Flagship 12.02.21

Page 1

www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

Child Care Access

The DOD is working hard to find new ways to ensure that those who need child care can get it, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for military community and family policy said.PAGE A2 VOL. 28, NO. 47, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

December 2-December 8, 2021

BIDENS SHARE ‘FRIENDSGIVING’ DINNER WITH FORT BRAGG TROOPS, FAMILIES

President Joe Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at Fort Bragg, N.C., Nov. 22. (COURTESY PHOTO)

By Todd Lopez

DOD Public Affairs

President Joe Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden enjoyed a “Friendsgiving” dinner with troops and their families last night at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The president and first lady touched on the upcoming holidays and the struggles endured by military families — struggles which are often amplified when service members are deployed during family-focused holidays. “I want to thank your families because they stand and wait,” the president told service members. “I know how hard it is to have someone who’s not at the table on a holiday — that are in harm’s way, that find themselves out of the country.” The president said that he and the first lady are aware of the struggles of having a family member away during the holidays

President Joe Biden speaks to soldiers during a ‘Friendsgiving’ dinner at Fort Bragg, N.C., Nov. 22. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Two CLF ships served as the logistics arm during CSG 8’s COMPTUEX

Secretary Austin Travels to Republic of Korea, California By DOD Public Affairs

ships performed exactly as they were designed to do, which is to increase the delivery capability to provide food, fuel, spare parts, ammunition and portable water to both U.S. Navy and allied ships at sea.” Getting the force to the “fight at the right place and at the right time” is the true essence

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III departs on an overseas trip Tuesday, November 30 to meet Republic of Korea senior government leaders and visit U.S. troops in Korea and California. Secretary Austin will meet with ROK Minister of Defense Suh Wook for the 53rd U.S.-Republic of Korea Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) and visit U.S. troops on the peninsula. The annual Security Consultative Meeting has played a pivotal role in the development of the U.S.-ROK Alliance. The SCM continues to be a cornerstone venue to discuss and affirm national commitments. Both sides are expected to pledge to continue to develop the Alliance—the linchpin of peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia—in a mutually reinforcing and future-oriented manner. In California, Austin will deliver the keynote address at the 2021 Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley. RNDF offers the defense community a chance to come together to discuss and

Turn to CLF, Page 7

Turn to Secretary Austin, Page 7

By Lashawn Sykes

Military Sealift Command Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Military Sealift Command’s Combat Logistics Force (CLF) fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195) served as the logistics arm, responsible for resupplying Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8’s flag ship, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and its allied ships, during CSG 8’s Composite Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 30 — Oct. 26, 2021. “This exercise provided a unique opportunity for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group to enhance multilateral warfighting capabilities and to fortify mil-to-mil relations with our allied partner, the Royal Norwegian Navy. Training events such as these send a clear message that we can provide flexible capabilities to promote security, stability, freedom of navigation, and the

Military Sealift Command’s fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195) served as the logistics arm, responsible for resupplying Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8’s flag ship, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and its allied ships, during CSG 8’s Composite Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 30 – Oct. 26, 2021. (COURTESY PHOTO)

free flow of commerce anywhere on the globe,” said Rear Adm. Curt Renshaw, commander, Carrier Strike Group 8. While the Navy warships provided the might for COMPTUEX, Supply and Grumman supplied the logistics arm that enabled the battle group to remain underway and on station, said Capt. Keith A. Walzak, master of USNS Leroy Grumman. “Working in tandem, the two CLF

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because their son, Beau, served as a major in the Delaware National Guard and was away during the 2008 holidays on a yearlong deployment to Iraq. “You do so much, and your families give so much,” Biden told service members. “You’re the ... finest military that the world has ever seen.” Through the “Joining Forces” initiative, the first lady has made military families a major focal point of her time in the White House, both now and when her husband served as vice president. Joining Forces is an initiative to support the families of service members, veterans, caregivers and survivors. “I know what it’s like to see that empty seat at the table and ... just how hard it is for the families,” the first lady said. “I want to thank all of you. That’s why we came to have dinner with you, to say ‘thank you’ to you. We’re so grateful for everything that you do.”

Norfolk Naval Shipyard held a “drive-thru”style Apprentice Graduation Nov. 23 at Scott Center Annex in Portsmouth, Va., celebrating the achievements of the graduates becoming journeymen in their trades. PAGE A3

ONR Chief

GPS

Declaring“Our time to innovate is now,” Chief of Naval Research (CNR) Rear Adm. Lorin C. Selby last week introduced a new vision for future naval power. PAGE A6

In late September, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global selected and co-funded with the U.S. Army Development Command the winning proposal of its second annual Global-X Challenge. PAGE A5

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

Child Care Access

The DOD is working hard to find new ways to ensure that those who need child care can get it, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for military community and family policy said.PAGE A2 VOL. 28, NO. 47, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

December 2-December 8, 2021

BIDENS SHARE ‘FRIENDSGIVING’ DINNER WITH FORT BRAGG TROOPS, FAMILIES

President Joe Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at Fort Bragg, N.C., Nov. 22. (COURTESY PHOTO)

By Todd Lopez

DOD Public Affairs

President Joe Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden enjoyed a “Friendsgiving” dinner with troops and their families last night at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The president and first lady touched on the upcoming holidays and the struggles endured by military families — struggles which are often amplified when service members are deployed during family-focused holidays. “I want to thank your families because they stand and wait,” the president told service members. “I know how hard it is to have someone who’s not at the table on a holiday — that are in harm’s way, that find themselves out of the country.” The president said that he and the first lady are aware of the struggles of having a family member away during the holidays

President Joe Biden speaks to soldiers during a ‘Friendsgiving’ dinner at Fort Bragg, N.C., Nov. 22. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Two CLF ships served as the logistics arm during CSG 8’s COMPTUEX

Secretary Austin Travels to Republic of Korea, California By DOD Public Affairs

ships performed exactly as they were designed to do, which is to increase the delivery capability to provide food, fuel, spare parts, ammunition and portable water to both U.S. Navy and allied ships at sea.” Getting the force to the “fight at the right place and at the right time” is the true essence

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III departs on an overseas trip Tuesday, November 30 to meet Republic of Korea senior government leaders and visit U.S. troops in Korea and California. Secretary Austin will meet with ROK Minister of Defense Suh Wook for the 53rd U.S.-Republic of Korea Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) and visit U.S. troops on the peninsula. The annual Security Consultative Meeting has played a pivotal role in the development of the U.S.-ROK Alliance. The SCM continues to be a cornerstone venue to discuss and affirm national commitments. Both sides are expected to pledge to continue to develop the Alliance—the linchpin of peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia—in a mutually reinforcing and future-oriented manner. In California, Austin will deliver the keynote address at the 2021 Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley. RNDF offers the defense community a chance to come together to discuss and

Turn to CLF, Page 7

Turn to Secretary Austin, Page 7

By Lashawn Sykes

Military Sealift Command Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Military Sealift Command’s Combat Logistics Force (CLF) fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195) served as the logistics arm, responsible for resupplying Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8’s flag ship, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and its allied ships, during CSG 8’s Composite Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 30 — Oct. 26, 2021. “This exercise provided a unique opportunity for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group to enhance multilateral warfighting capabilities and to fortify mil-to-mil relations with our allied partner, the Royal Norwegian Navy. Training events such as these send a clear message that we can provide flexible capabilities to promote security, stability, freedom of navigation, and the

Military Sealift Command’s fleet replenishment oiler USNS Leroy Grumman (T-AO 195) served as the logistics arm, responsible for resupplying Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8’s flag ship, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and its allied ships, during CSG 8’s Composite Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 30 – Oct. 26, 2021. (COURTESY PHOTO)

free flow of commerce anywhere on the globe,” said Rear Adm. Curt Renshaw, commander, Carrier Strike Group 8. While the Navy warships provided the might for COMPTUEX, Supply and Grumman supplied the logistics arm that enabled the battle group to remain underway and on station, said Capt. Keith A. Walzak, master of USNS Leroy Grumman. “Working in tandem, the two CLF

Drive-Thru Graduation

www.flagshipnews.com

www.facebook.com/ The.Flagship

www.twitter.com/ the_flagship

because their son, Beau, served as a major in the Delaware National Guard and was away during the 2008 holidays on a yearlong deployment to Iraq. “You do so much, and your families give so much,” Biden told service members. “You’re the ... finest military that the world has ever seen.” Through the “Joining Forces” initiative, the first lady has made military families a major focal point of her time in the White House, both now and when her husband served as vice president. Joining Forces is an initiative to support the families of service members, veterans, caregivers and survivors. “I know what it’s like to see that empty seat at the table and ... just how hard it is for the families,” the first lady said. “I want to thank all of you. That’s why we came to have dinner with you, to say ‘thank you’ to you. We’re so grateful for everything that you do.”

Norfolk Naval Shipyard held a “drive-thru”style Apprentice Graduation Nov. 23 at Scott Center Annex in Portsmouth, Va., celebrating the achievements of the graduates becoming journeymen in their trades. PAGE A3

ONR Chief

GPS

Declaring“Our time to innovate is now,” Chief of Naval Research (CNR) Rear Adm. Lorin C. Selby last week introduced a new vision for future naval power. PAGE A6

In late September, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global selected and co-funded with the U.S. Army Development Command the winning proposal of its second annual Global-X Challenge. PAGE A5

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2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

Family members watch a farewell ceremony September 7 at the Fort William Henry Harrison Reserve Center gymnasium in Helena, Montana. The 652nd RSG will become the first U.S. Army Reserve unit heading base operations in Poland during their upcoming deployment. (COURTESY PHOTO)

DOD Looks at Ways to Improve Child Care Access By Todd Lopez

DOD Public Affairs

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the challenges faced by service members and their families in getting child care demonstrated just how important child care is to the military mission. And now the department is working hard to find new ways to ensure that those who need child care can get it, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for military community and family policy said. “What the pandemic did, and what it showed us was that child care is not just a ‘nice to have,’ ” Patricia Barron, who spoke on Tues-

day as part of the Association of the U.S. Army’s “Thought Leaders” seminar, said. “You’ve got to have it. If you’re going to go to work, you’ve got to have your child care in place.” Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen H. Hicks has challenged the department, and MC&FP to uncover new and innovative ways to expand access to quality affordable child care for military families, Barron said. “We’ve been working really hard on what that could look like,” she said. “And we’ve had a couple of things that I’m very, very proud of.” Earlier this year, Barron said, the department kicked off a pilot program that allows military families to seek in-home child care

providers, and the department will help pay for the cost. “Now you can hire someone that comes into your home. They still need to be vetted, and still kind of have to go through the process that we would if we were to hire anybody to work in our centers. But you hire someone that comes into your home. And we will provide you with fee assistance to help pay for their salary,” Barron said, adding she hopes the program will be expanded next year. Barron also highlighted the DOD’s “Military Child Care in your Neighborhood +” effort, which aims to get more child care providers eligible for fee-assistance by the

DOD. Right now that effort is underway in Maryland and Virginia, but Barron said the program is expanding into other states as well. “That’ll provide more opportunities for access to fee assistance,” she said. For parents needing short-term child care — such as a babysitter — Barron said the DOD has partnered with “Sittercity.” “If you go on to Military OneSource, we have waived the registration fee,” she said. “You can go right into the portal there and you can put in your information and a list of people will come up — and of course it’s up to you to talk to them and vet them and all of that. But they’ve had their background checks done.” Barron said both the DOD and the services are working hard to improve access to child care for military service members and their families. “There’s just never enough child care, because we have a young force,” she said. “You know, we’re always going to have young people coming in, we’re always going to have babies ... and children.”

MQ-25 Conducts Ground Testing at Chambers Field

By MC3 Samantha Jenkins

Naval Air Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. — The U.S. Navy and Boeing are completing ground tests of the MQ-25 Stingray test asset at Chambers Field onboard Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia. “The Stingray is the future of naval aviation and the true revolutionary step of the Air Wing of the Future. MQ-25 represents the first aircraft carrier-based unmanned air vehicle (UAV),” said Rear Adm. John Meier, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. “The ground testing is another step toward the teaming of manned and unmanned aircraft platforms. Integrating platforms like the MQ-25 into the air wing will increase their lethality and reach.” The MQ-25 Stingray introduces unmanned aerial refueling and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities to the air wing that will extend the range, operational capacity and lethality of the Carrier Air Wing and Carrier Strike Group. “What we are doing today is deck handling,” said Rick Schramm, the technical lead engineer material review board. “We have a system installed on the airplane that allows the aircraft to be engines up, power running and taxing by controllers

on the deck.” Schramm described that they are using painted lines to section areas of the flight deck to test how the MQ-25 would be able to maneuver on board an aircraft carrier. This testing is in preparation for a demonstration planned aboard the carrier in December. This event will provide an early evaluation of MQ-25 operations in a shipboard environment. The MQ-25 is the first move toward the Navy’s strategic vision of unified, interoperable networks and systems architecture. It is paving the way for future unmanned systems to be introduced to the air wing and aircraft carrier environment. Chief Aviation Machinist Mate Michael Solle said the UAS capabilities of the MQ-25 will allow the F/A-18 to return to its primary mission set as well as extend its strike range and enhance maneuverability. The Boeing-owned MQ-25 recently completed its first aerial refueling of an F-35C Lightning II aircraft, marking the third refueling flight evolution for the test aircraft as a whole. Once operational, MQ-25 will refuel every receiver-capable carrier-based aircraft. The MQ-25 is intended to be one of the Navy’s fastest major defense acquisition programs to reach initial operational capability.

