Page 1

J O I N T

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

ARMY EDITION | 06.28.2019 | Vol. 09 | No. 25

Funk assumes command of TRADOC PG 8 The Army is not a “Safety School” PG. 2

Veterinary clinics contribute to mission success PG. 6

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e r e s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s • w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


2

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS EDITORIAL STAFF Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. Sean Tyler Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Sara Harper • Sara.Harper@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Aliza Reisberg • aliza.reisberg@us.af.mil Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA Home Office: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510; 222-3990 Advertising Sales: Pam Bullock, 446-2795 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606.

Why students shouldn't expect the Army to be their “safety school” By Tish Williamson

U.S. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

SAN ANTONIO

During a question and answer session with Maj. Gen. Patrick D. Sargent, commander, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Health Readiness Center of Excellence, or HRCoE, a visiting community educator asked what educators should tell their students who think of the military as “their last resort” — in case they do not get into college. The educator was part of a group of over 70 high school administrators, teachers and college professors visiting from across Wisconsin, Northern Illinois and Ohio sponsored by the Cleveland and Milwaukee U.S. Army Recruiting Battalions. The visits to Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston are part of an annual initiative sponsored by the U.S. Army Recruiting Command. Sargent said, “Those students who think they are saving the military as their back-up plan need to know that they will still need quality math and English skills to serve in the Army!” Sargent explained that joining today’s Army, particularly in such a highly technical and specialized field as Army medicine, is highly selective. The Army has made it a priority to ensure the quality of officers and Soldiers by identifying and assessing the right talent, skills and credentials to help win our nation’s wars and then come home safely. 71 percent of America’s youth do not qualify for military service at

Photo by Jose E. Rodriguez

A group of educators from the Wisconsin and Northern Illinois area tour the Flight Paramedic Simulator at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas during an educator's tour hosted by the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Health Readiness Center of Excellence commanding general and command sergeant major, on June 11.

all. Some disqualifying factors include obesity, drug use, nonwaiverable health problems, misconduct, or lack of aptitude. Sargent suggested that the best thing the educators could do to help their students who may be interested in serving in the Army is to link them up with their local recruiter or Junior Reserve Officer Training program early so that they can better understand the qualifications and requirements needed to serve, as well as some of the typical challenges and many benefits they can expect. The overall purpose of the visit was to ensure these community leaders learn about the countless opportunities available to high school students, college students and citizen providers and to depart Fort Sam Houston with a shared purpose of informing Americans about the many benefits the Army and Army Medicine have to offer. The HRCoE is the Army’s largest civilian-accredited service school and trains more than 35,000 students annually through 192 health related programs of instruction at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston. The center’s trainees represent Soldiers in 109 officer and warrant officer medical areas of concentration and

24 enlisted medical military occupational specialties. During the two-day event, attendees received overview briefs and tours on key specialty areas, programs and courses that highlight the HRCoE as a premiere 21st century medical education institution to include: Critical Care Flight Paramedics, Tactical Combat Medical Care, Dental Laboratory Assistants, Veterinary Assistants, Radiography Technicians, Respiratory Laboratory Technicians, Surgical Technicians, Physical Therapists and Physician Assistants. Some attendees also observed joint military training at the Medical Education and Training Campus, or METC. Visitors also got a better idea of the size and scope of the Army Medicine mission and the world class healthcare being provided to our Soldiers, retirees and veterans through tours at Brooke Army Medical Center, or BAMC, the Vogel Resiliency Center and the Center for the Intrepid. In his closing remarks, Sargent thanked the educators for all that they do to help their students figure out what it is they are meant to do in life. “That is a powerful and noble mission, and you have my utmost respect,” he said.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil, or call 878-4920 or 764-5701.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

Robotic combat vehicles could change way Army looks, fights By Sean Kimmons

ARMY NEWS SERVICE AUSTIN, TEXAS

Similar to how a boxer with a longer reach finds it easier to hit an opponent, the Army is looking to punch through the standoff defenses of nearpeer adversaries. Army Futures Command is behind many of the Army’s efforts to achieve that overmatch, which include over 30 projects within its CrossFunctional Teams that are responsible for tackling modernization priorities. While speaking at the International Armored Vehicles USA conference Tuesday, Gen. John Murray, the AFC commander, noted robotic

combat vehicles as one endeavor that could help Soldiers knock out defenses. During a Joint Warfighting Assessment in May, Murray observed Soldiers and Marines conducting defensive and attack maneuvers using breacher vehicles with robotic capabilities at Yakima Training Center in Washington. By fiscal year 2023, he said he expects “critical decisions” to be made on robotic combat vehicles after years of experimentation. “If there’s one single thing I think that will change fundamentally the way we look and the way we fight,” he said, “is the possibility of deploying robotic combat vehicles in the future, either com-

Spc. Daneille Hendrix

A remote-controlled concept assault breacher vehicle prepares to breach an obstacle during field testing at the Joint Warfighting Assessment 19, April 28.

pletely autonomous or semiautonomous as wingmen.” This fall, proposals are also due from industry partners on their ideas for the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle, which will replace Bradley Fighting Vehicles starting in 2026. AFC officially stood up last year, he said, after the Army missed a generation of modernization while fighting for years in counterinsurgency campaigns.

Representing the most significant Army reorganization effort since 1973, the command was created to prepare for the ongoing waves of changes in warfare. “The Army fundamentally woke up and realized that we have missed the wave,” he said. “They were crashing on the shore and we were about chest deep in water.” China and Russia, he said, took note of how the Army waged war and developed

READER!LOVED BRANDS ACROSS VIRGINIA Award-Winning Newspapers

Lifestyle Magazines CULTURE, DINING & STYLE

Military

VirginiaMedia.com/brands

3 anti-access/area denial capabilities to separate Army units and their partners on the battlefield. “Where we have been is no longer good enough,” said Maj. Gen. Gary Brito, head of the Army Maneuver Center of Excellence. “The operational environment, threat and technology are driving us to change.” Today’s potential adversaries, Brito said, have expanded the battlefield in four ways: time, domains, geography and nontraditional actors. While less kinetic, the space, electronic warfare and cyber activities that they use are still effective, he said. The Army’s new multi-domain operations concept, which leaders said could start becoming doctrine in the next year or two, is finding ways to defeat those capabilities. “Multi-domain operations is here to stay,” Brito said. “We cannot put our heads in the dirt.”


4

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

Marcus M. Bullock

U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Chad P. Franks, left, Ninth Air Force commander, relinquishes the guidon for the 1st Fighter Wing to the incoming commander, Col. David R. Lopez, during a change of command ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, June 21. Lopez previously worked as commander of the 1st Operations Group before taking command of the 1st FW.

1ST FIGHTER WING WELCOMES NEW COMMANDER By Airman 1st Class Marcus M. Bullock 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

The 1st Fighter Wing welcomed a new commander during a change of command ceremony held at Joint Base

Langley-Eustis, June 21, at the Bayview Commonwealth Center. U.S. Air Force Col. David R. Lopez assumed command for the 1st Fighter Wing from U.S. Air Force Col. Jason T. Hinds. U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Chad P.

