT WATER CRISIS.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

21


ADRIAN

Judge Dairy Farm Inc.

Gold

S & T Farms PTP

Marvin Farms Inc.**

Oberlin Farms LLC

Silver

Jeff & Larry Nielsen

Vissers Dairy LLC*

Wilson Centennial Farm LLC

Fred Feight and Sons

Double Eagle Dairy Inc.

Scott D. Norden N. Randy & Eric Bleich

2016 MMPA Quality Awards

L

Matthew Smith Bronze

ocal meetings this season will include presentations of quality awards to 512 members for the production of outstanding quality milk over the last fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016). Bronze, silver and gold awards will be presented to those members who met the established criteria for each award.

Bronze quality awards are presented to MMPA members

who met both quality premium categories (10,000 or less raw bacteria and 20,000 or less PI count) and maintained a somatic cell count of 250,000 or less for nine or more months out of the previous fiscal year.

Whelan Farms* Wilbert, Todd & Kurtis Sieler South Creek Farms

Dragt Farms Mervin G. Dailey Kenneth Vredenburg Kent L. Inniger Double-B Dairy Ammon R. Martin Cindy Eldred Ephraim & Esther Martin

Martinline LLC

Glen H. Miller

Gary A. Middleton

Central Michigan Milk Production

Gary L. Ries Hartland Farms Inc.

BARRY-EATON ALMA

Gold

Gold

Chase Crest Hill Farms LLC*

Ryan J. Litwiller

Crandall Dairy Farm LLC*

Ronald & Kevin Litwiller

Hammond Dairy Farm LLC

Silver quality awards are presented to those members

Silver

Silver

who met the same criteria as in the bronze award category for 12 months out of the previous fiscal year.

Louis & Ronald Brecht***

Endsley Dairy Farms LLC**

William Hough Dairy Inc.

Ivan L. Mast

Koutz Dairy LLC

Pixley Dairy Farm LLC

Gold quality awards are presented to members who

Bruce Carey

Miller Vue Farm

met the same criteria as in the silver award category and averaged a somatic cell count of 100,000 or less during the previous fiscal year.

Pine Hills Dairy LLC

Brent & Nina Butler

Bollinger Farms LLC

FFHR LLC

Jered Litwiller

Bronze

TLC Dairy

Cary Dairy Farms Inc.

Gary & Cory Nielsen

Halbert Dairy Farm LLC

Robert F. Durham

Ladine Farms

Bruce A. Litwiller

Steven G. Hochstetler

Vanderploeg Holsteins LLC

Dan & Lynda Walden

Vanderploeg Holsteins II LLC

Jacob Mast

Douglas B. Kamer

B & K Farms LLC

Star awards will be presented to those members who have

received a quality award for five (one star), 10 (two stars), 15 (three stars) or 20 (four stars) consecutive years.

512 TOTAL QUALITY AWARDS 333

BRONZE

22

Dwight Mansfield

Gordon H. Behrenwald

141

38

SILVER

GOLD

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

Hooks Farms Bebow Dairy Inc.

BLOSSOMLAND

Bronze

Gold

Albern Olson*

Jerry, Jerry & Terry Koebel

Carter Farms LLC*

Bronze

Titus B. Zimmerman*

Howard Payne

Joel Ensz** Chapin Family Farm LLC***

CHIPPEWA COUNTY

Tara Chapko

Bronze

Paulen Farms Inc.

David & Tammy Bell*

Friesen Legacy Farm LLC

Folkersma Farm LLC

Troy Haynes

Taylor Creek Farm LLC


CLARE-MT PLEASANT

Bronze

Karl M. Bontrager

Ronald J. Brinks

Silver

John Koch

Martin Yoder Jr.

Dick Haven Farms LLC

Tara Anthon Cattle & Management

Michael M. Graber*

Justin Meyers

James A. Oudman

Elton F. Dubois*

Devon Ray Yoder*

John W. Yoder

Kevin P. Ardis

Clark Dairy Farm LLC

David E. Yoder*

Gerald M. Martin

Kerwin J. Hamming

Le Var Farms LLC

Joseph & Ida Mae Delagrange

Calvin F. Miller

Rudvan Family Farms LLC

Ervin D. Mast

Allen Yoder

Buning Dairy Farm LLC

Gross Dairy Farms Inc. Rick Lee Newman

Daniel Lee Mishler Samuel Jay Bontrager

Zuiderveen Farms DEFORD/CLIFFORD- MAYVILLE

Glenn A. Cotherman

David N. Miller Joseph D. Mishler

Gold

Nathan Webster

Jeremiah & Rachel Ramer

Laura & Shelly Nesbit

Andrew Leon Stanley

Jesse & Chelsea Ramer

Pohl Dairy Farm Inc.

