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IN THIS THIS ISSUE IN NAVY COLLEGE COLLEGE NAVY IN THIS ISSUE PROGRAM SURVEY:

Vol. 26, No. 30 Norfolk, VA  |  flagshipnews.com  Vol. 26, No. 30 Norfolk, VA  |  flagshipnews.com 

PROGRAM SURVEY: PROFILES INCollege PROFESThe Navy Navy Program The College Program SIONALISM (NCP) announced a new, more more (NCP) announced a new, Senior efficient Chief Boatswain’s customerMate service efficient customer service Georgeopinion “Adam”survey Musgrove July 24, 24, as as part part opinion survey July offeredofsome valuable experithe continuing improvement of the continuing improvement ential advice forfor every Sailor to process Voluntary process for Voluntary consider. Education.  » See A6 Education.

07.26.18–08.01.18 07.26.18–08.01.18

 » See A6 ❯❯See

A4

TRUMAN STRIKE GROUP Navy Exchange, RETURNS TO NORFOLK, REMAINS READYMarine Corps

VOL. 26, No. 49, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

12.10.2020_12.16.2020

Exchange customers support Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society By Kristine Sturkie

Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs

MC3 Sam Jenkins Rear Adm. John Meier, right, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, awards Naval Helicopter Aircrewmen 1st Class George Parsons III, assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, the Navy and Marine Corps medal, Dec. 1, 2020. Parsons earned this metal by assisting an officer in distress in October of 2019.

VIRGINIA BEACH

In the spirit of giving, Navy Exchange (NEX) and Marine Corps Exchange (MCX) customers donated the highest amount since 2014 to the Navy-Marine F/A-18 Super Hornets perform a fly over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman Corps Relief Society (NMCRS). During the nearly F/A-18 Super Super Hornets Hornets perform perform aa fly fly over over the the Nimitz-class Nimitz-class aircraft aircraft carrier carrier USS USS Harry Harry S. S.Truman Truman F/A-18 (CVN 75) during a change of command ceremony for the “Fighting Checkmates” of Strike month-long campaign, nearly 81,000 tickets were (CVN 75) 75) during during aa change change of of command command ceremony ceremony for for the the “Fighting “Fighting Checkmates” Checkmates” of of Strike Strike (CVN Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211. sold for a total of $404,709 by both NEX and MCX Fighter Squadron Squadron (VFA) (VFA) 211. 211. Fighter customers. MC2 Scott T Swofford MC2 Scott Scott TT Swofford Swofford MC2 Customers supported their fellow Sailors and Marines by purchasing a NMCRS $5 benefit ticket. From Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic Public Affairs “The fact that he responded so immediately without thinkThis joint campaign by the NEX and MCX provides ingready abouttoyour own personal safety and only thinking about group remains surge forward or reFrom Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group From Harry Harry S. S. Truman Truman Carrier Carrier Strike Strike Group Group group remainshow ready to surge forward or reFrom their customers opportunities to help their brothers to defend Public Affairs deploy when called upon. that law enforcement officer truly reflects credit NORFOLK Public Affairs Affairs Public deploy when on called upon. and sisters in arms. This type of Navy and Marine yourself,missions on our Navy Naval Aviation, and the squad“Our strike group’s haveand dem“Our strikeron,” group’s missions have demCorps joint effort is important around the holiday A U.S. Navy Sailor who was at the right place, at the right Meier. “Imaneuverable am honored to be here to today to meet you NORFOLK onstrated we are said inherently NORFOLK NORFOLK onstrated weand arepresent inherently maneuverable season in particular. time in October 2019 was awarded for his heroic actions with the award.” operational unNearly 6,500 Sailors of the Harry S. Tru- and flexible while remaining flexible while remaining operational unNearly 6,500Navy Sailors of Marine the Harry S. Tru“Our customers look forward to being able to the and Corps Medal and on Dec. 1 to Cmdr. Michael Marks, commanding officer, HSC-9, who predictable any potential adversary,” said manprestigious Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) arrived any potential adversary,” said man Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) arrived predictable toserved support the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and aboard Naval Station Norfolk. as the officer at the time Parsons rendered theexecutive Navy’s dynamic in Naval Station (NS) Norfolk, Virginia, July Black. “This epitomizes Black. “This epitomizes the Navy’s dynamic in Naval NavalHelicopter Station (NS) Norfolk, Virginia, July Parsons their fellow men and women in uniform,” said retired Aircrewman 1st Class George III, assistance to the and Elizabeth force employment concept showsCity thispolice officer emphasized the 21. force employment concept and shows this 21. assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, was at Rear Adm. Robert J. Bianchi, Chief Executive importance receiving prestigious award for his Sailors’ ready andofcapable ofthis accomThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman strike group is strike group isactions. ready and capable of accomThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman his Elizabeth City home on Oct. 24, 2019 when a police officer Officer for the Navy Exchange Service Command (CVN 75) and strike group ships USS Nor- plishing any mission, at any time, as our naplishing any mission, at any time, as our na(CVNthrough 75) andhis strike group ships USS an Norcame neighborhood chasing assailant. When (NEXCOM). “NEX customers donated $315,974, an mandy (CG 60), USS Arleigh Burke (DDG tion directs.” “Amazing to see this award come to fruition,” said Marks. “I tion weapdirects.” have never seen this award presented before. It is the highest extraordinary amount especially during a pandemic. mandy (CGthe 60), USS Arleigh Burke (DDG he saw that assailant was trying to take the officers While in Norfolk, the strike group will not 51) and USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) MC2 Thomas Gooley While in Norfolk, the strike groupawarded will not heroism.” 51) Parsons and USS Forrest Sherman (DDGdetain 98) on, sprung into action and helped suspect. Their generosity is a true example of taking care of Gooley decoration MC2 Thomas Gooley MC2 Thomas conductnon-combat routine maintenance on ships,for A arrived after operating for more than three theonly Sailor embraces his loved on after USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) arrived at Naval Station only conduct routine on ships, arrived after operatingother for more than for three Parsons accolades his such shipmates.” Sailor embraces of hisour loved their on after after USS Harry Harry S. S.Truman Truman (CVN (CVN 75) 75) arrived arrived at at Naval Naval Station Station Sailor embraces his loved on USS Marksmaintenance added that Parsons is the AA best embodiment aircraft and equipment, but Sailors will also months in has the received U.S. 5th and 6th fleets areas of bravery, Norfolk. aircraft and equipment, but Sailors will also months in the from U.S. the 5thElizabeth and 6th fleets areas ofBettie Norfolk. Norfolk. as recognition City Mayor, J. Parker “The Navy Marine Corps Relief Society is a very all-volunteer service who make be able to continue advanced training, main-up less than one percent of the responsibility. be able to continue advanced training, mainresponsibility. who awarded him with a Mayoral Certificate of Appreciation important resource for our Navy and Marine Corps U.S. population who as serve. certifications, well as “I couldn’t be more proud of this strike tain warfighting warfighting certifications, the as well as “INovember couldn’t be more him proud of this strike intain last thanking for assistance aiding the withHSC-9 families,” said CindyAdditionally, Whitman Lacy, a varietyand of missions the CEO/Director, HSTCSG conducted time familyemploys and friends. MH-60S in focused ready forto whatever lies ahead.” group team’s performance overhismore than spend Additionally, the HSTCSG conducted family and friends. focused and ready for whatever lies ahead.” group team’s performance over more than spend time with Elizabeth City Police Department. Business and Supports Services include Anti-Surface Coordination and the Re- strike group partici- bilateral operationsDivision, with alliesHeadand partners “I’m incredibly proud of the grit,Warfare, determi-Strike While deployed, three months of operating in a highly-dybilateral operations with allies and partners “I’m incredibly proud of the grit, determiWhile deployed, the strike group particithree months oftooperating a highly-dy“I am honored receive aninaward like this,” said Parsons, quarters, U.S. Marine Corps. “This connaissance, Surveillance Reconnaisin both U.S. 5th andwas 6th the fleets,sixth to include nation and phenomenal effortIntelligence, Truman’s Sailpated inand a variety of partnership and interopnamic environment across two theaters,” both U.S. 5th and 6th fleets, to include nation and phenomenal effort Truman’s Sail-Operations, pated in a variety ofVisit partnership and namichadenvironment across two theaters,” who no idea the squadron wasAdm. set-up in a formation thatinteroptheand MCXin participated in Italy, the benefit ticket sance, Egypt, Morocco, France, Germany and ors havetoshown overMaritime the last Interdiction three months erabilityHelicopter exercises, as wellyear as maritime said HSTCSG Commander Rear Gene Morocco, Italy, France, Germany and ors have shown over the last months erabilityForce exercises, as wellprogram as maritime and Egypt, nearly said HSTCSG Commander Rear Adm. recognize himcarried for his out bravery than aGene year 18,000 customers Search and three Seizure, Anti-Terrorism Protection, the United Kingdom. Also, aircraft to from emsea,” said Harry S. Truman’s theater security operations. Strike which group allowed Black. “We the more full spectrum ofago.operating at Board Kingdom. Also, aircraft from emsea,” said Harry S.Combat Truman’s security operations. Strike group the United Black. “We carried outRear the full spectrum of operating at Personnel During the ceremony, Adm. John Meier, donate $88,735 fund the Air Navy Marine Corps Searchtheater and Rescue, Search units participated inand Exercise Baltic Opera- to help barked Carrier Wing (CVW) 1 supported Commanding Officer Recovery, Capt. Nick Dienna. missions from sustained combat flight oper- Commander, units participated in Exercise Baltic Operabarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 supported Commanding Officer Capt. Nick Dienna. missions from sustained combat flight operNaval Air Force Atlantic presented the Navy and Marine Relief Society to provide Sailors and Marines finanRescue, Planeour Guard, Operations, Medical Evacuations (BALTOPS) from the Adriatic Sea and Operation Inherent Resolve during May and to enjoy timeSpecial in port, ations to training and integration with NATO “While we plan from the Adriatic Sea and Operation Inherent Resolve during May and “Whileand we plan enjoy our timeEvacuation, in port, tions (BALTOPS) ations to training and integration with Corps Medal to Parsons in front of hisNATO entire squadron tion,toNon-Combatant ExerciseReplenishment, Lightning Handshake with the Moincluding reconnecting with those who sup- Vertical allies and regional partners.” including reconnecting with those who sup- Exercise Lightning Handshake with the Moallies and regional partners.” upper echelon and Disaster ❯❯ See EXCHANGE | A7 | A6 afar, we’reRelief. continuing to stay roccan Navy and Air Force. Black alsoleadership. emphasized that the strike ported us from »»See HOME Black also emphasized that the strike ported us from afar, we’re continuing to stay roccan Navy and Air Force. »»See HOME | A6

HSC-9 Sailor receives Navy, Marine Corps Medal for heroic actions

NMCP Culinary CNRMA HOLDS CNRMA HOLDS Specialists CHANGEprovide OF COMMAND, COMMAND, CHANGE OF RETIREMENT CEREMONY meals to Sailors during RETIREMENT CEREMONY COVID-19 was the guest speaker. By MC3 Caledon Rabbipal By MCSN MC3 Caledon Caledon Rabbipal By MC3 Rabbipal By Ariana Torman Navy Public Affairs Support Element – East

was the guest speaker. Scorby, a native of Manlius, N.Y., asScorby, a native of Manlius, N.Y., assumed command of CNRMA on March sumed command of CNRMA on March NORFOLK 10, 2016 and demonstrated innovative PORTSMOUTH NORFOLK NORFOLK 10, 2016 and demonstrated innovative Rear Adm. Charles W. Rock relieved leadership in guiding 14 installations Rear Adm. Charles W. Rock relieved leadership in guiding 14 installations Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s are Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr. as Com- galley acrossstaff a 20-state region. Rear Adm.the John C. Scorby battle Jr. as Comacross a 20-state assisting command’s against COVID-19 - region. mander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic While under Scorby’s command, mander, Region Mid-Atlantic While under Scorby’s command, one meal Navy atduring a time. (CNRMA), a change of command CNRMA encouraged energy conserva(CNRMA), during a change of commandmeals CNRMA encouraged energy conservaIn April, NMCP began providing Sailors ceremony held at Naval Station Norfolk, tiontothrough initiatives such as Battle ceremony heldpositive at Naval for Station Norfolk, tion and through initiatives such as Battle who tested the coronavirus were July 20. “E” for energy program, resulting in July 20. in a restriction of movement (ROM) “E” forstatus. energy program, resulting in placed The change of command ceremony the region garnering 27 Secretary of the The Sailors change were of command ceremony the region garnering 27 Secretary of the These instructed to self-quarantine for and water was immediately followed by a retire- Navy energy management wasdays immediately followed enlisted by a retireNavyand energy and water management 14 in the bachelor quarters, they ment ceremony for Scorby. awards during 2016 and 2017. Scorby MCSN Ariana Torman ment ceremony for Scorby. during 2016 and 2017. Scorby were meals three times coma day. awards Viceprovided Adm. Mary M. Jackson, also championedCulinary the Fleet and 3rd FamSpecialist Class Jamesha Mason, a baker in the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) galley, prepares desVice MaryareM.leftJackson, comchampioned the Fleet and Fam“The Adm. packages outside of theiralso so that serts,collaborating Dec. 1. NMCP galley mander, Navy Installations Command ilydoor Support Program, with staff are helping mitigate the spread of COVID-19 by providing meals to quarantined Sailors throughmander, Navy Installations Command ily Support Program, collaborating with out the pandemic. Naval Medical Center - Portsmouth Affairs Navy Public Public Affairs Support ElementPublic East Navy Affairs Support Element –– East

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Check off&the FATHER SONflu FATHER & SON shot from your INVENTORS INVENTORS 2020 to-do list RECOGNIZED: RECOGNIZED: A father and son team A father and enmeshed son team With theamong world were 32 inventors were among 32 inventors in honored a global pandemic, getat the Naval honored at the Naval ting this year’s seasonal Surface Warfare Center Warfare Center fluSurface shot may be more imDahlgren Division Dahlgren Division portant than ever. (NSWCDD) Patent Awards (NSWCDD) Patent Awards ceremony, July 19. ceremony, July 19.  See » See See A7 A3A7 ❯❯»

MCSN Caledon Rabbipal MCSN Caledon Caledon Rabbipal Rabbipal MCSN

COVID Call Norfolk Naval ShipMINE EXERCISE VETERAN’S MINE EXERCISE VETERAN’S Center yard’s Sailors supBEGINS: KITCHEN HELPS BEGINS: KITCHEN HELPS surpasses port VicU.S.STARBASE Navy mine countermeasure HOMELESS U.S.teachers Navy mine countermeasure HOMELESS 50,000 calls tory units, Japan Maritime Self VETS: units, Japan Maritime Self VETS: Defense Force MCM units, and (NMCP) The non-profit This program would go on to and Call Defense Force MCM units, TheCOVID non-profit Indianfurther Navy Science, Explosive Ordinance organization, is provide TechCenter reached a is Indian Navy Explosive Ordinance organization, Disposal units commenced 2JAmilestone preparing to place nology, Environment, and by answerDisposal units commenced 2JA preparing to place mine countermeasure exercise its 500th veteran into Math (STEM) education toexercise the ing their 50,000th call into mine countermeasure its 500th veteran 2018 near Ominato, Japan, on new housing within potential future employees of on on Dec. 1. housing 2018 near Ominato, Japan, new within July 18.Shipthe next week. America’s July 18. the next week. ❯❯See» A2 »  See B1 See C1 ❯❯See A6 yard. »  » See B1 See C1 Sign up

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Shelby West STARBASE Victory staff and NNSY Sailor volunteers pose for a picture together with the t-shirts and packages they had helped put together.