Franks, Ninth Air Force commander, officiated the ceremony offering some praise and insight to Lopez. “Col. Lopez’s flying and leadership experience make him the right leader for this command,” said Franks. “Always ensure every Airmen knows their purpose. Every Airmen matters, no matter where they work in the wing.” Lopez was previously the commander for the 1st Operations Group before being tapped for the 1st FW commander position. “I will strive every day to build on the extraordinary foundation of this amazing wing and take care of the

men and women under my command,” said Lopez. “It’s been an honor to be a part of this wing at multiple levels throughout my career and I’m truly humbled to be your commander standing in front of you today.” Attendees at the event were able to bid a farewell to Hinds who has been the 1st FW commander for the last two years. “To the men and women of the 1st Fighter Wing, thank you,” said Hinds. “In your quest to improve readiness and lethality, you have absolutely crushed it.” Hinds will move on to serve at the Pentagon, Washington D.C.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

5

President awards Medal of Honor to first living Iraq War recipient WASHINGTON

One by one, 12 members of Third Platoon made their way to the podium in the White House’s East Room on Tuesday afternoon, to join the Soldier who repeatedly risked his life on a fall night in Fallujah 15 years ago. Each platoon member, including former squad leader retired Sgt. 1st Class Colin Fitts and former platoon leader Maj. Joaquin Meno, shook hands with President Trump and joined former Staff Sgt. David Bellavia after he accepted the Medal of Honor, as several more members of the 1st Infantry Division followed. “It means a lot to me and it means a lot more so as a unit,” Meno said. “(Bellavia) and the guys displayed so

much professionalism and tenacity that everything complemented each other…the Soldiers on the ground, the team leaders, and the platoon sergeant. It really created a great brotherhood amongst us.” The first living recipient to earn the Medal of Honor for his bravery in the Iraq War, Bellavia was praised by Trump for placing his unit members’lives before his own. And Bellavia lauded the efforts of his fellow platoon members who each contributed to the fight that autumn night and during the vicious battles that followed. “I served with some of the greatest men I’ve ever met in my entire life,” Bellavia said after the ceremony.

men evacuated, rescuing his entire squad at the risk of his own life. Only when his men were all out did David exit the building.” Bellavia wasn’t done as the staff sergeant once again placed himself in harm’s way. As insurgents from the rooftop continued firing, a Bradley fighting vehicle could only force the enemy back into the house. The New York native decided then to summon his courage and re-enter the house to drive out the enemies to his waiting gunners. He first cut down an insurgent who had a rocket-propelled grenade launcher, and then he killed two more assailants hiding in the house. Bellavia defeated a fourth after engaging in hand-tohand combat; eventually stabbing the insurgent in the neck. Finally, he mortally wounded a fifth attacker, who fell from the rooftop and attacked him on the balcony.

Sgt. Kevin Roy

President Donald J. Trump presents the Medal of Honor to former U.S. Army Staff Sgt David G. Bellavia during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C., June 25.

The night of Nov. 10, 2004, during the onset of the Second Battle of Fallujah, Bellavia and his unit had been tasked to clear 12 houses of insurgents in an abandoned section of the Iraqi city. When they reached the 10th house, insurgents hiding behind barricades ambushed Bellavia’s men. Several men suffered injuries to their faces as enemy rounds ripped through the walls as bricks and plaster flew

through the air. Without hesitation, Bellavia charged toward the enemy rounds, spraying bullets at the insurgents, allowing his wounded teammates to evacuate the house. “The wall was ripped to shreds. David knew they had to get out,” Trump said. “He just took over. He leapt into the torrent of bullets without even thinking. He provided suppressive fire, while his

TOMORROW NIGHT

SATURDAY, JUNE 29

JULY 14

FRIDAY JULY 12

JULY 18

JOE BONAMASSA

SATURDAY JULY 20

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9

JULY 30

JULY 25

JULY 21

JULY 31

AUGUST 1

SATURDAY AUGUST 10 AUGUST 11

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3

AUGUST 13

AUGUST 14

AUGUST 21

SEPTEMBER 20 SATURDAY AUGUST 23 AUGUST 22

SEPTEMBER 8

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14

SEPTEMBER 17

AMPHITHEATER BOX OFFICE TICKETMASTER | 800-745-3000 twitter@LiveNationVB facebook/VABeachAmp

All dates, acts and ticket prices subject to change without notice. Subject to applicable service charges and fees.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18


6

Veterinary clinics contribute to mission success

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019 U.S. Army Spc. Carli Glaze, Fort Eustis Veterinary Clinic animal care specialist listens to a military working dog’s heartbeat at the Fort Eustis Veterinary Clinic at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, June 139. The clinic’s primary mission is to ensure the health and wellbeing of the MWDs.

By Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

The U.S. Army’s veterinary services offer a variety of services to propel the mission of Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Its multifaceted approach strengthens force readiness by providing veterinary public health capabilities through veterinary medical and surgical care, food safety and defense. “Our primary mission is to take care of the Military Working Dogs and serve the community, said U.S. Army Capt. Eric Dombou, Fort Eustis branch chief, veterinary services. “Everything we do ultimately focuses on the warfighter and their families.” The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps’ enlisted Soldiers are divided between two career specialties, animal care specialists and food inspection specialists. These two occupational specialties play a vital role in readiness operations. “We provide preventative care and emergency treatments to the Military Working Dogs,” said Pfc. Michaela D. Wilcox, Langley Veterinary Clinic NCO in charge. “We also contribute to providing medical care and surgical services to service members’pets.” The food inspection specialists play unique roles in the veterinary services’ operations. While the animal care specialists focus on the health of its furry friends, food inspection specialists focus on the well-being of its service

Delaney Gonzales

A veterinary technician palpates a cat during a wellness exam at the Fort Eustis Veterinary Clinic.

members. “Our main mission is to ensure the health and welfare goals of our military members is adequately met through food inspections and food defense,” said Sgt. Rysper Sirma, Fort Eustis Veterinary Clinic food inspection NCO. “We inspect food establishments on base such as the Exchange, the Commissary, Burger King, MWR facilities, the Child Development Center and more,” added Sirma.

The dynamic mission of JBLE’s veterinary clinics makes it an integral part of base operations. Active duty, reserve and retired service members can fully take advantage of the multitude of services provided for their own pets at JBLE. JBLE’s veterinary clinics currently offer numerous services including wellness visits, sick-call, surgery, health certificates (both international and domestic), vaccinations,

micro-chipping, radiology, inhouse laboratory tests, heartworm prevention, flea/tick prevention, over the counter supplements and prescription medications. Health certificates are key for a successful transition to an overseas location for any service member who is a pet owner. “This is an amazing benefit we offer our service members,” Dombou added. “We are familiar with the health certificate’s process as it is a service we often provide the most. Army veterinarians are trained and accredited by the USDA to issue health certificates for domestic travel and a couple of international destinations as well. We encourage service members to always reach out to us when anticipating PCS orders. Preparing pets for domestic and international travel can be a lengthy process depending on the final destination.” JBLE’s veterinarian team works closely with the base’s hospital for the prevention of

zoonotic diseases such as rabies “One of our important preventative medical measures is immunizing pets against rabies and coordinating animal bite treatments with human physicians,” Dombou stated. “This helps to prevent the spread of Rabies, a deadly zoonotic disease, which means it can be transmitted from an animal to a person.” The Soldiers who work in the veterinary treatment facilities are dedicated to providing excellent care for family pets. “Providing support for animal care is to honorably serve the people in my community by being able to provide quality care to their pets,” Wilcox concluded. “Pets are valuable members of the service members’ family, and we serve to help maintain the health and welfare of our community.” For more information about veterinarian services at JBLE contact (757) 878-5824 for the Fort Eustis location and (757) 764-5678 for the Langley Air Force Base location.


