Michigan Milk Messenger: December 2017

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 100 | ISSUE 6 | DECEMBER 2017

NMPF CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST

PEPPER-JACK CHEESE TOPS CHAMPIONSHIP CONTEST

NMPF CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST

Michigan Dairy AND MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

Celebrates 60 Years

mimilk.com


be

outstanding

be an Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator

Why participate in the MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC) Program? » Strengthen your leadership abilities » Broaden your knowledge of milk marketing and MMPA

» Be recognized for your abilities and accomplishments PLUS... the winning OYDC will have the opportunity to travel to Phoenix, Ariz, and Washington, D.C., to represent MMPA at a national level!

« Dave & Gretchen Tolan, 2016 OYDC Runners-Up

TALK TO YOUR LOCAL ABOUT PARTICIPATING IN THE OYDC PROGRAM Nominees must be involved on an MMPA member farm and be between 21 and 41 years of age as of Jan. 1, 2018. For more information, contact Jessica Welch at jwelch@mimilk.com or 248-474-6672.

www.mimilk.com/young-cooperators

OYDC SELECTION PROCESS FOR 2018 DEC-JAN

MARCH-APRIL

MAY

AUGUST

Locals nominate an individual or couple for the program during each local meeting

Nominees submit an application to be considered by the state nominating committee

Top 10 selected from pool of local nominees and invited to attend OYDC conference

Top 10 attend conference to learn more about MMPA while judges select winning OYDCs


DECEMBER 2017 FEATURES

DAIRY AND MEMORIAL 14 | MICHIGAN SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

On the Cover Winter and the holiday season is settling in across the Great Lakes region, and MMPA

YOUNG COOPERATOR 18 | NMPF LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

wishes all our members and friends a season filled with peace and happiness.

Now in its 60th year, the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation was founded by a group of visionaries who wanted to provide scholarship funds to students interested in dairy science.

Nate & Jenny Elzinga traveled to Anaheim, California for the national Young Cooperator leadership program. Learn about their experiences and how the dairy industry is working to unite.

RIDGE CREAMERY PEPPER22 | HERITAGE JACK TOPS CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST

In MMPA’s first year entrance into the NMPF Championship Cheese Contest, pepper-jack cheese made in Middlebury, Indiana wins the grand prize.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 1,700 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS Sixteen Tons

8

QUALITY WATCH

How to care for your cows in the winter

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

20

WE ARE UNDENIABLY DAIRY: UDIA/ NDB/NMPF JOINT ANNUAL MEETING

“To surmount the hurdles that we face, and carry these efforts across the finish line, we must stand together as a united industry.” — JIM MULHERN, NMPF PRESIDENT & CEO (PAGE 20)

DEPARTMENTS 29

MERCHANDISE

30 FREELINERS

24

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

31 CLASSIFIEDS 32 POLICIES

26 28

LOCAL OFFICERS

LOCAL MEETINGS

33

QUALITY PREMIUMS

34

MARKET REPORT

35 STAFF

MMPA Core Values: » Quality » Integrity » Progress » Leadership » Community Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor..................................................................Allison Stuby Miller Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation......................................................................................2,707 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

“Sixteen Tons” BY KEN NOBIS, MMPA PRESIDENT

In 1946 Merle Travis recorded a song he had written called “Sixteen Tons” about life in the coal mines in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. In 1955 Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded his version of the song, and it zoomed to number one in the Billboard charts. Many of us are familiar with the opening stanza, “You load sixteen tons and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt. Saint Peter don’t you call me ‘cause I can’t go. I owe my soul to the company store.” It is a gritty song with a good beat and people loved it, but I wonder if some of that love wasn’t due to the fact that many people at some point in their lives have felt the same way, even though they don’t work in the mines. Like maybe a few of us dairy farmers have shared that sense of hopelessness the last couple of years. You may feel you are at your wits’ end. You bust your keister doing everything you can think of on the farm to make the economics work, but you don’t experience the outcome you are looking for. It has been a long three-year dry spell for dairy prices in our market area.

“MMPA continues to monitor dairy on the domestic and global fronts, constantly assessing various methods of moving our members out of the price slump we are now experiencing. There are no easy answers.”

In 2007, several years before the start of the current dry spell, MMPA board members and management staff recognized the need for expanding our co-op’s processing capacity, so we moved forward with a plan that forecasted a 3 percent annual production growth. A 3 percent growth rate was three times our recent historical rate of growth at that time. When we instead saw 6 percent and greater growth over the next few years we, along with everyone else, were swamped with milk. So we continued to expand our internal capacity. Since we started this expansion phase, we have more than doubled that capacity, increasing it from four million pounds per day to more than eight million a day. As a result, we are currently well balanced with production, internal processing and external sales. That should signal the end of the story, right? Unfortunately, it isn’t “end of story” because dairy is no longer just a regional or domestic industry. Prices are impacted by factors outside our region. Today dairy is a global enterprise and the milk produced in other areas of the globe, say the European Union, has a direct effect on milk prices here in the United States. The E.U. has become an even stronger competitor for global sales of dairy since they abolished their quota system on April 1, 2015. In the words of some of the European dairy farmers, “The shackles have been removed; we can now produce to meet the growing market for dairy products.” The problem is that the E.U. governing body hasn’t let the free market work. When E.U. on-farm milk prices plummeted, the government stepped in and bought powder, which buoyed prices. The rebound in prices caused production to rise in the E.U. at a time when we still had more than enough milk in the global market. MMPA continues to monitor dairy on the domestic and global fronts, constantly assessing various methods of moving our members out of the price slump we are now experiencing. There are no easy answers. So … we hang on and look ahead. I did some more online research and found that “Sixteen Tons” had a revival in the 1980’s with six new versions recorded, one by Johnny Cash. That was an unpleasant time for agriculture, including dairy, but we got through it. Working together we’ll survive this slump too.

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QUALITY WATCH

How to best care for your cows during the winter BY ASHLEY HERRIMAN, MMPA MEMBER REPRESENTATIVE

As colder temperatures drift in, cow comfort shouldn’t be put on the back burner. Cattle housing and teat end health go hand-in hand as the colder weather impacts a cow’s ability to maintain skin moisture and smooth teat skin. Damaged and cracked teat ends provide an ideal environment for bacteria to grow and increase the chances of mastitis. Consider these key cattle housing factors to limit damage to your cow’s teat ends during colder winter months and increase milk quality: Provide clean and dry bedding for all ages of cattle. Properly bedding the housing areas during cold months plays a significant role in providing adequate insulation for teats amidst the cold. Also, cows lay for longer periods of time to maintain their warmth during cold winter days; increasing the time the teats are exposed to the bedding materials. If bacteria or moisture are prevalent in the bedding it increases the exposure of teats to bacteria and causes higher incidence of mastitis. Properly maintaining fresh cow and heifer housing to avoid frozen chunks of bedding and scrape or clean pens ahead of storms and cold spells to maintain adequate bedding. When bitter cold starts to blow in, consider using a windbreak for additional protection. Windbreaks may help save you money on feed costs, weight loss and a

“Cattle are built to handle all sorts of weather conditions, but frigid temperatures don’t have to make it miserable for both the animal and farmer.”

decrease in milk production. Animals require additional feed intake during the winter months to maintain their body temperature Therefore, windbreaks enable cows to gain and maintain their weight better. Windbreaks prevent drafts and add additional teat end protection from instant contact with cold gusts of wind. Focus on proper ventilation of dairy housing structure. Whether it is a newborn

calf shelter or housing for lactating cow, proper ventilation is of top importance. When you focus on fresh air, dairy cows can achieve their production potential. Poorly ventilated structures create stale air which compromises and affects milk production and quality. Ventilation systems should prevent high humidity in winter and heat build-up in summer. Look for excessive condensation and moisture damage, especially on the roof. Other signs of poor ventilation include air that smells of ammonia, excessive coughing, nasal discharge or open-mouthed breathing by the cows. If you run your fingers through the cow’s hair coat, it should be free of moisture in a properly ventilated building. Proper ventilation consists of exchanging barn air with fresh outside air throughout the structure. Fans hanging over stalls or alleys do not provide air exchange and are not a substitute for a welldesigned and managed ventilation system. Don’t skip the dip! Post-dip not only kills bacteria left on teat skin post milking but

also provide emollients to maintain teat end health. Higher levels of emollients are needed during the winter months to prevent cracked and chapped teat skin. These emollients, also known as conditioners will protect and provide much needed moisture to teat skin preventing teat skin from drying and chapping. To avoid teat dip from freezing teat ends, consider allowing post-dip to dry for 30 seconds and dabbing the teat ends with a paper or cloth towel prior to returning cows to housing. Powder winter dips are also an option during brutal cold. They contain a kill agent and conditioners as well without the potential of applying a liquid to teat ends in freezing weather. Properly store your teat dips to avoid freezing since the active ingredients in teat dip will settle out if it freezes. Cattle are built to handle all sorts of weather conditions, but frigid temperatures don’t have to make it miserable for both the animal and farmer. With proper bedding, nutrition and additional protection from the winter elements these tools will help protect your cattle and limit teat end damage. 8

