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Michigan Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 100 | ISSUE 5 | NOVEMBER 2017

INSIDE:

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NOVEMBER 2017 FEATURES

12 | THE RUBINGH’S DAIRY ABC

On the Cover A morning fog envelopes dairy cattle on a Lowell farm,

A look into the life of 2017 OYDC Runners-Up Jarris and Rebekah Rubingh on their Ellsworth, Michigan dairy farm.

THE MINE FIELDS TO 18 | FROM THE CORN FIELDS

as MMPA gears up for the impending meeting season. Photo by Renee McCauley.

S

MMPA member Mike O’Farrell traded his military life for dairy farming. Now he’s working to support fellow veterans interested in farming through the Farmer Veteran Coalition.

ON COOPERATION DURING 21 | FOCUS MEMBER MEETING SEASON

MMPA members will gather during 59 member meetings between late fall to early spring. What happens during these meetings and why do we hold so many?

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 100 | ISSUE 4 | OCTOBER 2017

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CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS

“Milk is a wholesome, inexpensive way to consume the protein needed for strong muscles.”

Bright Spots in the Dairy Arena

8

QUALITY WATCH New Sample Labeling System to be

— SHARON TOTH, UDIM (PAGE 24)

Implemented

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

DEPARTMENTS 25

20

MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADOR

SCHOLARSHIP AND LEADERSHIP

PROGRAM

MERCHANDISE

26 POLICIES 27

QUALITY PREMIUMS

28 FREELINERS

24

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK Hannah Miller joins the Milk Life and Milk Means More team

29 CLASSIFIEDS 30

MARKET REPORT

31 STAFF

MMPA Core Values: » Quality » Integrity » Progress » Leadership » Community Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor..................................................................Allison Stuby Miller Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation......................................................................................2,707 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

5


MMPA MATTERS

Bright Spots in the Dairy Arena BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

Recently I was visiting with an MMPA member about the status of the dairy industry, something that I do frequently these days. In the third year now of very constricted economic margins, our members have many questions and concerns. At the end of the conversation as we were heading our separate ways, he turned to me and smiled and asked, “Why don’t you have a meeting some time where all you present is good information, whether it’s true or not?” We both chuckled as we parted ways. His question was meant in jest, but it got me thinking about our current situation. I realized that while we naturally get bogged down in all the problems, we could pause now and then to recognize that there are bright spots in the dairy arena. Overall consumption continues to grow in the U.S. Per capita consumption has grown by 9.3 percent on a milk equivalent, milk-fat basis since the year 2000. We’re still struggling with declining consumption of fluid milk, but we’re seeing an uptick in whole milk consumption, and that gives us hope that we can turn that category around also.

“Overall consumption continues to grow in the United States. Per capita consumption has grown by 9.3 percent on a milk equivalent, milk-fat basis since the year 2000.”

Our industry has successfully pushed for allowing the use of 1 percent flavored milk in the school lunch programs in place of non-fat milk. We feel this change will help bring kids back to drinking their milk in school rather than dumping it in the garbage. Changing to 1 percent is a step in the right direction and we know working toward 2 percent or whole milk is better. This is good for children’s health and good for our industry. The recent good news about dairy fat being a much healthier choice than trans fats has opened the door for including guilt-free dairy products in everyday diet choices made by consumers. Since 2000, cheese consumption has increased by 19.5 percent and butter by 26.6 percent. Global dairy consumption is growing, too. The five major dairy trading countries, made up of Argentina, Australia, the European Union, New Zealand and the U.S., saw a record 1.66 million metric tons of cheese exports in 2016. The pace of cheese exports has increased from that level in 2017. The U.S. currently exports 15 percent of the milk we produce in this country. The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC), recognizing the need to grow U.S. dairy exports for a strong dairy economy, has set a goal of increasing that to 20 percent by the year 2021. Not an easy task but a doable one. The agriculture economy of the U.S. is tied very closely to our ability to export our products. We have engaged in ongoing efforts in the past and will continue to keep our elected officials and trade negotiators aware of our positions on this and other issues that affect us. While milk production is still expanding at a faster rate than consumption, MMPA has expanded its outlets for our members’ milk this year. Processing capacity is still a challenge, but your MMPA staff has worked very hard to find more and better markets for our milk than existed a year ago. Dairy economists predict recovery in the second half of 2018; however, this makes the third consecutive year they have made that prediction. With increasing global consumption, I’m hoping the third time is the charm. That would be great news. The upcoming year looks to be another challenging one. In the meantime, MMPA’s next round of member information meetings is scheduled for early December. We hope to have some encouraging news for you by then, so make sure to pencil in the date for the meeting you want to attend. Locations are available around the state to make it convenient for all members. Producers who have joined us in the past report that they felt the time spent was worthwhile. Our hope is to see more of our members at these information-packed meetings in December, and I look forward to joining you in some useful conversations.

6

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


QUALITY WATCH

New Sample Labeling System to be Implemented in January BY STEVE LEHMAN, TECHNICAL AREA SUPERVISOR

Over the next year, MMPA will be implementing a new technology system across all the cooperative’s business functions. This system will combine the functions of programs used by the departments within MMPA to realize efficiencies in milk marketing. One of the first new programs to be adopted will be the producer payroll program. This program will allow producer test results to be matched with milk shipments. Component and SCC tests, bacteria counts used for pay purposes, and special bacteria counts will be aligned with weights. This program will be implemented on January 1, 2018. The most notable difference in the new system will involve sample labeling. The current five label set will be replaced by a ten-label group, consisting of two parts: • The first five labels will be used only on the sample used for pay purposes and weight manifests, and will all be used at each pickup. • The second five labels will be used only on special samples. The intended use will be printed on each label—any unused labels in this group must be discarded.

“Rather than the current alphanumeric system used for producer numbers, the new program will use only numerical values. For example, producer “A555” will become producer “01555.”