2019 WARRIOR GAMES BEGIN

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

By Robert A. Whetstone

BROOKE ARMY MEDICAL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS TAMPA, FLA.

The opening ceremony of the 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games began with the traditional procession of service-member athletes representing their countries. The national anthem for each country was played marking the international participation of the games, but when U.S. Army Maj. Luis Avila, a wounded warrior, sang the StarSpangled Banner, you had a sense these games were going to be special. Jon Stewart, a comedian, was once again the master of ceremonies to of-

Lisa Ferdinando

Air Force athletes enter the arena for the opening ceremony of the Department of Defense Warrior Games, Tampa, Fla., June 22.

ficially open the games. He mixed humor with a compassion and seriousness about wounded warriors that seems to resonate with service members and families. “Thank you very much for coming out to the Warrior Games,” Stewart said. “We have had a tremendous day or two of competition. The athletes are finding out what it is like to

be in a city that was built inside of a humidifier.” “We are here to celebrate these unbelievable athletes from all of the branches (of military service),” Stewart continued. “These are men and women that refuse to allow themselves to be defined by their worst day, but define themselves by their reaction to that day and the resil-

7 ience, and the perseverance, and the dedication, and the camaraderie, and the family you are going to witness this week.” Stewart stated the athletes have gone through a lot to get to the games, but no one gets there by themselves. “The families and the caregivers so often work as hard as the athletes to get them prepared and to get them going and to be there,” Stewart said. Kenneth Fisher, chairman and chief executive officer of the Fisher House, plays a huge role in helping the families. Fisher acknowledged the work with wounded warriors that Jon Stewart continues to do as an advocate for service members in and out of uniform, and focused on family support. “I have had the great honor of meeting so many of this nation’s wounded people and never a day goes by when I am not inspired by you; amazed by what you have accomplished and humbled by the unconditional support given to you by your families, your friends, your spouses, your children; by all those who love you the most.”


8

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

FUNK ASSUMES COMMAND OF TRADOC By Michael Vernon Voss

U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

Delaney Gonzales

U.S. Army Gen. Paul E. Funk II, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command incoming commander, stands at attention during a change of command ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, June 21.

U.S. Army Spc. Jean-Marcel Scutt, a tuba player with the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command band, plays his instrument.

The U.S. flag and the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command flag fly in the wind.

9

Stefanie Antosh

Gen. Mark A. Milley (right) administers the oath of commissioned officers to Gen. Paul E. Funk II

Gen. Paul E. Funk II assumed command of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command from Gen. Stephen J. Townsend during a ceremony at Fort Eustis, June 21. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, who hosted the ceremony, said it was a great but bittersweet day for TRADOC to bid farewell to Townsend and welcome Funk as its 17th commanding general. However, the day was not about either of the generals, Milley continued, explaining that the focus was on celebrating the accomplishments of TRADOC. “This day is not so much about Steve Townsend or Paul Funk,” Milley said. “This day is really about the great work that Training and Doctrine Command does.” The 39th chief of staff of the Army explained that the motto “Victory Starts Here” is not just a motto, but that victory does in fact start at TRADOC. TRADOC is the organization that accesses Soldiers coming from civil society, trains them as noncommissioned officers, senior noncommissioned officers, captains and so on, Milley said. From cradle to grave TRADOC takes care of not just the Army, but the joint force and our allies and partners. Milley then shifted to Townsend’s leadership of TRADOC during the past 15 months, and how he has helped accelerate Army initiatives like Multi-Domain Operations, the Army Combat Fitness Test and One Station Unit Training. “Stephen Townsend has done an extraordinary job for the

Army here at TRADOC,” Milley said. “Under his leadership, this team has been instrumental to changing the culture and readiness of our Army.” Milley then thanked Townsend and his family for their contributions to the Army and the nation. The former TRADOC commander is moving into a new role as the next leader of U.S. Africa Command. In welcoming the incoming commanding general, Milley said the command is very lucky to have Funk, “a man of great character.” Commissioned as an Armor Officer through ROTC upon graduation from Montana State University, Funk has led and commanded Soldiers at every echelon, from platoon to corps and combined joint task force. His most recent assignment was as commander, III Corps and Fort Hood. “Paul Funk is an exceptional officer who has the skills, knowledge, attributes and character required to be the leader of this great organization,” Milley said. "He is ready to hit the ground running, and I have no doubt that he is going to take TRADOC to the next level.” “What a great Army day,” Funk said as he took the podium for his first remarks as TRADOC’s commanding general. “I would like to thank our Army senior leaders, who have placed their trust in me and allowed me the opportunity to lead TRADOC,” he said. “To the leaders and Soldiers of this historic organization, Beth and I are honored to join this team. Like many of you, I am a product of TRADOC and I am committed to ensuring we continue to forge America’s Army.”

Stefanie Antosh

Gen. Paul E. Funk II (front), Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark A. Milley (center), and Gen. Stephen J. Townsend, former commanding general of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, salute for honors to the host during a change of command ceremony at TRADOC headquarters, Fort Eustis on June 21.

Delaney Gonzales

U.S. Army Gen. Stephen J. Townsend, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command outgoing commander, receives a shell casing to symbolize the last cannon fired during the TRADOC change of command ceremony.


10

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

WE GET YOUR BUSINESS IN FRONT OF OUR MILITARY 3

L$"59+EL2;7 7 0 ( 7 P R : ?, < ( P > & ?7 P 2 68 : O 7 2 H K O

0.# " "1, ( % ) * 4) 1 / & 5 1 $ # 3- ' $ 0 * + % 2 - ! 1 ,

N < . K2 . K2 66

! 56>; 2E8B@<

(JD QO--" Q( H[ 2L4JdD [C RH 4'1&& 21-1,&1

&!/,:;!+ %71!;,7 !;3 */):28.14,7

*3),;,2/4!/,:;