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017


February 14 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Gerald & Rose King 7600 S 600 W, Topeka, IN

February 28 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Clarksville Research Station 9302 Portland Rd, Clarksville, MI

Milker Training Schools aim to help improve the marketability of MMPA members’ milk by providing milk quality and animal stockmanship knowledge, tools and training to members and their employees. Strategies to help members achieve this goal include: • Relay proper milking techniques and milk quality procedures. • Present the big-picture science of mastitis and milk quality. • Give members a chance to try-on and practice proper milking techniques and procedures. • Improve stockmanship and animal care while supporting National Dairy FARM requirements. Milker Training School classes can be taught in Spanish upon request.

Milker Training School Values Partnership, Quality, Animal Care Consistency, Education and Affirmation

To Marianne Gasiewski at 248-442-7597 or or To register, register,contact: contact: Marianne Gasiewski at 248-442-7597 gasiewski@mimilk.com. A $10 per person registration fee will be gasiewski@mimilk.com. A $10 per person registration fee will be deducted from your milk check to cover lunch and material costs. deducted from your milk check to cover lunch and material costs.

March 13 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eddie G’s 8484 W. Marlette Rd., Marlette, MI

March 28 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. The Shack 2263 W. 14th St., White Cloud, MI

April 12 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Clare Church of the Nazarene 10160 S Grant Ave., Clare, MI

April 24 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Whittemore Fire House 503 S. Bullock St., Whittemore, MI


NEWS & VIEWS Producers Scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Martin Fox House Dairy LLC Clark Dairy Farm LLC Garrett Beef Farm Zuiderveen Farms* Kenneth Van Polen* Grindstone Farms LLC Michael Bosscher * Benthem Brothers Inc* Leon Hamming Dick Haven Farms LLC Jerry Berrens Kenneth / Carol Tebos* Ervin Lee Yoder Eric / Janel Woodward Nathan / Jodie Mitchell Michael Yoder David Yoder * Firman / Ada Yoder * Devon Miller * Maple Leaf Jersey Farm Amos Hochstetler Levi / Ezra Bontrager * Eldred Farms Oberlin Farms LLC * *100

Four things Dairy Farmers need to know about Sustainable Agriculture

1

What is sustainable agriculture?

Sustainable agriculture is the production of food, fiber, or other plant or animal products using farming techniques that enable economic viability while protecting the environment, public health, human communities and animal welfare.

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October Pricing Announced The October Class III milk price climbed to $16.69 per hundredweight, up 33 cents from September and $1.87 above October 2016. The October Class IV price is $14.85, down $1.01 from September but $1.19 above a year ago.

Where is the push for sustainability coming from? Businesses and communities around the world are increasingly focusing on how to ensure a sustainable future for humans on this earth. International businesses have established sustainability goals and initiatives to meet the needs of our changing world. Because the dairy industry is critical to the food supply chain, both domestically and internationally, the industry must also assert its sustainability values. Farmers and cooperatives, like MMPA, have a great story to tell with sustainability, the push is now to define the stories, so we can share them with customers and consumers. One way the dairy industry can provide this message in a trusted format is by collaborating with third-party verifiers.

3

Why is the dairy industry collectively allowing

Upcoming Events December Local meetings begin December 5-15 Member Information Meetings December 14 Advisory Committee Meeting, Novi January 31 Resolutions Committee Meeting, Novi 10

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

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third-party personnel onto farms? Transparency is an opportunity for growth. There is a significant rise in the number of companies using third-party auditors and B-Corps to help provide transparency in the food supply chain. The use of a thirdparty or a B-Corp verification allows companies to work with individuals knowledgeable about the agriculture industry to conduct audits of farmers in their supply chain to help to ensure the products meet the demands of their consumers. Providing this type of transparency to our customers ensures all statements are true surrounding animal welfare, environmental stewardship and continuous improvement efforts.

What is it like having a third-party visit the farm? Some MMPA members have already undergone a third-party audit, such as John Wilcome from Windmere Farms in Coopersville Michigan. “They are looking for you to tell your dairy sustainability story. Questions will be asked about where you seek new practices, new regulations and how you have improved your farm over the years,” Wilcome says. “It’s your chance to convey and show the visitor how you care for your animals, the environment and what you do for your community if you employ or give back locally.”


Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program (MAMP) Advisory Committee Do you have a disagreement over an agricultural loan?

DISTRICT 1 Brad Hart, Clayton..................................517-445-2649

Have you received an adverse determination from an

Josh Lott, Mason.....................................517-740-9981

agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)?

Bruce Lewis, Jonesville ........................517-869-2877

If so, you might consider mediation.

Art Riske, Hanover..................................517-524-6015 Jeff Horning, Manchester....................734-428-8610

DISTRICT 2 Danny Ransler, Gobles..........................269-628-4218 Dan Ritter, Potterville............................517-645-7318 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......574-825-5198

The Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program (MAMP) helps resolve disputes between farmers and USDA agencies and between farmers and their lenders

Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.................269-660-2229

DISTRICT 3

or creditors.

Bill Stakenas, Free Soil...........................231-425-6913

The MAMP provides trained mediators to help the parties to a dispute

Burke Larsen, Scottville........................231-425-8988

communicate effectively about the issues and develop options for resolution.

Tim Butler, Sand Lake............................269-330-5538

Mediation is designed to resolve disputes quickly and confidentially while

Gary Nelsen, Grant.................................231-834-7610 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland...........................616-875-8162

saving the parties’ time, money and stress by avoiding hearings or litigation.

DISTRICT 4

Eighty to 100 percent of cases mediated by the MAMP are resolved each year.

Dave Folkersma, Rudyard....................906-630-1957

If resolution is not reached, the parties can still request a USDA hearing or

Ron Lucas, Posen....................................989-379-4694

proceed to court. There is no cost to the parties for using MAMP services. MICHIGAN RESIDENTS SEEKING MEDIATION OR WISHING TO LEARN MORE CAN CALL THE MAMP AT (616) 774-0121 OR VISIT WWW.AGMEDIATION.ORG.

Russ Tolan, Ossineke..............................989-471-2993 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Alpena...........................989-464-4022

DISTRICT 5 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain.......................231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy..................................231-388-0496

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Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...................989-304-0233 Robert Lee, Marion................................231-743-6794

DISTRICT 6 Aaron Gasper, Lowell............................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler.............................989-682-9064 Brad Ritter, Byron....................................586-405-4749 David Reed, Owosso..............................989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia..................................989-640-3372

DISTRICT 7 Scott Kleinhardt, Clare..........................989-386-8037 Philip Gross, Weidman..........................989-289-0670 Jason Elenbaum, Mayville...................989-274-1974 John Bennett, Prescott.........................989-345-4264 James Weber, Vassar..............................989-297-1850

DISTRICT 8

Recon is a Michigan based manufacturer and supplier of innovative dairy parlor equipment for superior cleaning functions and increased productivity. Call Recon today for more information: 800-338-4950.