Silver

Dewayne E. Mishler

Meadow Muth Farms LLC

Robert S. Millard

Wilbur J. Herschberger

FLINT

Calvin J. Bodeis

Gross Farms Inc.

Silver

Mark Hilty

Bronze

Norm, Philip & Steve

Apple Dairy Corp

John H. Bontrager

Vernon A. & Vernon V. Hochstetler

Martin C. Fox

Jonathan J. Yoder

Bronze

Jack Evans

Joseph E. Miller

House Dairy LLC

Stanley Yoder Family

Packard Farms LLC

Frye Family Farm LLC

Eli E. Shrock

Joni Borkholder

Raymond Buchholz

Carl Zook

Bronze Uriel Y. Miller Raymond & Miriam Kuhr Garrett Beef Farm

Daniel & Emma Coblentz

Alva Lengacher Raymond L. Miller Wakiana Dairy Inc.

Schooley Farm LLC

Wirth Farms LLC EVART

Weil Dairy Farm*

Gold

K & K Kern Farms LLC*

Daniel Diener

Corner Oak Farm

Van Polen Farms**** Harley & Marietta Lambright Mark F. Diemer

FRANKENMUTH Silver

Michael L. Bosscher

Fowler Dairy LLC

End Road Farm

Richard R. Wardin

CONSTANTINE

David K. Fisher

Gold

Marvin E. Eash

Robert, Michael, Matthew & Harold Cnossen

Virgil D. Yoder

Mybrook Farms

Kenneth & Carol Tebos

Larry M. Hershberger*

Alvin D. Bontrager

Tacoma Dairy Inc.

Vernon R. Miller

Milton D. Bontrager

Doddedale Farms

Thaddaeus Coning

Ferman R. Bontrager

Silver

Silver

Rufus B. Zimmerman

Gilde Farms LLC

Matthew D. Miller

David E. Miller

Jonathan Lee Taylor**

Freeman E. Yutzy*

Dennis E. Miller

David L. Dezeeuw

David L. Mast

Keith A. Deruiter

Daniel A. Bontrager

Bronze

GRAND RAPIDS

Devon J. Miller

Keith & Jane Wood

Silver

Omer M. Miller

Zuiderveen Farms*

Lamar J. Eash

Aris Dairy Farm LLC*

Bronze

Jacob W. Weaver

Sunny Side Dairy*

Petzold Dairy Farms LLC

Harley H. Lambright

Gaylord & Gerald Denslow**

L & E Robinson Farms LLC

Allen Troyer

Star City Farm Inc.

Byma Dairy LLC

Wayne S. Kaufman

Booms Dairy LLC

Fisk Farms

Marvin M. Shrock

Maynard J. Mast

Leon Hamming

Mark & Cheryl Richmond

Glen R. Mast

Ervin L. Eash

Bode Valley Farm Inc.

Marten & Sharlene Brower

Mervin A. Bontrager

Maynard & Laura Lehman

Jernstadt Dairy Farm LLC

James Schaendorf

Orva & Naomi Hershberger

David H. Miller

Yonkman Dairy

Franklin S. Bowman

Herman F. Mast

Wilbur P. Miller

Benthem Homestead Farms Inc.

John Byma & Team

Clyde S. Miller

Douglas L. Geissinger

William A. Benson

David Kraft

Brent & Joan High

Ernest & Erma Wengerd

Dale A. Brinks

Klamer Farms Inc.

Robert Pletcher The Graber Family Joe D. Stutzman Willie Yoder Jr. Omer F. Miller Jerry D. Lehman Dorvin Shaum Lavern J. Kurtz

Krafft Farms LLC Haubenstricker Dairy Farm LLC Bronze Cole Riverview Farms Inc. Dennis W. Hetzner Wardin Brothers Dairy LLC Larry Niec Farms LLC Eric J. Frahm

Swift Dairy Farm Inc.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

23


2016 MMPA Quality Awards (continued) HILLMAN

HURON

JACKSON COUNTY PLUS

MID-MICHIGAN

Silver

Gold

Silver

Gold

Nathan & Jodie Mitchell

Joseph & Brandon Kubacki

Riske Farms

Stephen Burkholder

Skudlarek Dairy Farm LLC*

Silver

Bronze

Christensen Farms*

Oak River Dairy LLC

Kubiak Family Farms

Sauer Dairy Farms Inc.