!;8&;#$

Q(JD d^&(4`df QO-- (]f R=d E9I9 dFYdf;R;[] R[ [] ( RH[<f(D 4d2d(4$= [C RH[ 2L]`d] 2L4JdD R=d $[]f;R;[] =(Jd 4d2Rdf [] R=d ';J;_ ,(4 Jd22d_2 R=(R K;Jd4 ;] c(^YR[] 2d(@[[4 [C R=d V(^d2 Dd(42" VL]d N09 K[(f2 C[4 ]d(4_D ZA+ 2[](4 Rd$=][_< E2;]> 2R(Rd<[C<R=d<(4R 4d2d(4$=d42 H;__ [>D R[ ($8L;4d f(R(" ](_ ^(Y2 [C R=d R=4dd<f;^d]2;[ $4d(Rd 'L^&d4_(]f (]f RH[ 2=;YH4d$`2" EII R=d;4 $L44d]R 'II !_[4;f(" R[ (](_D.d L]fd42R(]f R=d $[]f;R;[]2 (]f &dRRd4 [C R=d R;^d9 Rd$=][_[>;$(_ ;]][J(R;[]2 EII 'L^&d4< 7G=d 4d^(;]2 [C R=d Y4d2d4Jdf ;] R=d _(]f (]f 'II !_[4;f(" 4d^;]f L2 [C H(Rd42 [C c(^YR[] K[(f2" R=d ';J;_ ,(4 R=d 2($4;B$d2 ^(fd fL4;]> (]f 4(4d [YY[4RL< (]f >;Jd L2 ( L];8Ld $=(YRd4 ;] [L4 ];RD R[ dFY_[4d ( Y;J[R(_ %(J;f -_&d4>" ](R;[]52 =;2R[4D"6 2(;f QO--52 S[];R[4 2LYd4;]Rd]fd]R [C 7QO-Q(R;[](_ S(4;]d I(]$RL(4D9 Y4[:d$R R=(R ( [C Y(4R &d ;2 Y_d(2df R[ [C -^d4;$(52 ;]$4d(2d2 L]fd42R(]f;]> ^(4;R;^d =d4;R(>d96 _[2R [] S(4$= EII 'L^&d4_(]f H(2 [C c(^YR[] b" ZbUN" fL4;]> R=d *(RR_d ;] R=d E9I9 K[(f2" H=d4d 2=d 2d4Jdf *_[$`(f;]> Q(JD52 Q[4R= -R_(]R;$ df

PRINT "0,, 310,'&% +&'* 233 !1. %$'&0/1, *'(#*-($% $10( )0% 0($10( *10( "# 5!% )0.( "'/,+ (:))!;3145 "6#6 #17:;3

H[4`df G=d O(` c;__ I(;_[42 2;fd<&D<2;fd H;R= e_[L$d2Rd452 ,[4`2 %dY(4R^d]R [C ML&_;$

6**3$/+

'+11/ $-9+,7 *00!,42

%#;2('64'8. "*66/

*4;7

E VENTS

ONLINE

H;__ ;]J[_Jd R=d G=d ;]Rd4](_ 2R(CC dFd4$;2d ZNA Yd42[]]d_ ^[Jd^d]R [C (YY4[F;^(Rd_D C($;_;RD [LR2;fd [C R[ (] (_Rd4](Rd [Yd4(R;]> R[ ( ][R;[](_ =L44;< R=d _[$(_ (4d( ;] 4d2Y[]2d (&;_;RD $[^ (4;[ Rd2R;]> R=d $[^^(]f52 $(]d 2$d](4;[" [C OYd4(R;[]2 M_(]9 R[ dFd$LRd ( '[]R;]L;RD ;2 fd2;>]df R[ G=;2 Y=(2d RH[ (22d22^d]R d_d^d]R2 [C ($4[22 ;fd]R;CD >(Y2 (]f 2d(^2

`

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA is a trusted partner to the active duty military community and the contracted, authorized publisher of on-base newspapers in the area, some for as long as 38 years. Our branch-specific publications, corresponding websites and social media platforms offer the most relevant content for today’s service member in Hampton Roads. Choosing to do business with Military Newspapers of Virginia means you are an integral part of the daily lives of area active duty, veterans, retirees and their families.

CONTACT US TODAY TO START ADVERTISING! 757.222.3990 | MILITARYNEWS.COM

MilitaryNews.com | MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA


A visible war on invisible wounds

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

“Our support group goes back to that basic standard of the Air Force – taking care of your wingman. We’re a family, we’re here next to each other every day so we should take care of each other as much as we work with each other.”

By Senior Airman Anthony Nin Leclerec 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

As the Airman speaks, the tears well up in her eyes until the weight brings them rolling down her cheeks. She can’t hold her tears back, but she won’t keep quiet; every tear is a memory and every word a liberating breath. Every sob is met with a comforting hand on the shoulder and a ‘we are with you, let it out,’ as the group surrounding her knows those feelings all too well. “Our support group goes back to that basic standard of the Air Force— taking care of your wingman. We’re a family, we’re here next to each other every day so we should take care of each other as much as we work with each other.” A support group of U.S. service members came together for the first of many invisible wounds luncheons at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, June 10. Whether it’s post-traumatic stress disorder, a traumatic brain injury or other cognitive, emotional or behavioral conditions, invisible wounds are associated with a trauma experienced by an individual that may not be seen on the outside, but can be devastating on the inside to an individual without proper treatment. “In the beginning, I was dealing with my personal invisible wounds,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Patrick Sims, 733rd Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintainer and invisible wounds luncheon coordinator. “I’m always an extremely open person when it comes to what’s going on with me; I have nothing to hide nor am I ashamed of what’s actually happening to me because I know the more you talk about it, the more support you can get.” Sims has benefited from the mental

11

Courtesy photo

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Patrick Sims, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response volunteer victim advocate, practices for a wheelchair race at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Washington, Aug. 28, 2018. After injuries sustained during deployment, Sims can’t run but is able to participate in wheeled races.

health services available to military members since 2011, but has never experienced the level of help and healing achieved amongst a group of like people. To help with that, Sims took it upon himself to start a group at JBLE. “I [was] taught a long time ago that once you get new information that is helpful to you [you have to share it],” Sims said. “Hurry up and share it, get more people into it because you are not the only one going through what you’re going through.” He knows more people suffer from invisible wounds but not everyone is getting the help they need. “Some people don’t know their options,” Sims said. “Some people don’t know that there is more than just Mental Health and some people want

more than one person saying, ‘hey, this is what it is.’” Since starting his group, Sims has received feedback from the members who believe what he created is what was missing at JBLE and in the Armed Forces as a whole. “The response has been overwhelmingly positive,” Sims said. “Almost everyone that’s been to the group has said, ‘this is needed—I need this.’” The support group presents a ‘come as you are’ environment for those who participate. They also provide many off-base resources—most of them through Veterans Affairs who help active duty members as well as veterans. “I haven’t seen so many people

happy to be around [each other] and not worry about rank structure,” Sims said. “From Airman 1st Class, to Major, to Chief, it doesn’t matter. Everybody is there, even [Department of Defense] civilians. We all come together as a family.” According to Sims, the group provides a place to network, vent and heal; surrounded by people who will know, understand and call each other in the middle of the night if needed. Throughout his walk with invisible wounds, Sims has struggled, researched resources and strived to get better not only for himself, but for those around him. Sims is a wounded warrior ambassador, an ordained deacon, a first aid mental health responder, resiliency trainer and a victim advocate. Therefore teaching on ‘touchy subjects,’ he says, is something he is capable of doing and wants to do more of moving forward. “I want to invite those who are ready in our support group to come along with me and form an education group,” Sims said. “This way we can put together classes for leadership to help them understand how to balance the mission while working with someone who is dealing with invisible wounds.” According to Sims, this can be a real eye opener for leadership. As much as some leaders want to help, some just don’t know how. With the right tools, wingmen, leaders and warriors can take care of each other as people so no Airman is left behind. Helping one another in their walk so they don’t falter—and the mission will not fail. For more information about the support group or the invisible wounds lunch, email Staff Sgt. Sims at patrick.sims.1@us.af.mil.