Editorial Staff Military Editor | MC1 Maddelin Hamm, maddelin.hamm@navy.mil Managing Editor | Ensign James Caliva, james.caliva@navy.mil Graphic Designer | Trisha Irving, trisha.irving@virginiamedia.com

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Rear Adm. John Meier, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, is briefed on the deck control device for the MQ-25 Stingray by Richard Bubenheim, service systems electrical lead, Boeing, at Chambers Field on Naval Station Norfolk. The U.S. Navy and Boeing are completing ground testing of the MQ-25 Stingray. The MQ-25 Stingray is the first aircraft carrier based unmanned aerial refueling aircraft. (SAMANTHA JENKINS)

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailing address is located at PO Box 282501, Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 3

Shop 89 Fabric Worker Mechanic Allyson Cross, the Norfolk Naval Shipyard Apprentice Program Class of 2021 valedictorian, received her Technician Career Studies Certificate during the“drivethru”style Apprentice Graduation Nov. 23. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Celebrates New Journeymen in Drive-Thru Apprentice Graduation By Kristi R Britt

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, VA, — Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) held a “drive-thru” style Apprentice Graduation Nov. 23 at Scott Center Annex in Portsmouth, Va., celebrating the achievements of the graduates becoming journeymen in their trades. The 229 graduates, representing 23 trades across the shipyard, have completed a fouryear training program, which includes academics, trade theory, and on-the-job experience. Upon graduation, the appren-

tices receive a Technician Career Studies Certificate and are converted to the journeyman level of their trade. Due to recent COVID-19 guidance from the Secretary of the Navy limiting attendance to any Department of the Navy event to no more than 50 people, NNSY worked to instate the “drive-thru” style graduation in order to allow families to be able to celebrate the accomplishments of the apprentices while they receive their certificate in-person. “Congratulations to our graduates,” said Shipyard Commander Capt. Dianna Wolfson. “You are the ones who are going

to lead America’s Shipyard and keep our Navy sailing well into the 21st century through the vital skills you bring to our ONE TEAM in the repair, modernization and inactivation of our warships and training platforms.” The NNSY Apprentice Program Class of 2021 valedictorian was Allyson Cross, a Shop 89 Fabric Worker Mechanic. The 29-year-old Lakeland High School and Old Dominion University graduate finished the NNSY Apprentice Program with a 3.923 GPA, which also earned her an early promotion.

“I’m so proud of our apprentices who have had to come many adversities during our time in the program, including facing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” said Cross. “Many of us had to step into leadership roles to help bridge the gap in our workforce so we could still get the job done on time with first time quality and fulfilling the exceptional standards of our Navy. As we graduate today and take our place as journeymen within America’s Shipyard, I hope we can continue to excel in our roles as well as help mentor the apprentices and mechanics that follow behind us, instilling in them the same determination and integrity we have.” This year marked the 108th anniversary of NNSY’s Apprentice Program, one of the most historic and honored apprentice programs in the Nation. The program has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Labor, in partnership with the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA), as a 21st Century Registered Apprenticeship Trailblazer and Innovator.

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

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ONR Sponsors New Academic Center for National Security Innovation By Warren Duffie

Office Of Naval Research Public Affairs

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) continues its 75-year-old commitment to fostering innovation with the sponsorship of a Stanford University-based academic center formally launching next week. Media members are invited to attend the opening ceremony by visiting https://stanford.zoom. us/j/91738837494?pwd=dVJPM2MrUTJYdnNpVDd3cUNRUnk4QT09. The Gordian Knot Center for National Security Innovation (GKC) will help reimagine how the U.S. government approaches national security innovation, dedicated to solving pressing national security concerns and empowering students to tackle challenges at the intersection of commercial technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, machine learning, autonomy) and the instruments of national power (e.g., diplomacy, information, military, economic). The center is marking its formal launch

on Tuesday, Nov. 30, at 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time, during a virtual livestreamed event that will coincide with the final class session of Technology, Innovation and Great Power Competition—a new national security course at Stanford, developed and taught by founding members of the GKC, including innovation thought leader Steve Blank. At this session, students will share their journeys as they worked to understand critical problems at the intersection of technology and national security, and the solutions they propose. The class is an example of the types of activities the center intends to promote and empower—and of the kind of innovative efforts ONR is dedicated to advancing. “A Gordian Knot is a metaphor for an intractable problem,” said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Lorin C. Selby. “Today, our nation faces many intractable problems, from great power competition to non-state actor threats, as we reimagine what naval power looks like in the 21st century. We’re seeking new disruptive technologies, new operational concepts, and new types of

program management and mindsets.” The GKC will be based at the university’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, which is located at Stanford in the heart California’s Silicon Valley, the epicenter of the U.S. innovation ecosystem. The GKC aims to bridge silos across the Department of Defense (DoD), industry and academia—and foster greater innovation by helping to develop and inspire the national security workforce, from prospective entrants to senior executives. The GKC will coordinate resources at Stanford and throughout Silicon Valley to execute three lines of effort: (1) national security innovation education; (2) training for national security innovators; and (3) insight, integration and policy outreach. ONR’s involvement with the GKC is the newest chapter in a seven-decade partnership with Stanford that began in 1946— when the command awarded grants to Fred Terman, dean of the university’s engineering school. He used the opportunity to set up the Stanford Electronics Research Lab,

which advanced basic and applied research in microwave devices and electronics, enabled the university to become a leader in these fields, and sparked the investment and innovation that would create Silicon Valley. “In 1946, ONR partnered with Stanford in an effort that dramatically transformed American innovation,” said Selby. “Now we are collaborating with Stanford on another extremely important initiative, one we believe will be just as transformative to today’s challenges of accelerating technology development and delivery to our naval forces.” Joe Felter, GKC’s director and one of its founders, concurred: “In the coming decades, the U.S. will be engaged in great power competition with our strategic rivals, and there’s no guarantee we’ll come out ahead. Addressing the challenges facing the DoD and broader national security community demands unprecedented imagination and creativity.” Learn about GKC and its mission at https://gordianknot.stanford.edu/. For more information about the Nov. 30 GKC launch event, contact gordianknotcenter@gmail.com. To attend, visit https:// stanford.zoom.us/j/91738837494?pwd=dVJPM2MrUTJYdnNpVDd3cUNRUnk4QT09.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 5

How Science is Finding Ways to Navigate in GPS-Denied Environments By Felipe Reisch

Office Of Naval Research Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. — There’s no denying that GPS and mapping applications on our mobile phones have dramatically affected society, including the military. Still, even their use has limits on reach and capabilities. Now science is going above and beyond to get to remote locations where GPS has no reach. In late September, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global selected and co-funded with the U.S. Army Development Command the winning proposal of its second annual Global-X Challenge, which called for international projects to address capability gaps at high latitudes (Polar Regions). The winning project is a team composed of researchers from Japan, U.K., U.S. and Finland, led by Dr. Chris Steer from Geoptic Infrastructure Investigations Limited (U.K.), and will seek to show in nine months a proof of concept of an alternative navigation system in the Arctic using muons with precision equal to that of GPS. They will be using a natural source of radiation called cosmic ray muons as an alternative to the satellite-derived GPS signals. The unique aspect of this work is these subatomic particles pass through rock, buildings and earth — areas where GPS communications cannot be received. The lead ONR Global science director for this project, Dr. Charles Eddy, said, “The ability to navigate in Polar Regions will be of increasing importance in the coming decades as climate change is opening up Arctic waterways to commercial and military activities. This project, which uses cosmic relativistic particles that continuously impinge on the Earth’s entire surface, offers an innovative approach to the challenge of navigation at high latitudes with little or no GPS service.” On the same line, Dr. Steer commented, “Like echolocation, the timing difference between ‘pings’ - the signals from a crossing muon in our detectors — can allow the user to measure the distance from one detector to another with multiple detectors allowing location by triangulation. The technique has already been tested in the laboratory before, where the process of converting particles’ crossing times to infer the position of a detector was successfully demonstrated.” Challenges, opportunities and future applicability After initially testing the system in a large water-immersion tank in the U.K., the project will move to Finland to deploy into an Arctic lake that is covered by one meter of ice. At these high latitudes, conventional GPS measurements are problematic due their

(COURTESY PHOTO)

orbital constraints. From a science perspective, a significant challenge is the development of a number of tightly specified sensors such as a highly synchronized set of distributed clocks (to better than 10 billionths of a second), in order to minimize the inferred position uncertainty, and their integration with the muon detectors. To make matters even more challenging, said Steer, “we also need to deploy our system in Arctic weather conditions (typically -20 degrees Celsius), in an isolated environment and partially underwater. The cold environment has implications across many aspects of the project from personnel to ensuring the electronics are robust to the cold.” The science opportunities abound and they extend well beyond the underwater environment, as operating in GPS-denied environments

is such a common problem. “The sea is broadly transparent to cosmic ray muons, so we expect there to be a number of scientific subsea navigation opportunities. Similarly, as cosmic ray muons are highly penetrating and able to pass through many tens to hundreds of meters of rock, it is possible to see that this technology also has strong opportunities in tunnels and other underground settings,” Steer continued. The future is extremely bright for this line of research given that position finding is fundamental within many areas of science, engineering and industry. While generally a very positive aspect, “the wide-applicability can also be a distracting issue, as often a focus application is required to make progress,” said Steer. “Consequently, the next stage after this project would be to understand the positioning

needs of end users, down selecting to the best fit with our positioning measurement system, and maturing the technology for their needs.” The potential scope is wide and the project’s technology is transformative for positioning inside tunnels, and on land or underwater at high latitudes. About Global-X The purpose of the Global-X Challenge is to discover, disrupt and ultimately provide a catalyst through basic and applied research for later development and delivery of revolutionary capabilities to the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, the commercial marketplace and the public. ONR Global sponsors scientific efforts outside of the U.S., working with scientists and partners worldwide to discover and advance naval capabilities.

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

ONR Chief Unveils New Vision to Reimagine Naval Power By Warren Duffie

Office Of Naval Research Public Affairs

Rear Adm. Lorin Selby, chief of naval research, delivers remarks at the“HACKtheMACHINE”unmanned competition in Alexandria, Va., Nov. 17, 2021. HACKtheMACHINE Unmanned is the first in a series of public-facing technology challenges aimed at accelerating discovery and teambuilding between the DoN, industry and academia for the creation of groundbreaking unmanned and autonomous systems. (MICHAEL WALLS)

Unmanned competition, held virtually Nov. 16-19. This event, which is expanding to multiple cities across the country, is a public-facing technology challenge aimed at accelerating discovery and team building between the Department of the Navy (DoN), industry and academia. The ultimate goal of such events, Selby said, is to create new ways of doing business for autonomous and software-based systems. Comparing this moment in history to the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, when technological advances drove massive change, he noted that today, “data is the new oil, and software is the new steel.” Sponsored by ONR, in conjunction with Program Executive Office (PEO) C41, PEO Integrated Warfare Systems, PEO Unmanned and Small Combatants, the Navy’s Cybersecurity Office (PMW-130) and industry partners like Fathom5 and Booz Allen Hamilton, HACKtheMACHINE Unmanned is one of the ways ONR is working to support the Navy’s 2021 Unmanned Task Force and inte-

grate unmanned and autonomous technology at scale. A Strategic Hedge Selby emphasized the importance of America’s current naval force structure needing a “Strategic Hedge.” He noted that in World War II, the Navy was primarily invested in battleships as the nucleus of combat power for any future conflict. However, the Navy and the nation had a “hedge” investment in aircraft carrier and submarine force structure. Ultimately the hedge proved crucial to victory—far different from the beginning of the war, when battleships were seen by many as the key. The small, the agile, and the many represent a viable hedge to support the large and the complex platforms that comprise the backbone of today’s force structure. Rapid development of unmanned, autonomous systems provides the technological drive to create a hedge option for the 21st century Navy and Marine Corps. Developing this strategic hedge at ONR is one of many ways

the organization helps the Navy and Marine Corps adapt to potential futures. Finally, the CNR stressed the importance of moving from the current requirements-driven acquisition process—a successful process for large platforms, but one not rooted in speed—to a “problem-driven” process, where the Naval Research Enterprise asks operators and commanders what problems they are facing, and rapidly creates solutions to solve their problems. That approach has already begun. ONR provided dozens of unmanned platforms and sensors used in last April’s Integrated Battle Problem 2021 (IBP-21), which focused on a PACFLEET battle problem. In 2022, those efforts will continue, including partnering with SOUTHCOM to deliver new tools for drug interdiction efforts. Learn more at https://www.hackthemachine.ai. Warren Duffie Jr. is a contractor for ONR Corporate Strategic Communications.