Kundinger Farms Inc.

Bienz Double View Farm

Bronze

Williams Family Farm LLC

Donald Lindsey

KALAMAZOO

Steenblik Dairy Inc.

Ervin Lee Yoder

John C. Richmond & Sons Dairy Farm*

Gold

Schneider Dairy LLC

Starward Farm*

Leaky Faucet Dairy

H & K Dairy LLC

Bronze

Aron W. Whitaker

T & G Dairy LLC

David J. Leavine*

Andrew W. Johnson

VerHage Dairy Farm

Jeffry & Patricia Thelen

Fred, Corby & Cody Werth*

Gregory & Shelly Messing & Ashley Kennedy****

Silver

Stony Creek Dairy LLC

Risky Endeavor Dairy* Joseph P. Zbytowski*

Arnold Schuman

Bronze

Clinton Briley

Prime Land Farm

Grand Valley Farms

Grams Farms

Paul G. Leipprandt & Son Inc.

Martin & Sheri Wenger

LTD Dairy

Delcath Farms

Bernard Baker

Robert Hemmingson

Nugent’s Farm Dairy

James C. Jackson

Lucas Dairy Farms LLC

Zielland Farms

Victor Puschel

Samuel I. Ramer

Butterwerth Dairy Farm LLC

William C. Mazure

Vandenberg and Vandenberg

Bronze

Chippewa Dairy LLC

R L S Dairy Inc.

Rodney Pillars

Larry & Karen Adams

Vernon D. Yoder

Daniel Van Erp

Timothy Hood, Charles Hood & Tamara Spicher

Dutch Meadows Dairy LLC*

Penney Farms

Berlyn Acres II LLC**

Matthew & Taylor Noffze Kevin, Karen & Travis Zbytowski Todd Hemmingson

Albert J. Gusa HILLSDALE-LITCHFIELD Silver

INGHAM COUNTY

Poling Dairy Farm

Silver

Richard & Patricia Hawkins*

Marten Family Dairy LLC

Drakeland Farms LLC

Chuck & Linda Grettenberger

Easterday Dairy Farm

Bronze

Marilyn & Jeffrey Willson

Dallas Family Farms

Daniel L. Williams

Larry L. Steffey**

Ted & Jonathan Keenan

MSU Dairy - Dept. of Animal Science***

Bronze Brian Centala Ferry Farms LLC* Gordon, Joy & Justin Porter Dale & Carol Baker Jeremy & Jenelle Brenner Margro Farms Herman’s Holsteins LLC

Hogan Dairy Farms LLC Silver Leroy O. Zimmerman Riverview Dairy LLC* Wieber Dairy LLC***

Andrew J. Feldpausch Leroy & Stephanie Schafer Jon & Tina Thelen Sanborn & Sons LLC Green Meadow Farms Inc. 1 Green Meadow Farms Inc. 2

Anson K. Martin*

Randy Bender

Steven C. Roth

Louis Fifelski

Stout Dairy

Melvin T. Puschel

Fedewa Dairy LLC

Kevin Dykstra

Adkinson Farm Cook Dairy Farm

LANSING Silver Donald Walters II Danon & Clark Reeder

Robert & Richard Skriba Wadell Dairy Farm LLC Cornerstone II Dairy LLC Steven H. Simon Cliff & Kent Thelen

David Lyon

Bronze

Simon Dairy Farm LLC

Ri-Val-Re Farms

Webers Meadow LLC

Nobis Dairy Farms

Fogle Farms

Chris, Kristina, Hans & Patricia Langmaack

Slavik Farms

Ritter Farms

Kenneth & Sandra Wyrick

Risch Farms Graf Acres LLC Clona Farms LLC

Lyon Farm LLC

Houska Farms Inc. Thelen Dairy Inc. William C. Platte

Ron Launstein Casey Moore

LIVINGSTON CHARTER

Lew-Max LLC

Rapid Ridge Farms LLC

Silver

D & M Schrader Dairy LLC

Charles & Janet White

T & H Dairy II

Bon-Tek Operations LLC Bronze Wayne & Marvin Hochstetler

P H Farms LLC Allen & Eileen Ramer T & H Dairy II Double A Dairy LLC Terri Hawbaker

24

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


MID-SANILAC

MUSKEGON

SUNRISE

UPSTATE

Silver

Gold

Gold

Gold

D & P Dairy LLC

Herman & Rebecca Lambright

Brad & Nicole Wren

Boss Dairy Farms Inc.