12

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

Staff Sgt. Keifer Bowes

U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning IIs, center, lead a formation of Israeli Air Force F-35I Lightning IIs, right, and Royal Air Force F-35B Lightnings, left, during Exercise Tri-Lightning over an undisclosed location over the Mediterranean Sea, June 25. Tri-Lightning is a defensive counterair exercise over the Eastern Mediterranean involving the U.S. U.K., and Israel. The exercise is designed to improve interoperability and coordination in air operations among the U.S. and it's allies.

Three-nation F-35 exercise demonstrates air power interoperability By Lt. Col. Christine D. Millette U.S. AIR FORCES CENTRAL COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA

F-35 Lightning II fighter aircraft from the U.S, United Kingdom and Israel participated in Exercise Tri-Lightning over the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, June 25. Exercise Tri-Lightning was a one-day defensive counter

air exercise involving friendly and adversary aircraft from the three participating countries and consisted of active and passive air defense operations. This exercise is a demonstration of the interoperability between the U.S., U.K. and Israel using the F-35A, F-35B and F-35I respectively. “We build capacity with

our strategic partners to harness our air component’s capabilities and skills,” said Lt. Gen. Joseph Guastella, U.S. Air Forces Central Command commander. “The transatlantic strategic relationship between the U.S. and our allies and partners has been forged over the past seven decades and is built on a foundation of shared values, experience and vision.” The U.S. Air Force F-35As flew from Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, the Royal Air Force F-35Bs flew from RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, and the Israeli Air Force F-35Is flew from Neva-

tim Air Base, Israel. “Tri-Lightning was an exercise which had been planned for months and it provided an outstanding opportunity for the squadron to operate and learn from our fellow F-35 community,” said U.K. Wing Commander John Butcher, Squadron 617 commanding officer. “In addition it allowed us to share and gain valuable experience that we will be able to exploit during future training and potentially operational deployments, whether embedded on the Queen Elizabeth or from overseas air bases.” The F-35s from the three

nations played as primary friendly, or blue, force players in this exercise while a variety of other aircraft played the aggressor roles, simulating realistic combat situations between the advanced F-35s and previous generation fighters. “The exercise today reflects the close cooperation between the participating nations, said Brig. Gen. Amnon Ein-Dar, Israel Chief of Air Staff. “This training opportunity between Israel, the U.S. and Britain, strengthens shared capabilities and overall cooperation amongst allies.”


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

JBLE Community

13

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

4th of July concerts—USAF Heritage of Ameri- Owning your Story JBLE PT Pacer Program The Langley Club will be hosting an “Owning Your AD members that excel on their PT test (run) can volunca Band

There will be no less than 5 opportunities to see your USAF Heritage of America Band in performance over the July 4th holiday. ■ On June 27, the Concert Band will perform as part of Ft. Monroe’s “Music by the Bay” series at 7:00 p.m. ■ On July 3, the Full Spectrum rock band will perform as part of the Port Warwick Summer Concert Series in Newport News at 6:00 p.m. ■ Also on July 3, the Blue Aces rock band will perform as part of the Busch Gardens Independence Day concerts, Williamsburg, at 4:00 p.m. ■ On July 4, Full Spectrum will perform for “Stars in the Sky” at Victory Landing Park in Newport News at 7:00 p.m. ■ On July 5, the Blue Aces will perform at the “Fifth at the Fort” event, to be held on Ft. Monroe at 6:00 pm. Please come join us for one or all five of these familyfriendly musical celebrations of our nation’s birthday! For more information, please visit us online at www.heritageofamericaband.af.mil.

Gate Closure

The LaSalle Gate will be closed Sat, 29 Jun19 in order to repair the Emergency Vehicle Barrier system.

Summerfest

Huge opportunity to serve deployed members families and members who are deploying or just returned from deployment. The Chapel will be hosting an event 6-8 p.m., July 19 and the Airman and Family Readiness Center will be hosting an event noon – 2p.m., July 20 from at the Bethel chapel. Please have them call us at 757-764-3990 to sign up.

Memorial Truck

The Memorial Truck will be making its way to Langley Air Force Base June 30, at the Base Exchange. The memorial truck is designed in honor and remembrance of fallen military members traveled to Jacksonville Monday to gather signatures from veterans. Veterans sign the truck in red and blue, and wounded warrior sign the doors in gold.

OSI Foreign Travel Brief

The Office of Special Investigations will be hosting foreign travel briefs at 8 a.m., every Thursday, at the 633rd Air Base Wing Security Forces training room at 175 Sweeney Blvd, bldg. 775, rm 210. For more information, call 757-7647972.

Vacation Bible School

Vacation Bible School at the Regimental Memorial Chapel will be held 9 a.m. – noon, June 24-28. Those who to wish to register can stop by the chapel, Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., and Sunday, 8:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. For more information, contact Mrs. Vaul, director of religious education, RMC, at 757-878-4316 or verna.j.vaul@mail.mil.

Story” professional development seminar at 2 p.m., July 10, at Quesada Hall, to inspire, instill, and rebuild the next generation of leaders to come and do things better the second time around

Now Hiring! JBLE Exchange

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Exchange has immediate job openings to include retail positions in the main store express, as well as jobs at food facilities in the food court. The Exchange offers benefits, including paid vacation and sick leave for regular full-time and part-time associates. Those interested in applying for the job opportunities can visit ApplyMyExchange.com or contact the local Human Resources office at 757-887-2742 ext. 2.

CMSgt Grant S. Williams Sr. Enlisted Scholarship Award

The Langley Chiefs Group and Tuskegee Airmen - Tidewater Chapter is proud to manage the CMSgt Grant S. Williams Sr. Enlisted Scholarship Award to reward regular active duty Air Force (ADAF) enlisted members (E-1 through E-6) or a high school senior dependent of an ADAF enlisted member stationed at Joint Base Langley-Eustis who is currently enrolled in or planning to pursue higher education programs. The scholarship amount is $1,000.00 and recipients will be required to attend the Tuskegee Airmen – Tidewater Chapter Scholarship Gala on 3 Aug 19. Applications are available by contacting any member of the Langley Chiefs Group and must be received by1Jul19. For more information, please contact CMSgt Cliff Lawton at clifford.lawton@us.af.mil or (757) 225-7245.

Disability Claims Application

AMVETS representative is available at the SFL-TAP Center (bldg 705 Washington Blvd, Room 71) every Monday and Wednesday, 8 am - 4 pm to assist transitioning Soldiers with VA Disability Claims. Contact Mr. Timothy Allen, timothy.allen3@va.gov or (336) 618-1466 to schedule your appointment. No walk-in service is available.