Mike Noll, Croswell.................................810-404-4071 Mike Bender, Croswell..........................810-404-2140 Nick Leipprandt, Pigeon......................517-897-4155 Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin.............................810-706-2955

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

Peeling Back History BY JIM MULHERN, PRESIDENT & CEO, NMPF

I

f history teaches us anything, it’s that there are few new ideas under the sun since the days of P.T. Barnum when it comes to the strategies employed to grab consumers. Even in the dairy marketplace, despite all the great qualities of our products, we too often see troubling and misguided appeals to people’s fears and lack of knowledge. Because this type of marketing is nothing new, when we see its use today we know full well how this plays out: Individual brands scrapping for sales growth try to scare shoppers into buying their products, which leads consumers to question the integrity of the foods they are eating, creating a receding tide that diminishes the entire category. These appeals to fear are cheap, corrosive, and not constructive. This reality is why NMPF has launched a new consumer campaign, called Peel Back the Label, that encourages shoppers to think twice about some of the dubious claims made on product labels. While overall we are looking at different food products deploying a variety of deceptive claims, our main concern is the many misleading assertions made today about agricultural biotechnology. Research we conducted at the start of the campaign was sobering. Many people either don’t know or care about GMOs, but there are a significant number of purchasers expressing concerns – despite their admission that they have no idea what GMOs are, how they are used, or that the science is clear that GMOs are completely safe for human and animal consumption. Our consumer testing also found a small but vocal minority of consumers who understand the science behind food biotechnology, and are troubled by the amount of deceptive, derogatory rhetoric being used to scare people away from some brands, to the favor of others. And it is this audience we seek

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to grow: people who will not simply succumb to the siren song of huckster advertising, but who will join our effort to call out disingenuous labeling claims. What are some examples we are highlighting? They include products labeled “non-GMO,” even though there are no genetically modified versions of such foods – like oranges, tomatoes or salt. They include foods touting improved sustainability through sourcing non-GMO animal feed, when the evidence is clear that the opposite is true. They also include brands that suggest GMOs are something to worry about, despite the massive amount of research conducted around the world over the past 20 years that has time and again reaffirmed the safety of biotech crops.

as “No artificial growth hormones” or “Our farmers pledge not to use BGH” is that there’s something suspicious, even hazardous, about using rbST to produce milk. Only the required fine print, appended with an asterisk and usually buried on the label, tells the whole truth: that there is no significant compositional variance in the milk from cows treated with rbST. It is a distinction without a difference. But that didn’t stop marketers from touting this absence claim. The vast majority of fluid milk products today are sold as “rBST-free,” yet it hasn’t helped milk sales. The implied message that the use of rbST is reason for shoppers to be wary has poisoned the entire well. It’s clearly one reason why some consumers have forsaken the dairy milk category in favor of plantbased imitators. It’s easy to envision how absence claims about GM animal feed use will chase away even more consumers and achieve a similar result.

“…we must learn from history to avoid repeating it. Marketing to people’s worst instincts is a race to the bottom of product categories, and can damage an entire industry.”

I’ve been asked why National Milk is doing this now, or cares enough about the issue to invest resources in fighting what is regrettably an all-too-common trend in the food industry. My answer is that we must learn from history to avoid repeating it. Marketing to people’s worst instincts is a race to the bottom of product categories, and can damage an entire industry. The best example of this for dairy is what happened with the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST), or what was quickly dubbed bovine growth hormone. When FDA completed its safety assessment and first approved rbST more than 20 years ago, the agency spelled out how absence claims on dairy labels could be worded, since some brands wanted to make it a point of differentiation in the market. The clear message sent by claims such

The purpose of Peel Back the Label is to help people understand why the cynical use of fear-mongering to sell food is both deceptive and counterproductive. Sowing the seeds of distrust doesn’t build consumer confidence, nor does it help anchor a successful long-term brand development program. It’s unfortunate we’ve reached the point where this campaign is needed. But too much is at stake for America’s dairy farmers when their use of safe technological advancements that increase the sustainability of their farms is threatened by weak marketing claims up the food chain. We want to encourage an alternate focus on dairy’s many appealing qualities that will expand the pie for everyone.

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

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11/10/2017 11:39:53 AM


FUTURE SUCCESS is Generated by Past Visionaries

THE MICHIGAN DAIRY MEMORIAL AND SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION CELEBRATES 60 YEARS BY MELISSA HART

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s the NCAA Men’s Basketball season begins with courts across the country filled with athletes who have been awarded thousands of dollars in scholarship money to play basketball, dairy industry minded students are gearing up to compete for scholarships offered by one of the largest scholarship programs in the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation (MDMSF) was founded by a group

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of visionaries who wanted to provide scholarship funds to students interested in dairy science. Now marking its 60th anniversary, the program continues to award deserving students who are planning on pursuing a career in the dairy industry after graduation. Dr. Miriam Weber Nielson, MSU Department of Animal Science and Secretary of MDMSF Board of Directors, explained that the Foundation has awarded more than $1.5 million in scholarships to young people aspiring to careers in the dairy industry. She

commented, “With more than 1,000 donors, the foundation has provided a visible way for individuals and organizations to recognize with monetary gifts the work of their colleagues and friends in the industry, while strengthening the future of the industry.” “Gifts to the MDMSF are used to grow the endowment fund with interest from the principal used to create scholarships and support learning experiences for our students in dairy science,” Nielson commented.


When donations are made to the foundation they are recognized in one of two ways: Foundation honorees and named scholarships. Foundation honorees are named when $1,000 or more is given to recognize a dairy leader, that individual will become a MDMSF Honoree and is recognized by a plaque with the Honoree’s picture permanently installed in the MSU Livestock Pavilion and the Honoree’s name permanently inscribed on a plaque in Anthony Hall. Named scholarships may be named for an individual or organization with a minimum gift of $50,000. A named scholarship is awarded as part of the MDMSF program and carries the name of the individual or organization that provides the funds. Nielson feels it’s the best of both worlds, “What a great way to recognize deserving individuals in the industry, and at the same time support and encourage the young people who are the future of the industry!” Sheila Burkhardt, MMPA Sr. Director of Member and Government Relations, was a young Ag Communications student at MSU when she was awarded a MDMSF scholarship. “I greatly appreciated receiving the scholarship when I was a student at MSU,” she said. “The scholarship meant a lot to me not only financially but knowing that the Foundation

made the commitment to me and my education influenced my decision to be involved in the dairy industry after college.” Burkhardt continued, “It is pretty amazing the number of students who have benefited from the MDMSF scholarships over the years and the many different career paths those students have pursued.” Growing up on a dairy farm, Brian Troyer found his way to MSU and found a vast array of career choices when he chose dairy science as his area of interest. As the President of the MDMSF Board of Directors and recipient of the scholarship in the early 1980s, Troyer knows the value of these scholarships, “That scholarship helped me pay the bills while I was in college. I was able to reap the full benefit of what college had to offer as an undergrad at MSU and today I feel it’s vitally important to invest in the youth of our industry if we are going to thrive.” The MDMSF is more than just a vehicle for funds for students at MSU, Nielson commented, “The Foundation, and the people and organizations who contribute to it, have encouraged and supported the education of several generations of members of our Michigan dairy industry.” She continued, “Through generous contributions, donors have recognized the accomplishments of over 200

individuals, outstanding in various professions in the dairy industry, as Foundation Honorees. The Foundation is a great way to celebrate the accomplishments of people from all segments of our industry, something that we usually don’t do often enough! There are so many great stories to tell right here in Michigan.” The future of the dairy industry is under constant scrutiny and youth are a vital resource for future success. According to Nielson, MSU students interested in dairy are exceptional, “They stand out as being passionate, hard-working and willing to put in extra effort when needed to help others. More so than our average student in the Animal Science department, they seem resilient, focused and determined to find their niche.” Nielson is proud of the outstanding team work and generous support of time and money from the industry that has fueled the growth in the dairy program at MSU. She concluded, “In addition to the Foundation’s scholarships, the industry support of our programs, even in very difficult times, distinguishes MSU from many other universities in what we can offer our students. With that type of leadership, teamwork and can-do attitude in our industry as well as our young people, I’m confident that the future of our Michigan dairy industry is bright and full of new opportunities.” STUDENTS ATTEND MDMSF ANNUAL MEETING MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY (MSU) STUDENTS AND RECIPIENTS OF 2016-17 MICHIGAN DAIRY MEMORIAL AND SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION (MDMSF) SCHOLARSHIPS ATTENDED THE 2017 MDMSF ANNUAL MEETING TO EXPRESS APPRECIATION TO THE MDMSF BOARD FOR THEIR SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS. PICTURED (STANDING) LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: ETHAN HAYWOOD, EVELYN OKKEMA, KELLY RATERINK, JARED SANDERSON, STEPHANIE WEIL, AUSTIN HAYWOOD, HAILEY SHARRARD, JORIN OUWINGA, AND SHELBY BERENS. PICTURED SEATED LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: ELLEN LAUNSTEIN, ALLISON SCHAFER, LETA LARSEN, MADELINE MEYER, MARIN WESTERN, ALYCIA BURCH, AND NATALIE HORNING. MISSING FROM THE PHOTO IS EMMA BLOUGH. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT MICHIGAN DAIRY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS PLEASE VISIT ANS.MSU.EDU.