From the classroom to the home: Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s Sailors support STARBASE Victory teachers By Hannah Bondoc

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH

In 2002, Executive Director Bill Hayden, the founder of Science and Technology Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration (STARBASE) Victory at Victory Elementary School in Portsmouth, VA coordinated with Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) then Shipyard Commander Capt. Mark Hugel to help jump start the nonprofit school program to life. A dozen NNSY Sailors were engaged to STARBASE’s first facility to clean up, paint and assemble desks and chairs. This program would go on to provide further Science, Technology, Environment, and Math (STEM) education to the potential future employees of America’s Shipyard. Thus when COVID-19 struck this year and forced students to attend school from home, NNSY came to help STARBASE

teachers make project packages so Portsmouth students could better continue their education. “We conduct the class from here in the school, but we have to mail them the packages first so the kids can do it at home,” said Hayden. “Most of the items in the kits are probably in their home, but the children may not know where they are, and the parents may or may not be there to help.” After they get the packages, the students follow their teachers via video conference. “We have the children follow along through an application called Schoology, which is a learning management system— something I didn’t even know how to say three weeks ago,” STARBASE teacher Bill Lee chuckled. “The first virtual classroom I ever saw was the first one that I taught.” With virtual lessons to prepare, packages to put together and adapting to this new learning landscape, the teachers could use any extra help. Thus, in coordination with

NNSY’s Outreach Coordinator Valerie Fulwood and Command Community Relations Coordinator Culinary Specialist First Class Petty Officer Matthew Yacobellis, an email went out to NNSY’s Sailors asking for volunteers to help put together lesson packages—and a number of them responded. “They took care of the lion’s share of the work in putting these packages together during the couple of hours they have spent with us,” said STARBASE Volunteer Board Member and retired NNSY employee Robert Fogel. “We really appreciate the response from the shipyard to come out and be a part of this.” Along with their duties at the shipyard, many of the Sailors were more than happy to help as they wanted to give back to the community. “I love children so whenever there’s an opportunity to give back to them, I am always willing to volunteer and help out,” said volunteer Second Class Petty Officer Khadijah Sam.

“I was helped a lot when I was in school at that age, and I felt it was important to turn around and help other school age kids now that I am an adult,” added volunteer Third Class Petty Officer Sarah Wise. “I think more people should volunteer. It’s easy because the school is right down the street from NNSY, and there are some commands that will give time off for Sailors to volunteer. It’s run by an admiral, and the school has a military structure, so it’s familiar territory.” Fogel said that the process of planning this outreach would not have been possible without Fulwood and Yacobellis. “Valerie was the one who got us in touch with Petty Officer Yacobellis and has been our touchpoint between the shipyard and STARBASE,” said Fogel. “It’s going to make the rest of the year easier for the teachers and take a lot of the stress off of them.” Not only will the Sailors’ volunteered efforts help the teachers, but Hayden says that it will ultimately help NNSY in the long run by ensuring the continuation of the STARBASE students’ education and the option to apply to the shipyard—regardless of what the future brings. “To me, we are the starting point of technicians and engineers of NNSY,” Hayden explained. “There are jobs in the shipyard that will one day need to be filled—and we’re working on it.”

Micro Market@Sea satisfies Sailors’ cravings From Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs

NORFOLK

On Nov. 30, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Ships Store Program opened the first Micro Market@Sea onboard the USS San Antonio (LPD 19). Ship personnel will now have access to over 100 snack items with the potential to stay open 24 hours a day/seven days a week when operationally feasible. “We are excited to open the first Micro Market@Sea onboard a U. S. Navy ship,” said Scott Gray, Vice President, NEXCOM’s Ships Store Program. “As a retired Master Chief, I know first-hand that a ship never sleeps and Sailors want to be able to purchase something to eat whenever they are awake and working, regardless of what time that may be. It’s great that afloat Sailors now have the chance to be able to do that

in their Micro Market@Sea.” The 75 square feet Micro Market@Sea is an operation that works on an ‘honor system’ as a self-service, self-checkout store. To checkout, Sailors insert their CAC cards, scan the items for purchase and pay with their Navy Cash Card. The Ships Store Program worked with the Naval Supply Systems Command Business Systems Center in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, to develop a module within the USS San Antonio’s ships store software, ROM3, for the selfservice check-out capability. In order to help deter theft and assist in monitoring, the store has a camera system set in place at checkout. NEXCOM has plans to open other Micro Market@Sea locations in the future. “The USS San Antonio is the prototype for proof of concept to see if we could open and run a Micro Market on a ship,” said Gray. “With this location official open and running smoothly, we will begin looking at other

MC2 Darien Kenney On Nov. 30, the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Ships Store Program opened the first Micro Market@Sea onboard the USS San Antonio (LPD 19). Ship personnel will now have access to over 100 snack items with the potential to stay open 24 hours a day/seven days a week when operationally feasible.

ships that can support a Micro Market@Sea.” Beyond Micro Market@Sea, NEXCOM has nearly 50 ashore Micro Markets. The first Micro Market opened at the Southeast

Regional Maintenance Center in Mayport, Florida, in 2015. Since then, nearly 50 Micro Markets have opened on Navy bases in the continental United States, Bahrain and Guam.

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm. Charles W. “Chip” Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA):

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The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose offices are located at 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2020 Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved.

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A3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

MCC Patrick Gordon Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Yaasmeen Brown, assigned to Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River, monitors distribution of flu vaccines at NAS Patuxent River drive-through flu shot station for military members, Dec. 4, 2020. The vaccine can help reduce the overall impact of contagious respiratory illnesses on the population during the overlapping flu season, thus decreasing the burden on an already-taxed health care system dealing with the COVID-19 crisis. TRICARE beneficiaries who wish to get the vaccine before it’s available at the clinic can use a TRICARE network participating pharmacy at no cost.

Check off the flu shot from your 2020 to-do list By Donna M Cipolloni

Naval Air Station Patuxent River Public Affairs

PATUXENT RIVER, Md.

With the world enmeshed in a global pandemic, getting this year’s seasonal flu shot may be more important than ever. Medical experts agree the vaccine could help reduce the overall impact of contagious respiratory illnesses on the population during the overlapping flu season, thus decreasing the burden on an already-taxed health care system dealing with the COVID-19 crisis. “Even though the morbidity and mortality of flu is much lower than COVID-19, it’s still a potentially serious disease, especially among the very young, the very old, and the immune-compromised like cancer survivors, diabetics, and those with autoimmune disease,” said Dr. Akram Sadaka, director of public health at Naval Health Clinic Patuxent River (NHCPR). “Furthermore, hu-

mans can acquire both flu and COVID-19 infections simultaneously, thereby the morbidity and mortality is multiplied by a factor greater than five. Unless there’s a valid contraindication to receive the flu vaccine, everyone should get it. Period.” Because some of the symptoms of COVID-19 and flu are similar, it can be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. “Testing may be needed to help confirm which one is the culprit, and this is why we test for both in our clinic as a matter of Standards of Operating Procedure,” Sadaka noted. “Flu symptoms typically rise faster and last for a few days, while COVID-19 symptoms are more gradual and can last up to four to six weeks. Furthermore, loss of smell and/or taste is more common among COVID-19 patients; and one of the most important prognostic signs of COVID-19 is shortness of breath. Until COVID-19 is completely be-

hind us, we recommend testing not only to rule it out, but to control it and get rid of it as well.” Sadaka explained that, locally, the flu season begins toward the end of September and can last through the beginning of March, with peak season typically occurring in February. The vaccine is currently available in the community, but the Navy is receiving it later than usual this year; and although the clinic will be receiving a small batch shortly, it will be “prioritized for high risk individuals,” Sadaka noted. TRICARE beneficiaries who wish to get the vaccine before it’s available at the clinic can use a TRICARE network participating pharmacy at no cost. Visit www.tricare.mil/ flu for more information. Individuals should be sure to keep a record of their vaccines and share them with their primary care provider (PCP). “Having the flu vaccine does not com-

pletely prevent you from having the flu, but it reduces the risk of the disease, along with its morbidity and mortality by a large measure,” Sadaka added. “Those who can’t take the vaccine for a specific medical reason should consult with their PCP to receive drugs that are currently available to combat flu when they either come down with it, or are exposed to it.” And while Sadaka said people do not get flu from the flu shot, they can get some symptoms from it. “Developing flu-like symptoms from the vaccine is not necessarily a bad sign; in fact, it means the vaccine has worked,” he added. “I would rather have those symptoms than the whole flu.” In order to help prevent contracting the flu, Dr. Sadaka recommends strict personal hygiene and the avoidance of engaging in activities in crowded spaces. “Likewise, physical distancing is essential for everyone, along with masking,” he stated. “Be safe. Stay home as much as possible, and enjoy your holidays.”

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A4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Profiles in professionalism: Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate George “Adam” Musgrove By MCC Scott Wichmann

Commander, Navy Reserve Force Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate George “Adam” Musgrove had taken a Red Cross CPR refresher course the week before his Annual Training (AT) orders started November 4, 2020. As he grabbed his seabag on his way out of Seattle’s Sea-Tac Airport on the way to begin training with Submarine Squadron 11 at Point Loma, San Diego, he never could have known he’d put his recertification to use so quickly. Walking from the tarmac up the ramp and into the airport terminal for his connecting flight, Musgrove heard a woman cry out in distress. He spun quickly around to see a man in a pilot’s uniform laying on the ground. Musgrove said he took action immediately. “I get down on the ground and I start assessing him and checking him over and he’s taking some really heavy, deep gasps, and then he just stops breathing,” said the 43 yearold Musgrove, who serves as the Chelan County, Washington, Chief of Patrol in his civilian law enforcement career. Musgrove checked for a pulse and quickly determined the man needed CPR. He performed chest compressions for 5-6 minutes alongside a woman, who also knelt down to help. The pair continued performing chest compressions until an airline employee brought out an automated external defibrillator (AED). “One of the airline employees dropped an AED right next to us,” said Musgrove. “I pulled [the pilot’s] jacket open and ripped his shirt, and we put the AED on him. We energized it and shocked him, and he immediately goes to take a deep breath and then stops breathing again.” The pair immediately went into performing more chest compressions for a few tense minutes.

Courtesy Graphic

“We gave him a few rescue breaths,” said Musgrove, “and then he started breathing again. That was probably about six or seven minutes into it.” Aid crews arrived shortly thereafter and took the man away for medical treatment. While Musgrove said he never got a full update on the man’s condition, a subsequent phone call from San Diego to Seattle provided some encouraging news. “I got down to San Diego and I called back up to the airport and they connected me over to the battalion chief from the fire department,” said Musgrove. “And he says ‘I can’t give you all of the details, but just know that when we loaded him up and put him into the ambulance, he was talking.’ I’m glad I could be there to help out.” As a SELRES Sailor, Musgrove serves as the senior enlisted leader for Naval Reserve SSGN Continuous Maintenance Availability Pacific (CMAV) out of Bangor, Washington. Administratively attached to NOSC Kitsap, his command is an expeditionary maintenance unit with a primary mission to work on the guided missile submarines USS Ohio (SSGN-726) and USS Michigan (SSGN-727). A key element of the Navy’s fighting force, the SSGN features tremendous payload capacity, dual crew deployment, and inherent stealth. Each SSGN brings mission flexibility and enhanced capabilities to the warfighter,

something Musgrove and his team routinely support in the growing global playing field of the Great Power Competition. “I started a program several years ago called the SMART program,” said Musgrove. “It’s designed to utilize our Reserve Sailors from the expeditionary maintenance units. We provide an opportunity for those Reservists from across the country to come out and work on fast attack submarines when they’re in their shipyard periods. We provide needed maintenance with some of these Reservists who go out and alleviate the workload.” Musgrove said a fleeting thought occurred to him during his recertification course, one made more profound after the events of that fateful fall day at the Seattle airport. “When I was taking the CPR refresher course, for a moment I actually thought to myself, ‘I’ve never had to use this before,” said Musgrove. “Sure enough, the very next week — boom.” The senior chief offered some valuable experiential advice for every Sailor to consider. “I will tell you one thing. Just make sure that you’re taking every bit of training seriously,” he said. “I have almost 25 years in the Navy and this was the first time I’d ever had to use my CPR training. Absolutely take it seriously, because you just never know when you’ll be put into a position where you will have to actually utilize it.”