TSgt Release Committee Volunteers

The TSgt Release Committee is looking for a primary and backup emcee, photographer, and national anthem singer for the TSgt release party. Auditions for emcee and national anthem singer will occur on 25 June 2019. If you would like to audition please contact TSgt Stubbs, Erik (erik.stubbs@us.af.mil) and TSgt Fort, Katherine (katherine.fort@us.af.mil) for more information. The first two photographers to email the POCs will be the primary and backup photographers. Newcomer Orientation Brief There will be a newcomer orientation brief from 7:30 a.m. – noon, July 2, at the Bayview Commonwealth Center. FREE childcare may be provided, upon availability, through the Childcare for PCS Program sponsored by the Air Force Aid Society. For details, contact your Airman & Family Readiness Center (A&FRC) at 764-3990

teer to be a qualified pacer for runners needing extra motivation during the run portion of their PT test. Volunteer pacers will be available on a list at the Fitness Centers and FAC. Mock PT test with a pacer prior to official PT test is also an option. For more information on the program, please see attached and/or contact SSgt Alyson Silidker at the ACC Fitness Center, 764-5791. Thank you for your time and have a beautiful day!

Sports Physical Announcement

The 633d Medical Group is preparing for School and Sports Physicals as the summer approaches. The Pediatrics and Family Health Clinics are teaming up to provide parents and families more School and Sports Physical appointment times throughout the summer. Designated School and Sports Physical appointments will be available for eligible students, ages 4-18 years of age starting 17 June and ending 27 September. In order to keep these appointments running smoothly for all of our participants, please be sure to accomplish the following prior to arrival to School/Sports Physical visits: a. Obtain the Commonwealth of Virginia School Entrance Health Form from the clinic or online at: http:// www.vdh.virginia.gov/content/uploads/sites/58/2016/12/ MCH-213G-032014.pdf b. If there are specific sports physical forms for your school, please obtain them from the school. Otherwise, obtain the generic form online at: http://sbo.nn.k12.va.us/ athletics/documents/VHSLphysical.pdf c. Fill out all appropriate information required on the forms prior to the appointment (typically this is the first page labeled “Health Information Form”). d. Remember to bring any prescribed eyewear. e. Ensure your child is dressed in loose fitting clothes and easy to remove footwear. f. Bring any immunization records that you have for the child. g. To book the appointment please call 757-225-7630, option 1.

Running Club

The JBLE Running Club will begin holding running workouts every Tuesday starting at 11:30 a.m. The duration of the workout will vary week-to-week, but will usually be 30-45 minutes. The club will meet at the F-15 next to the Armistead gate (outside bldg. 330), and run the flight line with different workouts each week. Wear appropriate clothing for running and bring water!

Home Buying and Selling Seminar

Come and learn about the home buying or selling process. Home Buying seminars are held the second Tuesday of each month, 6-9 pm and Home Selling seminars are held second Wednesday of each month, 6-9 pm. Seminars are at JBLE-Langley Housing Office (Bldg 65), 11 Bur See

JBLE | 14


14

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

JBLE Community

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

rell Street. Must register no later than two days in advance. Call 764-5048 to register.

will operate under normal customer service hours from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The offices will close daily from11a.m. to noon. For more information, call (757) 764-5877/5878 or (757) 878-4797/0022.

Summary Court Officer

Pharmacist Cough and Cold Clinic

Continued from 13

1LT Adam Gabriel, 53rd MCB Fort Eustis, is detailed as the Summary Court Marshal Officer to secure make proper disposition of the personal effects pertaining to Sergeant Taje Revelle. Any person having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased estate, please contact1LT Gabriel at (630) 441-8808.

Summary Court Disposition

1st Lt Elizabeth M. Hill, 633d Medical Support Squadron, Langley AFB, is detailed as the Summary Courts Officer to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Senior Airman Devaughn D. Weston. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased, contact 1st Lt Elizabeth hill at 757-764-9591 or elizabeth.m.hill54.mil@mail.mil

Toastmasters Club

The Old Point Toastmasters Club will meet the first and third Wednesday of each month at11:40 a.m. to12:40 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Soldier Support Center, 650 Monroe Ave, Rm 106, to help attendees become better speakers, leaders, or just improve their conversation skills. Visitors are always welcome. For more information, visit https:// oldpointcomfort.toastmastersclubs.org or call 878-2204/ 2977.

Alpha Warrior fitness class

The 633rd Force Support Squadron gym staff will host a free “at your own pace” Alpha Warrior class from 11:3012:30 p.m., every Tuesday and Thursday, at the ACC gym Alpha Warrior rig. The class will teach attendees to exercise the entire body in full body circuit training by hitting every component of fitness for all levels of athletes and to also teach and encourage fitness. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Earl White at earl.white.3@us.af.mil or Tony Arroyo at victor.arroyo@us.af.mil.

JBLE Retiree Council

The JBLE Retiree council will meet every third Wednesday each month at 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m., in the Army Community Service conference room, building 650, on Fort Eustis. Retirees and those who are approaching retirement from all military branches are invited to attend the free meetings. Members can stay connected with their community and local events, as well as learn more about investments, benefits and other military-related information. For more information or to join, contact (757) 8785884, (757) 218-7118, or torrence0512@gmail.com.

633 ABW/EO Hours

The Fort Eustis and Langley Equal Opportunity Offices

Dependent and Retiree patients between the ages of 18 to 70 who are enrolled to USAF Langley Hospital can be seen at the 633 MDG Pharmacist Cough and Cold Walk-in Clinic. Patients should check in at the Family Health Clinic front desk and ask to be seen at the "Pharmacist Cough and Cold Clinic." Clinical Pharmacists will evaluate and, if needed, prescribe medications. Patients with the following symptoms cannot be seen in the Cough and Cold Clinic: patients having any symptoms of severe illness/disease such as shortness of breath/wheezing, active asthma attack, chest pain, coughing up blood, etc. Cough and Cold Clinic walk-in times are 8 to 10 AM and 1 to 3 PM Monday-Friday.

Durand Entry Control Facility (NASA gate) changes

Security Forces personnel will no longer man the Durand Entry Control Facility (NASA Gate). Personnel will still have their credentials checked by guards at the main NASA gate, however, their credentials will not be checked again at the Durand Entry Control Facility. NASA guards will still man their side of the Durand Entry Control Facility and will only allow CAC holders (no dependent ID cards) to enter NASA property. Additionally, no commercial vehicles are allowed access to NASA property. The Durand Entry Control Facility hours are from 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Manpower shortage impacts 633rd Medical Group services

The 633rd Medical Group strives to provide Trusted Care to all they serve, while supporting many deployed and home-station missions. Due to contract vacancies and multiple provider deployments/permanent changes of station during the coming months, it will take longer to receive appointments and have messages returned. In light of these staffing concerns, TRICARE will temporarily enroll only Active Duty service members and their family members. This action is being taken to ensure patients receive the care they deserve within the established standards. There will be no enrollment changes or action taken to any patients who are already enrolled at the 633rd Medical Group, regardless of category. For questions regarding TRICARE benefits, or for enrollment assistance to locate the best medical facility to meet healthcare needs, contact the TRICARE Information line at 1-800-TRICARE or 1-800-874-2273.