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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MBIC PRESENTS

#BlogMeetsBeef 2.0

The New Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. & Rethink the Ranch

Certified Angus Beef, Meijer and the Kentucky Beef Council Partner in the Effort Michigan Beef Industry Commission partnered with Meijer, Certified Angus Beef, Kentucky Beef Council and Michigan State University to promote beef at the meat case and host a #BLOGMEETSBEEF 2.0 Immersion Event. This immersion event was a chance for state beef councils, Meijer and CAB to reengage with influential food bloggers and RDs who attended #BLOGMEETSBEEF last year, and to build relationships with new bloggers. The event was conducted in August on the campus of MSU. This twoday experience focused on engaging participants with an in-depth experience on beef at the meat case. Highlights included a retailer panel discussion, hands-on beef cutting course, feedlot tour, meat case deep dive, and a cooking/food photography challenge. The event and contest was shared through influencers, SBCs, Meijer and CAB websites and social media properties.

BEEF COUNCIL CAMPAIGN REACHES MORE THAN TWO MILLION MILLENNIALS An ongoing online video promotion funded by six state beef councils, including Michigan, has gained broad exposure with millennials, the beef industry’s primary target audience. The checkoff campaign, featuring videos for Burger Bar Beef 101 and a recipe for “Bulgogi Lettuce Wraps,” generated over 2.5 million views. To date, the most consumer impressions generated by the campaign have come from Michigan and Illinois.

Grants Help Take Veal in the Classroom The Michigan Beef Industry Commission recently launched a new grant program that encourages culinary science teachers to explore the use of veal with their students. The program helps offset the cost of veal purchased for a culinary/veal production lesson. MBIC provided a resource toolkit to assist culinary science teachers in creating exclusive veal lessons.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the beef checkoff, is relaunching the iconic Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand, which is turning 25 this year. The overall effort was designed with millennials in mind and showcases the pleasure and benefits beef provides. A digital advertising campaign is driving traffic to the all-new www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com. The site is now a single, comprehensive location that provides an interactive experience on all things beef, from cuts and cookery, to a robust collection of beef recipes, to an inside-look at the lives of the people who raise beef. Part of the relaunch effort is a new video that features the familiar children’s song, “Old McDonald Had a Farm.” The song has a new twist in the video that celebrates the American tradition of farming and ranching while shedding light on what’s new about raising beef today. The video series will feature only real farmers and ranchers from across the country. You can view this Rethink the Ranch series of videos and web content at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/ raising-beef.

BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com


CATTLE ARE CARED FOR BY PRODUCERS WHO CARE

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE STORY YOUR CHECKOFF IS TELLING AT

MyBeefCheckoff.com/RethinkTheRanch

Funded by the Beef Checkoff


NATIONAL MILK PRODUCERS FEDERATION

Young Cooperator Leadership Program BY NATE AND JENNY ELZINGA, 2017 OYDC

A

fter the August OYDC meeting in Novi, we were excited to learn that we would be invited to the annual NMPF and YC (Young Cooperator) Leadership Program in California at the Disney Hotel with last year’s OYDC winners Darrin and Barbara Siemen. Though we were a little anxious because Anaheim is a long way from home, the day we left all anxieties subsided and turned into excitement and anticipation as we flew away from the lake effect snow that had begun that morning. Sunday morning, Oct. 29, we enjoyed breakfast during the YC Advisory council meeting and learned more about the NMPF YC program while meeting

the other council members. Later in the day we joined up with other YC couples from around the country for a welcome event and social mixer. Networking with the other young farmers and learning what they are all doing on their dairys and in their co-ops was definitely a highlight of the week! Monday morning, we started off the day with a great Disneyland breakfast together with the whole YC group. It was a full day of speakers and experts of a wide variety relevant to our industry and our generation. We were able to sit at the table with our first speaker, Mike Hutchens, for breakfast and lunch. I made sure I got as many Illinois jabs in as I could. He then led the group

through a colorful discussion on how to feed cows through low milk prices. His practical experience and broad knowledge base was well received. We then had an interactive session with Michele Payn. She did her best to take us, as farmers, down a notch in regard to how we talk to consumers about food. She went through some of the psychology of how a person receives and relates to information. We learned that even though facts are often on our side, most times leading with them is not effective. During lunch, Amy Myrdal-Miller, a registered dietary nutritionist, brought us through food marketing claims and how they actually match up with real, relevant nutrition. She reinforced the fact that food labels need to be regulated appropriately, especially in a day when consumers fall prey to so many marketing schemes. After lunch, Tom Fuhrmann from Dairy Works, walked us through basic leadership and management skills that are vital on today’s dairy farms. He spoke from a wealth of experience and knowledge then gave us a management toolbox of useful ideas and tools to help us on our dairies. He spoke at length to some of the cultural challenges and differences on farms between staff and gave some useful tips on how to move forward in some of those situations.

BARBARA & DARRIN SEIMEN, JENNY & NATE ELZINGA, AT THE DISNEYLAND HALLOWEEN RECEPTION.

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

After our afternoon break, we heard briefly from Andy Junkin. He gave us his earth shattering introduction on how he became a farm family consultant and highlighted some of his experiences in the field. It seems that some of the family conflicts that no one likes to talk about are all too common. He then led a panel


of three producers who were at various stages of farm transfer and brought out some of the challenges or successes they had to this point. Finally, finishing off the official portion of the day, we went through some exercises with the executive director of National Ag. in the Classroom, Lisa Gaskalla. She talked of the continued importance of the program and showed us some of the promotional material. Later, on Monday night, the YC group met at the ESPNzone for a fun night of food, games and refreshments. It gave us a chance to continue to network and build new relationships and encourage

TIME

FOR

each other in today’s market. We also learned that the MMPA crew is highly competitive playing games and according to Mike Hutchens, Michigan people are, in general, aggressive and highly competitive. I took that as a compliment! On Tuesday and Wednesday, we enjoyed the rest of the Joint Annual Meeting with the general assembly. This was our first time attending this conference, and we enjoyed it very much. It was refreshing to hear the collective dairy organizations talk in a message of unity and how we move forward TOGETHER. There was a strong sense of unity and collaboration in

the group, which to me was contagious. We were introduced to the Undeniable Dairy campaign, the Peel Back the Label campaign and the Dairy Pride Act, which are all an effort to “together” stand up and defend our industry, shine light on those that market in a negative fearful way, tell the good story of the products we produce and the even better story of those that produce it. I am hopeful that the tide is about to turn. I am excited and optimistic that consumers are hearing the good story about our product from the scientific community, from other countries, from friends and relatives, and from us.

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NMPF CELEBRATES INDUSTRY COLLABORATION & INNOVATION AT 101ST ANNUAL MEETING IN CALIFORNIA

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he importance of increased collaboration across the dairy community, defending the good name of dairy foods, and pursuing innovative new marketing strategies were key themes at the National Milk Producers Federation’s 101st annual meeting, where 800 attendees heard from their policy and promotion organizations on how to create more opportunities for the U.S. dairy industry. Hosted jointly by NMPF, the National Dairy Board and the United Dairy Industry Association, this year’s event was themed “We Are Undeniably Dairy,” building on a campaign launched earlier this year that celebrates dairy’s undeniable goodness in the areas of nutrition, sustainability and community involvement. NMPF’s leaders, in their remarks to members, stressed the need for America’s dairy companies to do more in collaboration with other marketing cooperatives.