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ARLINGTON, Va. — Declaring “Our time to innovate is now,” Chief of Naval Research (CNR) Rear Adm. Lorin C. Selby last week introduced a new vision for future naval power—one based on faster development of unmanned, autonomous systems, vibrant partnerships with industry and academia, and reimagined naval formations. “I think this decade, the 2020s, will have special significance for our nation and our role in leading the world,” Selby told a nationwide audience during the HACKtheMACHINE Unmanned event. “What can we do today that can deliver measurable results in two years, that leads to deployed capabilities at scale in five years, to fully realize that reimagined future?” Small, Agile, Many A critical important component of future naval success, he said, is incorporating advanced cyberphysical technologies found in “the small, the agile, and the many”—small unmanned, autonomous platforms that have the agility to be built and adapted quickly, in large numbers, and at far lower costs compared to larger platforms. These unmanned air, surface and subsurface vehicles will carry an array of sensors and modern payloads, and perform multiple missions. “The small, the agile and the many have the strong potential to define the future in a world where the large and the complex are either too expensive to generate in mass, or potentially too vulnerable to put at risk,” he said. “We are talking about how to iterate at scale and at speed. How to take things that meet operational needs and making them part of the force structure, deploying them in novel naval formations” that will “confuse and confound the tasks our adversaries must consider.” One of the advantages of the small, agile and many platforms in this new formation is that Selby believes they can be built relatively inexpensively compared to existing force structure. This makes them more attritable in high-end conflict—in other words, if they are shot down or otherwise put out of action, American forces will have dozens, even thousands, of backups in place. Having large numbers of advanced but inexpensive platforms in the fleet to counter an adversary’s expensive platforms could play an important role in deterring aggressive actions. Selby gave his remarks during a keynote address at the HACKtheMACHINE

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 7

CLF

from Page 1

of military logistics, said Maj. Gen. Carl von Clausewitz in the book titled On War. Both Supply’s and Grumman’s united effort exemplified their logistical force that empowered the Carrier Strike Group to remain in the fight throughout the 30-day exercise, executing 65 underway replenishments and transferring more than 19 million gallons of fuel and 3,500 pallets of cargo. The two CLFs’ combined performance not only enabled underway at-sea replenishments with the Navy’s warships but their efforts also allowed the combatant ships to remain on station indefinitely, projecting power. Without CLF ships, the combatant ships would be forced to leave the fight and transit to friendly ports for all of their resupply needs, said Walzak. Integrated exercises like COMPTUEX help our civil service mariners (CIVMARS) hone their UNREP skills; especially when Supply and Grumman were tasked to participate in a connected replenishment with each other, said Walzak. CONREPs, typically, occur between a Navy ship and a CLF ship. It is a way for CLF ships to replenish Navy war ships at sea of needed supplies. This involves rigging either a spanwire or highline to the ship being supplied and sending supplies over a ram-tensioned wire system known as Standard Tension Replenishment Alongside Method (STREAM), using a system of trolleys to travel over the wire, which support either the hoses or the cargo rig. “During the times that MSC ships are required to do this, the training is invaluable because all of the ships’ deck

(Catalina Magee)

officers and deck cadets get the opportunity to make approaches on the other CLF ship, and conn alongside, which is a rarity.” In addition to honing their UNREP skills, participating in COMPTUEX helps to increase CIVMARs’ overall readiness; especially those crewmembers who are new to the ship and are not familiar with the ship’s replenishment capabilities, said Walzak. “Executing the number of UNREPS that we do, during a major exercise like COMPTUEX, puts these new people right in the line of fire, in real time and at a rapid pace. It is actually a difficult situation for the rig captains, as many of their teams are new, with very little shipboard knowledge. Not to mention it takes time and practice to train to be a successful UNREP team member. None the less, we soldier through, with all hands on deck, to get the task at hand accomplished. One of the things not readily visible from across the water, on our customer ships, is the back and forth of our crews, between stations; so that, we can continue providing top quality logistic services to the fleet. Many crew members will find themselves moving from station to station to ensure we give as many rigs to the customers as possible.” Both Walzak and Capt. Bryan Yarde, master of USNS Supply, are equally proud of their crews’ performances. “We continue to answer the call, time and time again — and most times at a moment’s notice with a substantially reduced crew size. And still we rise to the occasion because our CIVMARS are some of very best people in the nation,” Walzak said. Instrumental to both Supply’s and Grumman’s success were five top-notch Navy reservists from Command Task

Force 953’s Watch Officer cell, located at Dam Neck Naval Base in Virginia Beach, Va. Acting as the on-site liaison for the commodore of MSC Atlantic, these reservists served as watchstanders, responsible for providing around the clock coordination of all replenishment requirements between CSG 8 and both CLF ships, along with all future movements and transits of the two CLF ships. “I was the primary point of contact for CTF953, responsible for supporting any briefs, deliverables, and overall operational support, said CTF 953 Watch Officer Team Lead CDR Douglas Ribble. “My team’s performance throughout COMPTUEX was nothing short of amazing.” Supporting Ribble were LTs Casey Adams, Ednidia Loaiza, and Westin Haddock, and OS2 (SW) James Proctor. MSC’s CLF ships include oilers (TAOs), dry cargo and ammunition ships (TAKEs), and fast combat support ships (TAOEs). For these designations, T means the ship is operated by MSC and comprised of CIVMARS, A means auxiliary ship, O means oiler, K means cargo, and E means explosives. They are composed of 31 ships (15 fleet replenishment oilers, 14 ordinance and dry cargo ships, and two fast combat support ships). In 2021, MSC ships operating in the Atlantic Ocean, loaded and discharged 16.4 billion pounds of cargo, delivered more than 381 million gallons of petroleum products, and more than 330 million pounds net explosive weight of ordnance. CLF ships supported 13 deployments, 10 major fleet exercises, and three fleet ordnance moves. To learn more about Military Sealift Command, visit https://sealiftcommand. com/about-msc.

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III addresses the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence at its summit on global emerging technology on July 13, 2021, in Washington, D.C. (Staff Sgt. JACKIE SANDERS)

Secretary Austin from Page 1

debate how the United States can lead the world in an era of increasingly complex challenges and opportunities. Austin will highlight his vision for the People’s Republic of China as the Department’s top pacing challenge, and discuss integrated deterrence, cooperation with allies and partners, the crucial role of investments in tech and innovation, and working with industry partners and Congress in the context of the forthcoming National Defense Strategy.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 1

uarterdeck

Rescues A U.S. Navy vessel rescued two Iranian mariners Nov. 27 from a fishing vessel after it was adrift for eight days in the Gulf of Oman. PAGE B3

HOME FOR THE

HOLIDAYS

The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) returns from a seven-month world deployment with the HMS Queen Elizabeth Carrier Strike Group, Nov. 24. During the deployment the crew navigated over 50,000 nautical miles and participated in multinational operations and joint training exercises with international partners to foster positive relationships while encouraging freedom of navigation and maritime security. MC2 AUSTIN COLLINS

USS The Sullivans Completes Historic Deployment By U.S. Second Fleet Public Affairs MAYPORT, Fla. — The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) returned to Naval Station Mayport, Nov. 24, marking the end of a seven-month world tour deployment to the U.S. 2nd, 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet areas of operations as part of the U.K. Carrier Strike Group 2021 (CSG 21) and Operation Fortis. CSG 21 was led by aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) on her maiden deployment and was comprised of multi-national forces, including The Sullivans, U.S. Marine Corps Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 211 and The Netherlands frigate HNLMS Evertsen (F805). U.S. Navy Cmdr. James Diefenderfer, Jr., commanding officer of The Sullivans, regards the integrated deployment as a step forward for the long-standing maritime alliance between the U.S. and U.K. “The Sullivans was fortunate to complete a seven month deployment with a United Kingdom carrier, marking the culmination of a decade-long bilateral carrier coordination effort,” Diefenderfer said. “The Sullivans’ crew proved again and again they have the grit and professionalism it takes to represent the U.S. Navy and the memory of the Sullivan brothers

while deployed.” The crew navigated over 50,000 nautical miles through four U.S. fleets, transiting the Strait of Gibraltar, Suez Canal, Bab-el Mandeb, Strait of Malacca and across the equator. The Sullivans also conducted 29 underway replenishments and 18 sea and anchor details during port visits to Portsmouth, England; Gaeta, Italy; Limassol, Cyprus; Guam; Yokosuka, Japan; Souda Bay, Greece; Toulon, France; and Rota, Spain. The Sullivans, the only U.S. surface ship in CSG 21, supported U.S. 2nd, 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet commanders across 20 warfare areas ranging from surface to ballistic missile and air defense. While operating with CSG 21 in Operation Fortis, The Sullivans was tasked to escort HMS Queen Elizabeth around the world, providing multi-threat defense. Operation Fortis was executed in six phases across four different areas of operations, demonstrating interoperability with more than 15 different allied and partner nations. The Sullivans also provided layered defense and command and control for the entire carrier strike group in support of air defense missions to ensure stability and security across the globe. “USS The Sullivans has been an integral part of the UK CSG for over a year,” said Royal Navy

Cdre. Steven Moorhouse, commander, CSG 21. “It was a pleasure working with The Sullivans, and I thank each and every member of the ship’s company for their loyalty, professionalism and great humour along our journey. The ship’s motto says it all: ‘We stick together.’ ” CSG 21 spent nearly half of the seven-month deployment in the U.S 6th Fleet area of operations, participating in four major multinational exercises, including Steadfast Defender and Strike Warrior 2021. “Sailing in 6th Fleet with this elite, multi-national strike group while demonstrating a fully integrated force showcased our nations’ special relationship and shared values,” Diefenderfer said. “This deployment continually challenged our ability to overcome linguistic and culture differences. The one thing that was proven time and time again is that Sailors from all nations can understand each other and find a way to work together.” The strike group then entered U.S. 7th Fleet and began a string of exercises in the Indo-Pacific, demonstrating seamless interoperability with allies and partners. Exercise Noble Union, conducted in the Pacific Ocean, fully integrated CSG 21 and Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7 and marked the beginning of a three-month tactical training with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

USS Minnesota Returns from Deployment

Turn to Holiday, Page 7

Navy Leaders Serve Students Thanksgiving Meal By MC1 David Kolmel

Naval Medical Forces Support Command Public Affairs

By Submarine Readiness Squadron 32 Public Affairs GROTON, Conn. — Many people were shopping for sales on the day after Thanksgiving, but the families of the crew of the USS Minnesota (SSN 783) got the best deal. The Virginia-class fast attack submarine returned to Naval Submarine Base New London on Friday, Nov. 26, after a seven-month deployment. “I can speak for all of our Groton shipmates when I offer our tremendous admiration and pride for the accomplishment of a well-executed deployment,” he continued. “And we extend our eternal gratitude to the families whose own service and sacrifice enabled such a bold commitment to liberty and the values we hold dear as a nation. New England’s winter will be a little warmer with their submariners home once again.” The ceremonial first kiss upon return to homeport was awarded to Steffanie Dube and Seaman Kyle Hodgson, while the first hug was awarded to Brittany Porter and her husband, Petty Officer 2nd Class Tyler Porter. “It’s been a long time and it was a challenging deployment,” she said. “This was the first deployment for a lot of people and the first deployment married for a lot of people.” During its deployment, Minnesota steamed more than 45,000 nautical miles. “I’ve been inspired by the crew of Minnesota on this nearly seven-month deployment. The men and women of USS Minnesota exceeded all my expectations and their

The strike group also trained with Republic of Korea’s Surface Forces on communication, search and rescue, replenishment capabilities, and cross-deck aviation evolutions. CSG 21 met the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG 5), the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group (CSG 1) and the JMSDF Carrier Strike Group to conduct quad carrier operations. Squadrons from different air wings operated in concert with the 17-ship force, representing six participating nations and demonstrating a commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific. After concluding operations in U.S. 7th Fleet, The Sullivans and CSG 21 reentered the Indian Ocean to participate in the Maritime Partnership Exercise in the Bay of Bengal with Australia, India, Japan and CSG 1. The Sullivans detached from CSG 21 in the Indian Ocean and sailed independently through U.S. 5th Fleet, after a farewell visit from Cdre. Moorhouse and U.S. Marine Corps Brig. Gen. Simon Doran, U.S. Senior National Representative to the United Kingdom’s CSG. “USS The Sullivans have been tremendous representatives of the United States during Carrier Strike Group 21,” Doran said. “From the North Sea to the South China Sea, from

The Virginia-class submarine USS Minnesota (SSN 783) transits the Thames River toward Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., Nov. 26. Minnesota and crew, operating under Submarine Squadron (SUBRON) FOUR, returned to homeport from a scheduled sevenmonth deployment in support of the Navy’s maritime strategy of supporting national security interests and maritime security operations. (MCC JOSHUA KARSTEN)

contributions to the nation will have a lasting impact,” said Cmdr. Bradley Bozin, commanding officer of USS Minnesota. “I couldn’t be more proud or humbled to have served alongside them. We thank our families for the sacrifices they have made during this deployment, our success rests in their strength. I would also like to thank Vice Adm. William Houston (commanding officer, Naval Submarine Forces and Submarine Force Atlantic), Commodore John Craddock (Commander, Task Force 69), Commodore Stafford and their staffs for the hard work to get us back home for this Thanksgiving holi-

day weekend.” Fast-attack submarines are multi-mission platforms enabling five of the six Navy maritime strategy core capabilities — sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security and deterrence. They are designed to excel in anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship warfare, strike warfare, special operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare. Fast-attack submarines project power ashore with special operations forces and Tomahawk cruise missiles in the prevention or preparation of regional crises.