JBLE Family Child Care Program

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Family Child Care Program is looking for child care providers interested in a professional, portable career that will allow them to stay at home and run a home-based business. The program is

available for children ages two weeks to12 years old. Child care providers must be at least18 years old, be able to read and speak English, be in good health, and willing to undergo a background check. The FCC will provide training and materials to get your business started. For more information, call Fort Eustis at 878-5584/5726 or Langley Air Force Base 764-3585/2835

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library encourages reading

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library has implemented an ongoing Reading Program entitled "1000 Books Before Kindergarten" and "1000 Books from 1st -5th grades." For every 100 books read, children can take their reading log to the library to receive a prize. After reading1000 books, children will receive a free t-shirt. For more information, contact the library at 878-5017 or visit www.groningerlibrary.com.

Do you know your Special Victims’ Counsel at JBLE?

The Special Victims’ Counsel at Joint Base Langley Eustis provides confidential legal advice and assistance, advocates the voice and choice for sexual assault victims and protects the rights and privacy interests of SAV, among other services. For more information or to reach the SVU, contact them at 225-1629.

Weekly Live Fire Schedule for 17 June-1 July 2019

IAW ASA Regulation 350-1 (http://www.eustis.army.mil/Pubs/Chap3/ TCFE%20Reg%20350-1.pdf) and Range Safety Brief, OIC / RSO Certification Block of instruction: The Range Safety OIC/RSO Certification brief is conducted every Friday at Range Operations (Bldg. 2432 Mulberry Island Road). Start time is 0900. A Commander’s certification Memorandum is required. Ranges, Training Areas, and associated facilities are Off Limits to personnel not engaged in Scheduled firing, training/recons, or inspections unless clearance is obtained in person from Range Operations. For hunting and private owned weapons range requirements contact Outdoor Recreation at 757-878-2391. There is tree cutting and construction in progress vicinity TA 20, 21 and 28. Expect large commercial trucks and use caution in these areas. DATE... RANGES... TIMES 17 Jun... BTRAC, R1... 0700-2200 18 Jun... BTRAC, R1... 0700-2200 19 Jun... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3... 0700-2200 20 Jun... BTRAC, R1... 0700-2200 21 Jun... BTRAC, R1 MAINTENANCE R2, R3, R5, R6... 0700-2200 22 Jun... No live fire event scheduled -------------23 Jun... No live fire event scheduled -------------24 Jun... BTRAC, R1, R2... 0700-2200 25 Jun... BTRAC, R1... 0700-2200  See JBLE | 15


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

JBLE Community Continuedfrom14 26 Jun... BTRAC, R1, R2... 0700-2200 27 Jun... BTRAC, R1, R2... 0700-2200 28 Jun... BTRAC, R1 MAINTENANCE R2, R3, R4, R5, R6... 0700-2200 29 Jun... POF R3 WILDLIFE HABITAT WORK... R1... 0900-1300, 06001400 30 Jun... POF R3... 0900-1300 1 Jul... BTRAC, R1... 0700-2200 DATE MOUT/ UOS SITE... TIMES Closed to all unit training... TA 20, TA 21 AND 21 MOUT -------------No unit training scheduled... TA 28 UOS

Worship hours for JBLE services Langley services

■ Main Chapel:

Sunday Catholic Mass at 9 a.m. Sunday Protestant Gospel Service at 11 a.m. Monday-Thursday Catholic Mass at 12 p.m. ■ Bethel Chapel: Sunday Protestant Community Service at 9 a.m. Sunday Catholic Mass at 11 a.m. Saturday Catholic Reconciliation at 3:30 p.m. Saturday Catholic Mass at 5 p.m. Additional/special services call 757-764-7847 or visit https://www.facebook.com/JBLELangleyChapel. Fort Eustis services ■ Regimental Memorial Chapel: Sunday Catholic Reconciliation at 8:15 a.m. Sunday Roman Catholic Mass at 9:30 a.m. Sunday Traditional Protestant Christian Service at 11 a.m. Sunday Latter Day Saints Worship at 10 a.m. (RMC Annex) Monday-Friday Roman Catholic Mass at 11:45 a.m. ■ Chapel NeXt, Wylie Theater, Bldg. 705 (entrance closes to Express Mart): Sunday Contemporary Christian Service at 10 a.m. ■ Cultural Center, Bldg. 2751: Islamic Daily Prayer, Monday - Thursday at 1:30 p.m. JUM'AH Prayer, Fridays at 12:30 p.m. (Islamic Prayer Room) Additional/Special services, call 757-878-1450/1316 or visit www.facebook.com/RegimentalMemorialChapel or https://www.facebook.com/ChapelNextFortEustis.

Protestant Combine Worship Service

On 7 Jul 2019, there will only be one Protestant Service, 0900 at the Bethel Chapel. There will not be a Gospel Worship Service on this date at the Langley Chapel. For more information contact the Chapel at 764-7847.

633rd Force Support Squadron RAPIDS/ DEERS location information ■ Langley Air Force Base

45 Nealy Ave, Wing A, Suite 114 Hampton, VA 23665

15

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com 757-764-2270 Customer Service Office's customer service hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. (CAC priority from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.) and Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Walk-ins are accepted until 3 p.m. The Awards and Decorations Office's customer service hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and closed between 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday. Requests and documents can be e-mailed to 633 FSS/ FSMPS Decorations Support at 633mss.dpmpe.decsupport@us.af.mil. The Official Passport Office is by appointment only. Walk-ins are accepted from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m., for Passport pickups and cancellations only. ■ Fort Eustis 650 Monroe Ave, Room 123 Ft Eustis, VA 23604 757-878-0948 Customer Service Office's customer service hours are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (CAC priority from 8 to 9:30 a.m.). Walk-ins are accepted until 3 p.m. All appointments are made online only. Please visit https://rapids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil/appointment/ default.aspx to make an appointment. Please visit http:// www.cac.mil/Portals/53/Documents/required_docs.pdf for information on identification and documentation requirements for ID card Issuance/Renewal and DEERS enrollments.

Other RAPIDS/DEERS Locations:

Please visit https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/rsl/ for locations and information on other RAPIDS/DEERS sites in the area. For service capability and hours of operation call ahead.

JBLE CAC/ID Customer Service Hours: LANGLEY

■ Walk-in Hours: Monday – Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. ■ Appointments: Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 3:40 p.m. ■ CAC Only Hours: Monday – Tuesday, Thursday – Friday:

7:30 – 9:30 a.m. Commercial: 765-2270 Fax: 764-4683 45 Nealy Ave, Bldg. 15 Wing A, Suite 114, Hampton, VA 23665 EUSTIS ■ Walk-in Hours: Monday – Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. ■ Appointments: Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. ■ CAC Only Hours: Monday – Tuesday, Thursday – Friday: 8 – 9:30 a.m. Commercial: 878-0948 Fax: 878-0942 650 Monroe Ave, Room 123, Fort Eustis, VA 23604 Anyone interested in scheduling an appointment can do so by accessing the RAPIDS Site Locator at the following links: Langley: https://rapids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil/ appointment/building.aspx?BuildingId=573. Eustis: https://rapids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil/appointment/building.aspx?BuildingId=228.