“We have to stop looking at other U.S. cooperatives as if we’re competitors,” said NMPF Chairman Randy Mooney in his remarks. “We have to recognize that in a globalized dairy market, our competitors are outside of America’s borders, and we have to work together to fight for a larger share of those markets.” NMPF’s annual Town Hall event featured presentations from staff on the latest policy issues affecting the industry, including efforts in Congress to address immigration reform, the fight against misbranded dairy imitators, and NMPF’s extensive work this year to achieve a positive outcome in the ongoing NAFTA negotiations. Later in the day, NMPF President and CEO Jim Mulhern discussed the organization’s work this year to improve the dairy safety net in the coming farm bill, as well as its new campaign, Peel Back the Label, which challenges the misleading marketing practices used by certain food companies.

“To surmount the hurdles that we face, and carry these efforts across the finish line, we must stand together as a united industry,” Mulhern said. “Our dairy community is unstoppable when we engage on these important issues.” He said major grassroots efforts will be needed in support of proposed congressional reforms to immigration laws. He also discussed how NMPF will be working more closely in the coming year with dairy processors on farm policy improvements. Trace Sheehan, co-producer of the documentary “Food Evolution,” was the meeting’s keynote speaker. He shared his experience working on the film, which centers on the contentious debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Later that evening, attendees were invited to a screening of the documentary and a question-andanswer session with Sheehan. SOURCE: NMPF

Communications Contest Honors Competing in the NMPF Communication Contest, MMPA was honored with 10 awards, including “Best of Class” for a feature article. Awards included honors for the Michigan Milk Messenger, photography, writing and website design presented during the annual meeting in KEN NOBIS, MMPA PRESIDENT, WAS A PANELIST ON THE NMPF PRODUCER PANEL ON OCT. 31.

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

Anaheim, California.


CHECKOFF LEADERS HIGHLIGHT KEYS TO INDUSTRY’S FUTURE

T

he checkoff’s mission of growing sales and building trust is key to assuring a prosperous future for the dairy industry, Dairy Management Inc. (DMI) CEO Tom Gallagher said during the 2017 joint annual meeting of the United Dairy Industry Association, National Dairy Promotion and Research Board, and National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) in Anaheim, Calif.

“It’s growing and will continue to grow. In fact, domestic cheese has carried the day in terms of sales the last four or five years,” Gallagher said. Butter also is enjoying a comeback, thanks to consumers’ acceptance of dairy fats and their desire to consume real foods. Butter reached its highest consumption mark since 1968 at 5.7 pounds per capita in 2016.

Beyond sales, Gallagher said the need to continue growing consumer trust is equally as important to the dairy industry’s future. Key to building trust is educating consumers who want more information about where their food comes from. Gallagher said the Undeniably Dairy campaign, launched earlier this year, will help set the record straight and build trust. The Undeniably Dairy effort was created through the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. The industrywide collaboration is beginning to make a difference, with 170 companies actively engaged, said Barb O’Brien, who serves as president of DMI and the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. “With our campaign, we have launched a very positive and proactive way of communicating,” said O’Brien. “It starts with listening and understanding what is on consumers’ minds. We’re working to shift

Speaking to more than 800 dairy farmers and industry representatives, Gallagher described how the checkoff has grown per capita consumption through several key areas, including exports and foodservice partnerships. He shared how DMI’s “go-to-market” approach proactively works in partnership with the supply chain to expand dairy markets and helps to fill a market need. He said DMI, which oversees the checkoff, allocates funds to stimulate unmet demand through product development, innovation and marketing. “Our job is to figure out where to use resources in the market chain,” Gallagher said. “Unmet demand is the key. Demand is not the function of what people buy – it’s the function of what we offer them. If we offer innovative products, whether it’s global or domestic, we know we can increase consumption.” Gallagher said, according to NMPF, U.S. per capita dairy consumption reached 591 pounds in 2016 – up from 566 in 2010 – and credited cheese and butter as the primary drivers for this growth. Cheese reached its highest consumption level ever in 2016, fueled by at-home use and out-of-the-home ingredient use, especially at foodservice. Per capita cheese consumption in 2016 was 36.3 pounds.

Gallagher said the long-term trajectory of per capita dairy consumption remains on a positive path thanks to the checkoff’s work with partners, including McDonald’s, Domino’s, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut. He said since the start of DMI’s partnerships, dairy sales have grown 25 percent.

the tone and tell our story in a meaningful way. Undeniably Dairy truly does establish that two-way dialogue.”

Beyond dairy consumption growth domestically, Gallagher said exports of U.S. dairy are providing a boost. They have more than quadrupled since 2000 – to nearly $5 billion in 2016 – thanks to growth in the top five markets: Mexico ($1.2 billion), Southeast Asia ($671 million), Canada ($632 million), China ($384 million) and South America ($280 million).

“We don’t need to fear change,” he said. “We need to lead the change, and when we do, we’ll be at the table when consumers, retailers and others have misperceptions. We’ll be at the table talking to them, educating them and influencing their decisions.”

Gallagher concluded his remarks by emphasizing the need to embrace change that he says is inevitable and goes “right to the heart of trust.”

SOURCE: DAIRY MANAGEMENT, INC.

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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Pepper-Jack Named Grand Champion in Cheese Contest

P

epper-jack cheese produced under the Heritage Ridge Creamery brand at Michigan Milk Producers Association’s Middlebury, Indiana cheese plant was recently named Grand Champion Cheese. The award was presented by the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) at the federation’s annual meeting in California.

The Heritage Ridge Creamery brand markets cheese produced at the Middlebury, Indiana plant and sold in the on-site retail store. The cheese plant produces Colby cheese, a softer, milder flavored cheddar cheese, in addition to cheddar, pepper-jack, Amish Creamery cheese and other flavors. Heritage Ridge Creamery is a brand of Middlebury Cheese Company, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the MMPA. The farmer-owned cooperative acquired the facility in 2016 and is currently reviewing options to increase capacity and expand product offerings.

The annual contest includes cheese made by dairy cooperatives belonging to NMPF. A record 194 entries totaling 3,070 pounds of cheese products were submitted in the 2017 contest. Heritage Ridge pepper-jack placed first in the hot or spicy cheese category and then went on to win the overall best cheese prize. This is the first year MMPA has entered a product in the cheese contest. “We are honored our product was recognized nationally, a testament to high quality milk from our farms and the craftmanship of our cheesemakers,” said Jim Feeney, senior director of sales for the MMPA. “We strive to exceed our customers’ expectations everyday with the quality products in our portfolio.”

RANDY MOONEY, CHAIRMAN OF NMPF, WITH JOE DIGLIO AND KEN NOBIS

NMPF CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST

NMPF CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST

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MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

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In 2017 your dairy promotion was hard at work connecting consumers to your families and the dairy foods you provide. As we look ahead to the New Year, here are a few programs and activities that have successfully shared dairy with Michigan consumers.

Undeniably Dairy

Great Dairy Adventure

The Undeniably Dairy campaign kicked off in May to rekindle consumers’ love for dairy products, and reshape the way they think about dairy and the people who produce it. DMI created the campaign that has been embraced throughout the dairy chain by local promotion organizations, cooperatives, brands and others. In Michigan, the Undeniably Dairy campaign has been incorporated into promotional resources, programs and outreach to both consumers and health professionals. The campaign has been featured in local media on Lansing’s Morning Blend, Detroit’s Live in the D, Grand Rapids’ Football Frenzy, CBS Radio Detroit and The HUB (a publication created for Detroit neighborhoods).

In July, the Michigan dairy community came together to host the Great Dairy Adventure, an event geared toward families, daycare centers and summer camps. Nearly 2,000 attendees had the chance to milk a cow, create dairy craft projects, pet calves and learn about the steps milk takes on its journey from cow to grocery store to their family table.

D N m dr m – Li du m

U c

Farmers Featured on Social Media UDIM continues to highlight Michigan dairy farm families on social media. Stories, photos and videos featuring farm families talking about their dairies help consumers reconnect with the people behind the delicious dairy foods they love. The MilkMakers videos have been the most popular Facebook posts this year. These videos were originally distributed to teachers to include in their curriculum, but have been a success with all audiences.