FORT SAM HOUSTON, San Antonio, Texas — Naval Medical Forces Support Command (NMFSC) and Navy Medicine Training Support Center (NMTSC) leadership served lunch to students going through medical training at Medical Education and Training Campus (METC) dining facility here for Thanksgiving. NMFSC, NMTSC, and senior leaders from the Army and Air Force took the opportunity to show their support to the students going through joint medical training during the traditional family holiday. “We remember today that for many of our students, this may be the first time away from family and close friends for Thanksgiving. My leadership team is honored to support the service of our Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen and others who are aboard Joint Base San Antonio this holiday season. We are grateful for the opportunity to serve a meal to them this Thanksgiving, and through this small gesture, convey our sincere appreciation for each of them,” said Rear Adm. Cynthia Kuehner, commander of NMFSC. “Our people are our greatest and unifying strength. I am humbled to gather with fellow service members today to share a smile, a hot meal, and time together in this exceptional community — I am grateful and consider myself truly blessed.” Capt. Ann Case, commander of NMTSC, reiterated Kuehner’s comments. “Leadership is a privilege, and it is a true honor as a Triad to be able to be support Turn to Thanksgiving, Page 7


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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: Can I enter into an RPP lease with roommates? A: Service members may enter into an RPP lease with roommates. All Service member roommates must complete the RPP Addendum. Additionally, each Service member must complete all RPP Requirements and be aware of their rights and responsibilities under the Service Members Civil Relief Act (SCRA).

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Finding Goodness and Light

By Lisa Smith Molinari

It’s December, and we haven’t managed to snap a decent picture for our annual family photo cards. I haven’t even started buying gifts for my various relatives, friends, family, neighbors and pets. I haven’t baked Francis’ favorite Cranberry Pinwheels or Hayden’s favorite Onion Swiss Bread or Grammy’s favorite Cheese Ball. I haven’t moved the Elf on the Shelf from his box in our basement. And I’m embarrassed to say, we haven’t even bought a tree yet. The stress is beginning to build, but I won’t panic because I already did the one thing that keeps me grounded through the holidays. No, I didn’t put a shot of Jamesons in my morning coffee. I didn’t book a flight to Cancun to hide out from my family. And I didn’t convert to Buddhism to avoid the holiday altogether. All I did was plug in my old ceramic Christmas tree. If you were born before 1990, you know what I’m talking about. Our mothers, aunts and grandmothers made them at local ceramics shops back in the day. When I was a kid, it seemed there was a ceramic Christmas tree glowing in the window of every split-level, doublewide, and brick ranch in town. Problem was, we didn’t have one in our brick ranch. Why? My mother thought they were tacky. Sigh ...

Sometimes, we visited our friend’s house who had a huge ceramic tree in the front window. I couldn’t stop staring at it. The vivid colors of the plastic pegs, glowing from the light bulb within, seemed impossibly pure. Cobalt blue, emerald green, golden yellow, ruby red and hot magenta. It was an irresistible feast for my ceramic-tree-deprived eyes. To me, that lighted tree somehow symbolized everything good about the holiday season. Twenty years later, I was pushing our stroller through a seedy indoor flea market in an abandoned strip mall in Virginia Beach, when I saw it. Francis was deployed and I had three kids under the age of five. Needless to say, I was stressed. I have no idea what possessed me to wander into the flea market, but three isles in, past the creepy dolls, the handbag knock-offs, and the suspicious electronics, there it was — a beautiful 1971 ceramic Christmas tree gleaming like a beacon in that broken down strip mall. “Eleven dalla?” the sweet Pilipino vendor suggested from behind a table heaped with old junk. I counted out the paltry sum and took my prize home. There on my kitchen counter, radiating precious jewel tones beside my toaster, was my sanity. The mesmerizing sight of the vintage tree transported me away from the mayhem. Away from the obligation to spend hundreds on meaningless gift cards for people we hardly know. Away from

the photo cards mailed out to so many recipients, there’s no time to even sign our names. Away from the minute-by-minute distraction of cell phones. Away from the 24-hour line-up of holiday television programming clogging up our DVRs. Instantly, the lighted tree catapulted me back to childhood. To a time before the Internet, digital photos, virtual reality, Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and Throwback Thursday. When we scratched the frost off of our windows with grubby fingernails, and couldn’t wait to get outside. When we ate all our peas at dinner because “A Charlie Brown Christmas” was airing at seven o’clock. When Christmas cards were special because we only got ten. When candy canes were a pretty big deal. When we called to thank our aunt for the crocheted hat from the rotary phone on the kitchen wall. When we laid under the tree in footed pajamas, gazing into the saturated colors of the dangerously hot incandescent bulbs, our bellies full of chocolate chip cookies. When the holidays, and life in general, were simple and sweet. Nowadays, the first thing I do to prepare for the holiday is plug in my ceramic Christmas tree to remind me of the simple joys of the season. But there’s no need to run out to a seedy indoor flea market in search of a handmade relic like mine. Just find the simple things that bring goodness and light to your holiday.

Six Things New Service Members Should Know About Their First Duty Station

FUNCTIONS AND/OR SERVICES FFSC PROVIDES: ClinicalCounseling(Individual, Couples,a nd Child Counseling) Personal Financial Management Information & Referral Family Employment Assistance Transition Assistance Family Advocacy Program Deployment and Mobilization Support Ombudsman Support Relocation Assistance Parenting Programs Stress and Anger Management Command Support Crisis Support SuicidePrevention SAPR Support

By Military Onesource You went through weeks learning basic military skills, then months learning your military job. Finally, it’s time to take your place in the military at your first duty station. When you arrive at your new installation, you’ll go through processing. The first place you go is the reception office with a copy of your orders. For example: At Fort Hood, head to Copeland Soldiers Service Center. At Fort Bragg, go to the Reception Company. At Joint Base Lewis-McChord, both airmen and soldiers report to Waller Hall. At Naval Station Norfolk, Marines and sailors go to the Naval Station Norfolk Administration Office at building N-26. At Joint Base San Antonio, all service members and contractors report to the Joint Personnel Processing Center. After presenting your orders, you may spend the first few weeks learning about the base, meeting key officers and enlisted personnel, discovering where your barracks and the mess hall are and getting clothing and gear issued. You’ll also figure out the do’s and don’ts of installation life. You’ll be integrated into your unit and your job. As the newbie, ask questions to get to know your role and your coworkers better. At your first duty station, you’ll have more responsibility and more freedom than you did during training. You’ll serve your country, but you’ll also have time for fun and exploring your new surroundings. Here are six tips for making the most of life at your first duty station. 1. Get to know your installation. As one soldier said, “Don’t live in your barracks.” See what your installation and the surrounding community have to offer. Start with MilitaryINSTALLATIONS. With this tool, you can easily locate your installation and find maps and directions on and off your post. You can also get contact information for programs and services and peruse location overviews and community points of inter-

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost.

(COURTESY PHOTO)

est. 2. Make friends and have fun. You’ll probably work and live with the people in your unit until a PCS move or you leave the service. Some of them are likely to become friends, and there will be plenty of opportunities to socialize together. Your installation’s MWR program gives you the chance to meet people and make the most of your free time. Some installations offer recreational facilities, all at low or no cost. For off-base fun, Information, Tickets and Travel gives you the scoop on sporting events, museums, theme parks, aquariums, zoos, historical sites and other attractions. The America the Beautiful pass gives you free access to national parks and recreation areas where you can hike, climb, ski, surf, stargaze or just relax. 3. Pay attention to the “off-limits” list. On your installation, you may see lists of places or services declared “off limits” by the base commander. These are usually known trouble spots in the neighborhood — think bad landlords, shady nightclubs or lemon car lots. The lists are posted and are also on your base website — like this one from Fort Bragg — so read them and avoid anything on them. Be aware of predatory lenders, payday loan outfits and others looking to scam you outside the installation. 4. Find military discounts on and off your installation. The service provides for your basic needs, but one of the perks of military life is shopping at installation commissaries and exchanges. Commissaries are like grocery stores and exchanges are like department stores, and both give you tax-free shopping and discount goods and services. Each service branch has its own exchange system, and you’re entitled to shop at any of them, either in person or online. Your military ID gets you discounts to events, destinations and more off base as well. You can

get discounted tickets to many local activities like sporting events, concerts, movies, museums and vacation packages through your installation’s ITT office. 5. Enjoy family and friends visits. If your family, friends or significant other would like to visit you on base, they certainly can. Most installations welcome visitors for events such as deployment homecomings or holiday parties. You’ll find instructions for civilian visitors on your installation’s website. Some installation recreation facilities — such as bowling alleys and movie theaters — are open to civilian guests if they are accompanied by a service member. You can also show your guests a good time off base — at concerts, amusement parks and sporting events — with discounted tickets from ITT. 6. Check out Military Family Readiness Centers. Before you dismiss this resource because of its name, understand installation-based Military and Family Support Centers are a resource hub for all service members, whether you’re single or married. They can help you connect the dots on your new installation and surroundings. The people at these centers can help you with many things like getting a good deal when buying your first car, planning your first PCS, understanding housing options, finding places to socialize and connect to your new community, preparing for deployment, getting personal financial help and more. The centers may go by different names, but they all offer helpful resources for military life issues. Check out MilitaryINSTALLATIONS to locate the center nearest you. You can also learn more about your new duty station or get answers to your military life questions by contacting Military OneSource by phone at 800-342-9647 or live chat.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 3

Adm. Samuel Paparo, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, presents a relic from the USS Arizona (BB-39) to the crew of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) in remembrance and commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The relic originates from a section of the superstructure of the Arizona that was removed from the ship when the Arizona Memorial was constructed. The Naval History and Heritage Command authorized the removal of sections of the relics for display and legacy enhancing purposes in 1994. (PETTY OFFICER 1ST CLASS NATHAN LAIRD)

U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander Inspired to Share USS Arizona Relics By Courtesy Story

Navy Public Affairs Support Element, Det. Northwest

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR HICKAM, Hawaii — On October 17, 1916, Woodrow Wilson was president and the average pay for an ensign in the Navy was $141.67 per month. The world was embroiled in World War I and the United States was preparing for the reality of having to join the bloody battle. The same year, USS Arizona (BB-39) was commissioned at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York. Throughout the ship’s 25-year career, it operated around the globe, serving the nation in times of war and peace. Having provided defense to the United States during World War I, Arizona assisted in escorting President Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference, where the terms of peace were established following the war. She was then transferred to the Pacific Fleet. In the early morning hours of December 7, 1941, Arizona, along with 1,177 Sailors and Marines, were lost during the Japanese attack on the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor. “Yesterday, December 7, 1941- a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan,” said President Franklin D. Roosevelt during a speech before Congress. “The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian Islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. I regret to tell you that very many American lives have been lost.” Among the 335 survivors was Pvt. Russell J. McCurdy, a 23-year-old assigned to Arizona’s Marine Detachment who had just come off watch when general quarters sounded. In an October 20, 1999 interview with Budd Nease, USS Arizona Reunion Association Historian, McCurdy detailed his detach-

ment’s quick muster, efforts to reach their battle stations, the devastating destruction and resulting acts of heroism that took place. “The ship was shaking, tossing and went up out of the water, then the bow rose up forty feet into the air and the bow opened up like a petal of a flower,” said McCurdy. Once he was able to swim to safety he reported for duty on the USS Tennessee (BB-43). Of the 88 Marines assigned to Arizona only 15 survived. The attack lasted just under four hours, but Arizona burned for more than two days with temperatures reaching more than 8000 degrees Fahrenheit. Ultimately she sank and took more than 900 Sailors and Marines with her to their final resting place. Even as the island buried their dead and tended to the wounded, the military had to move quickly to ensure they were prepared for the possibility of additional attacks on Oahu. Arizona’s Turrets III and IV were removed, restored and placed at shore coastal artillery sites; Battery Arizona and Battery Pennsylvania. Each site was named in honor of the Arizona, the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) being Arizona’s sistership. Guns and mounts from Turret II were refurbished and installed on USS Nevada (BB-36), who was aft of the Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor. After additional repairs at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Nevada returned to serve throughout the war. As salvage efforts continued, Arizona materials resting above the waterline were removed to prevent deterioration and were deposited locally on Waipio Peninsula. In early January 2021, Adm. John Aquilino, Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, then Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet was inspired by these remaining materials and began planning what would result in the USS Arizona (BB-39) Superstructure Relic Program (ASRP). Aiming to connect