A5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Shelby West Pictured from left to right: Charles Rogers, Welder (C920); Curtis Fennell, Electronics Technician (C900F); Kamau Adams, Engineering Technician (C981); Jerry Davis, Electronic Technician (C900F); and Roger Robertson, Electronic Technician (C900F).

Technology and Teamwork: Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s new Welding and Cladding System By Jason Scarborough

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH

Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) has continued to make improvements and progress toward a more modernized work environment. Recent modernization has come in the form of new equipment acquisition. One of these new pieces of equipment is for NNSY’s Pipe Shop (Code 960), the Advanced Manufacturing Engineering Technologies (AMET) Welding and Cladding System, which will be used to manufacture joints, repair and extend the lifespan of large valves, and service vari-

ous other shipboard components. The welding and cladding system is an automated process and does not require a welder onsite during its operation. “The shipyard is gaining new capabilities and a new modern process with the welding and cladding system,” said Engineering Technician, Kamau Adams, Production and Equipment Management Group (Code 981). “It’s an added safety component having this new automated system because you don’t have to actually have a welder, hands-on, working in the heat or in confined spaces.” The AMET Welding and Cladding System is able to clad and produce various

valves and create fitted joints that support submarine and aircraft carrier maintenance availabilities and operations. Cladding is any material used to cover a structure’s exterior. For metalwork, cladding is the bonding together of dissimilar metals. These metals are built up and welded together to protect against certain elements and to remain shielded from environmental conditions. In addition to the welding and cladding system’s safety advantages and its capability in extending the lifespan of various shipboard components, it also increases the production rate of repaired valves and fitted joints and increases the efficiency of

welders. Adams stated, “The cladding system is ultimately a set it and forget it system. This means that a welder cladding a particular valve may take a week, but the cladding system can be programmed and generate the same valve in approximately two days, cutting production time in half, while allowing the welder to be free to conduct other critical repairs.” The AMET Welding and Cladding System is an extremely valuable asset for the Pipe Shop. The automated system has proven to be efficient by increasing production, increasing the lifespan of shipboard components and improving safety measures for welders. However, what was also proven when the system first arrived: it cannot operate, repair, or maintain itself. While the shipyard continues to make great strides in modernizing equipment and facilities, it continues to follow the philosophy of people being at the heart of what NNSY does to accomplish the mission and provide the Fleet with well-equipped and highly capable ships and submarines.

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A6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

NMCP’S COVID Call Center surpasses 50,000 calls By MC2 Kris Lindstrom

Naval Medical Center - Portsmouth Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s (NMCP) COVID Call Center reached a milestone by answering their 50,000th call on Dec. 1. The concept for the call center began on Mar. 6 when the need arose to answer the ever increasing incoming calls regarding COVID-19, and grew into a call center staffed with multidisciplinary clinical personnel working through a central database to assist the nearly 900 calls per day. “I cannot reiterate strongly enough that reaching this milestone of 50,000 calls occurred only through brilliant strategic and tactical execution by a diverse, selfless team,” said Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Daley, NMCP Directorate of Medical Services associate director. At the beginning of the pandemic, the call center received a large numbers of calls relating to travel, command-specific guidelines, and other issues that were not directly related to the mission of the NMCP COVID Call Center. Now, it is focused on identifying symptomatic patients, active duty members and staff, so they can schedule them to get a COVID test at NMCP’s COVID Drive Thru testing site. “The main goal of the COVID call center is to safely triage patients who have COVID-like illness signs and symptoms without needlessly increasing patient or staff risk of exposure, and to assist patients who can otherwise manage their symptoms at home,” Daley said. “Fewer positive patients visiting the ER (emergency room) or hospital limits the transmission rate of the disease.” Lt. Cmdr. Terry Brown, NMCP COVID Call Center officer in charge, said that they currently have a staff of 14 answering phones and triaging pa-

MCSN Ariana Torman Lt. j.g. Ronni Zona, division officer, answers a call Sept. 3. The call center is focused on identifying symptomatic patients, active duty members and staff, so that they can be scheduled to receive a COVID test.

tients. The process in triaging patients is determining the severity of their symptoms based on three criteria. First, can patients manage symptoms at home? Second, do patients require an appointment to see their primary care doctor? Or third, are symptoms severe enough to be seen by the Emergency Department? “This information is gathered within seconds of speaking to patients on the phone,” Brown said. “After determining those key categories, the patient’s information is entered into the COVID Database and scheduled for a COVID swab the next day. The process itself

takes about three to five minutes per patient to include the administrative piece to complete the call.” The current design of the call center, which Daley and his staff refer to as Call Center 2.3, dramatically decreased call wait times while using half the staff and dealing with a call volume that is 64% greater than the average of the first five months of the pandemic. “This is not a mission that anyone asked for, but in typical ‘don’t give up the ship’ fashion, our Navy team is literally and figuratively answering the call,” Daley said. “I could not be more

proud of their efforts.” As the U.S. Navy’s oldest, continuously-operating military hospital since 1830, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth proudly serves past and present military members and their families. The nationally-acclaimed, state-of-the-art medical center, along with the area’s 10 branch health and TRICARE Prime Clinics, provide care for the Hampton Roads area. The medical center also supports premier research and teaching programs designed to prepare new doctors, nurses and hospital corpsman for future roles in healing and wellness.

FAMILY LINES FOR MILITARY & VETERANS 50% off add’l line price for lines 2-6 vs. Magenta; w/ AutoPay.

T-Mobile.com/military During congestion, the small fraction of customers using >50GB/mo. may notice reduced speeds until next bill cycle due to data prioritization. Video typically streams on smartphone/tablet at DVD quality (480p). International data at 2G speeds. Submit U.S. military verification within 45 days at my.t-mobile.com/profile; otherwise your plan will become Magenta at an additional cost of up to $20/line per month. Military individual must be account holder & account must maintain valid military line. Limited time offer; subject to change. At participating locations. Credit approval, deposit, $10 SIM card, and, in stores & on customer service calls, $20 assisted or upgrade support charge may be required. May not be combined with other promotions/discounts and features; existing customers who switch may lose certain benefits. U.S. roaming and on-network data allotments differ: includes 200MB U.S. roaming. Unlimited talk & text features for direct communications between 2 people; others (e.g., conference & chat lines, etc.) may cost extra. Unlimited high-speed data US only. In Canada/Mexico, up to 5GB high-speed data then unlimited at up to 128kbps. Not available for hotspots and some other data-first devices. Capable device required for some features. Video streams at up to 1.5Mbps. Optimization may affect speed of video downloads; does not apply to video uploads. For best performance, leave any video streaming applications at their default automatic resolution setting. Netflix: Offer subject to change. Receive Netflix Basic (1-screen, up to a $8.99/mo. value) while you maintain 2+ qual’g Military lines in good standing. Value may be applied to different Netflix streaming plans. Not redeemable or refundable for cash. Cancel Netflix anytime. Netflix Terms of Use apply: www.netflix.com/termsofuse. 1 offer per T-Mobile account; may take 1-2 bill cycles. See t-mobile.com/netflix for add’l info. Like all plans, features may change or be discontinued at any time; see T-Mobile Terms and Conditions at T-Mobile.com for details. Tethering: 3GB high-speed data then unlimited on our network at max 3G speeds. Smartphone and tablet usage is prioritized over tethering usage, which may result in higher speeds for data used on smartphones and tablets. AutoPay Pricing for lines 1-8. Without AutoPay, $5 more/line. May not be reflected on 1st bill. Int’l Roaming: Not for extended international use; you must reside in the U.S. and primary usage must occur on our network. Device must register on our network before international use. Service may be terminated or restricted for excessive roaming. Usage may be taxed in some countries. Calls from Simple Global countries, including over Wi-Fi, are $.25/min. (no charge for Wi-Fi calls to US, Mexico and Canada). Standard speeds approx. 128Kbps without Plus; with Plus approx. 256 Kbps. Gogo: on U.S.-based airlines; Wi-Fi Calling functionality, valid e911 address, & 1 prior Wi-Fi call w/ current SIM card required for messaging. Coverage not available in some areas. We are not responsible for our partners’ networks. Network Management: Service may be slowed, suspended, terminated, or restricted for misuse, abnormal use, interference with our network or ability to provide quality service to other users, or significant roaming. See T-Mobile.com/OpenInternet for details. See Terms and Conditions (including arbitration provision) at www.T-Mobile.com for additional information. T-Mobile and the magenta color are registered trademarks of Deutsche Telekom AG. © 2020 T-Mobile USA, Inc.


A7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

| Navy Exchange, Marine Corps Exchange customers support Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society EXCHANGE

Continued from A1 cial support when they are experiencing life challenges that could detract their attention from being mission ready.” The purchase of the benefit ticket entitled customers to $5 off plus an additional 5% off their one-time NEX or MCX purchase made Nov. 5 – 10, 2020. With the purchase of a benefit ticket, customers also received a free reusable tote, while supplies lasted. Navy and Marine Corps customers donated nearly $269,000 during the NMCRS benefit ticket campaign held in the spring. Since 2011, NEX patrons have donated nearly $3 million to the NMCRS while MCX customers have donated nearly $1 million since 2013.

| NMCP Culinary Specialists provide meals to Sailors during COVID-19 CULINARY

Continued from A1 there is no face-to-face contact,” said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Jacob Owens, NMCP’s cargo leading petty officer. “We’re able to provide the Sailors a warm meal while helping to mitigate any further spread.” As COVID-19 continued to spread in the community, the galley staff met the continued demand. On average, the galley prepared 291 meals each day. At its peak, the galley provided more than 800 meals in one day. In addition, the galley also provided meals to quarantined Sailors assigned to surrounding Norfolk commands, and the Sailors that were required to quar-

Courtesy Photo In the spirit of giving, Navy Exchange (NEX) and Marine Corps Exchange (MCX) customers donated the highest amount since 2014 to the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS).

antine upon returning from the USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) deployment to New York City in April 2020. “All of this was accomplished during a 60% reduction of manning in the CFO (Combined Food Operations) department,” said Culinary Specialist 1st Class Jesus Fimbres, CFO’s leading petty officer. “This really shows the hard work that was put in while we still prepared meals for the staff and inpatients here at NMCP.” As the U.S. Navy’s oldest, continuously-operating military hospital since 1830, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth proudly serves past and present military members and their families. The nationally-acclaimed, state-of-the-art medical center, along with the area’s 10 branch health and TRICARE Prime Clinics, provide care for the Hampton Roads area. The medical center also supports premier research and teaching programs designed to prepare new doctors, nurses and hospital corpsman for future roles in healing and wellness.

For more military news visit FlagshipNews.com

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A8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

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USS Donald Cook completes Black Sea patrol Donald Cook entered the Black Sea on Nov. 23, 2020, and conducted air defense exercises with NATO Air Command. ❯❯See B5

SECTION B | FLAGSHIPNEWS.COM | 12.10.2020

Jason Bortz The family of Petty Officer 3rd Class Cameron Walters is presented a Purple Heart Medal posthumously by Rear Adm. Pete Garvin, commander, Naval Education and Training Command, center, and Capt. Edgardo Moreno, commanding officer, Naval Aviation Schools Command, at a ceremony Dec. 4, 2020, at the National Naval Aviation Museum onboard Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola. Walters was one of three Sailors killed on Dec. 6, 2019, by a terrorist on NAS Pensacola.

Memorial service, award ceremonies honor victims of Pensacola terrorist attack From Naval Education and Training Command Public Affairs

PENSACOLA, Fla.

Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) held a memorial service, as well as wreath-laying and Purple Heart Medal ceremonies, at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola Dec. 4. The memorial service and wreath laying marked the one-year anniversary of the Dec. 6 NAS Pensacola terrorist attack that left three U.S. Navy Sailors killed and eight other personnel injured. “It was almost one year ago today during a despicable and cowardly act of

terrorism that Ensign Joshua Watson, Petty Officer 3rd Class Mohammed Haitham and Petty Officer 3rd Class Cameron Walters paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to their nation,” said Rear Adm. Pete Garvin, commander, Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), the ceremony’s guest speaker. “As we lay this wreath for our three fallen shipmates, we honor their bravery and their sacrifice.” The ceremony also recognized those who were wounded during the attack: Ensign Kristy Lehmer, Ensign Brianna Thomas, Airman Ryan Blackwell, Airman George Johnson, Jessica Pickett, Capt. Charles Hogue, Sheriff’s Deputy Matthew Tinch

and Sheriff’s Deputy Jonathan Glass. “Today, we continue to mourn those who lost their lives,” said Garvin. “We also pay tribute to the eight Sailors, Marines, government civilians, Naval Air Station Pensacola security forces and Escambia County Sherriff’s Office deputies who were injured. They all exemplify honor, courage and commitment.” Garvin commented on the strong relationship between the Pensacola community and the military at NAS Pensacola. “Here in Pensacola, in the ‘Cradle of Naval Aviation,’ we are a family with an unshakeable foundation, a family that stands the test of time and is unwavering in our defense of the constitu-

tion and the country whose course it directs,” said Garvin. During three separate ceremonies at the National Naval Aviation Museum, Garvin and Capt. Edgardo Moreno, NASC’s commanding officer, presented the Purple Heart Medals posthumously to the families of Watson, Haitham and Walters. “In these times the war zone is no longer limited to battlefields, it all too often finds its way to bastions where it is least expected,” said Cmdr. Michael Lofgren, NASC’s executive officer, who provided remarks at the ceremonies. “These heroes, selflessly and tirelessly preparing for a battlefield, suddenly and unexpectedly found themselves in a war zone.” The Purple Heart Medal is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to those wounded or killed while serving, on or after April 5, 1917, with the U.S. military.