• •

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291,200 impressions

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

233,000 impressions

118,200 impressions


“Student Swap”

Farmers Are Members of Team Chocolate Milk

This fall, UDIM produced the video “Student Swap,” which introduces figure skater Hannah Miller to life on a dairy farm, and Maddy Meyer, a Michigan dairy farm girl, to the world of figure skating. The video conveys the similarities between dairy farmers and urban millennials to further connect with consumers and give them an inside look at life on a dairy farm.

Athletes of Team Chocolate Milk are passionate about nutrition and fitness, and recovering with chocolate milk after hard training sessions. Several of Michigan’s dairy farmers are members of Team Chocolate Milk, including Ashley Messing-Kennedy, Gertie van den Goor and Carla Wardin.

Michigan Farm Families Featured During Soccer Games

Farmer Participates in School Nutrition Association of Michigan Fall Conference

During the 2017 soccer season, UDIM partnered with National Premier Soccer League to promote chocolate milk as a recovery beverage. Players from all six teams drank more than 750 chugs of chocolate milk as postmatch recovery beverages. Four Michigan farm families – the Hornings, the Shafers, the Windemullers and the Lindbergs – were featured with on-field appearances during games throughout the season to amplify the message that dairy farms are family farms.

The School Nutrition Association of Michigan (SNAM) Fall Conference represents foodservice employees who serve school breakfast and lunch to students every day. The UDIM Schools Nutrition team works with foodservice employees to educate them about the importance of milk and encourage students to take a milk with their meal. At the SNAM Fall Conference, dairy farmer Renee McCauley brought a full-size simulated cow and had the opportunity to answer farm questions from attendees.

Resources UDIM offers a wide variety of resources to help Michigan farmers share their dairy story, connect with local communities and give consumers information about the health benefits of dairy. •

Dairy producer grants provide funding for dairy producers, dairy farm employees and dairy cooperative employees to conduct promotional events in support of the dairy industry. Visit www.MilkMeansMore.org for more information and an application. Educational materials and promotional items to support farm tours, county fairs or other industry events with more information on dairy foods and the role they play in our diet.

Social media counsel helps farmers build their social networks.

Presentation and interview training prepares farmers to share their dairy story with audiences in various formats.

Farm tour guidance equips farmers with the tools they need to host a fun, educational tour.

Workshops help farmers and industry advocates connect with consumers about dairy foods.

In 2017, UDIM hosted trainings for: ¡

18 Michigan Dairy Ambassador students

¡

MSU veterinarian students

¡

MSU Dairy Club

¡

MSU Dairy Science class

¡

Crisis workshops for two cooperative staff teams to learn about the resources available through UDIM.

To learn more, order resources or schedule a workshop, DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER visit www.MilkMeansMore.org

25


DISTRICT 1

2017-2018

LOCAL OFFICERS

During the Local meetings held by each Local Association last year, the following officers were selected to lead their Local throughout the year. Elections for 2018-2019 officers will take place at each Local meeting this December or January. See page 28 for Local meeting dates.

Responsibilities of officers

ADRIAN LOCAL

President: Clark Emmons V. President: Jim Marvin Sec/Treas: Gary Stout Dairy Communicators: Geraldine Emmons, Joy Marvin

Hillsdale-Litchfield Local

President: Scott Ferry V. President: Bruce Lewis Sec/Treas: Carlton Evans Dairy Communicators: Jennifer Lewis, Cami Marz-Evans, Marianne Sickels

Ingham County Local

President: Richard Chaffee V. President: Dan Minnis Sec/Treas: Josh Lott Dairy Communicator: Evelyn Minnis

Jackson County Plus Local Local President: Presidents are responsible for presiding

at meetings of the Local membership, working with other officers of the Local to plan the annual meeting and making sure that the business and finances of the Local are conducted appropriately. Presidents hold general responsibility for the appointment of a nominating committee from among the Local’s membership to select candidates for the officer and delegate positions up for election at the annual meeting. Local Vice President: Vice Presidents preside at meetings of

the Local membership in the absence of the president. They must also work with other Local officers of the Local to plan the annual meeting and make sure that the affairs and business of the Local are conducted in an orderly fashion. Local Secretary-Treasurer: Local Secretary-Treasurers

keep Local board and membership meeting minutes and financial records in an accurate and orderly fashion to be presented at the Local annual meeting. Local SecretaryTreasurers manage all finances including requesting reimbursement and disbursing funds. They are in general charge of correspondence and communications by the Local to other places, including the MMPA office. The Local Secretary-Treasurer ensures all elected positions including delegates are filled and election results are communicated with the MMPA office in a timely fashion. Dairy Communicator: One and sometimes two or three

members of a Local work diligently speaking out and communicating on behalf of dairy farmers in their Local area. Dairy Communicators are involved in a wide variety of Local promotion activities ranging from giving farm tours to going to schools, giving classroom presentations to putting up fair or mall displays. Each spring, the Dairy Communicators gather to share ideas and learn from each other and cooperative leaders. 26

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

President: Tom Zenz V. President: Arthur Riske Sec/Treas: Arthur Riske

Saline-Ann Arbor Local

President: Jeff Horning V. President: Stan Lambarth Sec/Treas: Keith Weidmayer Dairy Communicators: Arlene DeForest, Lynda Horning, Kaitlyn Packard, Samantha Mamarow

DISTRICT 2 Barry-Eaton Local

President: Tom Wing V. President: Bob Baker Sec/Treas: Sally Bivens Dairy Communicators: Heather Wing, Sally Bivens

Blossomland Local

President: Jerry Koebel, Jr Sec/Treas: Joshua Gamble

Constantine Local

President: Richard Ultz V. President: Clyde Miller Sec/Treas: Richard Thomas Dairy Communicators: Judy Oesch, Richard Ultz, Cynthia Adam

Kalamazoo Local

President: Craig Newland V. President: Tim Hood Sec/Treas: Dan Ransler

Lansing Local

President: Daniel Ritter Sec/Treas: Kristina Langmaack Dairy Communicators: Stacey Edick, Kristina Langmaack

DISTRICT 3 Grand Rapids Local

President: Tim Butler V. President: Jonathan Acker Sec/Treas: Ken Leseman Dairy Communicator: Kay Willcome


Muskegon Local

President: Bill Stakenas V. President: Glen Sparks Sec/Treas: Sharon Powers Dairy Communicator: Terri Stakenas

West Michigan Local

U.P. West Central

President: Brad Ritter Sec/Treas: David Reed Dairy Communicator: Megghan Honke Seidel

President: Phillip Gross V. President: William Stough Secretary: Phillip Gross Treasurer: Doug Stevens Dairy Communicators: Bertha Mae Stough, Lynnell Rider

President: Mike Rasmussen V. President: John Black Sec/Treas: Jack Jeppesen Dairy Communicators: Cheri Chapin, Ramona Okkema

Evart Local

Chippewa County Local

President: David Folkersma V. President: David Bell Sec/Treas: John Kronemeyer Dairy Communicator: Anne Folkersma, Diane Miller, Toni Kronemeyer

Hillman Local

President: Gordon Dick V. President: Bruce Benthem Sec/Treas: Larry Buning Dairy Communicator: Amy Martin

Mid-Sanilac Local

Deford/Clifford-Mayville Local President: Ray Wolak V. President: Keith Wood Sec/Treas: Diane Foley Dairy Communicators: Diane Foley, Jane Wood, Katie Wood

DISTRICT 6 Flint Local

Livingston Charter Local

President: Bill Blumerich V. President: Patrick Bolday Sec/Treas: Kristie Lamb Dairy Communicators: Melissa Small, Kristie Lamb, Doris Stuever, Virginia Ankley, Kathleen Clinton, Kathleen Knust, Robin Falker

Upstate Local

Mid-Michigan Local

President: Larry Niec V. President: Eric Frahm Sec/Treas: Bob Krafft Dairy Communicators: Barbara Wardin, Joanmarie Weiss, Debra Krafft, Amy Bergdolt

President: Scott Bontekoe V. President: Chuck White Sec/Treas: Janet White Dairy Communicator: Jodi Hill

President: Brady Brown V. President: Mike Noll Sec/Treas: Dennis Lee Dairy Communicators: Jordan Noll, Jodi Sharrard, Sara Lee, Rita Phillips, Gertie van den Goor