today’s Sailors to our nation’s naval history. “Distributing solemn pieces of our naval history to ships throughout the Pacific Fleet highlights our commitment to honor those that came before us and ensures today’s Sailors always remember the fighting spirit and sacrifices made by the warriors who fought for our freedom many years ago,” said Aquilino. The ASRP members include Navy History and Heritage Command (NHHC), Pacific Fleet, Navy Region Hawaii (NRH) and Construction Battalion Mobile Unit 303 (Seebees). The program’s goal is to create and deepen connections between the Sailors of today and those of the past. The team oversaw the planning, construction and distribution of 138 relics to Pacific Fleet ships and submarines. “We received outstanding support from everyone involved: NHHC’s conservation experts advised how to handle and display the relics, the Seabees cut and preserved them, the Navy Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Centers procured and packed the boxes for transport and distribution, and the Navy Air Logistics Office helped fly the boxes as space available cargo from Hawaii to Fleet concentration areas across the Pacific,” said Bruce Stewart, U.S. Pacific Fleet Logistics Planning Director. The ASRP has taken care to ensure the relics are available to inspire future generations. Each relic was preserved and mounted in a display case built and sealed with shipboard safe materials. Additionally, guidelines were created to ensure the relics will be passed-down when a ship or submarine is decommissioned. Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS ChungHoon (DDG 93), whose namesake honors Rear Admiral Gordon Pai’ea Chung-Hoon, the first Hawaiian-born Admiral in the U.S. Navy, was presented the first relic display

in a ceremony onboard May 21, 2021. All 138 Pacific Fleet ships and submarines will receive relics in ceremonies held throughout the area of operations, which covers nearly 100 million square miles - half of the Earth’s surface. Considered Heritage Assets, the Arizona relics fall under the remit of the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and are coded and tracked. As these relics belong not to individuals, but to every American, distribution to individuals or private for—profit entities is not authorized. The ASRP members have ensured these relics would be cared for by those who continue to serve in the Pacific Fleet. In addition to the Arizona relic, each display includes a brass plaque with the inscription: USS ARIZONA December 7, 1941 “TO THEM, WE HAVE A SOLEMN OBLIGATION” ADMIRAL CHESTER W. NIMITZ PRESENTED ON THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR “While the distribution to every U.S. Pacific Fleet ship and submarine is a sizable undertaking, it was made easy with the amazing support that we received across the Navy”, said Stewart. “Once commands understood the solemn nature of the project, they could not wait to help-out.” The final relic will be presented to the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Daniel K. Inouye (DDG 118), during its commissioning ceremony on Dec. 8, 2021. The ship is named after the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, United States Senator from Hawaii and U.S. Army veteran known and remembered for his heroic efforts in World War II. The USS Chung-Hoon and USS Daniel K. Inouye are fitting bookends to this meaningful project. While the Pearl Harbor National Memorial continues to see more than one million visitors each year, the relics displayed aboard these ships and submarines offer today’s service members a physical reminder of that fateful day 80 years ago, regardless of where they are in the world’s oceans, and of the fighting spirit of those who came before.

U.S. Navy Ship Rescues Iranian Mariners in Gulf of Oman By NAVCENT Public Affairs GULF OF OMAN — A U.S. Navy vessel rescued two Iranian mariners Nov. 27 from a fishing vessel after it was adrift for eight days in the Gulf of Oman. Dry cargo ship USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) responded after the Combined Maritime Forces, and international maritime coalition headquartered in Bahrain, received a distress call from the stranded mariners at 10 a.m. local time. “This is what we are trained and ready to do,” said Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces. “As professional mariners, we have a responsibility to help people in need at sea.” Today, Charles Drew safely transported the mariners to an Omani coast guard vessel sailing near Muscat, Oman. The mariners were in good health and spirits at the time of the transfer. “We appreciate the government of Oman for its assistance and support in helping us return the mariners home,” said Cooper. Combined Maritime Forces consists of 34 nations and is the largest naval partnership in the world. Its naval vessels and personnel operate in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Northern Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf promoting security and stability.

GULF OF OMAN (Nov. 27, 2021) Two Iranian mariners signal for assistance Nov. 27 after their fishing vessel is adrift for eight days in the Gulf of Oman. Dry cargo ship USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) responded and provided food, water and medical care. (U.S. NAVY PHOTO)


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NRL/NASA experiment to study origins of Solar Energetic Particles By Paul Cage

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Public Affairs

WASHINGTON —A joint-U.S. Naval Research Laboratory/NASA experiment prepares to investigate the origins of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) that could affect Navy satellites and harm personnel during future crewed missions to the moon and beyond. Researchers will use a new instrument, the Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph Pathfinder (UVSC Pathfinder) to try to understand the origins of these particles, how they’re generated close into the sun to provide accurate space weather forecasting when these events happen. “These SEPs are the Sun’s most dangerous form of radiation, and they pose a major challenge to space exploration,” said Leonard Strachan Jr., Ph.D. an astrophysicist at NRL, and the mission’s principal investigator. “These powerful particles can wreak havoc with spacecraft and expose astronauts to dangerous radiation.” UVSC Pathfinder will ride to space aboard Space Test Program Satellite (STPSat)-6, the primary spacecraft of the Space Test Program (STP)-3 mission for the Department of Defense. STP-3 is scheduled to lift off Dec. 4 on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 551 rocket from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. UVSC Pathfinder, as its name implies, is a pathfinder mission due to the new design of the coronagraph that uses five separate apertures, each with their own occulter that greatly improve the signal collected at the lowest regions of the Sun’s corona where the SEPs are first formed. A coronagraph is a special type of telescope designed to block out direct light from the sun so that fainter, nearby regions in the corona are not washed out. “First we need to prove that these work,” Strachan said. “We are trying to increase the effective collecting area of the instrument by a factor of 30. If we can prove it works, then we can think about how to miniaturize the instrument and possibly deploy them to multiple locations in the Solar System.” As the United States prepares for the Artemis program and return of humans to moon for the first time since 1972, understanding the impact of SEPs on missions is imperative. Just prior to Apollo 17, the last crewed mission to the moon, a large solar flare erupted with enough strength that it could have exposed astronauts to dangerous levels of radiation. Fortunately, the astronauts were not on the lunar surface. “Apollo 17 would have been pretty serious if the coronal mass ejection would have been directed towards the moon,” Strachan said. “If we are going to have people working on the moon and in lunar orbit, they will need to know when to get into their protective shielding. So there are some

Northrop Grumman personnel examine the U.S. Space Force Space and Missile Systems Center’s Space Test Program Satellite 6 (STPSat-6) at its facility in Dulles, Virginia, prior to its shipment to Florida for final launch processing. Seen on the front of the spacecraft is NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration instrument, the first long-duration laser communications mission that will validate advanced relay operations for future missions. (COURTESY PHOTO)

true applications that will come out of this research, and not just scientific curiosity.” While other NRL solar instruments, like the Wide-field Imager for Parker Solar Probe aboard NASA’s Parker Solar Probe and the Solar Orbiter Heliospheric Imager aboard ESA/NASA’s Solar Orbiter are moving about the inner solar system, UVSC Pathfinder will be in a near Earth geosynchronous orbit. “The further out you go in space, the less data you can bring back because the transmission signal strength drops rapidly with distance and therefore it requires huge radio dishes to get the data,” Strachan said. “So being in a GEO orbit, we have a dedicated ground station at White Sands Missile

Range, so we can get all of our data down, which is a major advantage.” Strachan said this mission could not be accomplished without the team work at NRL and the collaboration between NASA and the DoD’s Space Test Program. “The teams at NASA and the Space Test Program worked with us to get in on the satellite, so this is fortunate for us,” Strachan said. “We hope to have more opportunities to get experiments on as many rockets going up as possible in the future with this type of collaboration.” UVSC Pathfinder will fly alongside NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration, which is testing an enhanced communications capability with

the potential to increase bandwidth to 10 to 100 times more than radio frequency systems — allowing space missions to send more data home. UVSC Pathfinder was designed and built at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, and funded through NASA’s Heliophysics Program and the Office of Naval Research. It is managed by the Heliophysics Technology and Instrument Development for Science, or H-TIDeS program office at NASA Headquarters. The Space Test Program office at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is part of the U.S. Space Force’s Space Systems Command, headquartered at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California.

USS Howard visits New Zealand By Commander, Task Force 71/ Destroyer Squadron 15 Public Affairs WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Howard (DDG 83) arrived in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov. 26 for a routine port visit. This port visit is an indication of the depth of the relationship between New Zealand and the U.S. The U.S. Navy along with its network of alliances and partners plays a key role in the security of global trade routes and freedom of navigation, and maintaining global access for our Navy is central to that role. USS Howard is in New Zealand for a standard port visit and to consult on cooperative exercises. Professional engagement with friends, partners, and allies in the region allows the opportunity to build upon the existing, strong relationships and continue our shared learning. “My crew is extremely excited to visit New Zealand and proud to be called upon to represent the U.S. Navy as we build our relationship and deepen the friendship with the people and leaders here,” said Cmdr. Travis Montplaisir, Howard’s Commanding Officer. “As the Royal New Zealand Navy celebrates their 80th anniversary this year, we’re pleased to help them mark the occasion and look forward to a successful visit that ensures continued opportunities for cooperation.” USS Howard will take part in a range of activities with the New Zealand Defence force, including training and interoperability exercises and official engagements. Having taken measures to mitigate and operate in a COVID-19 environment, Sailors will be granted liberty in Wellington. The U.S. Navy is dedicated to the health of its force and families. Mitigation for the continuing COVID-19 pandemic in part-

USS Howard (DDG 83) arrives in New Zealand for a routine port visit, marking the first visit to the country from a U.S. warship since 2016. Howard is assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 71/Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, the Navy’s largest forward-deployed DESRON and the U.S. 7th Fleet’s principal surface force. (COMMANDER, TASK FORCE 71/DESTROY)

ner nations has been a key component of port visit planning. The U.S. Navy continues to take appropriate force health protection measures, helping to mitigate the spread of COVID while maintaining the commitment and capability to train and operate in the COVID environment. This marks the first visit of a U.S. warship to the country since USS Sampson (DDG 102) visited in 2016 following the Kaikoura

earthquake. The port visit allows for leadership from USS Howard and New Zealand forces to meet and discuss the security and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific that drives global economic development, and continues our shared interest to preserve rules-based international order. This cooperation allows the U.S. Navy and New Zealand to continue its commitment to their relationship and peace,

security and stability across the Indo-Pacific region. U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of responsibility. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict.


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the student’s during their time away from home,” said Case. “The smiles on their faces when they see that their leadership is sharing time with them, and wish them a blessed Thanksgiving, validates why we do what we do.” METC, is a tri-service campus that conducts training in 48 medical programs, and graduates approximately 16,500 enlisted medical personnel a year.

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supporting combat operations in Operation Inherent Resolve to more than a dozen PASSEX’s with foreign Navies, the Sailors on The Sullivans embodied their ship’s motto — We Stick Together.” The Sullivans participated in one final exercise with the Tunisian Navy in the Mediterranean Sea, the first time conducting high-level integrated operations together. “The crew worked extremely hard over the

Rear Adm. Cynthia Kuehner, commander of Navy Medical Forces Support Command (NMFSC) and Capt. Shannon Johnson, deputy commander of NMFSC, serve food to service members attending courses at Medical Education and Training Campus (METC). NMFSC leadership spent time serving meals, because many of the students are just out of boot camp and have not had an opportunity to go home for the Thanksgiving holiday. (MC1 DAVID KOLMEL)

last year and a half preparing for and executing a deployment as dynamic as this one,” Diefenderfer said. “I am grateful for the love and sacrifice that the Sailors and their families displayed through a global pandemic leading into a deployment. The crew came together to accomplish every operational tasking as a team.” The U.S. and U.K. interoperability with additional international allies and partners demonstrates a shared focus on security and freedom of the seas. Forward-deployed forces remain ready to respond to crises globally as a combined maritime force.