Additionally, there are several ID Card Issuance Offices located across the Hampton Roads Region. Use the following link to search for locations nearest you. https://rapidsppointments.dmdc.osd.mil/appointment/default.aspx. Sponsors who need dependent ID cards reissued may complete in advance the DD Form 1172-2 and have it available for family members to be seen at an appointment or during walk-in hours.

Military Tuition Assistance briefing

Prior to the first use of Military Tuition Assistance and after not using MilTA for one year or more, service members are required to attend an initial and refresher MilTA briefing to ensure rules, roles and user responsibilities are clearly understood. The briefings are conducted on a walkin basis in room 123 at the Education Center every Tuesday at 9 a.m. and every Thursday at 2 p.m. For more information, contact the Education Center at 764-2962 or 633fss.fsde.eo@us.af.mil.

MPS Customer Service hours of operation

The Langley MPS Customer Service changed the servicing process of customers and the hours of operation due to a large increase of the servicing population. ■ Hours of operation: Monday – Tuesday & Thursday Friday 7:30 a.m. – 4p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. ■ Walk-in Hours: Monday – Friday 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. ■ CAC Only Hours: Monday – Tuesday & Thursday - Friday 7:30 – 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday, no CAC only hours Personnel who need dependent ID cards should complete a DD Form 1172-2 and have it available for family members to be seen after 9:30 a.m. (during the walk-in hours or appointment time). ■ Appointments: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. until 3:45 p.m. Appointments are for issuing ID cards, DEERs transactions, citizenship applications, SGLI/FSGLI and any other actions done by the MPS Customer Service (except Passport/Visa applications and Awards and Decorations sections). The appointment system allows everyone the opportunity to schedule an appointment. To schedule an appointment, visit the following link: https://rapids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil/appointment/ building.aspx?BuildingId=573. For more information, call 764-2270.

JBLE Base Operating Status Hotline

In the event of inclement weather or other emergencies impacting base, JBLE personnel are strongly encouraged to check the most up-to-date base operation status using the many JBLE social media options. Check the status on the JBLE website at www.jble.af.mil, on Twitter by following @JBLEstatus, on the free JBLE smartphone application (available in Google Play and the Apple App store), and on the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Facebook page. In addition, the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Base Operating Status hotline features updated information of the installation's operating status. The hotline number has recently changed to 764-7550. Please update records.


16

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • June 28, 2019

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

All-New 2020 C Corolla

All-New w 2019 RAV4

OR 2

750

$

2019 Camry

Incentive

CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757.437.4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com

2

4

1

CASEY TOYOTA

2019 Highlander

OR

U.S. Military

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757.259.1000 • caseytoyota.com

2

3

2019 Sienna

2019 TACOMA

CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA 4

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757.490.1111 • toyota.checkeredflag.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 833.628.1653 • firstteamtoyota.com

4

2019 Prius Liftback

2

2

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA

PRIORITY TOYOTA CHESAPEAKE

PEARSON TOYOTA

PRIORITY TOYOTA HAMPTON

6357 George Washington Memorial Hwy. • Gloucester 804.693.2100 • gloucestertoyota.com 12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757.874.6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757.213.5000 • prioritytoyotachesapeake.com 2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757.838.5000 • prioritytoyotahampton.com

Every new Toyota comes with

5

$750 REBATE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA, INC. AND MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACTS ON NEW TOYOTA VEHICLES, DATED FROM JUNE 3, 2019 THROUGH JULY 8, 2019. TO QUALIFY FOR THE REBATE, AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE OR LEASE YOU MUST (1) BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD; OR A MILITARY VETERAN OR RETIREE (RETIREES HONORABLY DISCHARGED) OF THE U.S. MILITARY WITHIN TWO YEARS OF THEIR DISCHARGE/RETIREMENT DATE; OR A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER OF AN ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL, INCLUDING GOLD STAR FAMILY MEMBERS; AND (2) PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE; (3) RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENT FOR YOUR NEW VEHICLE; AND (4) RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL FROM AND EXECUTE A FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. ON LEASE CONTRACTS, REBATE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, REBATE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. LIMIT ONE REBATE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION PER ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL OR ELIGIBLE HOUSEHOLD MEMBER. OFFER NOT COMBINABLE WITH THE COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE PROGRAM, THE IFI PROGRAM, AND THE LEASE-END REFI PROGRAM. VEHICLE MUST BE TAKEN OUT OF DEALER STOCK. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY. PROGRAM IS NOT AVAILABLE IN AL, FL, GA, HI, NC, AND SC. REBATE TERMS MAY BE MORE GENEROUS IN YOUR LOCAL AREA. ASK YOUR PARTICIPATING DEALER ABOUT THE MILITARY REBATE TERMS IN YOUR AREA. MUST PAY SALES TAX. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK OF TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. 2ALL LEASE OFFERS: LOW MILEAGE LEASE. OFFER AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 30,000 MILES. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2800 DOWN, FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 RAV4 LE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE MODEL 4430, MSRP $26,685 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $26,246. COROLLA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,810 DOWN, FIRST $189 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2020 COROLLA 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1852, MSRP $20,880 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $20,538. HIGHLANDER DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,720 DOWN, FIRST $279 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 HIGHLANDER LE MODEL 6948, MSRP $36,135 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $34,499. TACOMA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,740 DOWN, FIRST $259 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 TACOMA MODEL 7540 DOUBLE CAB SR5 V6 SHORT BED, MSRP $35,935 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $34,822. PRIUS DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,720 DOWN, FIRST $279 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. EXAMPLE BASED ON 2019 PRIUS LIFTBACK MODEL 1221, MSRP $24,700 AND CAPITALIZED COST, WHICH MAY VARY BY DEALER, OF $24,490. LEASES DO NOT INCLUDE $350 DISPOSITION FEE DUE AT LEASE END. EXAMPLES INCLUDE $650 ACQUISITION FEE AND ASSUME DEALER PARTICIPATION. YOUR PAYMENT TERMS MAY VARY BASED ON FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. OFFER AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. 3BUYERS CAN RECEIVE A $1,250 FINANCE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA ON RAV4 IF VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. STANDARD APR RATES APPLY. INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED FIRST TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. 4CUSTOMERS CAN RECEIVE $1,500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON CAMRY; $2,500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON HIGHLANDER (EXCLUDES HYBRIDS); $3000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON SIENNA OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. ALL OFFERS: OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE. DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. VEHICLE SHOWN MAY BE PROTOTYPE AND/OR SHOWN WITH OPTIONS. ACTUAL MODEL MAY VARY. DELIVERY MUST BE TAKEN FROM DEALER STOCK BY 7/8/19 AND IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. LEASE, APR AND CASH BACK OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS END 7/8/19. 5TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25,000 MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 24-HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE IS ALSO INCLUDED FOR 2 YEARS AND UNLIMITED MILES. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS AND EXCLUSIONS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS, EXCEPT EMERGENCY FUEL DELIVERY. 1

Profile for Military News

Peninsula Warrior Army Edition 06.28.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 25

Peninsula Warrior Army Edition 06.28.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 25