First Navy Osprey landing, take-off, refueling on aircraft carrier By Lt.Cmdr. Miranda Williams USS Carl Vinson Public Affairs

PACIFIC OCEAN

The “Titans” of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 30 and USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) made naval aviation history Nov. 20-21 when they conducted the first ever Navy CMV-22B Osprey landings, take-offs, and refueling from an aircraft carrier. The CMV-22B is the U.S. Navy version of the Osprey, a multi-engine, dual-piloted, self-deployable, medium lift, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) tilt-rotor aircraft. Under the guidance of the Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission (VRM) Wing, Navy pilots and maintainers trained with Marine Corps pilots and maintainers who have operated with the MV-22 since 2007. “This is the one of many firsts that VRM-30 and the VRM community will attain as we move to transition from the venerable C-2A Greyhound to the capable CMV-22 Osprey,” said Capt. Dewon Chaney, commodore, VRM Wing. “What the Sailors have accomplished here is inspiring given the tight timeline for these milestones and the complexity of this aircraft. The Marines have flown this aircraft for decades and we are leveraging that experience to springboard into supporting the advanced carrier air wing.” Compared to the C-2A, the CMV-22B offers increased operational range – capable of transporting cargo and passengers as far as 1,150 nautical miles, increased survivability,

enhanced beyond-line-of-sight communications, greater cargo capacity, and faster cargo loading/unloading. “The landings, take-offs, and refueling were a culmination of well-planned strategic efforts to bring increased capabilities to the fleet,” said Cmdr. Steven Parente, commanding officer, VRM-30. “The CMV-22B will deliver lethality to the fleet, and enable the carrier strike group to achieve dominance across the air, land, and sea through the provision of high priority cargo and personnel from shore bases to aircraft carriers at sea. Additionally, the increased flexibility and capabilities of the CMV-22B will further expand the carrier strike group’s influence and agility, broadening its ability to meet a wide array of operational tasking.” VRM-30 is projected to reach initial operational capability in 2021 and deploy as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) Two embarked aboard Carl Vinson, under the command of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) One. “This is an exciting time for our Navy and especially for carrier strike groups,” said Rear Adm. Timothy J. Kott, commander, CSG 1. “The MV-22 Osprey has already proven effective in a wide range of operations, including humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, amphibious assault, and medical evacuation missions. We are eager to take full advantage of the Navy’s variant of the Osprey, which gives us options we did not have before.” As the Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD)

MC3 Aaron Smith A CMV-22B Osprey from the Titans of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 30 approaches the flight deck of Nimitz-class nuclear aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Nov. 20, 2020. This evolution marked the first time the Navy CMV-22B Ospreys have landed on a carrier. Vinson is currently underway conducting routine maritime operations.

aircraft, the CMV-22 will transport personnel, mail, supplies and high-priority cargo from shore bases to aircraft carriers at sea. “The CMV-22B is a great addition to the advanced carrier air wing,” said Capt. Matt Thrasher, commander, CVW-2. “With our increased capacity of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye and EA-18G Growler, kinetic capacity of the FA-18 E/F Super Hornets, fifth generation capabilities of the F-35C Lightning II, and the agile logistical support of the CMV-22B Osprey, CVW-2 provides the most modern and lethal capabilities to the strike group and fleet commanders.” In order to support fifth generation aircraft,

Vinson received major upgrades during a 17month maintenance availability, making Vinson the first aircraft carrier equipped to support both the F-35C Lightning II and the CMV-22B Osprey. “These historic events are all in support of one goal,” said Capt. Matthew Paradise, Vinson’s commanding officer. “Ensuring our personnel are well equipped and well taken care of. Having the newest technology, coupled with the superb skill of our personnel, is what continues to ensure we are the mightiest Navy in the world.” To learn more about Carrier Strike Group One, visit www.dvidshub.net/unit/CSG1.


HeroesatHome The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | 12.10.2020 | B2

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The rack or the rocking chair By Lisa Smith Molinari

“My lower back started hurting again,” I told my new primary care doctor at the base clinic, who appeared to be about twelve years old. My last PCM was also female, but a little closer to my age. The one before that was a nurse practitioner, and the three before that were middle-aged men. Each time the Navy assigns me a new PCM, which happens frequently, I have to explain myself all over again. Once, my PCM changed a week before my pap smear appointment, and I didn’t know it until I was sitting in the examining room in a paper gown. He walked in, told me to put my feet in the stirrups and to “scootch down to the end of the table.” Military dependents get used to these cringe-worthy moments in our healthcare. Due to our mobile lifestyles, we become accustomed to changing everything from hair stylists to churches to pizza joints to schools to dentists to mechanics. Why would our experience with medical doctors be

any different? “My back started hurting a few years ago,” I explained to the young PCM I’d been assigned, “and Dr…what was her name? She sent me for physical therapy. It worked. Well, until now.” After giving me a blank stare which seemed to say, “Cry me a river,” my new PCM sent me for a fresh x-ray. “Mild to moderate degenerative arthritis,” she told me, but all I heard was, “Go find a rocking chair and some tapioca pudding, because you’re officially ancient. ” I was referred for another round of physical therapy sessions. Although I knew the PT would help to alleviate my back pain, memories of my last round of physical therapy convinced me that it could wait until after the holidays. “Now, pull your right knee up to your left ear,” my previous physical therapist had told me in all seriousness three years ago. I had to look out the window to see if any pigs were flying by. I had envisioned myself being

gently guided through therapeutic motions intended to heal my stiffened spine, but no one bothered to tell me that I would have to break a sweat, not to mention turn myself into a human pretzel. Every PT session followed the same general routine: Before I had the chance to get into a good People Magazine article in the waiting area, I was greeted by one of the therapists and brought into the cheerful PT suite with its colorful work out equipment, entertaining background music, happy houseplants, and padded tables. Although I would have preferred to nod off on a padded table while enjoying the music, I was always asked to warm up on a treadmill, followed by rolling my under-stretched thighs repeatedly over a foam cylinder on the floor. Piece of cake, or so I thought. Who knew that the harmless limbering exercise would elicit visions of being strapped to “the rack” by Medieval King Longshanks? I was then allowed to lounge on one of the padded tables, which

would have been lovely, if it were not for the dog leash I had use to pull my extremities into positions that made me look like a Cirque du Soleil reject covered in an unladylike sheen of sweat. While the therapist cleaned the table, I had to endure a final mélange of strengthening exercises. Isometric lunges, step ups, wall squats and something affectionately referred to as “monster walks” — pacing back and forth across the room in front of everyone, legs splayed out in a semisquat with a giant rubber band around my thighs. When my ordeal was over, I would grab my belongings from the patient cubbies, and bid my assigned therapist adieu, promising to do my homework. I never committed the therapists’ names to memory and often wondered if they were all descendants of Emperor Caligula. Despite the painful memories of my last PT sessions, I am fully confident that my next physical therapist will teach me to touch my knee to my ear again, and that my back will feel better for it. No need to buy that rocking chair just yet.

Creating New Holiday Traditions When Your Service Member Is Away From Military Onesource

With your service member away and people around the world avoiding travel and large gatherings because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the holidays may feel different this year. There are things you can do to help make the holiday special for yourself and those you love, whether your service member is stationed far from home or deployed. Sharing old traditions and creating new ones can keep the holidays fun and meaningful, and help you stay connected. You are an important influence in your service member’s life. Sharing traditions or creating new ones during this time of year shows that you are thinking about and supporting your loved ones. This is meaningful, as they – and you – may be feeling a lot of emotions, whether they express it or not. Creating new virtual traditions With video get-togethers more common since the pandemic started, your service member and other loved ones are probably comfortable with online visits. Think about scheduling one or more virtual get-togethers this season. Add in some holiday fun to make them even more memorable. Hold a virtual “potluck.” No need to bring food to this get-together, just something else to share – a toast, joke, poem or favorite holiday memory. Create a slideshow of holidays past. Collect photos and short videos from family and friends in plenty of time to create a slideshow or video presentation of seasons past. Use screensharing during an online gathering to show the presentation. Half the fun will be seeing each other’s reactions and sharing memories. Schedule a holiday game night. Create and email bingo cards for guests to print out for a

Courtesy Photo

holiday bingo night. Or hold a trivia night of random facts, family history or a combination of both. Look into multiplayer online games that everyone will enjoy and that will create the feeling of being there with each other. Open presents together. Get together virtually to share the experience of opening presents. If your service member has children, read a holiday story. Watch your favorite holiday movie at the same time. If possible, watch while using video chat or social media to comment on the best parts in real time. If holiday movies are not your thing, you could choose a television series to stream and talk about. Other new traditions to try Here are some more ideas to bridge the distance gap and celebrate with loved ones. See if they work for you, and share them with others in your service member’s network of support. Design family T-shirts or hats for family members to wear one day around the holidays. Put something meaningful or fun on them and then video chat or text pictures of yourselves wearing them. Send your service member one of the T-shirts or hats ahead of time, so they can wear it on the designated day. Send a care package or even an experience. Sending a care package is a great way to brighten your service member’s holiday season, especially if they are deployed. Or you might consider sending an experience they

may remember over time. Think about giving your service member a round of golf or a gift certificate to a local restaurant. Create a photo book. Include images of you and your service member, together and apart, from throughout the years. Make a copy for you and send a copy to them as a holiday gift to share and look through together. Encourage your service member to get together with friends. Missing home may put a damper on wanting to celebrate, but suggesting that your loved one get together safely with buddies and newfound friends can help. Remind them to embrace the local culture whether they are in North Dakota, the Pacific region or somewhere else. Send several holiday cards in the same package. Write a different note of appreciation and love in each one. Your service member can open one card a day leading up to the holiday. See these guidelines from the Postal Service to make sure your cards get there on time. Send a homemade ornament with pictures of you, children or cherished pets on it. Whatever your holiday plans, make sure you and your service member set realistic expectations ahead of time. Are you expecting to talk over the holidays? Do you want to send presents? Discuss what you want, and make sure it’s doable based on your loved one’s location and operational situation. And don’t forget the postal deadlines.

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost.

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B3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Lance Cpl. Juan Anaya Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314 declares their initial operational capability (IOC) for the F-35C Lightning II, having met the standards set forth by Headquarters Marine Corps. IOC declaration marks a significant accomplishment for VMFA-314 of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW) that further enables 3rd MAW to support the Marine Air-Ground Task Force.

3rd Marine Aircraft Wing advances air superiority with F-35C By 1st Lt. Charles Allen

3rd Marine Aircraft Wing Public Affairs

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION MIRAMAR, Calif.

In a time characterized by rapidly evolving tactics and modernized equipment, the Marine Corps has taken the next step in maintaining air superiority as Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314 declares their initial operational capability (IOC) for the F-35C Lightning II. Initial operational capability declaration marks a significant accomplishment for 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW), enabling VMFA-314 to deploy the F-35C onto aircraft carriers where they will be able to support combat operations anywhere in the world. “The F-35 is an expeditionary platform that extends the reach of our Marines and machines, and increases our ability to support joint and allied partners at a moment’s notice,” said Maj. Gen. Christopher Mahoney, 3rd MAW commanding general. “By effectively employing the F-35, MAGTF

[Marine Air-Ground Task Force] commanders have the potential to dominate our adversaries in a joint battlespace, in the air and out at sea.” Having the most advanced stealth fighter jets the world has ever seen is only the beginning. A strategic and tactical understanding of how to operate and properly maintain the F-35 and its advanced capabilities is essential to its employment in an increasingly nonpermissive maritime domain. To receive this qualification, squadrons must meet the Headquarters Marine Corps standards, which define the minimum number of trained Marines, mission ready aircraft and trained pilots needed in order for a squadron to become IOC complete. “Our maintenance department was critical to the success of IOC. In addition to accepting and inspecting the multiple aircraft that arrived throughout the year, the Marines maintained a high level of aircraft readiness,” said Lt. Col. Duncan French, VMFA-314 executive officer. “Those mission capable aircraft

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allowed the pilots to train in the appropriate missions required of IOC, as well as contributed towards the readiness metrics of IOC.” The F-35’s ability to combine advanced stealth capabilities, integrated avionics and the most powerful sensor package the Department of Defense has ever seen allows it to operate in contested areas, and gives the Marine Corps an unparalleled ability to maintain air superiority in dynamic, unpredictable and competitive environments. French continued, “VMFA-314’s declaration of IOC is a significant milestone not only for 3rd MAW but also the Marine Corps. VMFA-314 is the first F-35C squadron in the Marine Corps. The F-35C’s unique capabilities, compared to the F-35B and legacy aircraft, provide the Marine Corps with a complementary increase in combat projection and the ability to operate from the U.S. Navy’s aircraft carriers.” As tactics and equipment used in the current battlespace continuously change, 3rd MAW commander’s willingness to develop

their understanding of emerging technologies and to utilize them empowers the Marine Air Combat Element with the flexibility to solve dynamic problems that Marines will face in the future. “This achievement ultimately would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of the Marines, Sailors, and civilian contractors assigned to VMFA-314,” said Lt. Col. Brendan Walsh, VMFA-314 commanding officer. “The successful transition of the Black Knights to the F-35C culminating in this IOC declaration is a testament to the squadron’s distinguished legacy of pioneering new aircraft.” The capability to employ the F-35 alongside 3rd MAW’s other capabilities further enables support of fleet Marines and joint and allied partners preserves 3rd MAW’s ability to dominate the battlespace for the MAGTF and joint commanders. 3rd MAW continues to “Fix, Fly, and Fight” as the Marine Corps’largest aircraft wing and remains combat-ready, deployable on short notice, and lethal when called into action. For questions regarding this release, please contact the 3rd MAW Communication Strategy and Operations Office at 3rdmawmedia@usmc.mil.