Sharrard Farms LLC*

Koppenol Dairy Farms Inc.

Cedar Lane Dairy Farms**

Silver

Radloff Dairy LLC

Stroven Dairy Farm

Circle K Farms Inc.

Rubingh’s Dairyland LLC

Gale, David & Harland Schultz

Dewey Farm LLC

W-R-L Daniels Farm LLC

Richard J. Fettig

Parr Dairy Farm LLC

Silver

Silver

Muxlow Dairy Farm

Bronze

Doug & Shelly Ekkel & Family

Anschuetz Dairy Farm

Cumper Dairy Farms

James & Connie Seefeldt

Albert Lee Tiles*

Bennett Dairy Farm LLC*

Steven & Lisa Alexander

David & Sue Brown

Larsen Farms**

Wenkel Farms

Bronze

Norris Dairy Farm Inc.***

Derek Brewer

Diller Farms

J-Max LLC

Bronze

David M. Varosi*

Sueann M. Higgins

Gold

Horning Farms LLC

Shell Farms Inc.

Tri-R Farms LLC

William & Robert Gruppen

Col-Shee Family Farm

Reba Zimmerman & Sons

Sun Quest Hoof Trimming LLC

Bronze

J & B Dairy LLC

Weaverland Farms

Gleason Dairy Farm

Lemajru Dairy Farm LLC

Bradley R. Booms

Donald A. Beattie

Reetz Dairy LLC

Welter Dairy Farms LLC

Sunglow Dairy LLC

Weber Dairy Farms LLC

David Shoemaker

Paul Carol Courtade

Barry Troyer

Fischer Dairy Farm

Beuschel Fruit & Dairy LLC

Timothy Hagley

Edward Joe Lawler

Robert T. Wackernagel

Gallagher Dairy Farm Inc.

MK Farms LLC

Howe Farms Inc.

Twin Dairy

Timothy Mater

Stakenas Farms Inc.

Double B Dairy

David & James Heberling

Powers Dairy Farm LLC

Noll Dairy Farm Inc.

David J. Marsh

Roger Markey

Ackerberg Farms

Rick L. Sutton

Carson Acres LLC

Goma Dairy Farms LLC

Milton A. Patz

Glen, Casey & Andrew Sparks

Wieciech Farms

Paramount Enterprises Dairy LLC

U.P. WEST CENTRAL Silver

WEST MICHIGAN

Silver Dennis Raterink Seth Ponstein* Welchkin Acres** Arlyn J. Walt Heritage Farms LLC Timothy Baker Nienhuis Dairy Farm LLC Daybreak Dairy LLC Bronze Douglas K. Warner Pyle Dairy Farm Inc.* Mark & Elizabeth Ponstein* Melview Farms LLC

Bronze OWOSSO

Norman Terhaar

MID-THUMB

Clemens Dairy Farm Inc.

James H. Iciek

Silver

Drayton Family Dairy LLC

Silver

Jason W. Szakal

Robert & Donna Pepper

Oman Family Dairy Farm

Mark Hilaski

Bronze

Pirman Corner Farm Inc.

Riverside Dairy LLC

Dave Cappaert

David Sovis

Pleasant View Dairy Farm LLC

Braid Farms Inc.