A QR code on each label in a set will allow the information from the weight manifests to be aligned with test results. If the label used on the sample for pay purposes does not match the label on the weight manifest, a load may be rejected by a processing plant, leading to additional transportation costs. Labels must be used for all manifests and samples, as it will not be possible to manually enter sample data. Labels that are being used for the current system must be discarded after December 31, 2017—they will not work in the new system. Rather than the current alphanumeric system used for producer numbers, the new program will use only numerical values. For example, producer “A555” will become producer “01555.” Tank numbers will be based upon the number of physical bulk tanks or direct load bays on the farm, and pickups from each tank or bay will be identified by a number. As with the current labels, placement on the sample vial is important. All labels must be placed on the hinge of the vial, below the fill line within the rough area. Improper placement results in the inability of automatic scanning devices to read the label, leading to reduced lab efficiency and delays in testing. In addition to the change in labeling, there will be changes in the reporting of test results. The new system will allow producers to more easily designate who receives test results, and to set the level at which that person receives the test results. For example, a nutritionist could be automatically notified when milk components reach a certain level, or a sanitation specialist could be notified when bacteria counts reach an elevated level. The fax system of receiving test results will be discontinued. The ability to receive test results through the members-only area of the MMPA website, email and U.S. Mail will continue to be offered, with the addition of a text message option. MMPA member representatives will begin delivering labels to farms in December, and instructions for the use of the labels will be delivered to haulers at the same time. If the labels are used properly, this system will improve the speed and ease that component and quality results are reported to members.

8

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


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Ken Hein Dairy Producer Vince Tichy Encirca Certified Services Agent


NEWS & VIEWS Producers Scoring 95 percent or higher on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Larry Steffey Graf Acres LLC James, Edward and Patrick Bolday

Nominating Committee Accepting Applications for Board of Directors Four positions on the MMPA Board of Directors— one at-large and three district—are up for election in 2018. The at-large term will be voted on at the 102nd Annual State Delegate Meeting and is currently held by Mark Halbert. In addition, the terms of District Directors Hank Choate of District 1, Corby Werth of District 4 and Eric Frahm of District 7 are up for election at District Delegate meetings in February.

Donald Small Steven and David Spencer Donal Farm LLC

September Pricing Announced by USDA

» DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE APPLICATIONS ARE DUE

USDA said September’s Class III price was $16.36 per hundredweight, down 21 cents from August’s price and 3 cents lower than September 2016. The Class IV price, $15.86, was 75 cents less than in August but $1.61 higher than September 2016.

Upcoming Events

DECEMBER 1, 2017

» DISTRICT DIRECTOR APPLICATIONS ARE DUE

JANUARY 12, 2018

In order to be nominated for a position on the board of directors, each candidate must submit an application. The State Nominating Committee will meet to evaluate applications and may interview candidates for the at-large positions. The District Nominating Committee will review applications for those interested in the District Board positions. Email Muszynski@mimilk.com or call 248-474-6672 for more information.

November 20 Leaders’ Conference, East Lansing

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

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MMPA 4-H Milk Marketing Tour Participants Attend National 4-H Dairy Conference Michigan 4-H members enjoyed several days of fun and learning at the National 4-H Dairy Conference in Madison, Wisconsin on Oct. 1-4. Five students earned a sponsored trip as Michigan delegates after attending the MMPA 4-H Milk Marketing Tour. In total, nine students from Michigan attended the conference.

THE TOP FIVE SELECTED WERE:

The National 4-H Dairy Conference, held in conjunction with World

• MIRIAM COOK, CLINTON COUNTY

Dairy Expo, brings future dairy

• GRACE SAYLES, SHIAWASSEE COUNTY

leaders together build upon their

• DREW NEYER, ISABELLA COUNTY

knowledge of the dairy industry. The Michigan delegation joined

• DYLAN KELLER, HILLSDALE COUNTY • ELYSE ZIMMERLEE, EATON COUNTY

approximately 200 students from the U.S. and Canada.

BACK ROW, FROM LEFT: JONATHAN SAYLES (SHIAWASSEE COUNTY), KYLE SCHAFER (CLINTON COUNTY), MIRIAM COOK (CLINTON COUNTY), ABBY VANDYK (KALAMAZOO COUNTY). FRONT, FROM LEFT: CAITIE THEISEN (ISABELLA COUNTY), DREW NEYER (ISABELLA COUNTY), DYLAN KELLER (HILLSDALE COUNTY), GRACE SAYLES (SHIAWASSEE COUNTY), AND ELYSE ZIMMERLEE (EATON COUNTY).

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

11


LEGISLATIVE WATCH

NMPF ANNOUNCES SUPPORT FOR LEGISLATION CREATING

New Agriculture Guest Worker Program

Advisory Committee DISTRICT 1 Brad Hart, Clayton..................................517-445-2649 Josh Lott, Mason.....................................517-740-9981

A coalition of dozens of

solutions for dairy farm employers.

dairy farm organizations,

It recognizes that we need to move

led by the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), is supporting new congressional legislation

Art Riske, Hanover..................................517-524-6015 Bruce Lewis, Jonesville ........................517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester....................734-428-8610

past the status quo and pursue a new

DISTRICT 2

approach to matching the supply

Danny Ransler, Gobles..........................269-628-4218

and demand for workers in U.S. agriculture.” Mulhern said Goodlatte’s AG

Dan Ritter, Potterville............................517-645-7318 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......574-825-5198 Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN.........574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek.................269-660-2229

DISTRICT 3

that would help address

Act “reflects many of the key

Bill Stakenas, Free Soil...........................231-425-6913

one of the most challenging

principles that our organization

Burke Larsen, Scottville........................231-425-8988

issues affecting America’s

and its members have offered to

Tim Butler, Sand Lake............................269-330-5538

the Judiciary Committee as the

Bill Gruppen, Zeeland...........................616-875-8162

milk producers:

Gary Nelsen, Grant.................................231-834-7610

measure was developed.” In addition

DISTRICT 4

obtaining a dependable,

to establishing the new type of

Dave Folkersma, Rudyard....................906-630-1957

legal workforce.

visa for future workers, it would

A

allow current undocumented farm

by 57 dairy cooperatives and state dairy

The new H-2C program will be

Amy Martin, Leroy..................................231-388-0496

farmer associations on a letter backing

administered by the U.S. Department

Robert Lee, Marion................................231-743-6794

Rep. Robert Goodlatte’s (R-VA) new

of Agriculture, not the Department

Agriculture Guestworker (AG) Act. The

of Labor.

founding member of the

workers to apply for H-2C visas

Agriculture Workforce

so that they can participate legally

Coalition, NMPF was joined

in the agricultural workforce.