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B4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Celebrating LASCO’s silver anniversary of revealing the wonders of our sun Paul Cage

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Since the early years of the space age, researchers in the Solar Physics Branch of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have been involved in observational and theoretical studies of the solar atmosphere. Experiments developed at NRL have flown on NASA missions such as Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount, the Orbiting Solar Observatory satellite series, NASA’s third space shuttle mission STS-3, Spacelab-2 and Atlas missions; all feats of engineering that have helped humanity understand the wonders of the heavens. But, none have lasted as long as LASCO. It was Dec. 2, 1995 when the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph was launched into space as part of the European Space Agency (ESA)–NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Originally planned as a two-year mission, SOHO/LASCO is celebrating its silver anniversary, 25 years of scientific discovery of the sun; from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar winds. “It is truly amazing,” said Russell Howard, Ph.D., an NRL astrophysicist who has been with LASCO since its inception. “I believe it is the longest mission here at NRL that is still operating at least. It is certainly cost effective to continue operating instruments as long as they are working well.” As with all missions, LASCO started as a concept to answer three questions related to the quiet sun: What is the structure and dynamics of the solar interior? Why does the solar corona exist and how is it heated to the extremely high temperature of about 1-million-degrees Celsius? And, where is the solar wind produced and how is it accelerated? Those questions started to define the LASCO instrument concept in the early 1980s. “At the time, the ESA was planning a solar mission as one of it four cornerstone missions,” Howard said. “We thought we should collaborate with them on this new mission in some way. We discussed the goals we wanted for the instrument, and in 1987 we submitted the proposal in response to an opportunity announcement issued jointly by NASA and ESA.” The NRL team also became co-investigators on a European Principal Investigator instrument called the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope that flew on SOHO. With the mission greenlighted, the NRL team got to work. The original principal investigator was Donald Michels, Ph.D. As the mission continued to be built, Guenter Brueckner, Ph.D. was made principal investigator since his branch was supplying a lot of technical personnel and laboratory space. Howard was a project scientist for LASCO until after launch when Brueckner became ill and asked him to take over. “The original concept of the mission, to study the quiet sun during the 2 1/2 year lifetime of the mission, evolved because of the increase in activity of the sun to study the active sun, keeping its original objectives,” Howard said. “Now, because it has been observing for 25 years, it has evolved adding solar cycle studies - it is now into its third solar cycle (of eleven years each), an unprecedented opportunity.” LASCO had three telescopes on SOHO at launch, two were traditional coronagraphs, a special type of telescope that uses an occulting disk to completely block direct sunlight, allowing scientists to see the atmosphere around the outside of the sun’s corona, much like the moon blocks the sunlight during an eclipse. But LASCO’s third telescope, C1, was very unconventional in its design and purpose. “C1 allowed us to create an image of the corona at specific spectral wavelengths, and particularly the increased telemetry allowed us to operate LASCO much more completely,” Howard said. Like the Martian rovers, SOHO/LASCO has had its share of going dark. For the first two-and-a-half years, all three instruments worked perfectly. However in June 1998, SOHO would have its first mishap, forcing scientists and mission specialists to scramble to save the operation. A bad command was sent and the whole spacecraft lost power becoming “lost in space”, frozen for several weeks. “We estimated that the temperature inside the box surrounding our telescopes was about minus 90 degrees Celsius,” said Howard. “This was about 60 degrees Celsius colder than the test temperatures and several components failed.” A month after the loss, the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope in Puerto Rico transmitted a radio signal that bounced off the SOHO spacecraft and was received by the 70-meter

Courtesy Photo European Space Agency (ESA) engineers building the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft at Matra Marconi Space in Portsmouth, England, Nov. 22, 1995.

antenna at NASA’s Deep Space Network. This was a very important step in the recovery process, because the SOHO team located the spacecraft in space and learned that the spacecraft was rotating about an odd axis. Two months later, the team regained control and slowly powered-up and thawed out the fuel lines to be able to execute a maneuver to point back at the sun. The recovery of the mission took five months; however, one system that failed was critical to the operation of the C1 instrument. Like Lazarus though, the little spacecraft beamed back to Earth, “I’m not dead! What do you want me to do now?” Since then, LASCO continues to work, sending images and data back on a daily basis. “My top success is the demonstration of the importance of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) in forecasting geomagnetic effects,” Howard said. “Because CMEs had not been observed regularly, the primary sources of geomagnetic storms were thought to be flares and the recurrent co-rotating interaction regions. But the observation of the “halo” CME (a CME that is directed at Earth) was now a regular event, which was probably the key to convincing people of its significance.”

CITIZEN SCIENTISTS The SOHO mission’s open data policy has promoted solar research across the globe, and LASCO in particular has spawned interest in other nations flying such instruments. Karl Battams, Ph.D. is a computational scientist at NRL and in 2020 assumed the role as the principal investigator for LASCO. He also manages the Sungrazer Project, which, since 2000, encourages amateur citizen scientists to discover new comets using SOHO’s images. “The Sungrazer Project is one of the oldest citizen science projects, “Battams said. “The citizen scientists who participate – whether they realize it or not – they are learning so much more than just how to look for little moving dots of light in an image. They are having to think about the physics of the situation. They are having to understand a coronagraph image. We aren’t feeding them simplified subsets of the science data. We are saying ‘Here are the science products. Go make some new science from it.’”

LASCO’S FUTURE As with any mission, failures do happen with time and a catastrophic failure could occur at any time. Currently the region where SOHO is orbiting, about 1 million miles from Earth, about four times the distance as the moon is from Earth,

is much safer than a low-Earth orbit. Eventually the SOHO/LASCO mission will come to an end. In 2016 LASCO observations were designated essential for space weather forecasting resulting in NASA being requested to maintain observations until a replacement mission could be put in place. The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration commissioned NRL to build two instruments, one to be launched around 2024-2025 in an Earth orbit and one to go to Lagrange point 1, where the SOHO spacecraft currently is bathed in sunlight all the time and can constantly view the sun, which is an advantage over an Earth orbit. “I would expect LASCO to continue operating for at least one year after the launch of a replacement to perform crosscalibrations,” Howard said. “But the fate of the mission depends on NASA and ESA and then SOHO itself.” Just like when Thomas Harriot and Galileo Galilei turned their telescopes to the heavens to reveal the moon, planets and stars, LASCOs 25-year mission has revealed the sun’s magnificence amazing scientists and researchers around the world. “This mission has been half of my professional career,” said Howard. “It has been an absolute joy to participate in creating the concept, building the instrument (with new or emerging technologies), analyzing the amazing data and seeing the result of the dedicated efforts of so many people during the preceding years and becoming such an important capability for the National Space Weather Program.” In addition to Howard and Battams, there are currently three scientists at NRL who were there at LASCO’s beginning. George Doschek, Ph.D., emeritus, who was the head of the Solar Terrestrial Relationships Branch when LASCO was launched. Astrophysicist Dennis Wang, and research physicist Clarence Korendyke, Ph.D. worked on developing LASCO. Nathan Rich, an aerospace engineer, came a few years after launch and worked on operations.

ABOUT THE U.S. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory is a scientific and engineering command dedicated to research that drives innovative advances for the Navy and Marine Corps from the seafloor to space and in the information domain. NRL is located in Washington, D.C., with major field sites in Stennis Space Center, Mississippi; Key West, Florida; and Monterey, California, and employs approximately 2,500 civilian scientists, engineers and support personnel.

Logistics Center in Yokosuka completes three-year pipeline project By Brandon Taylor

NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan

Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka joined with Gilbane Building Company to complete a pipeline repair project at Defense Fuel Service Point (DFSP) Hakozaki. The completion of this three-year repair project involving nearly 230 personnel was celebrated in a ribbon-cutting ceremony and adds another chapter of command successes during 2020—a year which put NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s products and services to the test in supporting mission partners throughout the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility during the COVID-19 pandemic. “As a team, we made history. This pipeline repair project at DFSP Hakozaki is the first major overhaul since World War II,” said Capt. Edward Pidgeon, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka commanding officer. “Our fuel

infrastructure is now more resilient than ever and is protected against even the toughest natural disasters.” The $46 million project installed 25 24ton seismic pipe anchors, enabling nine miles of pipeline to withstand total soil liquefaction in the event of a typhoon or tsunami. Further, integrity tests indicated the pipeline can endure an earthquake magnitude up to 9.0, after replacing degraded pipeline with more seismically resilient pipeline and expansion loops to provide pressure relief during pipeline flexing. These improvements will allow DFSP Hakozaki to continue to receive, store, handle and transfer petroleum products and bulk lube oil in the event of a natural disaster. In addition to the protections against natural hazards, DFSP Hakozaki refurbished 12 miles of pipeline, had 35% of existing pipes replaced and received a comprehensive inspection of all tanks and canals. This repair project is expected to extend system service life by 25 years.

Midoriko Morita Capt. Edward Pidgeon, center left, commanding officer of Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka, and Lt. Cmdr. Eric Martorano, center right, are joined by staff and a contractor from Gilbane Building Company during a ribbon cutting to celebrate the completion of a pipeline repair project at Defense Fuel Service Point Hakozaki, Nov. 20, 2020.

NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka is one of eight FLCs under Commander, NAVSUP. Headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, and employing a diverse, worldwide work-

force of more than 22,500 military and civilian personnel, NAVSUP’s mission is to provide supplies, services, and quality-oflife support to the Navy and joint warfighter.


B5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Marine Corps Sgt. Anthony L. Ortiz U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Sampson with Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Combat Logistics Regiment 2, conducts an operations check on a 310 Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle (310 SUGV) on Camp Dwyer, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, May 11, 2013. The 310 SUGV is a man-portable robot with dexterous manipulator and wearable controller for dismounted mobile operations.

NPS researchers, Marines explore the trust factor in human-machine teaming By Javier Chagoya

Naval Postgraduate School Public Affairs

MONTEREY, Calif.

Trust in autonomous systems to do what they are designed to do, and meant to do, is paramount before these systems can be confidently employed as an operational capability. In an era of Great Power Competition, where those who can field autonomous capabilities the fastest will have a distinct advantage, researchers at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) are exploring many of the fundamentals of autonomous systems, especially in the trust and confidence arena. On the eve of the COVID-19 pandemic, NPS researchers conducted a novel experiment with an autonomous robot in a simulated environment – with real Marines – seeking to understand just how confident the Marines were in the robot to complete its tasks in a combat environment. The NPS research team, comprised of Assistant Professor Mollie McGuire, Research Associate Christian Fitzpatrick and NPS student Marine Corps Maj. Dan Yurkovich, traveled to

Camp Lejeune, N.C., to research Yurkovich’s thesis, titled “HumanMachine Teaming,” using Camp Lajeune’s Combat Town Range and nearby Marines from the Advanced Infantry Training Battalion (AITB) as part of a testbed. This research was directly responsive to the Marine Corp’s 2018 Science and Technology Strategic Plan which has a key objective to pursue advanced robotic systems to support ground maneuvers. The experiment put the robot in an urban environment in the Combat Town Range, calling for the robot to conduct room clearing, which is one of the most common of tasks in an urban warfare environment, but also one of the most dangerous. For the experiment, the researchers employed the 310 Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle (SUGV), a man-portable robot intended for use by soldiers, combat engineers and mobile explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technicians to gather data for situational awareness in critical conditions. The Marines interfaced with the robot through a virtual gaming environment, created by NPS’ Modeling Virtual En-

vironments and Simulations Institute, where they “trained” the robot in its specific room clearing tasks and could then evaluate its effectiveness in accomplishing them from a “safe room” nearby. “The experiment aimed to see if introducing and training with the robot in a virtual environment would aid in developing trust with the actual robot,” said McGuire, who served as thesis advisor. “The experiment explored ways to develop trust in robotic teammates in a more efficient manner by using virtual environments instead of having Marines spend hours training with the robot itself.” McGuire noted that the objective was then to see if the Marines that “trained” the robot within the gaming environment had higher trust in the actual robot due to the potential forming of a “team dynamic” between man and machine – the robot learning human preferences, and the human learning robot capabilities. “The young Marines in our experiment had a high level of technical competence especially in the understanding of machine learning,” said

Fitzpatrick. “Some Marines [had questions about] our processes in the transfer of gaming data to the robot which indicated they were closely observing us as we were observing them.” According to Fitzpatrick, the team was able to collect good data across a range of measurements. “Gauging human-robot interaction with actual users was invaluable,” said Fitzpatrick. “Our conclusion was that if Marines are involved in the development and integration process from the start, they would trust the unmanned capability to a greater extent when using them during real-world operations.” McGuire explained that if this trend continues, it might suggest a positive relationship between training time and trust development between humans and their robot teammates. Yurkovich recently discovered that his original sponsor for this project, the Office of Naval Research, has incorporated some of his results into larger projects. He noted that other researchers are exploring the concept of rehearsals in virtual environment and how it transfers to live execution. The experimentation appears to be promising as developers and researchers are evolving models to a next generation virtual environment game play and further resolving it to the real-world, he added.