Brad Pellegrini

Andrew A. Brown Reid Dairy Farm LLC Alfred, Doris & Duane Stuever* Bronze Frederick & Candice Inbody Richard Noake Lester & Barbara Knust Steven & David Spencer Thomas Neil Wagner Blumerich Farms William & Virginia Ankley Tracy & Theresa Sohn

John & Philip Kuyers

Robert Paidl SALINE-ANN ARBOR Silver Huehl Acres Breuninger Farms LLC*** Bronze Ritter Farms LLC**** Lambarth Farms LLC** Brian D Sweetland

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

25


YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

2016 Dairy Promotion Updates As we start the New Year, the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) reflects on the work we did on your behalf in 2016. Over the past year, we have worked to connect with consumers about the benefits of milk in their diet and the roles your families have in local communities across the state. Here are a few updates:

Reaching High School Athletes For the 2015-16 school year, 197 grants for over 9,000 athletes were awarded to schools to purchase chocolate milk. The grant also provided t-shirts and promotional items, and money for equipment to help keep the chocolate milk cold. Grant application for the next school year will be available for download at milkmeansmore.org.

Chocolate Milk for College Athletes UDIM continues to tout the benefits of chocolate milk as a recovery beverage in colleges. The program now has contracts with Michigan State University, University of Oakland, Central Michigan, Eastern Michigan, Western Michigan, Northern Michigan, Davenport, Detroit Mercy, Hope College, Grand Valley State, Michigan Tech, Ferris State, and Saginaw Valley.

Farm Tours Educate Influencers Over the past year, UDIM has hosted over 300 influencers (dietitians, foodservice personnel and others) on tours of Michigan dairy farms to show the commitment dairy farm families and their teams have for caring for their cows and providing safe, wholesome dairy products.

Local Grants Available

Chocolate Milk the Refuel Beverage at 16 Races Nearly 100,000 runners finishing Iron Man, Marathon or 10k races across Michigan received chocolate milk to refuel and messages promoting the benefits of chocolate milk. A newly formed “Team Chocolate Milk” participated fall races and will continue in 2017.

More than 120 grant applications, totaling over $60,000 in funding, were submitted by farm families in 2016. The majority of the funding was used to purchase milk and other dairy products for community events reaching 100,000 people. Grants will once again be available to all Michigan dairy farm families and employees in 2017.

Undercover Video Crisis Drill

Smoothie Program for Schools

Milk Donation Program

Grants were given to 47 schools to purchase an industrial blender to make smoothies. Nineteen of these schools were not previously purchasing bulk yogurt or milk as an ingredient for feeding their students. Following the grant program, all 47 schools added smoothies to their menus.

Milk is one of the most requested, yet least donated, items at food banks. On average, food bank recipients receive the equivalent of less than one gallon of milk per person per year. UDIM worked with:

Jump with Jill Rocks Michigan The Milk Means More “Jump with Jill Live Tour” continues to rock Michigan schools with a positive dairy message. This past year UDIM reached 84 schools with close to 30,000 school children singing and dancing to the Bone Rap. If you’re interested in hosting Jill at an elementary school in your community, contact Jolene at jolene@milkmeansmore.org

To test and enhance our crisis response plan, UDIM hosted an undercover video crisis drill in December. This workshop also equipped producers with tools to create a crisis plan for their farm. If you’re interested in creating a crisis plan for your farm, contact jolene@milkmeansmore.org

• 15 Busch’s stores to raise donations of over 15,000 gallons of milk for Forgotten Harvest. UDIM will match consumers’ donations. • Gleaners Community Food Bank in southeast Michigan to assist with their “Milk Match Program,” which will provide more than 61,000 gallons of milk. MORE UPDATES AND INFORMATION ARE AVAILABLE AT MILKMEANSMORE.ORG

MMPA MEMBERS BRAD AND NICOLE WREN INVITED JUMP WITH JILL TO VISIT THEIR CHILDREN’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TO TEACH THE STUDENTS ABOUT EATING HEALTHY, INCLUDING MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTS.

26

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


I NEED YOUR HELP! You don’t know it, but I have Subclinical Ketosis – and it’s robbing you of milk production.

Get your herd tested for FREE and give them the boost they need with GlucoBoost®. GlucoBoost® is a revolutionary, fermented product available as a dry highly palatable feed product that eliminates the production loss associated with Subclinical Ketosis. If left unchecked, ketosis and subclinical ketosis (SCK) can cost you nearly $300 per cow per lactation. GlucoBoost provides your transition cows with the vital glucose precursors needed to protect them against Ketosis and SCK as well as helping to maximize early lactation performance. Fermented Nutrition offers the only solution for production loss due to SCK and Ketosis and will test your herd for free. Don’t let a poor energy status rob you of profits. Give your cows the energy security and performance Boost they need. Feed GlucoBoost!