AG Act would establish an entirely new visa program, dubbed the H-2C visa, which would allow farm employers to bring in foreign workers on a year-round basis. It would replace the existing H-2A temporary visa program, which dairy farmers cannot use because their labor needs are year-round, not seasonal.

Russ Tolan, Ossineke..............................989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen....................................989-379-4694 Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Alpena...........................989-464-4022

DISTRICT 5 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain.......................231-825-8182 Mike Rasmussen, Edmore...................989-304-0233

DISTRICT 6 Aaron Gasper, Lowell............................616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler.............................989-682-9064

In addition to legislation addressing

Brad Ritter, Byron....................................586-405-4749

the needs of farm employers, the

David Reed, Owosso..............................989-723-2023

House Judiciary Committee will also consider a measure requiring the use of the E-Verify database program. NMPF has been clear that mandatory E-Verify participation should only be required if farmers first have

Jamie Meyer, Ionia..................................989-640-3372

DISTRICT 7 Scott Kleinhardt, Clare..........................989-386-8037 Philip Gross, Weidman..........................989-289-0670 Jason Elenbaum, Mayville...................989-274-1974 John Bennett, Prescott.........................989-345-4264 James Weber, Vassar..............................989-297-1850

DISTRICT 8

NMPF President and CEO Jim Mulhern

protections in place for current

Mike Noll, Croswell.................................810-404-4071

said Goodlatte’s bill “is a significant step

workers and access to a future

Mike Bender, Croswell..........................810-404-2140

forward in providing positive, workable

labor pool.

Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................989-977-3718

Nick Leipprandt, Pigeon......................517-897-4155 Bill Blumerich, Berlin.............................810-706-2955

SOURCE: NMPF

12

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


MMPA Advisory Committee Hosts Legislative Luncheon The MMPA Advisory Committee met in Lansing on September 27 for the committee’s quarterly meeting with co-op management. The luncheon program welcomed legislators from the Michigan State House of Representatives and Senate, offering the opportunity for members to discuss legislative issues impacting the agriculture industry with their local elected officials. State Rep. Tom Barrett, chair of the Michigan House of Representatives agriculture committee, and State Sen. Judy Emmons, an MMPA member, gave remarks during the luncheon program.

MMPA MEMBERS CARLTON EVANS (LEFT), TIM HOOD (CENTER) AND ERIC FRAHM (RIGHT) DINED WITH STATE REP. BETH GRIFFIN (CENTER LEFT) AND STATE SEN. TONYA SCHUITMAKER (CENTER RIGHT).

MEETING WITH STATE REP. SHANE HERNANDEZ (CENTER LEFT) WAS AARON BEAK, MMPA DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND HEDGING, ALONG WITH GERTIE VAN DEN GOOR (LEFT) AND MIKE BENDER (CENTER RIGHT), MMPA MEMBERS.

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

13


THE RUBINGH’S DAIRY ABCS

“Our milk quality is the result of a team approach,” Jarris said. “From nutrition to genetics to high quality feed to milking procedures, a lot of factors go into achieving high quality milk.”

14

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


A LOOK INTO THE LIFE OF 2017 OYDC RUNNERS-UP

JARRIS AND REBEKAH RUBINGH ON THEIR ELLSWORTH, MICHIGAN DAIRY FARM BY ALLISON STUBY MILLER

“A is for Alfalfa. B is for Bottle. C is for Calf.” It’s the ABCs of a dairy farm. While dairy farmers are experts in their field—literally—and know these ABCs by heart, outside the agriculture sphere, these concepts aren’t as familiar to all. Enter Rebekah Rubingh, MMPA member dairy farmer and former elementary school teacher, who set out to provide education on dairy farming to children with A Dairy Farm ABC Book. Flip through the pages of the book and you’ll see photos of silos and tractors, dip cups and ear tags, all scenes of Rubingh’s Dairyland and the Rubingh family. The 350-cow dairy is managed in part by Rebekah’s husband, Jarris, the fifth generation on the farm. Recently Rebekah and Jarris were recognized by MMPA as the 2017 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperators (OYDC) Runners-Up for their on-farm accomplishments and leadership.

REBEKAH RUBINGH

A budding photographer, Rebekah says she started the ABC book to put many of her photos of the farm to use. So, she put together a Christmas book for personal enjoyment. “Then I took it to the farm to show dad. Dad said, ‘this is good, you need to get this published,’” she recalled. Funding from the MMPA Upstate Local allowed her to publish the book and it is now sold in bookstores, available in libraries and shared in classrooms. “Jarris gave me ideas for the letters like q and z,” she explained. Thanks to Jarris, Q became “quality” and Z became “Zip,” the name of one of their bull calves.

she put it. Jarris, on the other hand, has lived and breathed dairy all his life. Their marriage in 2009 brought her up to the family’s dairy farm in Ellsworth, Michigan. The couple manages two locations down the road from the main farm, raising young stock and overseeing cropping. Jarris returned to the farm after graduating with a degree in agriculture business from Dordt College in Iowa. In completing his senior research project, he observed other farms’ milking routines and brought back ideas to his farm to standardize procedures. Overall, the Rubinghs focus on continually improving their farm and the product they produce: milk. “My product must be good enough for me and my family before I can sell it to anyone else,” Jarris asserted.

Though a published book about dairy under her belt may suggest otherwise, when Rebekah first met Jarris, she wasn’t exactly a seasoned dairy farmer. “Completely lost,” as

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

JULIA AND JEMIMA RUBINGH

JARRIS RUBINGH

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

15


RUBINGH'S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

In 2016, the farm was one of only 38 MMPA farms to earn a gold quality award. To achieve a gold award, farmers must maintain low bacteria counts for the entire year, including keeping somatic cell count lower than 100,000 for the entire fiscal year. In the last five years, Rubingh’s Dairyland achieved two silvers and two bronzes before attaining the top award. “Our milk quality is the result of a team approach,” Jarris said. “From nutrition to genetics to high quality feed to milking procedures, a lot of factors go into achieving high quality.” The genetics side is where Jarris makes his mark. He and his brother Daren work to improve genetics of the herd of registered Holsteins by performing genomic testing. The testing provides predictions about the capabilities of the bull’s children, including health, production yield, calving and type traits. “We have primarily used genomic proven bulls in the last 5-10 years. Today we have 23 cows in the top 1 percent in the nation as far as genetics go. Plus, 50 percent of our herd is in the top 20 percent of the nation genetically,” he relayed. The farm’s breeding program centers around maximizing butterfat and protein components in their herd’s milk. The milk their high-performing cows produce averages 4.1 percent butterfat and 3.2 percent protein, with an average production of 76 pounds of milk per day. “Not many herds are that high,” says Jarris. Rebekah enjoys naming these high performing cows to stretch her creativity. She readily named off a few of her favorites. There’s Twist, Oreo and Chocolate. Plus, Othello, Desdemona, Hercules and even Runaway for the calf always looking to escape. Looking ahead, Jarris and Rebekah have a goal of taking over the farm in the next ten years and be profitable 16