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Feast for Homegating From meaty meals and zesty appetizers to sweet, long-lasting snacks, fuel your crowd with recipes that keep them coming back from kickoff to overtime. PAGE C4

COMES

A CHALLENGER Ken Dixon. (JONATHAN MCLARTY)

VCW brings Tidings of Destruction to Norfolk on December 4th By The 757 Heater

Virginia Championship Wrestling brings Tidings of Destruction to the Norfolk Masonic Temple on Saturday night December 4th with special guest “The Fallen Angel” Christopher Daniels. The Norfolk Masonic Temple is located at 7001 Granby Street right next door to Granby High School. Doors open at 6:30 PM with bell time scheduled for 7:30 PM. Christopher Daniels is a professional wrestling legend, who has competed for nearly every major promotion in the world. He’s the firstever Ring of Honor Grand Slam Champion, a former TNA/Impact X-Division and Tag Team Champion, former IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Champion in Japan with Bryan Danielson, and a current member of All Elite Wrestling (AEW). Not only will “The Fallen Angel” be appearing for a special meet and greet with fans, but he will also compete in the main event against former Virginia Heavyweight Champion Gino Medina. Tickets have been flying ever since this blockbuster match-up was announced, so if you plan to sit ringside, it would be prudent to purchase yours online in advance at vcwprowrestling.com. VCW fans were already excited for the main event between Medina and Daniels, but then it was announced that this event would feature a double main event. It’s safe

Christopher Daniels. (JONATHAN MCLARTY)

Logan Laroux. (JONATHAN MCLARTY)

to say this caused the hype for Tidings of Destruction to reach a fever pitch. The second main event features Virginia Heavyweight Champion Ken Dixon defending against Logan Easton Laroux. Last month, Dixon shocked the wrestling world by defeating “Mr. Xcellence” Brandon Scott in an impromptu bout for the gold. The new champion then made it known that he will take on any challenger to prove that he’s the best wrestler in the state today. Logan Easton Laroux (fresh off an appearance on AEW) proved that he’s a worthy contender with a victory over JTG at the Norfolk

Masonic Temple the same night Dixon became champion. Since both men appear to be on a path of ascension, it will be interesting to see who walks out of Norfolk with the most prestigious title in Virginia. Speaking of prestigious titles, current VCW Tag Team Champions the Dirty Blondes have been deemed unable to defend by Director of Operations Jerry Stephanitsis. Coincidentally, Black Wallstreet issued a challenge to the Golden Pinky Society for a rematch December 4th in which those titles would be on the line. Apparently, Stephanitsis liked the

idea because that’s exactly what’s happening this weekend. “Diamond” Victor Griff and Benjamin Banks absolutely have the fans in their corner, but will that be enough? Drolix and Chuck Lennox proved last event that they are a formidable team that can back up everything they say. As tensions continue to mount, this bout is likely to get out of hand. Hopefully VCW officials can keep this one in the ring, so we get a decisive winner. The Golden Pinky Society and Black Wallstreet aren’t the only individuals with bad blood boiling over in their feud. “Mr. Xcellence” Brandon Scott locks up with Dirty Money in a special Grudge Match at Tidings of Destruction. Back in July, Brandon Scott smashed the ankle of Dirty Money with a steel chair. This put Money on the shelf for a few months, as he had to undergo emergency surgery to correct the damage. With his ankle completely healed, it’s unquestionable that the winner of this year’s Liberty Lottery is going to be out for revenge against Brandon Scott. Fans shouldn’t forget that Dirty Money also has a guaranteed Virginia Heavyweight Championship match in his back pocket. It’s just another example of how the landscape in VCW has been shaken to its core. All three VCW championships will be Turn to VCW, Page 3

World premiere documentary, The Flying Greek, to take place in Springfield, Missouri Interview conducted by Yiorgo The ‘Flying Greek’ documentary will have its world premiere Friday, December 10, at 8:00 pm in Springfield, Missouri at the historic Fox Theater with doors opening at 7 PM. Produced and directed by Jason Braiser, this incredible documentary that I have already seen and highly recommend, tells the story of Manoli Savvenas who wrestled professionally as Mike Pappas from 1968-1978. Born in a small village in Greece, Manoli left Greece, traveled to Melbourne, Australia, where he learned the art of professional wrestling. Eventually, Manoli came to America, wrestled in Mexico and in the US in such famous wrestling territories back then like Memphis for Jerry Jarrett and Nick Gulas, in Florida for Eddie Graham and in New York for Vince McMahon Senior, the father of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) owner, Vince Kennedy McMahon. Tickets can be purchased at https://manolisjewelers.com or at https://flintlocksyndicate. ticketleap.com/the-flying-greek-film-premeire/ with 10% of proceeds going to https://fightcolorectalcancer.org/ because Manoli is fighting colon cancer currently. Yiorgo: With us today are both Manoli Savvenas, the star of the documentary and it’s Director and Producer, Jason Braiser. Thank you both for being here. Manoli, tell us how this documentary all

began. Manoli Savvenas: I was a guest on a local TV show called The Mystery Hour hosted by Jeff Houghton. I had a very good time at the show, it went very well. I am a jeweler now and the next day, a guy who was there helping with the camera named Jason Brasier came to my store, Manoli Jewelers. He introduced himself. He was a very good wrestling fan who filmed documentaries. When he heard my interview on the Mystery Hour, he said, ‘Oh my God, I was looking all my life to do something like that.’ Because everyone was making documentaries about the big stars of today and not someone like me who wrestled more than 40 years ago. Jason asked if he could do a documentary about me. I was hesitant at first because I had bad experiences about all of that. When I quit the wrestling business, I was very bitter and I did not want to do anything with it. But with Facebook, a lot of people would tell me stories that I didn’t even remember and I was happy about that. I told him if he was interested, yes I would be very happy to do that. So he wanted to know what I went through and as I told him, he realized that I was more popular then I said I was. After he did his research, he found out, everywhere I wrestled, I was more popular and I did not know that myself. I was amazed for example that people would remember who I had a match with in 1971. Jason found all this information and we were both very Turn to The Flying Greek, Page 3

Manoli Savvenas and Andre the giant. (GEORGE NAPOLITANO)

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Professional Bull Riders’ Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour Returns to Hampton By Hampton Coliseum HAMPTON, Va. — Host to one of the PBR (Professional Bull Riders) Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour’s longest tenured events, Hampton, Virginia, will welcome the organization’s expansion series for the ninth consecutive season on March 5 when the PBR Hampton Classic takes over the Hampton Coliseum. For one night only, some of the best bull riders in the world will battle the sport’s rankest bovine athletes in the ultimate showdown of man vs. beast in one of the most exciting live sporting events to witness. Last season, as the only rider to go a perfect 2-for-2, Marcos Gloria (Central de Minas, Brazil) captured his first Velocity Tour victory, winning the eighth iteration of the PBR Hampton Classic. While the event was largely dominated by the fierce bovine athletes who make up half of every qualified ride score, Gloria initially broke through in Round 1 of the Old Dominion State event when he covered

Quarter After for 88.5 points. Gloria then clinched the win when he dominated the championship round courtesy of his 88-point trip on Wade Rock. For his efforts, Gloria earned a muchneeded 41 points, surging to No. 58 in the world standings. The most recent PBR tour stop in Hampton was one of 24 regular-season events that helped shape one of the fiercest races for the Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour in PBR history. While Virginia-native Michael Lane (Tazewell, Virginia) held the No. 1 position in the standings for the majority of the season, he was surpassed during the last out of the year when Adriano Salgado (Batatais, Brazil) used a runner-up finish at the Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour Finals to surge to the top ranking in the standings. The Brazilian newcomer Salgado finished a slim 26.5 points ahead of No. 2 Lane, who was unable to compete at the year-end event due to injury. Other past PBR Hampton Classic event winners include: Bruno Scaranello (2020),

Brady Sims (2019), Nathan Burtenshaw (2018), Brandon Davis (2017), Juliano Antonio Da Silva (2016), Gage Gay (2015) and Josh Birks (2014). The Hampton tour stop will tentatively mark the 16th Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour event of the year, with PBR’s fastest-growing tour first stopping in cities including Portland, Oregon; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Jacksonville, Florida; and North Charleston, South Carolina. The bull riding action for the 2022 PBR Hampton Classic begins at 7:00 p.m. EST on Saturday, March 5 at the Hampton Coliseum. On Saturday evening, all 40 competing riders will attempt one bull each in Round 1. Following the opening round, the Top 10 will then advance to the championship round where they will attempt one final bull, all in an effort to be crowned the event champion. Tickets for the one-day event go on sale Wednesday, December 1 at 10:00 a.m. EST, and start at $15, taxes and fees not included. Tickets can be purchased online at ticket-

master.com and PBR.com, at the Hampton Coliseum Box Office, or by calling PBR customer service at 1-800-732-1727. For those fans interested in purchasing at the Hampton Coliseum Box Office, please visit HamptonColiseum.org for information on making an appointment, operating hours and more. PBR VIP Elite Seats are available for $195 for avid fans who want an exclusive VIP experience while enjoying the world’s top bull riding circuit. These tickets offer the best seats in the venue, a question-and-answer presentation with some of the top bull riders and stock contractors in the world, $10 concession voucher, souvenir credential and lanyard, and pre-event photo opportunity from the dirt. For an enhanced PBR experience, fans can purchase add-on PBR Premium Experiences which will include the Elite Experience on Saturday, March 5. The Elite Experience, available for $50, will include a Q&A session with a select group of the league’s top riders, bullfighters and stock contractors, photo opportunity, and commemorative credential and lanyard. For more information on PBR Premium Experiences, or to purchase the Elite Experience for the PBR Hampton Classic in Virginia visit https://pbr.com/tickets/ premium-experiences/.

Class of 2021: For Marian Arlanza, Deafness Is No Handicap By Harry Minium All things being equal, Marian Arlanza has overachieved in her four years at Old Dominion University. The Virginia Beach native will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in medical laboratory science in December with a 3.92 grade-point average. It’s the highest average among all medical laboratory sciences majors. But things aren’t always equal. Sometimes, students find the strength to overcome a major hurdle that might hold others back. Such is the case with Arlanza, who was born legally deaf. Thanks in part to her parents, who have been her advocates, and her innate desire to succeed, she eventually will work in a hospital or clinic laboratory doing tests that she hopes will save lives. She said deafness has required adaptation, but has not held her back. “I’ve accepted the fact that I lost my hearing, but that doesn’t mean my knowledge and passion for medicine have been taken away,” she said. “I can still see, touch, smell and walk. There are so many things you can do without letting your disability stop you.” Arlanza said her work ethic comes from her mother, Ann, who recently retired from Sentara Virginia Beach General Hospital after a long career in nursing, and her father, Marlon Melanio Arlanza, who works for the U.S. government. Doctors aren’t quite sure why Arlanza lost her hearing. They think she was born deaf. Her inability to hear wasn’t diagnosed until she was a year old. “They realized I could hear, but only at a very low level,” Arlanza said. Even with hearing aids, she can’t make out speech. Nonetheless, her mom was determined that she would have the same opportunities as her peers. She enrolled her daughter in an elementary school that provided interpreters for the hearing impaired. She also signed her up for speech therapy, and unlike some with hearing deficiencies who have difficulty speaking, Arlanza speaks clearly and

confidently. She also learned American Sign Language so that she could work with interpreters. “My mom wanted me to excel,” said Arlanza, noting that many deaf children are homeschooled. “She wanted me to get accustomed to the classroom.” She studied at the Health Sciences Academy at Bayside High in Virginia Beach, where she at first planned to follow her mother into nursing. Much of her family immigrated to America from the Philippines, and every female in the family is a nurse. Eventually, she realized that communicating with patients would be difficult, so she decided to train to work in a laboratory. “Marian is everything we want our students to be,” said Barbara Kraj, associate professor and program director of the medical laboratory science program. Arlanza has used interpreters throughout her four years, in class and during clinical practicum at Sentara Princess Anne and Sentara Norfolk General hospitals. Kraj said ODU’s Office of Educational Accessibility has made sure Arlanza had the help she needed. “What they do here at Old Dominion to accommodate people is so much better than anything I’ve experienced anywhere else,” Kraj said. Arlanza is an artist, and Kraj said she believes “that’s helped her with manual tasks. She’s very meticulous. Very detail-oriented.” That attention to detail, and her artistic talent, were apparent when students were encouraged by microbiology instructor Angela Wilson to submit projects for the American Society for the ODU Microbiology Agar Art contest, in which participants aim to create something artistic in a petri dish. Most attempt to do simple art. But not Arlanza. She took living microorganisms and drew them in a way that when they grew, they did so in the shape of a fish, a complicated, detailed representation replete with bubbles coming from its mouth. She said it reminded her of a goldfish she

Marian Arlanza. (COURTESY PHOTO)

had when she was a child. “It’s hard enough to draw a fish on a piece of paper,” Kraj said. “To do it, predicting how the bacteria would grow, that took a lot of skill.” Like so many students in the College of Health Sciences, Arlanza is motivated by her desire to help others. It was a desire passed on by many family members. “I have wanted to help people since I was in high school,” she said. “I’m also motivated to make my parents proud. They’ve

done so much for me.” Arlanza said she also owes much to her interpreters, including Cara Greenwood, who has worked with her the last four years. “She’s been a wonderful student,” Greenwood said. “She finishes her homework before it’s due. She studies before it’s time to study. She’s worked so hard, and she’s absolutely brilliant. “We’re all going to miss her, but we’re so happy for her. She’s just been an incredible example for others.”