Mid-Thumb

Frankenmuth Local

President: Peter Juengel Sec/Treas: Daniel Weil

President: Jeremy Werth V. President: Paul Ponik Sec/Treas: Ron Lucas Dairy Communicators: Connie Lucas, Michelle Lucas President: Marv Rubingh V. President: Terry Lautner Sec/Treas: Richard Fettig Dairy Communicator: Rebekah Rubingh

President: Mark Ziel V. President: Darwin Sneller Secretary: Ashley Kennedy Treasurer: Nick Leipprandt Dairy Communicators: Shelly Messing, Barbara Siemen, Ashley Kennedy, Cassie Sneller

Clare-Mt. Pleasant Local

Alma Local

DISTRICT 4

Huron Local

DISTRICT 7

DISTRICT 5

President: Steve Berens V. President: Nate Pyle Secretary: William Gruppen Treasurer: Darren Coffey Dairy Communicators: Jenny Elzinga, Arlene Ter Haar, Danielle Berens

DISTRICT 8

Owosso Local

President: William Pirman V. President: Galen Van Drese Sec/Treas: Kimberly Pirman Dairy Communicator: Kimberly Pirman

Sunrise Local

President: John Bennett V. President: Jeremy Beebe Secretary: Chris Daniels Treasurer: Michael O’Farrell Dairy Communicator: Abigail O’Farrell

President: John Hufnagel V. President: Aaron Gasper Sec/Treas: Kris Wardin Dairy Communicators: Doreen Slavik, Carla Wardin, Patti Jandernoa

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27


2017-2018

LOCAL MEETINGS

The information listed below was available at press time. All members will receive complete meeting details in the invitation from their local. LOCAL DATE LOCATION CITY

TIME

Barry-Eaton/Lansing

12/2/2017

Castleton Township Hall

Nashville

12:00 p.m.

Upstate

12/5/2017

Ellsworth Christian Reformed Church

Ellsworth

11:00 a.m.

U.P. West Central

12/6/2017

Home Base Restaurant

Shaffer

12:00 p.m.

Chippewa County

12/7/2017

Rudyard Christian Reformed Church

Rudyard

11:30 a.m.

Kalamazoo

12/12/2017

Four Roses Café

Plainwell

11:00 a.m.

Sunrise

1/3/2018

Klacking Township Hall

West Branch

12:00 p.m.

Muskegon

1/4/2018

Russ’ Banquet Room

Muskegon

11:30 a.m.

Deford/Clifford-Mayville

1/8/2018

Spring of Life Church

Mayville

12:00 p.m.

Frankenmuth

1/9/2018

DaVinci’s Italian Restaurant

Frankenmuth

12:00 p.m.

Alma

1/10/2018

Maxfield’s

Blanchard

11:30 a.m.

Ingham County

1/10/2018

Old Chicago

Okemos

6:30 p.m.

Flint/Livingston Charter/Owosso

1/10/2018

Durand VFW

Durand

12:00 p.m.

Grand Rapids

1/10/2018

Golden Corral

Walker

11:45 a.m.

Evart

1/11/2018

Rehoboth Reformed Church

McBain

11:00 a.m.

Mid-Michigan

1/11/2018

AgroLiquid Headquarters

St. Johns

11:45 a.m.

Hillman

1/12/2018

Ramada Inn

Alpena

11:30 a.m.

Huron

1/13/2018

Franklin Inn

Bad Axe

12:00 p.m.

Constantine

1/13/2018

Siloam Fellowship

Goshen, Ind.

10:30 a.m.

Saline-Ann Arbor

1/16/2018

Freedom Township Hall

Manchester

12:00 p.m.

Jackson County Plus

1/17/2018

Gene Davis & Sons Catering

Jackson

12:00 p.m.

Mid-Thumb

1/17/2018

Holly Meadows Golf Course

Capac

11:30 a.m.

Hillsdale-Litchfield

1/18/2018

Olivia’s Chophouse

Jonesville

12:00 p.m.

Mid-Sanilac

1/18/2018

Woodland Hills Country Club

Sandusky

11:00 a.m.

Adrian

1/19/2018

UAW Hall

Adrian

12:00 p.m

Blossomland

1/19/2018

Zeke’s Restaurant

Dowagiac

12:00 p.m.

Clare-Mt. Pleasant

1/19/2018

Clare Church of the Nazarene

Clare

11:00 a.m.

West Michigan

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

What are MMPA Locals? why do they meet?

Local Associations are a small organization of MMPA members within an area prescribed by the board of directors. The Locals are distributed geographically within MMPA’s eight districts. Every MMPA producer agrees to affiliate with one of the 30 Local Associations upon becoming a member. According to the bylaws of MMPA, each Local Association is required to hold a meeting every year to conduct business. At a Local Association’s annual meeting, members select Local officers and delegates by ballot. Further, Local meetings give members an opportunity to learn what is happening in their cooperative and the dairy industry, discuss issues and set policy. Local meetings and leadership positions allow members to get involved and make an impact on their cooperative.

28

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017


MERCHANDISE

Product Change: Laundry Detergent By the time many of you read this article, you will have noticed a change in one of the laundry detergents you purchase through our merchandise program. This change is due to a decision by Ecolab to consolidate their product offerings. Because Ecolab sells very little of the ChoreMate Liquid Laundry compared to the Liquid Lustersuds, the decision was made to discontinue CM Liquid Laundry in favor of Liquid Lustersuds. While you won’t notice a difference in the efficacy of the new product, you will notice the absence of dye and perfume in Lustersuds. Pricing for Lustersuds will remain the same as the Liquid Laundry and we will continue to use the same stock number. We have carried Liquid Lustersuds in the fifteen gallon container for many years, but if you’re not familiar with the product, it is a natural soap based product that lubricates cotton fibers so linen has a nice soft touch. While it is ideal for hospitality and shirt laundries, it is also an excellent product for cleaning udder prep towels and farm clothing. Lustersuds is safe for all washable fabrics including colors and whites. It is compatible with liquid bleach and is effective over a broad temperature range. This product is available in fifteen gallon containers and now in the one gallon jug. Stock # Description

6004 6980

Member price

Liquid Lustersuds 1 gal..................................................................... $14.89 Liquid Lustersuds 15 gal................................................................. $226.24

New Glove: If you are looking for a warm, virtually waterproof glove for work around the farm this winter, we may have found the glove for you. The Showa 406 thermal insulated glove is very useful for general handling in a cold, wet environment. It features a double latex coating on the exterior for excellent grip and liquid repellence combined with a dual knit acrylic/nylon inner liner for added insulation and warmth. This glove is very flexible and comes in a high visibility orange color. It will be available in medium, large and extra-large sizes. Stock # Description

5078 5079 5080

Member price

Showa 406 – medium....................................................................... $10.00 Showa 406- Large............................................................................. $10.00 Showa 406- XL................................................................................. $10.00

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928 Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

IF YOU WISH TO ORDER THESE PRODUCTS OR ANY OF THE OTHER ITEMS WE STOCK, PLEASE CALL THE WAREHOUSE AT 1-877-367-6455.

1 Place order through your milk hauler 2 Call in your order:

THREE WAYS TO ORDER YOUR MMPA MERCHANDISE

Duane Farmer, Supervisor................................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................................877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)............................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax..................................................................... 989-317-8372

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

29


FREELINERS

Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. Visit www.mimilk.com/michigan-milk-messenger/ advertise/freeliner-and-classified-ads

Cows Brown Swiss Heifers. Weaned to bred. AI sired & AI bred. 269-317-8425

Equipment Bulls

Misc. Van Dale silo unloader

Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com.

parts for a 10/20, make offer.

Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548.

parlor. Sand slinger bucket for skid

Gleaner F2 combine diesel, hydro,

• If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate.

Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

• Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication.

Big Holstein AI Springing heifers. $1,600 each. Your

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member.

choice. 989-330-6416.

LEGENDAIRY. No bull.

Co-Products Menu

Soybean meal, canola meal, hominy, oat hulls, wheat midds, citrus pulp, malt sprouts, beet pulp, soybean hulls, cereal feed, cottonseed, distillers, gluten feed, wet feeds and more!