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

Jarris & Rebekah Rubingh Rubingh’s Dairyland, Ellsworth, Michigan Upstate Local, District 4 Herd and Land: Milk 380 cows and farm 1,000 acres

Proud parents of four children: Jerusha (6), Jemima (5), Julia (3) and Jethro (1)

enough that any member of the family can be involved if they chose to be. For now, they enjoy their role as dairy farmers. “The best part of being a dairy farmer is working outside and being close to my family every day,” Jarris admits. Rebekah, a graduate from Cornerstone University with a degree in elementary education, enjoys the farm for the opportunity to continually learn and use her skills to promote the dairy industry. She works hard alongside Jarris on the farm while also homeschooling the sixth generation and dreaming up plans for book number two. The couple is involved in Michigan Farm Bureau, with Jarris as the current president of Antrim County and Rebekah participating in

discussion meets and the promotion and education committee. In 2014, Rebekah was named the Michigan Farm Bureau Agriculture Promoter of the Year. Rebekah is also an MMPA dairy communicator. Rebekah, with the help of Jarris, penned the ABCs of dairy farming all the way to the XYZ. But for the farm and family of the 2017 OYDC Runners-Up, the future is still unwritten. “X is for extra special care. Y is for yellow cornstalks. Z is for Zip.” Selection for the 2018 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator program begins this winter during local meetings. If you are interested in participating in the program, contact your local. Learn more at mimilk.com/ young-cooperators.


be

outstanding

be an Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator

Why participate in the MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC) Program? » Strengthen your leadership abilities » Broaden your knowledge of milk marketing and MMPA

» Be recognized for your abilities and accomplishments PLUS... the winning OYDC will have the opportunity to travel to Pheonix, Arizona, and Washington, D.C., to represent MMPA at a national level!

« Dave & Gretchen Tolan, 2016 OYDC Runners-Up

TALK TO YOUR LOCAL ABOUT PARTICIPATING IN THE OYDC PROGRAM Nominees must be involved on an MMPA member farm and be between 21 and 41 years of age as of Jan. 1, 2018. For more information, contact Jessica Welch at jwelch@mimilk.com or 248-474-6672.

www.mimilk.com/young-cooperators

OYDC SELECTION PROCESS FOR 2018 DEC-JAN

MARCH-APRIL

MAY

AUGUST

Locals nominate an individual or couple for the program during each local meeting

Nominees submit an application to be considered by the state nominating committee

Top 10 selected from pool of local nominees and invited to attend OYDC conference

Top 10 attend conference to learn more about MMPA while judges select winning OYDCs


From the Mine Fields Y to the Corn Fields Z BY MELISSA HART

AS A COMBAT ENGINEER IN IRAQ, MIKE O’FARRELL SPENT HIS DAYS SCANNING THE ROADS LOOKING FOR IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICES (IED) SERVING THE UNITED STATES MILITARY TO KEEP HIS FELLOW SOLDIERS SAFE. TODAY, INSTEAD OF HEARING BOMBS EXPLODE, O’FARRELL LISTENS TO NOISY CALVES AT FEEDING TIME AND MONITORS CALM COWS MEANDERING THROUGH THE BARN TO BE MILKED BY ROBOTS.

“As a veteran, I’ve learned that farming gives you your space and gives you the chance to be out in the open. It’s a slower lifestyle but it also keeps you busy, there is always something to do,” O’Farrell commented. 18

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


MMPA members, O’Farrell and his wife Abbie, manage their family farm in West Branch, Michigan, where they milk 115 cows with two robotic milking units. O’Farrell also serves as the Vice President of the Michigan Chapter of the Farmer Veteran Coalition (FVC), a national organization whose mission is to mobilize military veterans to feed America. FVC strives to cultivate a new generation of farmers and food leaders and developing viable employment and meaningful careers through the collaboration of farming and military communities. They believe that veterans possess the unique skills and character needed to strengthen rural communities and create sustainable food systems. The FVC also believes that agriculture offers purpose, opportunity and physical and psychological benefits to the veterans as well.

families are paying a disproportionately high price for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.” A study confirmed for the first time what many already knew—ever increasing numbers of those enlisted in the US military had their roots in rural America. The FVC was formed in 2007 when a California farmer, Michael O’Gorman, organized a meeting for farmers in California’s Central Coast to talk about creating jobs on their farms for returning veterans. The idea of opening up their farms to veterans appealed to those in attendance and the Farmer Veteran Coalition was born. According to the Farmer Veteran Coalition’s website, over the next year, the small group of volunteers searched the country for other organizations with similar missions. Of 40,000 groups organized to help veterans nationwide, they could not find one with the mission of introducing

“As a veteran, I’ve learned that farming gives you your space and gives you the chance to be out in the open and it’s a slower lifestyle but it also keeps you busy, there is always something to do,” O’Farrell commented.

Another program offered is the Homegrown By Heroes (HBH) program. HBH is the official farmer veteran branding program of America. The HBH logo serves to inform consumers that products donning the logo were produced by military veterans. The program is available to farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and value-added producers of all branches and eras of military service. “One of the things we would like to see with FVC is partnering retired farmers with younger veterans who want to get into farming. I believe this kind of mentoring would be very valuable,” O’Farrell explained. “I stumbled upon farming to help me cope and work through basic challenges and I believe if we teach people about this organization, we can help a lot of people who can benefit from being in agriculture,” O’Farrell concluded. MMPA SPONSORS FARMER VETERAN COALITION THE MMPA BOARD OF DIRECTORS APPROVED A

One of the ways he processed his experiences in Iraq was facing the challenges of a dairy farm and being able to stay busy, not dwelling on the past. “Being on the farm has helped me to move on. I believe in hitting challenges head on,” he revealed.