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 3

The Flying Greek

from Page 1

happy about it. Jason Braiser: I’m an unapologetic wrestling fan and love the documentary style. I had been wanting to do a documentary project and was looking for a subject that just stuck with me. When I learned about Manoli’s career, as Manoli said, I contacted him, we talked and I was just a kid in a candy store hearing his stories and just blown away by his career. I love talking to Manoli and hearing his stories. Every day we filmed was always an absolute delight. Y: What can the people expect to see and experience at the premiere? JB: It will be a night of celebration and fun as we talk about Manolis’ unique life and career. International wrestling legend and former WWE and WCW superstar Medusa who narrates the documentary will also be there. She really identified with his story and the trials and triumphs he went through. We are asking people to wear masks at the premiere to protect Manoli as his immune system will be shot because of the chemotherapy. No political reason, just to protect him. For those not able to attend, there will be an online screening to be announced soon. MS: Yes It is a beautiful family story and I am very happy to do the donation because it is very personal to me. This is a fight I am going through right now and I am going to win. Thank God I have good doctors and the last time I saw them they said I am doing 60% better and that is like a miracle. Y: Jason, can you share a fun behind the scenes story about the documentary? JB: I think the most fun I had was when we filmed a sequence of Manoli getting in the ring and showing me a few wrestling moves. I was elated and will never forget that day. Just the knowledge he was giving, I was soaking up every minute. Even just how to throw a proper forearm. I remember him really working with me on that as well. He didn’t want me to accidentally hit to hard. Y: As Director/Producer, what has been your proudest moment about the documentary? JB: Honestly, I’m just proud about the whole dang thing. There is one small thing that would go unmentioned as it’s a small detail. I told my composer that the end credits music would be approached as if it were his entrance music today. Manoli said if he came out it would be to Zorba the Greek. We couldn’t use that of course due to copyrights, so we used it for inspiration. So the end credits music is The Flying Greek entrance music. Y: Manoli, where were you born and what was life like growing up in Greece

VCW

from Page 1

on the line Saturday night, as VCW Liberty Champion “Greek God” Papadon will defend against Arik Royal. In November, Papadon ended the three-year reign of “Platinum Icon” Phil Brown with some nefarious tactics. Upon his victory, the “Greek God” demanded silence from VCW fans. Instead, he was greeted with a chorus of boos. The crowd was enraged with the way Papadon won the title. Although Arik Royal has only been with VCW for a few months, he’s already garnered solid support from fans. Time will tell if that will be enough for him to walk out of the Norfolk Masonic Temple as the new VCW Liberty Champion. The first-ever Tidings of Destruction Derby Match will take place this Saturday night. Six wrestlers compete in a one-fall to a finish bout in which the first individual to score a pinfall or submission will be declared the winner. This one is guaranteed to be out of control, off the wall action like only VCW can provide. Phil Brown, BK Westbrook, Dezmon King, Isaiah Frazier, Fenix Fury and the debuting Boar are the six participants. Whoever ends up scoring

Manoli is also known as Mike Pappas. (GEORGE NAPOLITANO)

dotes about Andre? MS: When Andre came to New York, I happened to be there. I was the smallest and he was the biggest. At that time, Vince McMahon Senior used all my pictures with Andre in the posters to advertise him. Wrestling journalist and photographer Bill Apter took the very first picture of Andre and me together. It was at Madison Square Garden and he put it in the magazine as a centerfold. Also another wrestling journalist and photographer George Napolitano took pictures of Andre and me together in Philadelphia. Andre was really a very good friend of mine. I travelled with him many, many times, always driving and Andre was very polite. He would not like to sit in the back because he did not want to insult me, like I was his chauffeur. So he was always sitting in the front and because I am very small, and I needed to have the front car seat close to the brake and gas pedals, Andre’s knees would be up to the windshield. So let’s say we drove to Philadelphia and he wants to drink beer. He would call me Boss or Michel, because he was French and did not speak English very well. He would say, ‘Michel, why don’t you go in and buy the beer’. He would pay for it. I would ask him. How much beer he wanted and if we were say 120 miles away, he would say, ‘Well, buy two cases’. He would drink a lot of beer and wanted me to drink too. When we would go out, he would get mad at people who would not call him by his name. He would tell them, ‘I am a human being like you, don’t treat me like that’. He did not want to be around a lot of people all of the time because of that reason. Y: How did you get the nickname ‘The Flying Greek’? MS: Bill Apter gave me that nickname. At that time you had ‘The Golden Greek’ Spiros Arion and John Tolos in New York so Bill Apter called me ‘The Flying Greek’, because when I came to New York, everybody was doing more kicking and punching and I did more the high flying. The people liked me because they saw me doing different things. Y: What are you doing today? Today I am a jeweler, I own my own store, Manoli Jewelers here in Springfield, Illinois for the last 42 years. I have always been involved in the community here, and I along with a friend, we started the Greek Orthodox Church (Saint Thomas) here in Springfield. I brought our culture here with a Greek Festival every year and we also have a monastery here as well. It makes me really happy that we are in the middle of nowhere, but we have orthodoxy here. Yiorgo is an arts, entertainment and sports writer. A stage, TV and movie actor, he is also a sports entertainer, educator, motivational speaker, writer, storyteller and columnist.

during and after World War II? M: I was born in a very small village, about 400 people, called Saint Isidoros on the island of Rhodes in the country of Greece. We were seven kids and my family moved to the capital of Rhodes in 1947 when I was six years old. We all lived in one room. We had no bed. We all slept on the floor one next to the other. We had no electricity, no bathroom, no running water. There was a fountain in the neighborhood and my mother would go and get the water from there and bring it to our house for cooking, drinking and we took a bath probably once a month. It was very, very difficult years. Many times we had no breakfast. Many days we only ate beans. My mother would make her own bread, give us a slice and we would wet the slice of bread, put some sugar on it and eat it. We ate meat maybe once every two months and we ate a lot of vegetables. We all stuck together and helped each other. Y: The documentary does an excellent job in telling your story. You eventually came to America and you wrestled in New York for Vince McMahon Senior,

Vince Kennedy McMahon’s father. Can you tell us about that? MS: I never would think even in my biggest dream that I would travel all over the world, be here in the United States and get to know so many wonderful people thanks to wrestling. To answer your question, I always had the guts to make the calls. All they can say is no. So I called New York, told them that at that time I was working in Tennessee, I wanted to go visit my sister in New Jersey and could I work for them a little while. They said yes. My first match was in Philadelphia against ‘The Unpredictable’ Johnny Rodz. I had a fantastic match and Vince McMahon Senior, he liked my work style very well and he treated me very nice. I asked him if I could stay a little longer and he said yes but I had to ask Nick Gulas first because I was working under Gulas work visa. Nick said yes and I was able to stay and work for the WWWF back then. Mr. McMahon liked me and my style and I did really well there. I really appreciate what Mr. McMahon did for me. Y: There are famous pictures with you and Andre. Can you share some fun anec-

the deciding fall will garner some momentum that could catapult them further up the rankings. Finally, in late breaking news, it’s been announced that VCW Commissioner George Pantas will be the special guest on Loulies Lounge. Loulies Lounge is hosted by “The Big 44” Tim Loulies and sponsored by the Virginia Beach Funny Bone. Last time the Commissioner was a special guest in the Lounge, he was assaulted by Director of Operations Jerry Stephanitsis and his hired thug The Reason. Pantas spent some time convalescing at home under the watchful eye of his doctors and thankfully is feeling better at this stage. This whole interview could very well be another setup. Stephanitsis has vowed that he’s had a “Grinch-like” change of heart just in time for the holiday season. If that’s true, fans will have to see it to believe it. VCW presents Tidings of Destruction on Saturday night December 4th at the Norfolk Masonic Temple. Once again, it is highly recommended that you purchase tickets in advance at vcwprowrestling.com. Although VCW has only hosted two events this year, both were attended by large crowds. VCW always produces a family-friendly live event that’s certain to entertain everyone. Hopefully, this author will see you there!

the Virginia Heavyweight Championship belt. (JONATHAN MCLARTY)


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

Food

Pulled Beef and Slaw Sliders. (COURTESY PHOTO)

A Hall of Fame Feast for Homegating Fans By Family Features Gathering your team to plan for a truly memorable game day at home starts with almost everyone’s favorite part of the festivities: the food. From meaty meals and zesty appetizers to sweet, long-lasting snacks, fuel your crowd with recipes that keep them coming back from kickoff to overtime. One superstar of the menu at many homegating parties is salsa, whether it’s used as a finishing touch in recipes or as a standalone snack to enjoy with chips, veggies or other pairings. In fact, according to the Game Day Eats Report from Fresh Cravings, 22% of guests would insist on running out to pick up salsa if it wasn’t available for the feast; 18% would even be devastated and consider leaving. Chef Anthony Serrano recommends these all-American recipes he makes for his family on game day. Pulled Beef and Slaw Sliders are perfect for piling high with delicious toppings before hitting the couch just in time for kickoff. Snacking throughout the action is a preferred approach for many fans, making Cast-Iron Smoked Queso Dip and Hummus Deviled Eggs go-to options for armchair quarterbacks.

These crowd-pleasers make game day worth celebrating, especially if you use a salsa with high-quality ingredients like vine-ripened tomatoes, crisp vegetables, zesty peppers and spices found in Fresh Cravings Salsas. Their flavor-packed, vibrant recipe offers a homemade-tasting alternative to the softer, duller blends of jarred salsa. To find more championship-level game day recipe inspiration, visit FreshCravings.com. Pulled Beef and Slaw Sliders Recipe courtesy of chef Anthony Serrano Pulled Beef: 2 pieces (about 3 pounds each) beef chuck roast 2 tablespoons taco seasoning or barbecue rub 1 cup beef bone broth 16 ounces Fresh Cravings Chunky Mild Salsa Salsa and Queso Slaw: 16 ounces Fresh Cravings Chunky Mild Salsa 16 ounces broccoli slaw blend ¼ cup green onions, sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup crumbled queso fresco 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ cup mayo 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2tablespoons cilantro (optional)

slider buns Fresh Cravings Salsa barbecue sauce pickles jalapenos sliced cheese roasted peppers onions To make pulled beef: Season both sides of beef with taco seasoning. Wrap with plastic wrap and place in fridge 2-12 hours before cooking. Place meat, beef bone broth and salsa in pressure cooker; seal according to pressure cooker directions. Cook on high 60 minutes. Once pressure cooker is safe to open according to instructions, open and let meat rest in liquid 15 minutes. Remove meat from liquid and place in large bowl. Carefully shred meat. Pour liquid, up to half, over meat while shredding to keep it juicy. To make salsa and queso slaw: In large bowl, mix salsa, slaw blend, green onions, salt, queso fresco, Dijon mustard, mayo, apple cider vinegar and cilantro, if desired. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until needed. To assemble sliders, place pulled beef and salsa and queso slaw on buns. Top with salsa, barbecue sauce, pickles, jalapenos, sliced cheese,

roasted peppers and onions. Cast-Iron Smoked Queso Dip Recipe courtesy of chef Anthony Serrano 2 cups cheddar cheese 1 cup Monterey Jack cheese 1 teaspoon almond flour 1 cup heavy cream 1 cup Fresh Cravings Restaurant Style Salsa 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon sea salt ¼ cup cooked chorizo 1 teaspoon liquid smoke cilantro, for garnish diced bell pepper, for garnish In cast-iron pan, mix cheddar cheese, Monterey Jack cheese and almond flour. Pour in heavy cream and salsa; bring to gentle simmer. Whisk while simmering 5-7 minutes, or until queso dip begins to thicken. Add paprika, salt, chorizo and liquid smoke; adjust seasoning as necessary. Garnish with cilantro and bell pepper. Hummus Deviled Eggs Recipe courtesy of chef Anthony Serrano 6 hard-boiled eggs, peeled ¼ cup Fresh Cravings Classic Hummus ¼ cup smoked cheddar cheese 2 tablespoons bacon, cooked and crumbled 1 teaspoon yellow mustard 1 teaspoon salt smoked Spanish paprika, for garnish parsley, for garnish Cut hard-boiled eggs in half lengthwise. Remove yolks and place in bowl. Using fork, mash yolks into fine crumble. Add hummus, cheese, bacon, mustard and salt; mix well. Evenly disperse teaspoons of yolk mixture into egg whites. Sprinkle with any remaining bacon, paprika and parsley.

Easy and Delicious Ethnic Dishes By Family Features When tried-and-true family favorites turn stale and boring, digging through cookbooks and sorting through blogs for new recipes may seem far too time-consuming for your busy evenings. However, a simple ethnic twist in the kitchen can turn bland dinners into exciting meals. You don’t need a plane ticket to explore international cuisines. Start with a versatile ingredient like rice, one of the most common kitchen staples around the world. It can transport you to another country in recipes like Korean-inspired Kimchi Fried Rice Bowl with Fried Egg, which provides a savory blend of veggies, basmati rice, soy sauce, sesame oil and more. A quick and easy recipe complete in less than 30 minutes, it’s a simple option for exploring new flavors and encouraging kiddos to expand their horizons. For a spicy take on ethnic cuisine, you can push mealtime over the top with Thai Cashew Chicken Fried Rice, ready to eat in half an hour. Aromatic jasmine rice is cooked to fluffy perfection then cooled before being combined with sauteed chicken, sugar snap peas and garlic. The dish gets a kick from a Thai red chili pepper, which offers a moderate to hot level of spice; simply omit if spice isn’t nice for you or your loved ones. Mix in soy sauce and a sprinkle of cashews for a truly traditional Thai flavor. Ready in just 10 minutes, Success Rice’s no measure, no mess, boil-in-bag options make these recipes and other delicious ethnic staples possible with perfectly fluffy rice and quinoa. As a foolproof solution for dishes worth savoring, it takes all the guesswork out of making rice and gives home cooks more time to focus on the rest of the recipe and dinner together as a family.

Kimchi Fried Rice Bowl with Fried Egg. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Find more family meal ideas with an ethnic twist at SuccessRice.com. Kimchi Fried Rice Bowl with Fried Egg Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 4 2 bags Success Basmati Rice 2 tablespoons canola oil ½ pound mushrooms, sliced 1 onion, diced 1 cup kimchi, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon ginger, minced 4 cups baby spinach 2 tablespoons soy sauce 4 teaspoons sesame oil 4 eggs, fried Prepare rice according to package directions.