Non-GMO

products available

Contact merchandisers at ZFS, Inc: MI/IN/OH: 866.888.7082 WI: 800-523-6760 www.zfsinc.com/divisions/ingredients

810-404-0468. Ten horse lobed vacuum pump variable speed. Plate cooler and 2,000 gal. Surge bulk tank. Crowd gate. Double five Surge auto flow loader. Contact Country Corners Farm, 616-218-9350.

3250/1840hrs, 6 row black corn head, 15 ft. flex grain head, poly on skids and under auger, SCH cutter bar, almost new extra set of rice and cane tires on rims and rear tires also, runs great needs nothing. $5,500 989-310-3850.

Keep Keep Calves Calves Cozy Cozy and and Healthy Healthy

Comfy Calf Jackets Comfy Calf Jackets “17 years in business” “17 years in business”

Low Prices - Top Quality Low Prices - Top Quality No Velcro No Velcro Custom Sizes Available Custom Sizes Available Call (517) 543-2415 Call (517) 543-2415 (10% Discount through November) (10% Discount through November)

30

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

Wayne G Hochstetler Wayne G Hochstetler 4425 W. Vermontville Hwy. 4425 W. Vermontville Hwy. Charlotte, MI 48813 Charlotte, MI 48813 517-543-2415


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 800 Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. Three operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www.tristatescabbling.com. A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. Call 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR, 60 KW, keep everyone warm and producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122. HOOF TRIMMING - 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Also doing fly control and cement grooving. Gibson Hoof Care (Tom) 989-239-6843. FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Spring special 2000 gal. Muellers for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112. FOR SALE: SPRINGING HEIFERS out of an AI bred herd. Aron Whitaker, Elsie, MI. 989-666-6565

Thinking about installing solar panels? Get valuable, practical guidance January and February 2018 featuring Extension expertise from • Michigan State University • The Ohio State University • • University of Nebraska • University of Wyoming • during six 60-minute sessions Agricultural Solar Electric Investment Analysis webinars Learn more and register https://events.anr.msu.edu/SolarAnalysisWebinar/ Questions? Contact Charles Gould at 616-994-4547 or gouldm@msu.edu

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION!

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

GREEN MEADOW FARMS

www.hamiltondist.com

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

31


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1 Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2 The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1 a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2 a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3 testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy

32

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

1 a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2 the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3 testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4 MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.


MERCHANDISE PREMIUMS

MMPA Quality Premium Program Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

MMPA Member Testing Fees Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below.............................................................................. +55¢/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1

51,000-75,000....................................................................................... +50¢/cwt.

Cow samples may be tested for:

76,000-100,000.............................................................................. +45¢/cwt.

Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC.

101,000-125,000....................................................................................+40¢/cwt. 126,000-150,000............................................................................. +35¢/cwt. 151,000-175,000.................................................................................... +30¢/cwt.

Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

176,000-200,000............................................................................ +25¢/cwt.

Raw bacteria count and components.

201,000-225,000.................................................................................. +20¢/cwt.

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member

226,000-250,000............................................................................ +15¢/cwt. 251,000-300,000.................................................................................+00¢/cwt. 301,000-400,000.......................................................................... - 30¢/cwt.

representative.

Additional Tests Available: All costs are listed per individual sample.

401,000-500,000.............................................................................. -$1.00/cwt.

• Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13

501,000-600,000......................................................................... -$1.50/cwt.

• Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15

601,000 and greater........................................................................ -$2.00/cwt.

– Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count

• Johne’s Milk Test

- PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6

- PCR.........................................................................................................$40

A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month.

To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month

- ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50

Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol. Lab form provided below for your convenience.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #___________________________________________ Sample Date_____________________ Member name________________________________________________ Sample ID________________________ BLV ELISA _________

Johne’s ELISA _________

Johne’s PCR _________

Pregnancy _________

Refer to fee schedule above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. To avoid potential service charges, this card MUST be filled out completely when sending samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs.

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

33


MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN OCTOBER 2017 AMS Survey Prices (monthly average, per pound)

Cheese 1.7254 / LB

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 # This Month # Year Ago % Change Total Class 1 Sales

556,639,167

559,238,835

-0.46

Total Class 2 Sales

328,573,172

347,100,878

-5.34

Total Class 3 Sales

383,962,229

505,831,292

-24.09

Total Class 4 Sales

264,696,730

279,283,751

-5.22

1,533,871,298

1,691,454,756

-9.32

36.3%

33.1%

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers...............................................................................4,866 Avg. Daily Production per farm....................................................10,168 Avg. Protein Test...........................................................................3.14%

Butter 2.3718 / LB

Avg. Butterfat Test.........................................................................3.77% Avg. Oth Solids Test......................................................................5.76% Avg. SCC - MMPA......................................................................167,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb.......................................................................... $2.1084

Milk Powders

Other Solids Price /lb................................................................. $0.1853

NonfatDry Milk

Class III Price @ 3.5%.................................................................... $16.69

0.8099 / LB

Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt................................................... ($0.32)

Dry Whey

Uniform Price @ 3.5%................................................................... $16.37

0.3790 / LB

SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000..................................................... $0.00086

National Trends* (production in millions of pounds)

*For 23 States 34

Butterfat Price /lb....................................................................... $2.6646

MESSENGER | DECEMBER 2017

California Wisconsin New York Idaho Pennsylvania Michigan Texas Minnesota New Mexico Washington Ohio Indiana *Total U.S. *U.S Y-T-D

2017

3,254 2,548 1,239 1,239 898 933 973 816 658 548 470 357 16,744 169,218

2016

3,305 2,490 1,240 1,237 892 903 924 793 650 551 460 346 16,503 166,519

% Change

-1.5 +2.3 -0.1 +0.2 +0.7 +3.3 +5.3 +2.9 +1.2 -0.5 +2.2 +3.2 +1.5 +1.6


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff

Novi Headquarters

Manager of Field Services Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Northwest Area Supervisor Sarah Michalek, Dewitt.....................................248-305-0537 Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 202 Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Board of Directors

Hedging and Business Development Aaron Beak............................................................. ext. 256

Officers

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Northeast Area

Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Vassar.................................248-513-7920

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Sales James Feeney.......................................................... ext. 258

Directors-At-Large

Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Bridget Moore, Perrinton...................................231-414-4539 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ashley Herriman, Herron...................................269-245-6632 Laura Lubeski, Bad Axe......................................248-826-6294 Emily Peacock, Imlay City...................................248-826-7243

Southwest Area Supervisor Dave Brady, Grass Lake......................................517-937-9061 Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Brittni Tucker, Wyoming....................................248-880-3785

Southeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca........................................989-330-1638 Rachel Botta, Findlay, OH...................................248-533-2288 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481

Operations Ed Jaquay............................................................... ext. 248

Kris Wardin, St. Johns 989-640-9420

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210 Communications Allison Stuby Miller................................................. ext. 296 Krista Schrock............................................... 269-986-6792 Supply Chain Therese Tierney....................................................... ext. 217

Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775

Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Manufacturing Plants Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid, Michigan Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221 Middlebury Cheese Co., Middlebury, Indiana Henry England, Plant Manager...................... 574-825-9511

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson.....................................................989-289-9686

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 202

Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303

MMPA Labs

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Other Member Services

Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

Ken Nobis, President

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/ field-staff and searching by your producer number.

Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 Mark Iciek, Gladwin 989-387-4767 District Directors 1 Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2 Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3 David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512 4 Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5 Doug Chapin Remus 231-349-4059 6 Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7 Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8 Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

DECEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

35


Early registration registration ends Early endsJanuary January21! 21!

Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference February 8–10, 2018 Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort Mount Pleasant, Michigan Take a break from the day-to-day dairying challenges, expand your knowledge and network with others at this year’s Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference. Learn new tools and strategies to move your farm forward. The program includes: • The latest in global trends, local markets and strategies to survive

the challenges facing the industry today from experts David Kohl and Gary Sipiorski

• All things milk: pricing, local challenges, marketing and quality, and LPC • An in-depth look at in vitro fertilization and its practical application on dairies across the U.S.

• The use of transition-cow behavior to improve cow care, cow health and overall productivity • Workshops that include “Milk Check Economics: What Can Dairy Farmers Do?” “Labor Regulations and Legal Requirements” and “Lean Management Strategies” as well as a robotics producer panel

www.glrdc.org 517-884-7089 •• honkemeg@msu.edu honkemeg@msu.edu www.glrdc.org•• 517-884-7089


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