DONATION TO THE MICHIGAN CHAPTER OF THE FARMER VETERAN COALITION, PRESENTED BY KEN NOBIS TO MIKE O’FARRELL, CHAPTER VICE PRESIDENT, AND NICK BABCOCK, CHAPTER PRESIDENT, DURING THE MMPA ADVISORY COMMITTEE

O’Farrell joined the FVC after being asked to serve on the board of directors and commented that the Michigan chapter is a fairly new organization and they are now developing educational programs to help the farmer/veterans get started in their businesses. “It’s quite a diverse group of farmers, they aren’t just dairy farmers, but we have sheep farmers and vegetable growers. It’s a huge array of people involved,” O’Farrell said.

veterans to agriculture and none that addressed the new dynamic that the military would be returning, in large numbers, to small towns across the country, far from the services available to veterans in more populous areas, and just as far, sometimes, from the type of career and lifestyle the veterans they worked with were wanting to pursue.

In November 2006, William O’Hare and Bill Bishop of the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey Institute published a report showing that “rural

FVC provides educational programming and fellowship funding for veterans in the beginning years of farming or ranching.

MEETING IN SEPTEMBER.

Membership to the FVC is open to everyone, not just veterans. To find out more about the Farmer Veteran Coalition and their annual meeting in December visit www.farmvetco. org. More details can be found at facebook.com/farmvetcoMI/ or by emailing Michigan@farmvetco.org.

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

19


Michigan Dairy Ambassador SCHOLARSHIP AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

Launches New Format

Michigan high school and college students interested in pursuing a career in the dairy industry have until Jan. 13 to apply for the 2018 Michigan Dairy Ambassador Scholarship and Leadership Program.

The Michigan Dairy Ambassador Program Team is excited to launch a new format that will award the scholarships based on participation in dairy promotion outreach, industry events, and an interview with dairy industry judges. All applicants should plan to attend a day-long leadership training on Feb.9, the second day of the Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference (GLRDC). All attendees will be considered 2018 Michigan Dairy Ambassadors, will represent Michigan dairy farm families, and will be equipped with the messaging and practice to effectively communicate with consumers in-person and online. Participation throughout the year in communication and leadership trainings, dairy events and promotion activities will earn points with the opportunity to advance to the interview round. Application, resume, participation throughout the year in dairy promotion activities, and

the interview will be considered for scholarship recipient selections. Two Dairy Ambassador scholarships will be awarded, one to a junior winner and another to a senior winner. The senior division is reserved for college students up to age 22, with the winner receiving a $1,500 scholarship. The junior division is limited to high school students in grades nine to 12, and the winner receives $1,000 that can be applied toward higher education or the purchase of a dairy animal within the upcoming year. Applicants are not required to have a dairy farm background, but they must plan to pursue a career related to the dairy industry. The scholarship program is funded through a benefit auction held at the annual Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference (GLRDC). Currently, Lindsay Larsen of Scottsville, is serving as the 2017 senior Michigan dairy ambassador representative. Jessie Nash of Elsie is the junior Michigan dairy ambassador representative. Students interested in applying for the 2018 Michigan Dairy Ambassador Scholarship and Leadership Program can download an application from grldc.org or contact Megghan Honke Seidel at 989-666-3773. Applications must be submitted electronically to 1glrdc@gmail.com and will be accepted until Jan. 13. Any questions about the Michigan Dairy Ambassador Program please contact Jessica Welch at 248-474-6672, ext. 303 or jwelch@ mimilk.com.

MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADORS BENEFIT FROM ONGOING TRAINING AND LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES. THE 2017 DAIRY AMBASSADORS GATHERED IN MARCH FOR COMMUNICATION TRAINING. PICTURED: (BACK ROW, L-R) MASON HORNING, STEVEN WILKINSON, CONNOR NUGENT, ASHTON GEURINK, ALEX TAYLOR, CHRISSY POLZIN, JESSICA PARRISH AND JESSIE NASH. (FRONT ROW, L-R) LINDSEY SHARRARD, JULIA CHAMBERLAIN, RILEY SMITH, MIRIAH DERSHEM AND ADDY BATTEL.

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

This year’s event will take place in Mount Pleasant, Michigan on February 8-10, 2018. For the conference schedule and registration information, please visit glrdc.org or contact Megghan Honke Seidel.


Focus on Cooperation DURING MEMBER MEETING SEASON

A

and making decisions.” Further, the principle of education, training and information means cooperatives strive to keep open lines of communication between management and the membership.

All cooperatives are guided by seven principles. After voluntary and open membership is the principle of democratic member control: “cooperatives are controlled by their members who actively participate in setting policies

MMPA’s winter meeting season puts these principle in action every year when members gather to elect cooperative leadership, set policy resolutions and guide the direction of MMPA. The process begins at the local level, moving upward through the membership from there. This structure is the cornerstone of MMPA. The more members there are involved in the process, the stronger our cooperative can be.

s a cooperative, MMPA distinctly recognizes the importance of cooperating. Whether it is farmers with other farmers or cooperatives with other cooperatives, working together for the greater benefit of all is a key to sustaining success of MMPA and the region’s dairy industry. With that in mind, MMPA is centering its annual meeting season theme on “Focus on Cooperation.”

LOCAL

NUMBER OF LOCALS: 30 Each local association meets once per year in December or January. All members are invited to attend their local meeting. Positions elected by local: • President • Vice President • Secretary • Treasurer

district

state

NUMBER OF DISTRICTS: 8

NUMBER OF DIRECTORS: 5

Each district meets once per year

Approximately 180 delegates

in February. Local delegates attend

from the local associations

their district meeting to conduct

attend the state annual meeting

business on behalf of members in

in March to elect at-large directors

their local.

and adopt policy resolutions.

Positions elected by district: • District Director • Chairman

The number of local delegates is determined by membership and milk production counts at the end of the fiscal year.