In large wok or skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Stir-fry mushrooms and onions 3-5 minutes, or until softened. Stir in kimchi, garlic and ginger; stir-fry 1-2 minutes, or until well coated. Stir in rice, spinach, soy sauce and sesame oil. Stir-fry 2-3 minutes, or until spinach starts to wilt and rice is heated through. Divide rice between four bowls and top each with one fried egg. Thai Cashew Chicken Fried Rice Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 4 2 bags Success Jasmine Rice 2 tablespoons canola oil ½ teaspoon salt ¾ pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, cubed

½ pound sugar snap peas, trimmed 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1 Thai red chili pepper, thinly sliced (optional) 3 tablespoons soy sauce ⅓ cup roasted cashews Prepare rice according to package directions. Let cool completely. In large wok or skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Season chicken with salt. Cook chicken, stirring, 3-5 minutes, or until starting to brown. Stir in sugar snap peas, garlic and chili pepper, if desired. Cook, stirring, 3-5 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through and snap peas are tender-crisp. Stir in rice. Cook 2-3 minutes, stirring to combine. Stir in soy sauce. Cook 2-3 minutes, or until rice is heated through. Sprinkle with cashews before serving.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 5

Health

Alex and Allison Pate are pictured shortly after Alex’s cancer diagnosis in 2017. (PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX AND ALLISON PATE)

For Many Wounded Warriors, Not All Damage is Visible or Combat-Related By Jacob Moore

MHS Communications

Alex and Allison Pate have known each other since they were teenagers. Alex joined the Air Force after high school and the couple married shortly thereafter. Alex is now a retired staff sergeant, and the Pates currently live on a farm in the same rural southwestern Missouri town of Forsyth where they both grew up. What makes them unique is that their journey back to home, while it may feel like a lifetime of experiences for the young couple, has actually only taken a little less than five years. Alex is a ‘wounded warrior,’ but he never saw combat in his military career. His battle was against cancer and the toll that the subsequent treatment took on his body. He is a stark reminder that not all wounded warriors suffered their injuries in combat operations. “About two years into his service, he was diagnosed with cancer,” said Allison, who now serves as her husband’s ‘informal’ caregiver. “He was having problems when he was doing PT and getting really fatigued and finally went and got things checked out.” At the time, she was 19 and he was 22. Alex learned that his testicular cancer had already spread to his chest and abdomen, and required immediate intervention. “They went ahead and, within the week, removed one of his testicles and had a port [for the administration of medication and fluids] put in. They also did some scans and realized they needed to start chemotherapy the following week,” Allison said.

“His chemo schedule was very intense. He had five days of eight-hour sessions the first week and every week it would start over again.” The physical effects of Alex’s treatment were almost immediate. The emotional effects would come later. “We basically lived in the hospital and, within the first two months, he had lost 60 to 80 pounds. He couldn’t keep a drink of water down, let alone food. It was very scary,” Allison recalled. After about six weeks of recovery following his final chemotherapy treatment, Alex returned to active duty. “When he got back to work, they gave him light duties to get started, but the anxiety and depression due to being in a small room with no more than two or three people throughout chemo was taking over him,” said Allison. “He just wasn’t himself anymore. We were young and we wanted to act like it, to be excited. I had never seen him like this and we kind of shut down.” They were told that what he was going through was “normal” for a cancer patient and that the anxiety and depression would slowly go away. “We were told that he would be the old Alex. He’ll be athletic. He’ll want to be outside. He hunts, he fishes, he’ll be a ‘man’s man’ - he loves to work,” she said. “That wasn’t Alex anymore. He would come home from work and sleep for 15 or 16 hours. He didn’t have any drive and he didn’t want to do anything anymore.” The chemotherapy had taken its toll, especially on his knees and back. “He had no muscle carrying him when he lost

all of that weight.” Air Force Wounded Warrior volleyball practice session “The old Alex” wasn’t returning and, as a vehicle operator, he was expected to use heavy equipment, including operating tow trucks and rigs, as well as performing maintenance. “His body was the main thing he used for his job, and he wasn’t able to do those things anymore,” Allison said. Alex faced skepticism within his command. After fighting off cancer, they expected him to return to being “young and healthy” again, physically and mentally. This was not the case. “He was treated like: ‘You got through it move on.’ ” Two years of physical therapy couldn’t fix the degenerated and bulging disks in his back. She recounts a medical visit to Louisiana State University’s Surgery Center: “They walked in and opened his file and said, “Oh, this has to be the 80-year-old man next door. We’re sorry. We must have mixed your X-rays up,”” But that was his X-ray at age 23, she said. Even though his wounds aren’t immediately visible, Allison says she and her husband are still able to identify with wounded warriors who have suffered injuries both inside and outside of combat. “We don’t ever compare our story to other people, who may have been injured in combat, because there’s no two people who are going to be alike. But we can find common denominators and connect with people and be there for each other in the ways that we know how to.” Allison said she and Alex really found their

support network when he became a part of the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program, or AFW2. “That’s where he found people that fully believed him and fully listened to what was going on. We still consider some of the people we’ve met through AFW2 as family,” she said. “I have a notebook full of people that I can call at any time, when I might be doubting myself.” Looking back, Allison credits an unnamed Air Force psychiatrist at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana - the Pates’ one and only duty station - as being one of Alex’s biggest advocates on the road that would eventually lead to him being medically retired. “He is the main reason Alex was able to get out the way he did. A lot of people couldn’t connect the dots - why his anxiety wasn’t getting better; why his depression wasn’t getting better; why his body was still so deteriorated,” she said. “That psychiatrist believed him from day one. That single person made him feel seen, heard and appreciated.” The telehealth technology that has expanded since the COVID-19 pandemic also helped lessen Alex’s previous anxiety about attending in-person appointments. “Alex will do things privately as much as he can,” said Allison. “Being able to go online and book a doctor’s appointment on the computer, doing therapy appointments at home - stuff like that has helped with his anxiety more than anything.” Testicular cancer is most common among males between the ages 15 and 34. It can be detected early through screenings both at home and by a doctor; recovery rates are very high among those who identify it early. Alex has remained cancer-free since he left the Air Force. The Pates now have two children, ages one and two. Alex now works part-time as a tow truck driver, while Allison is a stay-at-home mom and caregiver.

Mental Stress is like a ‘Check Engine Light’ Flashing–Don’t Ignore It By Janet A. Aker

MHS Communications

For one Air Force senior enlisted leader, the problem of “combat stress” and the toll it takes on warfighters — and often on their families, too — continues to be an issue that the military community struggles to fully understand. “Sometimes they don’t feel right about only having mental injuries. They don’t think it’s a big deal, but it is,” said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Jason David, the chief enlisted manager for the Defense Media Activity. David spoke about his own journey of recovery through the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program during a video conversation with Defense Health Agency Command Sgt. Major Michael Gragg at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas, Nov. 19. They were both attending Virtual CARE Week events as part of the DOD’s Warrior Care Month observance. David was seriously wounded in Operation Iraqi Freedom and said he “had a hard time with recovery in general.” He later was deployed to Afghanistan, and made use both times of mental health care services available to troops and veterans as part of his recovery. “I’m not ashamed to say that I’ve seen a psychiatrist. I’m not ashamed to say I’ve been to behavioral or mental health care,” he told Gragg during their conversation during the Day of Healing events David also spoke about the continued soci-

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Jason David spoke about his own journey of recovery through the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program during a video conversation with Defense Health Agency Command Sgt. Major Michael Gragg at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas, Nov. 19.

etal stigmatization of wounded warriors. “Aside from the physical [injuries], the mental stress — they call it combat stress — that is a bizarre concept for folks that are not serving, who haven’t served, or don’t know anyone who has served in the armed forces,” he said. The physical and mental recovery “takes a toll on yourself, your family, and your livelihood.” And for those who have invisible wounds, the burden can even be bigger, David said. He used the analogy of an automobile engine warning light to help explain the effects that psychological injuries can have. “What happens when your check engine

light turns on? Do you just ignore it until your engine stops or are you responsible because you’re thinking about the longer game, you’re thinking about the big picture?” “You don’t know if it’s going to be a dramatic chain of events that’s going to ultimately hurt you in the long run.” The priority placed on mental health and total force fitness reflects a generational change for many senior leaders, David said. “Leaders should include Warrior Care in their toolbox,” David said. “You can’t be the leader you grew up with today in 2021. You have to evolve” in your thoughts and actions about wounded warriors and warrior care. “You have to be a different leader. What

worked 20 to 30 years ago won’t work today.” Visit the Defense Health Agency Facebook page for more of the interview with David. In addition to Warrior Care programs and each Service’s treatment programs, Military OneSource provides wounded warrior specialty consultation services to help eligible wounded, ill or injured service members, veterans and their families get immediate assistance for issues related to health care, resources, facilities and benefits. Service members and veterans injured in accidents or battling serious illnesses are also eligible. For help with thoughts of suicide, contact the Veterans Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 and press 1.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021

Estate Sales Estate Sales

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Flea Market/Bazaars Estate Sales OLDE TOWNE ANTIQUES/FLEA MARKET. Dec. 4, 10-2. Fantastic finds. 441 Middle St. 757-339-1876. oldetowneportsmouth.com

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WOOD FENCES, BUSHES, MULCH & YARD CLEAN UP Weed Eating, Blowing, Grass Cutting. Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Plumbing

Roofing CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs-business, BBB 757-377-2933

★ HONEST PLUMBING ★ ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS Drains ♦ Fixtures ♦ Water heater 837-6903 OR 510-5970

CUSTOM ROOF COMPANY Quality Work. Licensed & Insured. 757-329-2224 FREE ROOFING ESTIMATES JAYHAWK EXTERIORS 757-963-6559 www.jayhawkext.com

Professional Services MOWING SERVICES I have a JD tractor with a long-reach, 6-15 ft batwing, and side mowers for hire. Larry 252-333-8557

ROOF REPAIR Shingles/Rubber/Slate/ Metal/Chimney Flashing. 757-718-1072

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021 7 Autos for Sale

Trucks and SUVs

Boats & Watercraft

HYUNDAI 2018 SONATA

FORD 2013 FIESTA

1981 32FT TROJAN SEDAN Port Motor New (20 Hours) Both Motors Run, Located in Wanchese, NC $15,000 OBO. Call: 252-339-3747 MAC 26 SAILBOAT w. 50 HP Tohatsu Built By MacGregor Yachts 1997 w. heavy duty, E-Z loader 4 wheel trailer $12,250. 757-617-7373

Education/Training Estate Sales APPRENTICE TRAINER IMS Gear Virginia, LLC seeks Apprenticeship Trainer to work in Virginia Beach, VA. Req’d: Voc’l High Sch Dipl. w/ conc’n in Indust’l Maint., Mechatrncs or rel. field, or equiv. Knowl. of Appr’p train’g proc’s & 3 yrs exp: Read’g schem’s & CAD draw’s; Troublesh’g pneumatic & e-pneum’c comp’ts of industr’l mach. and equip’t; Knowl. of PLC progr troublesh’g proc’s. Apply: Kimberly.gerick@imsgear.com

Travel/Camping Trailers CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

Autos for Sale

SE AUTO ALLOYS 1 OWNER 34K MILES $18750.00 TRINITY PREOWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757963-2299

4DR AUTO AC GOOD MILES GREAT GAS MILEAGE! 70K MILES $6950.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-373-4245

LINCOLN 2000 TOWN CAR

FORD 2020 ESCAPE

Excellent Condition Silver $4000 Call:757-618-0661

Good news.

MAZDA 2017 MAZDA3

BUICK 2013 LACROSSE

PREMIUM LEATHER FULLY LOADED ONLY 32K MILES $17450.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

SPORT 4DR 5SPD LEATHER 1 OWNER $16750.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

USED TRAILER SALE!!! OVER 100 Avail. For Boats 12’-38’ BUDGET BOATS: (757) 543 -7595

SEL LEATHER ROOF NAVIGATION 1 OWNER 7K MILES $28450.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

JEEP 2019 CHEROKEE

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

MAZDA 2017 MAZDA3

CHEVROLET 2020 MALIBU

Room For Rent CHESAPEAKE Large room for rent. TV, bed, internet, washer & dryer. $190 weekly. Must be the cleaning type. Call Heith: 757-581-9520

LT AUTO AC 23K MILES 1 OWNER $20950.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

CHRYSLER 2006 CROSSFIRE

Convertible, 32k miles, mint condition. $16,500. 252-312-7727

HONDA 2019 FIT

Fridays in The Pilot

SPORT 4DR 5SPD LEATHER 1 OWNER $16750.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

TOYOTA 2019 HIGHLANDER

MERCEDES-BENZ 2011 E-CLASS

convertible 41k mi black/beige int svc recs new tires brakes nav XM showroom local $22195 9193244391

MERCEDES-BENZ 2019 220A

Driven 8100 miles, white ext/black int, 4 dr, seats 5 people. Clean title. 1 owner. Smoke free. 100% garage kept. Excellent condition. $40,000. 757-808-4042

XLE LEATHER ROOF NAVIGATION 28K MILES PRICED TO SELL $35750.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today.

Wanted Automotive

Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

LX 5DR AUTO AC 1 OWNER $16450.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

LATITUDE 4X4 V6 AUTO 1 OWNER $22950.00 TRINITY PRE-OWNED AUTO SALES VA DLR 757-963-2299

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Fun & Games

ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035

Jump start your day.

Jumpstart yourday. Early homedelivery 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Sudoku

CryptoQuip

Last week’s CryptoQuip answer

My car is dreadfully overdue for maintenance. I’ll ask the mechanic to check it at his oiliest convenience.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, December 2, 2021