U.S. Warship USS Donald Cook completes Black Sea patrol Lt. j.g. Sarah Claudy and Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Will Hardy, USS Donald Cook Public Affairs MEDITERRANEAN SEA

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) began its south-bound international strait transit en route to the Mediterranean Sea after conducting Black Sea maritime security operations enhancing regional maritime stability, combined readiness, and naval capability with NATO allies and partners in the region, December 2, 2020. Donald Cook entered the Black Sea on Nov. 23, 2020, and conducted air defense exercises with NATO Air Command. A U.S. P-8A, Canadian CF-188s, and a NATO E3A AWACS were among the participants of the joint air maritime integrated mission, which fostered NATO interoperability. “Our Black Sea visit enhanced our relationships with NATO allies and other partners in the region,” said Cmdr. Kelley Jones, commanding officer of Donald Cook. “We are especially grateful for the Bulgarian hospitality we experienced in

MC3 William Hardy Sailors stand watch as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) arrives in Varna, Bulgaria, Nov. 25, 2020. Donald Cook, forward-deployed to Rota, Spain, is on its 11th patrol in the U.S. Sixth Fleet area of operations in support of regional allies and partners and U.S. national security in Europe and Africa.

Varna.” The crew partook in a Thanksgiving celebration on the pier during a brief stop for fuel in Varna, Bulgaria. Donald Cook is the seventh U.S. Navy ship to visit the Black Sea since the beginning of 2020. The Black Sea is a critical waterway for maritime commerce and stability throughout Europe. The U.S. Navy routinely operates in the Black Sea to work with our NATO Allies and partners, including Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Turkey, and Ukraine. It is in the world’s best interest to

maintain a stable, prosperous Black Sea region and deter aggressive actors who seek destabilization for their own gain. Donald Cook recently began its 11th patrol in U.S. Sixth Fleet in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa.The ship’s operations in the Black Sea strengthens interoperability among NATO allies and partners and demonstrate collective resolve to Black Sea security under Operation Atlantic Resolve. Four U.S. Navy destroyers, including Donald Cook, are based in Rota, Spain, and assigned to Commander, Task Force 65 in

support of NATO’s Integrated Air Missile Defense architecture. These Forward-Deployed Naval Forces-Europe ships have the flexibility to operate throughout the waters of Europe and Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope to the Arctic Circle, demonstrating their mastery of the maritime domain. U.S. Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.


B6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

MC3 Anthony Collier Sailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) pose with seized narcotics following a visit, board, search, and seizure operation in support of Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) Combined Task Force (CTF) 150 in the Arabian Sea, Dec. 4, 2020. CMF is a multinational maritime partnership which exists to counter illicit non-state actors on the high seas, promoting security, stability and prosperity in the Arabian Gulf, the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Indian Ocean and Gulf of Oman.

USS Ralph Johnson conducts maritime interdiction in North Arabian Sea From Combined Maritime Forces Public Affairs NORTH ARABIAN SEA

The guided-missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), deployed to U.S. Fifth Fleet and operating in support of the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), interdicted a shipment of more than 2,000lbs (900kgs) of suspected narcotics from a stateless dhow

in the international waters of the Arabian Sea, Dec. 4. This seizure, conducted in direct support of CMF’s Combined Task Force (CTF) 150, marks the fourth CMF drugs seizure since October. The narcotics are currently in U.S. custody awaiting analysis. To mitigate the risk of contracting and spreading COVID-19, the boarding team undertook carefully executed precautionary measures during and after the boarding, to include decontamination of all seized

Happy holidays to the brave military heroes we serve every day. Wherever you are. Your service is the greatest gift of all.

contraband. Ralph Johnson initially identified a dhow loitering without power in international waters. When the ship approached to determine if the dhow required assistance, they failed to produce flag registration documentation. A subsequent search discovered the narcotics. CMF is a multinational maritime partnership which exists to counter illicit non-state actors in international waters, promoting security, stability and prosperity in the Arabian Gulf, the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Indian Ocean and Gulf of Oman. CTF 150 conducts maritime security operations outside the Arabian Gulf to disrupt criminal and terrorist organizations, ensuring legitimate commercial shipping can transit the region, free from non-state threats. CTF 150 is currently led by the Royal Saudi Naval Force, the second time the country’s Navy has led the task force.

ADSINC.COM


B7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Collins The Seawolf-class fast attack submarine USS Seawolf (SSN 21) makes a routine port visit in Gibralter, Dec. 1, 2020. Seawolf is currently operating in the U.S. Sixth Fleet area of operations in support of regional allies and partners and U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa.

USS Seawolf visits Gibraltar From U.S. Sixth Fleet Public Affairs GIBRALTAR

The Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine USS Seawolf (SSN 21), conducted a scheduled port visit in Gibraltar, Dec. 1. The Pacific-based submarine is operating under the command and control of the commander, Submarine Group 8,

and commander, Task Force 69, to complement the undersea warfare capabilities of the U.S. Sixth Fleet. "USS Seawolf exemplifies dynamic flexibility and ensures maritime security and stability in the region,” said Vice Adm. Gene Black, commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet. “The crew’s technical and tactical expertise embodies the professionalism of the submarine force.” The crew will adhere to COVID

health guidelines and rules during their stay to ensure the health and safety of the local population and Sailors onboard the submarine. Seawolf was commissioned in 1997 and is the lead submarine of its class. USS Connecticut (SSN 22) and USS Jimmy Carter (SSN 23) comprise the rest of the class. Seawolf-class submarines are quiet, fast, well-armed, and equipped with advanced sensors.

Commander, Task Force 69 is responsible for submarine warfare operations in the USEUCOM and USAFRICOM Areas of Responsibility. Specifically, Task Force 69 is composed of attack submarines and guided missile submarines capable of destroying enemy surface ships and submarines. U.S. Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national security interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.

USS Sioux City completes successful deployment From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command / U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs

MAYPORT, Fla.

The Freedom-variant littoral combat ship USS Sioux City (LCS 11) returned to Mayport, Fla., Dec. 4, following its deployment to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations. Sioux City, along with the “Sea Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, Detachment 6, deployed on August 30, 2020 to conduct U.S. Southern Command and Joint Interagency Task Force South’s enhanced counter-narcotics operations missions in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific Ocean. During their deployment. Sioux City participated in a multi-lateral passing exercise (PASSEX) with the British River-class Corvette HMS Medway, and the Jamaican Coast Guard Cutter HMJS Nanny of the Maroons, a successful exercise displaying the capabilities of interoperability in the 4th Fleet area of operations. Along with their embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) 104, Sioux City disrupted approximately 2,120 kilograms of cocaine, which

has an estimated street value of 148 million dollars. In addition, Sioux City conducted a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) for a tanker in distress and completed multiple days of hurricane assistance and disaster relief in Honduras, collecting and delivering over 36,000 pounds of supplies in support of U.S. Southern Command’s Hurricane Iota relief efforts in Central America. While completing its mission, Sioux City travelled approximately 14, 000 nautical miles, visited six ports, and launched and recovered her embarked aircraft 304 times. “The success of this deployment is a direct reflection of the hard work that the Sioux City Sailors have put in over the past nine months,” said Cmdr. Dan Reiher, the commanding officer of Sioux City. “This deployment gives a new meaning to our motto of ‘Forging a New Frontier’, because we have begun to define the capabilities of Sioux City and Littoral Combat Ships as a whole.” Sioux City partnered with U.S. Navy and international warships, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Drug Enforcement Administration, FBI, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, as well as other allied partners and international agencies, all of which are playing a role in counter-narcotics opera-

MCSN Juel Foster The battle ensign as seen from the forecastle of the Freedom-variant littoral combat ship USS Sioux City (LCS 11) during a sea and anchor evolution, Sept. 11, 2020. Sioux City is deployed to the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility to support Joint Interagency Task Force South's mission, which includes counter illicit drug trafficking in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific.

tions in the area. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability,

and build enduring partnerships in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American region. Learn more about USNAVSO/4th Fleet at https://www.facebook.com/NAVSOUS4THFLT and @NAVSOUS4THFLT

SECNAV names future guided missile frigate USS Congress From SECNAV Public Affairs WASHINGTON

Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite announced Dec. 2 that the U.S. Navy’s second Constellation class guided-missile frigate will be named USS Congress (FFG 63). Braithwaite made the announcement during a hearing on Navy and Marine Corps Readiness with the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support on Capitol Hill. “To honor and recognize the work [Congress] and your staff do every day to support our Sailors and Marines, I take pleasure in announcing that a future frigate will carry the name Congress,” said Braithwaite. “The Department of the Navy looks to you for the strong oversight and partnership that has enabled our maritime strength ever since Congress authorized the construction of our first six ships -- the mighty American frigates of 1794.” The ship naming honors the rich history and legacy of the Navy. Congress was among the six original frigates authorized by Congress in the Naval Act of 1794, which established the U.S. Navy as an agile, lethal and ready

force and cemented the enduring partnership between the sea service and our nation’s elected legislative officials. Two naval vessels carried the name Congress during the American Revolution. The first was a row galley that served the Continental Navy during the war, and the second was a 28-gun frigate that was set afire while being outfitted to prevent her capture by the British. The third USS Congress was a 38-gun wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate launched in 1799. Her first duties with the newly formed United States Navy were to provide protection for American merchant shipping during the Quasi War with France and to defeat the Barbary pirates in the First Barbary War. The fourth naval vessel to carry the name Congress was a 52-gun frigate launched in 1841. She served in the Mediterranean, South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. She continued to operate as an American warship until the Civil War when she was sunk by the first ironclad CSS Virginia in battle of Newport News, Virginia. In 1868, the fifth USS Congress, a screw sloop was launched. The screw sloop moved the Navy toward the modern age, supporting POLARIS arctic mission and visiting the Philly centennial exposition in 1876. The sixth USS Congress (ID-3698), was built as a private fishing vessel before she was commissioned as a

patrol vessel during WWI. She was in commission from 1918 to 1919 carrying out miscellaneous patrol duties until she was stricken from the Navy List and sold. In October, Braithwaite announced USS Constellation as the name for the first ship in the new Constellation class of ships while aboard the museum ship Constellation in Baltimore Inner Harbor, Maryland. Constellation class frigates will be built at Marinette Marine Corporation in Marinette, Wisconsin with the first ship scheduled for delivery in 2026.


B8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

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7 $750 INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA, INC. AND MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACTS ON NEW TOYOTA VEHICLES, DATED FROM NOVEMBER 30, 2020 THROUGH JANUARY 4, 2021. TO QUALIFY FOR THE INCENTIVE, AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE OR LEASE YOU MUST (1) BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD; OR A MILITARY VETERAN OR RETIREE (RETIREES HONORABLY DISCHARGED) OF THE U.S. MILITARY WITHIN TWO YEARS OF THEIR DISCHARGE/RETIREMENT DATE; OR A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER OF AN ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL, INCLUDING GOLD STAR FAMILY MEMBERS; AND (2) PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE; (3) RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENT FOR YOUR NEW VEHICLE; AND (4) RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL FROM AND EXECUTE A FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. ON LEASE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. LIMIT ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION PER ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL OR ELIGIBLE HOUSEHOLD MEMBER. OFFER NOT COMBINABLE WITH THE COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM, THE IFI PROGRAM, AND THE LEASE-END REFI PROGRAM. VEHICLE MUST BE TAKEN OUT OF DEALER STOCK. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY. PROGRAM IS NOT AVAILABLE IN AL, FL, GA, HI, NC, AND SC. ASK YOUR PARTICIPATING DEALER ABOUT THE MILITARY INCENTIVE TERMS IN YOUR AREA. MUST PAY SALES TAX. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK OF TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. 2LOW MILEAGE LEASE. TERMS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH PARTICIPATING DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES (TFS). NOT ALL CUSTOMERS/ LESSEES QUALIFY. RAV4 LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 RAV4 LE FWD 2.5L 4-CYL MODEL 4430 WITH MSRP OF $27,225, CAPITALIZED COST OF $23,932, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $18,241. $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,120 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $229, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. $500 CASH FROM TMS MUST BE APPLIED AS A CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION (DOWN PAYMENT) THAT IS EXCLUDED FROM DUE AT SIGNING; NO CASH BACK OPTION. HIGHLANDER LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 HIGHLANDER LE 3.5L V6 8AT (AWD) MODEL 6948 WITH MSRP OF $39,865, CAPITALIZED COST OF $33,479, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $26,710. $3,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $3,040 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $309, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. $1,000 CASH FROM TMS MUST BE APPLIED AS A CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION (DOWN PAYMENT) THAT IS EXCLUDED FROM DUE AT SIGNING; NO CASH BACK OPTION. COROLLA LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 COROLLA 1.8L 4-CYL LE MODEL 1852 WITH MSRP OF $21,230, CAPITALIZED COST OF $17,681, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $12,950. $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,190 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $159, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. $500 CASH FROM TMS MUST BE APPLIED AS A CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION (DOWN PAYMENT) THAT IS EXCLUDED FROM DUE AT SIGNING; NO CASH BACK OPTION. ALL LEASES: DEALER CONTRIBUTION MAY VARY AND COULD AFFECT LEASE PAYMENT. INDIVIDUAL DEALER PRICES, OTHER TERMS AND OFFERS MAY VARY. MUST LEASE FROM PARTICIPATING DEALER’S STOCK AND TERMS ARE SUBJECT TO VEHICLE AVAILABILITY. LESSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAINTENANCE, EXCESS WEAR AND USE, AND WILL PAY $0.15 PER MILE FOR ALL MILEAGE OVER 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. $350 DISPOSITION FEE IS DUE AT LEASE END. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH TFS APR CASH, TFS LEASE CASH, CUSTOMER CASH, APR, APR SUBVENTION CASH. OFFER AVAILABLE IN DE, MD, PA, VA, WV REGARDLESS OF BUYER’S RESIDENCY; VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK USED BY TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. 3CUSTOMERS CAN RECEIVE $1000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON RAV4 (EXCLUDES HYBRIDS) AND TACOMA (EXCLUDES TRD PRO MODELS) OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. 4BONUS CASH FROM TOYOTA MOTOR SALES U.S.A., INC. ON THE LEASE OF A NEW 2021 HIGHLANDER FROM PARTICIPATING DEALER’S STOCK AND SUBJECT TO VEHICLE AVAILABILITY. MUST LEASE THROUGH YOUR DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES TO QUALIFY FOR CASH AND CASH MUST BE APPLIED AS CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION ON LEASE. THERE IS NO CASH BACK OPTION. LEASE TERMS ON APPROVED CREDIT. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS/LESSEES QUALIFY. 5VARIES BY MODEL. 0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS ON COROLLA; 0% APR FINANCING UP TO 72 MONTHS ON CAMRY AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX, TITLE, LICENSE AND DEALER FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67 AT 0% AND 72 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $13.89 AT 0% FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. 6CASH ALLOWANCE INCLUDES $1,000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA, WHICH CUSTOMERS MAY RECEIVE FROM TOYOTA OR APPLY TO DOWN PAYMENT, AND $1,000 BONUS CASH FROM TOYOTA (LE AND XLE HYBRID MODELS ONLY), WHICH WILL BE APPLIED TO DOWN PAYMENT. ALL OFFERS: OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE. DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. VEHICLE SHOWN MAY BE PROTOTYPE AND/OR SHOWN WITH OPTIONS. ACTUAL MODEL MAY VARY. DELIVERY MUST BE TAKEN FROM DEALER STOCK BY 1/4/21 AND IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS END 1/4/21. 7TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25,000 MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 24-HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE IS ALSO INCLUDED FOR 2 YEARS AND UNLIMITED MILES. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS AND EXCLUSIONS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS, EXCEPT EMERGENCY FUEL DELIVERY. 1