• Delegates

• Vice Chairman

• Dairy Communicators

• Secretary

Advisory committee meets four

• Outstanding Young Dairy

• Advisory committee members,

times per year to keep membership

Cooperator nominee Nominates an individual or couple for the Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator program. Selects delegates to help guide the association in policy formation and elect the board of directors. Two delegates from each local comprise each district’s nominating

credentials committee member,

informed of association matters and

and resolutions committee

to serve as a liaison between

members

co-op leadership and members.

Reviews and proposes policy

Resolutions committee members

resolutions for the state resolutions

meet in months leading up to

committee

annual meeting to prepare

Selects advisory committee

resolutions for consideration.

members and resolutions committee members.

Board of directors, comprised of five at-large and eight district directors,

committee to nominate members to

Elects District Director to serve on

meet monthly to make decisions on

run for District positions.

state Board of Directors.

behalf of the cooperative.

District

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

21


LOCAL MEETINGS December 2017 - January 2018 Local Meetings held annually by each of MMPA’s 30 local associations. All members are encouraged to attend their local meeting where the district board member will provide information on behalf of MMPA. Local business and voting of officers and delegates is conducted.

NOVEMBER 2017

DECEMBER 2017

LEADERS’ CONFERENCE

JANUARY 2018

REGIONAL MEMBER INFORMATION MEETINGS

STATE NOMINATING COMMITTEE MEETING

DISTRICT NOMINATING COMMITTEES MEETINGS

district and local

Dec. 5-15, 2017

Dec. 14, 2017

Late Jan. 2017

MMPA leaders held in

Informational

Committee members

East Lansing, Michigan,

meetings held to

interview nominees

to kick off meeting

provide a space for

for Director-at-Large

Nov. 20, 2017 Conference for state,

season and to provide

dialogue between

position on Board of

timely information

MMPA leadership

Directors. Position

on association and

and members.

will be voted upon

industry issues.

Open to all members.

at Annual State

No voting occurs.

No voting occurs.

Delegate Meeting.

Who can vote?

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE MEETING Jan. 31, 2018 Resolutions committee

The nominating

reviews and votes on

committees in each

policy statements for 2018.

district gather to

The MMPA board and

nominate members

management use the policy

for district office,

statements as framework

committees and

for decision-making and to

board positions.

convey MMPA positions on key issues to legislators.

According to the bylaws of the Michigan Milk Producers Association, any milk producer who signs a membership agreement and is approved by the board of directors is a member. A producer whose farm is a sole proprietorship has one vote. A legally registered partnership, corporation or LLC member is eligible for up to four votes to be cast by individuals involved in the business of the member’s milk production. At the Annual Meeting and district meetings, delegates elected at the local level vote on behalf of fellow members in their local.

22

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017


Why are there so many MMPA meetings?

As a cooperative, MMPA was founded by dairy farmers and is still governed by member control. Cooperatives provide members with a guarantee of market and guarantee of payment while being guided by the members themselves in this process. The meetings held each year provide a space for members to elect leaders, guide policy direction and give feedback to management. MMPA provides a wide range of leadership opportunities for members to get involved and make an impact on their cooperative.

FEBRUARY 2018

MARCH 2018

DISTRICT MEETINGS

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE MEETING

ANNUAL STATE DELEGATE MEETING

February 2018

March 14

March 15

Meetings held annually by

The resolutions committee

Meeting held in Lansing,

each of MMPA’s eight districts

reconvenes the day before

Michigan, for members

for local delegates. Policy

the Annual State Delegate

and all delegates to honor

resolutions are reviewed and

meeting to consider input

award winners and provide

voting of district officers and

from district meetings.

board members occurs.

an annual overview of the association. Delegates vote on final policy resolutions and director-at-large positions.

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

23


YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

U.S. OLYMPIC HOPEFUL FIGURE SKATER

Hannah Miller Joins the Milk Life and Milk Means More Team

Figure skater and U.S. Olympic hopeful Hannah Miller, a Michigan native, recently joined the Milk Life team and Milk Means More campaign. She will serve as an athlete ambassador promoting the benefits of milk as part of a healthy diet on social media and through special appearances. “A personal goal is to inspire other athletes, especially young athletes, to think about nutrition not only for fitness, but what it means as part of an overall healthy lifestyle,” Miller, who also volunteers with Learn to Skate, said. “I’m proud to partner with the United Dairy Industry of Michigan to shine a spotlight on milk’s health benefits and how it is part of my nutritious diet. It’s easy to be an ambassador for something I enjoy myself.” “Hannah’s popularity and youth make her an ideal person to reach out to teens and kids, who often don’t consider nutrition as a critical factor in being all they can be,” said Sharon Toth, RD, CEO of the United Dairy Industry of Michigan. “Milk is a wholesome, inexpensive way to consume the protein needed for strong muscles as well as nine essential nutrients needed for the body to perform at its peak.” Miller’s impressive figure skating career includes winning gold at the 2011 24

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

U.S. novice ladies championship, bronze at the 2012 U.S. junior ladies competition, and the silver at the 2012 ISU Junior Grand Prix Final. In her first senior competition, the 2013 U.S. National Championships, Miller placed 10th and most recently placed 7th at the National Championships in 2016. Miller attends the honors college at Michigan State University and is studying to be a sports psychologist.

Miller joins several other Milk Means More professional athletes, including Detroit Pistons All-Star Andre Drummond, swimmer and gold medalist swimmer Allison Schmitt, soccer player and gold medalist Lindsay Tarpley, U.S. champion runner Leah O’Conner, and CrossFit Games champion Rich Froning.


MERCHANDISE

Calf Blankets With October temperatures soaring into the 80 degree range, it seemed as though summer wasn’t planning to end. In Michigan, however, temperatures can change seemingly by the minute and the coming winter promises to be cold and snowy. Calves are affected by the colder temperatures much more than we realize. To help these baby calves stay warm and comfortable, the merchandise program carries calf blankets by Udder Tech. These high quality blankets are designed to stay on the calf and are easy to put on and take off. When compared to other insulation, inch for inch, no other insulation is warmer than Thinsulate insulation and its performance remains virtually unchanged after repeated cleanings. Unique features of these blankets include: • 3M Thinsulate insulation • Single blanket, 150 grams insulation • Double blanket, 300 grams insulation • Belly strap to keep blanket in place and snuggly wrap the calf when laying down • Durable water-resistant nylon • Extra strap length to accommodate growth • Machine wash and dry • Quick release buckles-no Velcro to get matted

These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives:

The warehouse carries three versions of Udder Tech blankets. We have the regular size which comes in both single and double insulated. These blankets are blue with black trim. We also stock a double insulated, small size, in pink, designed for Jersey calves and twins. Stock # Description

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information

Member Price

5636

Regular single insulation................................................................... $34.03

5680

Regular double insulation................................................................. $37.40

5635

Small double insulation.................................................................... $35.71

IF YOU WISH TO ORDER THESE PRODUCTS OR ANY OF THE OTHER ITEMS WE STOCK, PLEASE CALL THE WAREHOUSE AT 1-877-367-6455.

Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928 Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149 540-553-5755

1 Place order through your milk hauler 2 Call in your order:

THREE WAYS TO ORDER YOUR MMPA MERCHANDISE

Duane Farmer, Supervisor................................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................................877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)............................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax..................................................................... 989-317-8372

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

25


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1 Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2 The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative.

If…

If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1 a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2 a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3 testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy

26

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

1 a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2 the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3 testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4 MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.


MERCHANDISE PREMIUMS

MMPA Quality Premium Program Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

MMPA Member Testing Fees Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below.............................................................................. +55¢/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1

51,000-75,000....................................................................................... +50¢/cwt.

Cow samples may be tested for:

76,000-100,000.............................................................................. +45¢/cwt.

Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC.

101,000-125,000....................................................................................+40¢/cwt. 126,000-150,000............................................................................. +35¢/cwt. 151,000-175,000.................................................................................... +30¢/cwt.

Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

176,000-200,000............................................................................ +25¢/cwt.

Raw bacteria count and components.

201,000-225,000.................................................................................. +20¢/cwt.

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member

226,000-250,000............................................................................ +15¢/cwt. 251,000-300,000.................................................................................+00¢/cwt. 301,000-400,000.......................................................................... - 30¢/cwt.

representative.

Additional Tests Available: All costs are listed per individual sample.

401,000-500,000.............................................................................. -$1.00/cwt.

• Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13

501,000-600,000......................................................................... -$1.50/cwt.

• Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15

601,000 and greater........................................................................ -$2.00/cwt.

– Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count

• Johne’s Milk Test

- PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6

- PCR.........................................................................................................$40

A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month.

To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month

- ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50

Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol. Lab form provided below for your convenience.

NORTHSTAR MI LABORATORIES Loc/Hlr/Producer #___________________________________________ Sample Date_____________________ Member name________________________________________________ Sample ID________________________ BLV ELISA _________

Johne’s ELISA _________

Johne’s PCR _________

Pregnancy _________

Refer to fee schedule above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. To avoid potential service charges, this card MUST be filled out completely when sending samples to be tested by NorthStar Labs.

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

27


FREELINERS

Freeliners and Classifieds can now be submitted online. Visit www.mimilk.com/michiganmilk-messenger/advertise/ freeliner-and-classified-ads

Bulls

Equipment

Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com.

16ft Van dale Magnum Silo unloader: excellent shape. Copeland 5 hp compressor. 6 ton feed bin. Jamesway belt feeder. Commercial water softener. All in excellent shape. Call Jim 517-204-0888.

Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548.

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding desired month of publication.

Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com. Polled Registered Jersey Bull 15 mo. old. Sire: SR Irwin Shaggy-P. Dam is EX-90, All-Michigan 3 yr. old, proj. to 20,000#. Asking $1400 Call 989-305-0143.

Cows Brown Swiss Heifers. Weaned to bred. AI sired & AI bred. 269-317-8425

No bull.

Co-Products Menu

Soybean meal, canola meal, hominy, oat hulls, wheat midds, citrus pulp, malt sprouts, beet pulp, soybean hulls, cereal feed, cottonseed, distillers, gluten feed, wet feeds and more!

Non-GMO

Tire scraper with universal quick attach for skid loaders. Misc. Van Dale 10 20 parts. Silo unloader, make offer. 810-404-0468.

Milking Equipment Delaval Double 8 herringbone parlor with blue diamond suspended stalls, 16 universal take offs, GEA IQ units, 10 HP Lobe vac pump, plate cooler, & 3 yr old commercial water heater. Also, 1600 gallon Mueller tank. ALL OR PART. Available Oct 15. Call Bruce @ (231) 598-0621.

Misc.

LEGENDAIRY.

products available

2012 Schaben 6500 sprayer, 60 foot width, 1,000 gallon, all hydraulic booms, auto rate controller, inductor cone, 3 nozzle, flush tank, foam markers. Text or call Terry Koebel: 269-930-1944. Three Oaks, MI.

Contact merchandisers at ZFS, Inc: MI/IN/OH: 866.888.7082 WI: 800-523-6760 www.zfsinc.com/divisions/ingredients

For Sale: Rye Seed, $7.00 per bushel. 810-656-6227.

Keep Calves Cozy and Healthy

Comfy Calf Jackets “17 years in business”

Low Prices - Top Quality No Velcro Custom Sizes Available Call (517) 543-2415 (10% Discount through November)

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

Wayne G Hochstetler 4425 W. Vermontville Hwy. Charlotte, MI 48813


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by:

DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING,

ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent &

INC: NO water needed. Wider,

fair grades) & CORN SILAGE.

rougher grooves for better

Call 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. Three operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361.

MAIL:

Classified Ads Michigan Milk Messenger P.O. BOX 800 Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

FOR SALE: NEW & USED MILK TANKS. We stock all sizes, makes, models. Special prices to co-op members, corporate & private farms. Contact us anytime day or night. Spring special 2000 gal. Muellers

CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of

for $13,900 & up. 2700 & 4000 gal. Muellers call for quote. 800-558-0112.

the 2” wide groove. Best traction,

NEW KATOLIGHT PTO GENERATOR,

lowest prices. (800) 554-2288.

60 KW, keep everyone warm and

www.tristatescabbling.com.

producing if there is a power outage. Call Brent at 248-770-5122.

A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS FOR SALE: Springing heifers out of an AI bred herd. Aron Whitaker, Elsie, MI. Call 989-666-6565.

UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/

HOOF TRIMMING - 20 YEARS OF

texturing provides high quality

EXPERIENCE. Also doing fly control

traction in new & old concrete, fast

and cement grooving. Gibson Hoof

service. Call for your below pricing

Care (Tom) 989-239-6843.