STOP LOSING MONEY. GET YOUR HERD TESTED TODAY! 855.551.9439 | www.fermented-nutrition.com 27

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2016


2016-2017 Local Meetings The meeting information listed below was availiable at press time. All members will receive complete meeting details in the invitation from their local. In addition to these local meetings MMPA is hosting eight information meetings across the state in January. Information about these meetings was mailed to members in December. Local Muskegon Deford/Clifford-Mayville Adrian Frankenmuth Flint/Livingston Charter/Owosso Grand Rapids Ingham County Evart Alma Hillman Huron Constantine Saline-Ann Arbor Mid-Michigan Jackson County Plus Mid-Thumb West Michigan Hillsdale-Litchfield Mid-Sanilac Blossomland Clare-Mt. Pleasant

Date

Location

City

Time

1/04/2017 1/09/2017 1/10/2017 1/10/2017 1/11/2017 1/11/2017 1/11/2017 1/12/2017 1/13/2017 1/13/2017 1/14/2017 1/14/2017 1/17/2017 1/17/2017 1/18/2017 1/18/2017 1/18/2017 1/19/2017 1/19/2017 1/20/2017 1/20/2017

Russ’ Banquet Room Spring of Life Church UAW Hall DaVinci's Italian Restaurant Durand VFW Golden Corral Old Chicago Rehoboth Reformed Church Maxfield’s Ramada Inn Franklin Inn Siloam Fellowship Freedom Township Hall Agro Liquid Headquarters Steaks Eatery Restaurant Holly Meadows Golf Course Zeeland Township Hall Olivia’s Chophouse Woodland Hills Golf Club Zeke’s Restaurant Clare Church of the Nazarene

Muskegon Mayville Adrian Frankenmuth Durand Walker Okemos McBain Blanchard Alpena Bad Axe Goshen, Ind. Ann Arbor St. Johns Jackson Capac Vriesland Jonesville Sandusky Dowagiac Clare

11:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:00 pm 12:00 p.m 11:45 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 11:45 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:30 am 12:00 p.m. 12:00 pm 12:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m.

MMPA Districts

DISTRICT 1 Adrian Local Hillsdale-Litchfield Local Jackson County Plus Local Saline-Ann Arbor Local Ingham County Local DISTRICT 2 Blossomland Local Constantine Local Kalamazoo Local Barry-Eaton Local Lansing Local DISTRICT 3 Grand Rapids Local West Michigan Local Muskegon Local DISTRICT 4 Hillman Local Chippewa County Local U.P. West Central Local Upstate Local

28

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

DISTRICT 5 Alma Local Evart Local DISTRICT 6 Mid-Michigan Local Owosso Local Flint Local Livingston Charter Local DISTRICT 7 Frankenmuth Local Sunrise Local Clare-Mt Pleasant Local Deford/Clifford-Mayville Local DISTRICT 8 Huron Local Mid-Sanilac Local Mid-Thumb Local


MERCHANDISE

Winter Teat dip: January and February are the coldest months of the year. The combination of freezing temperatures and low humidity cause teat ends to become chapped and damaged. The warehouse has products that can help maintain good teat end conditions.

Artec

These are service personnel only.

Ecolab’s Artec is a blue post-dip that is effective against mastitis-forming bacteria with the use of 1.5% heptanoic acid. It was proven to work very quickly in only 15 seconds of kill time. Artec also contains a triple blend of emollients for superior teat conditioning (78% system including glycerin and lanolin). The dip can be used very well during cold weather as skin protection reducing the need for teat salves or creams. Once again, during extreme cold, teat end blotting may be required after dipping. ITEM Artec – 5 gallon Artec – 15 gallon

STOCK # 6064 6981

MEMBER PRICE $95.00 $246.38

Artec – 55 gallon

6077

$827.89

Udder Cream For those cows that do experience some teat chapping or freezing, Ken Ag’s Udder Cream can help. This product can be used in cold or warm weather. Udder Cream softens and soothes chapped teats and udders in wintertime and aids in the prevention of dryness during sunny and windy summer conditions. Caution: To avoid contamination of milk, thoroughly wash and dry udder and teats before each milking using an individual clean towel. ITEM Udder Cream 14 oz. tub

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information

STOCK #

MEMBER PRICE

5710

$4.69

Discontinued Products and NPE Free Alternatives Unfortunately, Wintercare has been discontinued by Ecolab and is no longer available. With all the changes involving NPE we thought it would be helpful to let everyone know what alternatives are available. Please refer to the chart below and please be sure to call the warehouse with any questions.

Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636

DISCONTINUED DUE TO CONTAINING NPE NPE FREE ALTERNATIVES Pat Mitchell Teat Ecoplus 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Protek Masticare Optima Concentrate Ecoplus Addison, MI 49220 Optima Plus concentrate Ecoplus 517-403-0928 Monodine* Bac-drop udder wash* *No iodine based udder wash will be available through Ecolab

Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr.

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler

Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor......................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................... 877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)..................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax........................................................... 989-317-8372

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

29


PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #____________________________________ Sample Date__________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA__________

Johne’s ELISA_________

Johne’s PCR_________

Pregnancy_________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs to avoid potential service charges.

30

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.*

3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature.

In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and,

4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

31


FREELINERS

To place a freeliner, fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations.

« Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. » Visit www.mimilk.com/michigan-milk-messenger/advertise/ freeliner-and-classified-ads

Bulls

Cows & Heifers

Registered Holstein Bulls:

Complete Herd Dispersal. 52 cows

We now have a nice selection of

milking and dry. No TMR, 60 lbs. avg.,

service age bulls, sired by top

3.9 B.F., 3.12 protein, SCC 156,000.

• An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn.

AI sires. Green Meadow Farms,

Basil Ervin, Blanchard, Mich. 49310.

Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit

989-330-6416.

• It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office.

Service age Holstein bulls. 8548 evenings or 810-404-8548.

1,000 gallon Mueller Bulk Tank, complete $2,500. Please contact

• Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member.

Registered Holstein breeding

517-605-4945.

• If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate.

polled, high production, low SCC

• Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication.

www.greenmeadowfarms.com.

Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-

bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886

Dairy Equipment

Mueller 2,000 gal. Bulk Tank, all stainless steel, automatic washer, asking $10,000. Brown Farm, Cheboygan, Mich. 231-625-2036.

or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

Equipment Hoof Trimming Chute. Bought new in 2010, never used. Asking $7,000. 989-737-7829.

Misc. Haylage, Corn Silage, wrapped 1st cut, round bales and some dry cow. Delivery available. 231-250-8592.

Wanted Jersey or Holstein springing heifers. 269-792-4358. Good Used Freestalls. Orvan Miller 231-924-9396 ext. 373. Small farm looking for experienced milker. Starting pay $10 per hour. Located in Holton, MI. Farms strives for excellent milk quality. Call Jennifer 231-218-4134.

32

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by:

MAIL: Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002 EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3 operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC. FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-25002000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK TANKS, complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112. WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, Sunset & Mueller, 1-800-558-0112. DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1 ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. HERD OF DAIRY COWS, parlor and freestall cows. 40 years of AI breeding. First, second and third lactation. $2,500. Doyle David 989-343-0756 or 989-254-0213. Prescott, Michigan. CALF JACKETS. Keep your calves warm this winter. Very durable, water repellent, Cordura outer shell, with double faced quilted Thinsulate lining. No Velcro. $25 each. 517-543-2415.

JUNE CLOVER SEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. SWARTZ FEEDER WAGON, stainless steel bottom, sides, vertical elevator and auger trough, new chain and slats, good tires. $1,100 obo. 989-777-4612. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122. OPEN POLLINATED SEED CORN 55.00 per 80k bag. 89 day variety called Tommy Boy available at Dudek Seeds. We deliver to all of Michigan. Check us out on our website at www.http:// dudekseedcom.ipage.com/home/1901. html or Facebook at Dudek Farms or YouTube videos search Tommy boy corn. Call us at 586-453-4806 text welcomed also email us dudekseeds@ gmail.com for more information.

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION!