C2 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

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nSubmit YOUR events, news and photos The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

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PRIORITY AUTOMOTIVE TO HELP HUNDREDS OF SHELTER PETS FIND HOMES DURING THE HOLIDAYS From Priority Automotive CHESAPEAKE, VA.

For the 12th straight year, Priority Automotive is teaming up with local animal shelters to find homes for shelter pets during the holiday season. Starting December 5, Priority will pay half of the adoption fees at four area shelters to help families and individuals reduce the initial cost of bringing a new pet home. Priority has committed $40,000 to the effort. The pro-

gram will continue through New Year’s, or until the funds run out. “Finding homes for shelter pets during the holidays has become a Priority family tradition,” said Priority Automotive President Dennis Ellmer. “These wonderful animals need homes, and there are many loving homes across Hampton Roads ready to make them part of their family.” Last year, the program helped 366 Hampton Roads pets find forever homes. On the Peninsula, 76 animals were adopted with Priority’s help. On

the Southside, 290 animals were adopted from shelters in Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Chesapeake, with 35 pets adopted in a single day on Dec. 19 -- a Home for the Holidays record. COVID-19 restrictions have led to some changes this year. At the Peninsula SPCA, adoptive families are asked to make online appointments and schedule a time to see adoptable pets at the shelter. At the three participating Southside shelters, adoptions are being handled on a first-come, first-served basis, with capacity restrictions lim-

iting the number of people allowed into the shelter at one time. Participating shelter locations are as follows: • Virginia Beach SPCA - 3040 Holland Road • Norfolk SPCA - 916 Ballentine Boulevard • Chesapeake Animal Services - 2100 S. Military Highway • Peninsula SPCA - 523 J Clyde Morris Blvd. “The Priority family is a true partner in our effort to find homes for all of our deserving animals. Through their generosity, we are able to place our animals with loving individuals and families just in time for the Holidays. It is indeed a time that brings light to giving back – to both our animals and our community,” said Derby Brackett, Chief Executive Officer of the Virginia Beach SPCA.

Locals Helping Locals Launches APP for Hampton Roads From Locals Helping Locals VIRGINIA BEACH, VA.

If you are looking to shop local, but have a hard time knowing where to go, worry no more because there’s an app for that! Locals Helping Locals teamed up with Anchor’s Media to release an app on December 4th, 2020. The goal is to make it easier for the Hampton Roads community to find and support local businesses in the area. The app is available in the Apple store and Google Play Store. There is no cost associated with downloading the app.

Courtesy image/

The app features a directory of all local businesses, events in the area, news, and most importantly offers from each business! “I love supporting small, locally owned businesses and this app puts them all in one place. It’s hard to go on Google Maps and type in local businesses because you really won’t find what you’re looking for,” Founder Conrad Brinkman Stated. There are currently more than a dozen

local businesses participating on the app. Brinkman said that if any local business would like to check out the group and app to email localshelpinglocals757@gmail.com The app has been downloaded more than 250 times this weekend during the launch and Brinkman says the group set a goal of 5,000 by January. For more information about Locals Helping Locals, visit our Facebook page

or Instagram Page (@localshelpinglocasl757) or call Conrad Brinkman, Founder at (757) 803-8366. Locals Helping Locals was founded by Conrad Brinkman in May 2020 during the Pandemic. After local businesses came together to help with a blood drive and food drive, he wanted to keep that momentum going! He meets with the group every Thursday at 1PM via zoom and has yet to skip a week!


C3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Courtesy Photo/

This Holiday Season, Doctors Urge Public to Make Safety a Top Priority From Statepoint

With COVID-19 infections at an alltime high, medical experts urge the public to make safety their number one priority throughout the holiday season. “Nearly a year into this pandemic, people are yearning for a return to normalcy. However, COVID-19 cases are surging and with flu season already upon us, bringing together people from different households during the holidays is far too great a safety risk,” says Susan R. Bailey, M.D., president of the American Medical Association (AMA).

During this unusual year, the AMA is sharing top tips for a safe and healthy holiday season: 1. It may not be the way you’re used to celebrating, but consider limiting this year’s gatherings to just the people who live in your household. 2. If you live somewhere warm, you may be able to add a few people to your plans, but only if your get together is outdoors and safely physically distant. 3. Take advantage of the video conferencing technologies available at your fingertips to bridge the distance between you and family or friends. Whether it’s watching holiday movies,

unwrapping gifts or sharing recipes together, many of these traditions can still happen virtually. 4. Interested in holiday deals and discounts? Shop for bargains from home. And if you must go to the store in person and you’re at-risk, check ahead of time to see if there are special hours for you. 5. Consider additional outdoor activities that can bring together other people in your circle without the dangers of dining inside. Go apple picking, leaf peeping or hiking. Think beyond the traditional holiday activities and start new traditions.

6. Disappointed that your usual large dinner is for a smaller group? You can still cook a large meal and share a portion with neighbors or friends. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends “delivering them in a way that doesn’t involve contact with others.” 7. Continue to follow everyday safety guidelines to prevent the spread of COVID-19: wash your hands, maintain physical distancing and #MaskUp. More health resources, along with tips to prevent the spread of COVID-19, are available at ama-assn.org. “Missing holiday traditions is difficult, but with top scientists and researchers working round the clock to combat this virus, I’m hopeful that by this time next year, friends and family will be together again, one way or another,” says Dr. Bailey.

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C4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

Food

Mike Garten/

Red Velvet Cookies | This easy cookie recipe is a real showstopper. By Kate Merker

A spin on your classic chocolate chip cookie recipe, these red velvet cookies are studded with rich chocolate chips and colored a vibrant red. This recipe, inspired by a red velvet cake, takes minutes to prepare and bake, and makes enough cookies for the whole family! Instead of opting for a recipe with white chocolate chips and cream cheese, this one doubles down on the chocolate flavor (using both semi-sweet chips and rich cocoa powder), to make a cookie that every chocolate dessert-lover will adore.

For their signature red color, the Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen loves to use gel food coloring, which adds a vibrant hue without the moisture or a regular food dye. The mixture of cocoa powder and red food coloring turns a classic cookie recipe into a fun and festive sweet treat. While they make a super Valentine’s Day Dessert (they’re the perfect color, after all!) these red velvet cookies should be added to your baking recipe arsenal for any time of year. And instead of making red velvet cookies with cake mix, these super easy delights will impress your whole family when they find out you

made them from scratch. Now all you need is a glass of milk! Ingredients • 2 c. all-purpose flour • 1/2 c. Dutch process cocoa powder • 1 tsp. baking soda • 1 tsp. kosher salt • 1 c. (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature • 3/4 c. packed brown sugar • 1/2 c. granulated sugar • 1 large egg • 1 tsp. red gel paste food coloring • 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract • 1 12-oz pkg semisweet chocolate chips

Directions Heat oven to 350°F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. In large bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt. Using electric mixer on medium speed, beat together butter and sugars until combined. Add egg, food coloring and vanilla and mix until just combined. Reduce mixer speed to low and add flour mixture until just combined. Fold in chocolate chips. Scoop heaping spoonfuls of dough onto prepared sheets, spacing 1½ inches apart. Bake cookies, rotating positions of pans on racks halfway through, until darker around edges, 9 to 12 minutes total. Let cool 5 minutes on pans, then slide parchment (and cookies) onto wire rack and let cool at least 5 minutes more before serving.

Beef Wellington | Turn a center-cut beef tenderloin into a seriously show-stopping dish. By Kate Merker

Introducing the next show-stopping centerpiece to your Sunday dinner: a perfectly cooked Beef Wellington. This statement standout looks seriously impressive, but is a lot easier to make than you’d think. Once you learn how to make Beef Wellington, you’ll be serving this stunner all year long. If you cook this masterpiece correctly — with our instructions, you definitely will! — this main course, a great Christmas dinner idea, doesn’t need a Beef Wellington sauce. The center-cut beef tenderloin is seared then coated with salty and spicy Dijon mustard. To keep the puff pastry case crisp on the outside, we then wrap the mustard-coated beef in flavorful prosciutto spread with duxelles (a flavor-packed mixture of mushrooms, shallots and thyme). This ensures plenty of flavor without a soggy crust. The meat then gets wrapped in store-bought puff pastry (we love Dufour Classic Puff Pastry), then scored and baked for a golden-brown presentation. Ingredients • 2 tbsp. olive oil • 2 lb center-cut beef tenderloin, tied with twine • Kosher salt and pepper • 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter • 2 shallots, finely chopped • 1 lb. mixed mushrooms, trimmed • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped • 2 tsp. fresh thyme leaves • 1 tbsp. dry sherry or brandy • 10 to 12 thin slices prosciutto • 14 oz. puff pastry, thawed • 1 large egg Directions Heat oil in a large skillet on medium-high. Season beef with ¾ tsp each salt and pepper, then cook until browned on all sides, 5 to 7 minutes total. Transfer to a plate, let rest 5

minutes, then remove twine and brush with mustard. Wipe out skillet, then add butter and heat on medium-low. Add shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes. Meanwhile, to a food processor, add mushrooms and pulse to finely chop. Increase heat under skillet to medium, add mushrooms to shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms have released their liquid, about 5 minutes. Continue cooking, stirring often, until mushrooms have browned, 12 to 15 minutes more. Stir in garlic and thyme and cook 2 minutes. Stir in sherry and cook until nearly dry, 15 seconds. Transfer to a plate. Overlap 3 sheets of plastic wrap on a work surface. Place prosciutto on top, overlapping to make roughly a 12- by 7-inch rectangle. Spread mushroom mixture evenly over prosciutto. Place beef tenderloin on the bottom edge of mushrooms and carefully roll tenderloin in mushroom-prosciutto layer, using the plastic wrap to help tighten it as you roll. Once it is completely rolled, wrap in plastic, twisting the ends to make sure it is very tight. Refrigerate 15 minutes. Heat oven to 400°F. On a lightly floured surface, unfold puff pastry and roll to a rectangle about 3 inches wider than the beef roll on the shortest side. Unwrap beef, and place log along the edge of the long side of pastry. Brush edges of puff pastry with beaten egg. Roll the beef in the puff pastry to cover completely. Fold ends of puff pastry like a present to cover ends and pinch to seal and folding underneath. Place on baking sheet seam side down. Brush top and sides of pastry with egg, then use a small sharp knife to cut a few slits into the top of the pastry. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center reads 120°F degrees for rare, 30 to 35 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes, then slice and serve while warm.

Mike Garten/


C5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

I Am Navy Medicine: Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Shelby M. Foster by Douglas Stutz

Naval Hospital Bremerton

In the middle of October, a patient’s routine visit to Naval Hospital Bremerton (NHB) took a potential lost turn. Upon arriving home, the patient soon discovered his retired military identification card was nowhere to be found. Assuming it had somehow been misplaced during his time at the pharmacy or on the quarterdeck, he contacted NHB inquiring if anyone had found it and turned it in. On duty at the time replying to the phone call was Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Shelby M. Foster. She gathered the necessary details and replied that she would check for the missing ID card. “The individual contacted Security and was upset he lost his ID and provided a few different locations he visited in the hospital earlier that day,” said Foster. After being relieved from watch, Foster retraced the patient’s steps through the command’s pharmacy and across the quarterdeck to no avail. No ID card. “I then scanned those locations he specified with no luck,” Foster said. Not one to simply stop there, Foster immediately took the initiative to expand her search parameters to the multiple, adjacent patient parking areas. “I figured it was a possibility he may have lost it in the parking lot. I began searching surrounding patient parking and was able to locate it in the Mt. Baker parking lot,” shared Foster. It was approximately 45 minutes after receiving the phone call that Foster called the patient back to inform him of the good news. “I contacted this individual and told him we would do everything we could to get him his ID returned back to him. He was pleasantly pleased with my efforts and ended up writing a letter to the commanding officer stating how pleased he was with my outstanding customer service. He went on to state I went ‘above and beyond, and confirms the professionalism that I have experienced at the hospital.’ It was an amazing feeling knowing that I made his day. Even though I was just doing my job I still really appreciated his gratitude,” commented Foster. As a result of her selfless attention to detail and professional resourcefulness, Foster was recognized by Capt. Shannon J.