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can

989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF

fix your scabbled floors. Diamond

TRIMMING, LLC.

MICHIGAN CERTIFIED WHEAT SEED Red and White. Zmitko Farms

sawed grooves, no hammering

989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

or cracking of concrete. No hoof

DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small

damage. Call Opperman Grooving

bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED.

13 ‘’ PLASTIC LEG BANDS FOR

Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381.

989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

COWS: 20 blue, 44 yellow, 3 red, 4 yellow new Velcro bands. Sell all for $20 plus postage. “MEYER”

Concrete Grooving and Texturing

INDUSTRIAL #8500 SUPER MANURE SPREADER. 850 cu. ft. capacity, with 28x26 Titan tires. Clean & ready to work, $16,000. 

Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner

231-625-2036. Cheboygan, MI.

Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202

2012 “ ABI” 110 PCC MANURE

Cell: 1-716-353-1137

SPREADER, used 3 times. 110 cu. ft. PTO drive, 12 gauge Cor-Ten steel floor, $6500, Cheboygan, MI. 231-818-1461.

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION!

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

GREEN MEADOW FARMS

www.hamiltondist.com

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN SEPTEMBER 2017 AMS Survey Prices (monthly average, per pound)

Cheese $1.6608 / LB

Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 # This Month # Year Ago % Change Total Class 1 Sales

536,322,615

342,994,480

-4.33

Total Class 2 Sales

278,985,725

342,994,480

-18.66

Total Class 3 Sales

543,212,044

340,680,667

+59.45

Total Class 4 Sales

257,904,641

256,294,906

+0.63

1,616,425,025

1,500,548,834

7.72

33.2%

37.4%

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers...............................................................................4,907 Avg. Daily Production per farm....................................................10,980 Avg. Protein Test...........................................................................3.08%

Butter

Avg. Butterfat Test.........................................................................3.75%

$2.5298 / LB

Avg. Oth Solids Test......................................................................5.77% Avg. SCC - MMPA......................................................................170,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33 Protein Price /lb.......................................................................... $1.6988

Milk Powders

Other Solids Price /lb................................................................. $0.2241

NonfatDry Milk

Class III Price @ 3.5%.................................................................... $16.36

$0.8499 / LB

Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt..................................................... $0.44

Dry Whey

Uniform Price @ 3.5%................................................................... $16.80

$0.4167 / LB

SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000..................................................... $0.00083

National Trends* (production in millions of pounds)

*For 23 States 30

Butterfat Price /lb....................................................................... $2.8559

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2017

California Wisconsin New York Idaho Pennsylvania Michigan Texas Minnesota New Mexico Washington Ohio Indiana *Total U.S. *U.S Y-T-D

2017

3,064 2,458 1,204 1,227 874 910 955 795 650 542 451 340 16,175 152,483

2016

3,173 2,439 1,209 1,225 859 880 868 770 625 546 442 332 15,989 150,016

% Change

-3.4 +0.8 -0.4 +0.2 +1.7 +3.4 +10.0 +3.2 +4.0 -0.7 +2.0 +2.4 +1.2 +1.6


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff

Novi Headquarters

Manager of Field Services Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Northwest Area Supervisor Sarah Michalek, Dewitt.....................................248-305-0537 Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 202 Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Board of Directors

Hedging and Business Development Aaron Beak............................................................. ext. 256

Officers

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Northeast Area

Management Information Systems Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Vassar.................................248-513-7920

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Sales James Feeney.......................................................... ext. 258

Directors-At-Large

Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337 Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Bridget Moore, Perrinton...................................231-414-4539 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Animal Care Coordinator Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ashley Herriman, Herron...................................269-245-6632 Laura Lubeski, Bad Axe......................................248-826-6294 Emily Peacock, Imlay City...................................248-826-7243

Southwest Area Supervisor Dave Brady, Grass Lake......................................517-937-9061 Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Brittni Tucker, Wyoming....................................248-880-3785

Southeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca........................................989-330-1638 Rachel Botta, Finley, OH.....................................248-533-2288 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481

Other Member Services Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775 Sustainability Coordinator Kendra Kissane, Grand Rapids...........................248-880-4234

MMPA Labs Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Toll Free 800-233-2405 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson.....................................................989-289-9686

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 202

Operations Ed Jaquay............................................................... ext. 248

Kris Wardin, St. Johns 989-640-9420

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251 Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210 Communications Allison Stuby Miller................................................. ext. 296 Supply Chain Therese Tierney....................................................... ext. 217 Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303 Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 Mark Iciek, Gladwin 989-387-4767 District Directors 1 Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2 Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3 David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

Manufacturing Plants Constantine, Michigan Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid, Michigan Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221 Middlebury Cheese Co., Middlebury, Indiana Henry England, Plant Manager...................... 574-825-9511

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant Supervisor: Duane Farmer Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372

Ken Nobis, President

If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area. Your assigned member representative is listed on your quality statements or can be found by visiting mimilk.com/contact/ field-staff and searching by your producer number.

4 Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436 5 Doug Chapin Remus 231-349-4059 6 Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7 Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8 Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

NOVEMBER 2017 | MESSENGER

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Give the gift of your dairy delights this holiday season On sale now! Heritage Ridge Creamery holiday gift baskets featuring cheese and butter made from MMPA milk.

Box #1 - $25

Box #2 - $35

Pepper-jack, Colby, Colby-jack, Monterey Jack with Yogurt Cultures (1 lb. each)

Butter (2 lb) and Colby, Amish Creamery, Garden Vegetable, Thunderjack (1 lb. each)

To order, visit the store or call 574-825-9511. SHIPPING AND HANDLING CHARGES ARE ADDITIONAL

Want to save on shipping? If you are interested in purchasing gift baskets at MMPA locations in Mt. Pleasant, Ovid and Constantine, call 248-474-6672, ext 0 by Nov. 20 to place your order and to schedule a pick up day. A limited supply of pre-ordered gift boxes will be available at the MMPA Michigan locations during regular business hours between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 2017.

Heritage Ridge Creamery • 11275 W 250 N, Middlebury, IN 46540 Heritage Ridge Creamery is a brand of Middlebury Cheese Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Michigan Milk Producers Association.

Profile for Michigan Milk Producers Association

Michigan Milk Messenger: November 2017  

Michigan Milk Messenger: November 2017  

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