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

GREEN MEADOW FARMS

www.hamiltondist.com

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary

| FOR MILK MARKETED IN NOVEMBER 2016

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

% This Month Year Ago Change

National Trends* (million pounds) 2016

2015 % Change

California

3,302

3,243

+1.8

Wisconsin

2,490

2,436

+2.2

New York

1,240

1,184

+4.7

Idaho

1,243

1,195

+4.0

Pennsylvania

899

880

+2.2

Mideast Federal Order #33

Michigan

903

861

+4.9

Total Producers........................................................................................................ 5,282

Texas

922

852

+8.2

Minnesota

795

780

+1.9

New Mexico

650

643

+1.1

Washington

554

547

+1.3

Ohio

455

454

+0.2

Indiana

342

335

+2.1

Total Class 1 Sales

562,430,320

538,576,677

+4.43

Total Class 2 Sales

305,557,778

176,018,516

+73.59

Total Class 3 Sales

300,934,556

513,008,628

-41.34

Total Class 4 Sales

275,457,091

264,768,019

+4.04

1,444,379,745

1,492,371,840

-3.22

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

38.9%

36.1%

Avg. Daily Production per farm.....................................................................10,330

Production

Avg. Protein Test....................................................................................................3.20% Avg. Butterfat Test................................................................................................ 3.83% Avg. Oth Solids Test............................................................................................. 5.76% Avg. SCC - MMPA...............................................................................................161,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb................................................................................................$2.8085 Butterfat Price /lb.............................................................................................$2.1044 Other Solids Price /lb...................................................................................... $0.1750 Class III Price @ 3.5%.......................................................................................... $16.76 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt.................................................................. ($1.58) Uniform Price at 3.51.............................................................................................$15.18 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000..................................................................$0.00088

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb..................................................................................................... 1.7596 Butter /lb.......................................................................................................1.9092 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb.....................................................................................0.9119 Dry Whey /lb............................................................................................. 0.3690

34

MESSENGER | JANUARY 2017

Total U.S.*

16,057 15,646

+2.6

U.S.* Y-T-D

182,627 179,126

+2.0

* For 23 States


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff Northwest Area

Novi Headquarters

Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 200

Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Alpena...................................269-245-6632 Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

Southwest Area Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Krista Schrock, Orland, IN..................................269-986-6792 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822 Brittni Tucker, Elsie.............................................248-880-3785

Board of Directors

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Officers

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Operations Ed Jaquay............................................................... ext. 248 Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251 Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210

Ken Nobis, President

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Directors-At-Large Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511

Southeast Area

Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304

James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830

Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638

Communications Allison Stuby........................................................... ext. 296

District Directors

Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303

1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032

Andrea Meade, Livonia......................................248-880-4113 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481

Other Member Services

Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771

Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

Manufacturing Plants

3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

MMPA Labs

Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835

Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775

Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Ovid, Michigan Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221 Deutsch Käse Haus, Middlebury, Indiana Elsie Raber, Plant Manager............................ 574-825-9511

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson.....................................................989-289-9686

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/ field-staff and searching by your producer number.

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-0535 6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

JANUARY 2017 | MESSENGER

35


Early registration ends January 20!

Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference February 2–4 Bavarian Inn and Conference Center Frankenmuth, Michigan With With the the current current state state of of milk milk prices prices and and ever-increasing ever-increasing consumer consumer demands, demands, dairy dairy producers producers are are facing facing aa volatile volatile environment. environment. Attend Attend this this year’s year’s Great Great Lakes Lakes Regional Regional Dairy Dairy Conference Conference to to arm arm yourself yourself with with the the knowledge, knowledge, tools tools and and strategies strategies to to help help ensure ensure your your future future in in dairy. dairy. Checkout Checkout sessions sessions on: on: •• Understanding Understanding everything everything from from global global markets markets to to production production costs costs and and learning learning from from the the •• •• •• •• ••

challenges challenges others others face face to to help help your your operation operation survive survive and and thrive thrive Moving Moving your your herd herd into into the the new new decade decade regarding regarding hoof hoof and and udder udder health health with with new new tools, tools, techniques techniques and and management management practices practices to to improve improve reproduction reproduction and and longevity, longevity, and and produce higher profits produce higher profits Learning Learning from from faculty, faculty, veterinarians veterinarians and and producers producers who who will will share share their their expertise expertise on on how how to excel in milk quality with evolving standards to excel in milk quality with evolving standards Discovering Discovering what’s what’s happening happening Down Down Under Under in in dairy dairy from from an an Australian Australian producer producer Understanding Understanding consumers consumers and and building building trust trust in in today’s today’s food food supply supply through through transparency transparency Finding Finding your your competitive competitive edge edge through through feed, feed, nutrition nutrition and and milk milk component component strategies strategies

www.glrdc.msu.edu • 517-884-7089 • honkemeg@msu.edu