Johnson, NHB/Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Bremerton commanding officer. “The commanding officer generously presented me a ‘character, competence and compassion’ coin for ‘going above and beyond’ to locate the individual’s lost retired military identification card,” said Foster. For the born and raised Fort Wayne, Ind. native, the recent snippet of such service before self has been a hallmark of her Navy career of nine and a half years which began after graduating from Southside High School in 2011. “I played a ton of sports and graduated with honors. I was in the delayed entry program for a majority of my senior year of high school prior to shipping off. I barely left the area until I joined the military. Immediately following boot camp I went to (Navy) master-at-arms ‘A’ school at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. I met my husband there and we have been happily married for almost seven years now. We have three beautiful children Bentley, age 7, Aston, age 5, and Royce, age 3. We also have two dogs, Cain, a German shepherd and Cooper, a pomchi,” shared Foster. Her Navy career has taken her to the Far East, assigned to Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba in the Caribbean, at California’s central valley at Naval Air Station Lemoore, and now in the Pacific Northwest. “Like most young kids that come into the military, I wanted to join the Navy to travel and get an education,” Foster remarked. As part of the Navy’s master-at-arms rating, Foster is responsible for such duties as waterborne and land security, aircraft and flight line security, strategic weapons and cargo security, maritime security and platform protection; conducting customs operations, corrections operations, detainee operations, and protective service operations. She performs force protection, physical security and law enforcement; organizes and trains personnel in force protection, physical security, law enforcement, and weapons proficiency; develops plans for physical security and force protection enhancement of Navy commands and personnel; and assists commands in conducting terrorist threat analysis and

Douglas H Stutz/ A small act making a big impactMaster-at-Arms 2nd Class Shelby M. Foster, a Ft. Wayne, Ind. native assigned to Naval Hospital Bremerton, was recently recognized for her selfless professionalism and personal initiative by helping a patient in need of timely assistance. Such action on her part is indicative of her naval career, which has taken her from the Far East to Caribbean to California to currently stationed in the Pacific Northwest

implementing defensive measures. She is currently the Security Watch Commander at NHB, where she’s been assigned for the last year and a half. “I have worn many hats in my naval career. From basic sentry to watch commander to various administrative positions, to field training officer, to my favorite position, which was the anti-terrorism training team coordinator for Guantanamo Bay Naval Base,” Foster said. She also currently holds such collateral duty jobs as Sexual Assault Prevention and Response victim advocate, Basic Life Support program instructor and command decontamination (DECON) team member ready to response to any radiological or nuclear incident. Her leadership on the DECON team have also been noticed by command leadership. “My role during the DECON training was team lead for one of the two groups. I assigned jobs, formulated a plan for our initial set-up and assisted my team throughout the whole process. At the end of the training the lead instructors presented me with a coin. It was a very fun experience and I had an amazing team. I couldn’t have done it without all of their

hard work and dedication,” Foster said. Like the rest of her command counterparts, Foster has also been routinely involved in helping to stop the spread of COVID-19. “My role is to ensure patients, visitors and staff are following the COVID-19 safety guidelines. Back in March I was lucky enough to go on mission to [Navy hospital ship] USNS Mercy (T-AH-19) that ported in Los Angeles to relieve the local hospitals in the area. I provided security and assisted with patient transports on and off the ship.” “We are (all) first responders,” continued Foster. “It is our job to assist others. We have so many different trainings under our belt that we could be placed anywhere and be able to provide a helping hand.” Foster attests that the best part about her career so far revolves around her shipmates and marriage. “The friends I have met and family I have gained along the way are the best part about my time in the Navy,” exclaimed Foster. “The job is interesting and my experiences have been fascinating but without my gained family those experiences wouldn’t be as awesome.”

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C6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

ReligiousSales Announcements Estate

Misc. Merchandise For Sale

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

TALBOT PARK BAPTIST CHURCH DRIVE-BY “LIVING NATIVITY” 12-13 DECEMBER, 6-8 PM Please join us for a long-standing tradition in Talbot Park! View the Nativity scene as your drive by the church in the 3rd lane along Granby St. Church location is 6919 Granby St., Norfolk

FUR COAT Ladie’s Fox & Leather, Medium, Excellent, $225. 757-481-2616

LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPS AKC, Yellow, 2M available for Christmas, 1F, 2M available for New Years, will have 1st shots/worming, health guarantee, $600, 252-883-6148, currently accepting $200 deposits to hold for Christmas and New Years

YORKIPOOS

PURE BRED AKITA PUPPIES I have a nice big boned litter of Akita puppies. These pups are AKC registered Championship blood line.$1500 Parents on Premise. (757) 768-8283

Misc. Merchandise For Sale Announcements

CAST IRON WOOD BURNING STOVE: 31.5 inch W, 23.5 inch H, 16 inch Deep, $300. Call: 757-392-1483

OFFICER NOMINATION FOE Aerie 3204 nominations of Aerie Trustees on December 17, 2020. Elections on January 7, 2021.

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Fridays in The Pilot

FIREWOOD FOR SALE $170/Cord, Delivery Available Call: 757-478-9914 FIREWOOD FOR SALE $170/Cord, Delivery Available Call: 757-478-9914

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets BOXER PUPPIES AKC, 4 males, 4 females. Brindles & Fawns. Ready 12/27/20. Parents on site. $750. 252-702-4767 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES Beautiful purebred light golden, golden and fox red. Parents on site. Available January. 24th $950 Call Jeffrey @ 804-221-5485

9 wks, home raised, vet checked, UTD. $1350. 978-846-9449

SHIH TZU PUPS 10 wks AKC Reg’d 1st Shots & Dewormed, Ready For Christmas. $1200. Call: 757-692-1309

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Room For Rent VIRGINIA BEACH Private Ent. & Bathroom $650 incl all utils & cable, pet ok 757-717-0129

757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com S & H ENTERPRISE 20 YRS. Concrete Exp. All types of concrete work driveways, stamped & exposed. We accept credit cards. 757-652-4050. www.shabazznva.com

Electricians

Care For The Elderly

ANY ELECTRICAL 498-2653 10% OFF ABSOLUTELY ANY JOB. Free Estimates $100 OFF ANY BREAKER BOX. COLE ELECTRIC - 498-2653

Handyman Services HEALTH & SPIRITUAL CARE PROVIDER For elderly or special needs. 757-287-9561

★GENERAL REPAIRS★ AFFORDABLE SAME DAY REPAIR All Handyman, Int & Ext: Flooring, Bathrooms, Small Jobs, Remodel, Rot Repair. 30 Yrs. Exp. BBB A+ Rating. Fall prices! 757-430-2612.

Concrete/Asphalt Estate Sales

Hauling

DRIVEWAYS/CONCRETE WORK RICHARDS 757-869-0380 DRIVEWAYS FOUNDATION REPAIR, ADDITIONS, SIDEWALKS, RGSPROS.COM

Home Improvements ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 ANY AND ALL TYPES HOME REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS Windows, Siding, Custom Decks & More! BBB A+ Rated. FREE estimates! Call ECH Company: 757-435-1900 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating BRICK & STONE REPAIRS Steps, Walls, Foundations, etc. Virginia Beach Native. Masonry Contract. 40+ yrs Known As Stone Smith USA. Semi-Retired - A Legend In His Own Mind! Earl Smith 757-2700578. You Won’t Find A Better Man!

(A) FAMILY TRASH MAN-HOUSEHOLD, Demo inside & out, construction sites, dumpster drop off, backhoe work. We haul it all! 20 yrs. exp., lic & ins. 485-1414 B & J MOVING Reasonable Rates, Licensed & Insured. bandjmoving.com 757-576-1290

CRAWL SPACE REPAIRS Richard’s Crawl Space Repairs - Vapor Barriers - Joist Repair- Girder Repairs - Foundation Repairs 757-869-0380 RGSPROS.COM/ SEWAGEPROS.COM

YOUR PERFECT

HIRE

IS WAITING

D & W GARAGES 20x24’ $15,995; 24x24’ $17,995; 24x30’ $20,995; w/Slab & Vinyl Siding. 465-0115 or 362-1833. dandwgarages.com

FOR ALL YOUR LANDSCAPING GIVE US A CALL Fall Clean Ups. Renovations, monthly maintenance, mulching, shrub trimming seeding, aeration. Buddy 757-535-0928

FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Small & large jobs. Lic/Ins. Low Prices. BBB A+ RATING 757-227-8964

LEAF RAKING AND CLEANUP Yard Work, Weed Control, Mulching, Trimming, Planting, Transplanting of Shrubbery and Trees. 25 yrs exp. Call 757-918-4152

RICHARD’S / RGSPROS.COM PLUMBING REPAIRS/CLOGGED DRAINS/JETTER SERVICES/ KITCHENS/BATHROOMS/ ADDITIONS/ROOFLEAKS/ HANDYMAN REPAIRS/CRAWL SPACE REPAIRS/VAPOR BARRIERS/SEWAGEPROS.COM 24 HR SERVICES/757-869-0380 CALL RICH ANYTIME WE’RE HERE TO HELP

Lawn and Tree Service AMERICANTREESERVICE.CO ★Catering to all your tree & yard needs.★ ★100% Price Match Guarantee★ ★24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES★ ★Norfolk, Virginia Beach, & Chesapeake★ ★757-587-9568. 30 years experience★

PARKER TREE SERVICE Mulch, trim shrubs, landscaping. Free Estimates. 757-620-9390

YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING, MULCH & WOOD FENCE REPAIR Weed eating, Blowing, Bushes & Mulch, Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Roofing CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs -business, BBB 757-377-2933

ROOF REPAIR Shingles, tar, rubber, slate, metal, asbestos removal. 757-718-1072

ROOFING SALE 30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Lic’d & Ins’d. (757) 345-9983.

Miscellaneous Services Plumbing ★HONEST PLUMBING ANY & ALL PLUMBING SEWER & DRAIN CLOGS WATER HEATERS & FAUCETS (757)510-5970

ADORABLE PUPPIES SMALL*MEDIUM*LARGE FINANCING AVAILABLE 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH GIFT BAG WITH EVERY PET LIMITED TIME OFFER CALL NOW 757-431-3647 www.pet-go-round.com

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jobs.pilotonline.com


C7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020 Autos for Sale

Autos for Sale

HONDA 2017 CIVIC

NISSAN 2011 ALTIMA

4 door, auto, AC, cruise, power windows & locks, back up camera, Honda warranty, excellent condition! 27K miles. $14,000 Call: 757-351-5611

HYUNDAI 2010 GENESIS COUPE

3.8liter, leather interior XM radio, Brembo brakes, 1 owner, $4500 obo 757-701-5250

Autos for Sale

MERCEDES-BENZ 2004 SLKCLASS

CHEVROLET 2005 CORVETTE

18,000 mis., 1 owner, super charged, $20,000 in upgrades, car cover, showroom new, $25,900. Call 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

CHRYSLER 2000 CONCORDE

110k miles, serviced regularly, runs & drives great! $3,000. 757-676-3635 Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

320. 56K mis., 1 owner, convertible hardtop, leather, showroom new, $9400. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

NISSAN 2011 VERSA

92k miles, 32-34 mpg, 4 dr, great running shape. $3,600. 757-816-8369 Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Classic, Antique Cars

Wanted Automotive

FORD 1989 BRONCO

AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. TOP DOLLAR, FAST, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 701-3361

4X4, XLT, 5.8 L, best engine, 114k loaded, both tops/hard tops & New enclsd canvas tops, new insp, EC, new tires, $16,500 OBO. 757-286-3858

INTERNATIONAL 1962

63,000 miles. Clean. Serviced. $7900. 757-439-0582. Va Dlr

TOYOTA 2017 CAMRY

LE 4 cycl, auto, AC, cruise, backup cam, pwr seats/windows/locks, 27K mi, excellent condition! Toyota Warranty. $16,500 Call: 757-351-5611

TOYOTA 2019 AVALON

XLE Package, 9,000 original mis., factory warranty, leather, sunroof, $29,800. 757-675-0288, Va. Dlr.

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Travelall. 9 pass, 26K original mis., air, 100% new, constant show winner, fuel injected, disc brakes. Call for details 757-675-0288, Va. Dlr.

Trucks and SUVs

LOOKING TO BUY OLD FOREIGN CAR PROJECT In any condition! Rusty? Non running? OK! Porsche, Jaguar, Mercedes, Ferrari, Maserati & more! Fast & easy transaction. If you have any of these or any other foreign cars sitting around please call Adam: 203-5077900

Good news. Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Boats & Watercraft

FORD 2010 F-150

“RAPTOR”. Gar. Kept, runs & drives great, new insp, all serviced, 4WD, $25,900. 757-675-0288, Va. Dlr.

USED TRAILER SALE!!! OVER 100 Avail. For Boats 12’-38’ BUDGET BOATS: (757) 543 -7595

Wanted Automotive

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today.

ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035

Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Don’t pay full price! With The Virginian-Pilot’s coupons and sales inserts, shop smart and save big every week!

Fun and Games

Sudoku

Last week’s CryptoQuip answer I suppose you might call the person in charge of a robbery the commender-in-thief.

last week's answers

Religious Services For your installation’s religious service times, visit www.flagshipnews.com/ base_information/religious_services


C8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 12.10.2020

94 cents of every dollar supports programs and services for local military families.

Profile for Military News

Flagship 12.10.2020  

Flagship 12.10.2020