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VOL. 27, No. 03, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

USMC, DOD COMMENCE OPERATION WARP SPEED NearlyoneyearafterCOVID-19 arrivedintheU.S.,thevaccine wasapprovedforemergency useauthorization(EUA)onDec. 19,2020. See A7

01.21.2021_01.27.2021

SUBFOR announces 2020 Junior Officers of the Year By Holly Carey

Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK

Shelby West Captain Dianna Wolfson took the helm Jan. 15 as the 110th commander of Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) and first female leader in its 253-year history.

Captain Dianna Wolfson becomes 110th commander, first female leader of Norfolk Naval Shipyard By Michael D Brayshaw

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH

Captain Dianna Wolfson took the helm Jan. 15 as the 110th commander of Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) and first female leader in its 253-year history. Wolfson also holds the distinction of becoming the first female commander of any of the nation’s four public shipyards when she assumed command in June 2019 of Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF). This marks her third NNSY tour, with previous assignments as Operations Officer and Project Superintendent for the USS Newport News (SSN 750) Engineered Overhaul. Wolfson takes command of the shipyard during a period of great transition, as NNSY is upgrading its facilities as part of Naval Sea

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Systems Command’s Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program (SIOP) and continues integrating cutting-edge technologies in ship repair and modernization. In the midst of that, NNSY has worked in the past year to minimize the spread of COVID-19 amongst its nearly11,000-member workforce while maximizing the mission of delivering assets back to the Navy. One of Wolfson’s priorities will be implementing a codified NNSY Strategic Framework, focused on improving four key areas: leadership performance, organizational culture, employee development, and mission execution. “One phrase I will use often because I truly believe in its importance is ‘One Mission, One Team,’” said Wolfson. “We have one mission—to forge every opportunity to preserve our national security and gain a competitive advantage to be the shipyard our Navy needs

Meet EEO Specialist Ashley Vanderjagt Ashley Vanderjagt, Arizonanativerecentlysat downtoshine abit oflight onwhosheisandherdecisiontomovefromherthe insuranceindustry. See A2

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throughourexceptional,safe,timelyandcostconscious delivery of our warships. Together, we are in the mission of relentlessly chasing best performance in the stewardship of our nation’s naval assets.” Wolfson has extensive experience not only at three of the nation’s four public shipyards, but also serving a variety of vessels. As part of the Navy’s initial groups of female surface nuclear officers in the1990s, Wolfson earned her surface warfare qualification while serving on USS George Washington (CVN 73) from 1998 to 2001 and later served on USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) from 2007 to 2009. She also has a deep knowledge of submarines, including roles as assistant project superintendent, docking officer and nuclear zone manager at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine 

Commander, Submarine Forces announced the winners of the 2020 Junior Officer of the Year (JOOY) competition, Jan. 8. “Bravo Zulu to all junior officers who were nominated and selected,” said Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, Commander, Submarine Forces. "The competition this year was intense, and I am extremely proud of these outstanding undersea warriors.” The JOOY program gives special recognition to those junior officers of the Submarine Force, to include submarine tenders, who demonstrate superior seamanship, management, leadership and tactical and technical knowledge. Recognition as a JOOY is based on squadron-wide and tender competition. The winners are: - Lt. John B. Camuso, USS Minnesota (SSN 783), Commander, Commander, Submarine Squadron 4, Groton, Connecticut - Lt. Molly C. McNamara, USS John Warner (SSN 785), Commander, Submarine Squadron 6, Norfolk - Lt. Joshua L. Steves, USS Providence (SSN 719), Commander, Submarine Squadron 12, Groton, Connecticut - Lt. Haley E. Bonner, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Blue), Commander, Submarine Squadron 16, Kings Bay, Georgia - Lt. Thomas F. Gruebl, USS Alaska (Gold) (SSBN 732), Commander, SubSee SUBFOR | A7

Navy Expeditionary Combat Command leadership receives COVID-19 vaccine From Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Public Affairs VIRIGINIA BEACH

Rear Adm. Joseph DiGuardo, Commander Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) received the COVID-19 vaccine on Jan. 11. NECC command staff also received the vaccine including; Mr. Michael Durkin, Executive Director; Capt. Ed Gettins, Chief of Staff; and Master Chief Jeffery Barnes; Force Master Chief.

See WOLFSON | A7

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See VACCINE | A7

Virtual Leadership

NIWCAtlantic

With theCOVID-19pandemic threatening an“all stop”to required career milestone leadershipandethicstraining, thestaffofNavy Reserve Naval LeadershipandEthics Center usedinnovation and teamwork tomeetthemoment . See A6

NIWC Atlanticrecently heldaDigital Engineering Challenge designed to encourage employee-developed, model-based solutions forcomplex problems. See A5

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Courtesy photo Facility Manager David Powers points out the recently completed electromagnetics integration facility on Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD). The facility will house 50 personnel specialized in Electromagnetic Environmental Effects, including modern computer stations, a laboratory, and team meeting rooms.

New Year, New Office Space: Navy invests in facility modernization at Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division From Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Public Affairs DAHLGREN

For several dozen engineers at Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), bringing in the New Year also means settling in at new workstations on the base. A recently completed electromagnetics integration facility in Dahlgren, Virginia houses modern computer stations, a laboratory, and team meeting rooms. When fully occupied post-COVID, the new facility will provide workspaces for approximately 50 personnel specialized in Electromagnetic Environmental Effects, or E3. “We provide a full range of testing and systems engineering resources to ensure

that ships, weapons systems, and ordnance are safe, reliable and interoperable,” said Katie Willis, who leads these projects as the Electromagnetic Effects Division Head at Dahlgren. In its simplest conceptual form, E3 works with the wide variety of equipment found on a modern warship, and helps ensure that the electronics on one system do not interfere with those of its neighbors. The idea, as Willis put it, is “to make sure that the systems can all work together.” Putting that simple concept into practice, however, presents an engineering challenge beyond the imagination of non-technical specialists. It is also a task that has only grown more complex in recent years. The personnel seated in Dahlgren’s new facility will focus primarily on systems located on the topside of ships, but even that relatively

compact space can now sport high-energy laser weapons, unmanned systems, and sensors that the Navy did not have to contend with in prior generations. The topside work also needs to mesh with equipment internal to the ship and under the water line. Every new layer of equipment brings new capabilities to Navy warfighters, and also translates into the increasingly complex projects within Dahlgren’s Electromagnetic Effects offices. The new construction at NSWCDD is one of several recent investments that Willis said will “position Dahlgren to continue excellence in the E3 line of work.” In addition to new capabilities and efficiencies that come with a modern office environment, the new space also represents an investment in the needs of the Navy’s most important

resource: its workforce. “It’s a significant improvement on the physical environment that people are sitting in,” said Willis. “Employees have noted that it is very nice to have office spaces that they look forward to coming into each day.” Good morale supports employee retention, and both of those are critical ingredients for accomplishing the larger national security mission. The recently completed building comes amidst a burst of related construction activity for electromagnetics integration work at Dahlgren. By the spring of 2021, NSWCDD will occupy a second new facility with workstations for 66 people. In 2022, a third facility with 65 seats will also be completed. All three projects are funded through the Navy’s Capital Investment Program, which supports infrastructure reinvestments that improve government operations by replacing outdated facilities. Across the base as a whole, NSWCDD supports contracts totaling approximately $2 billion in a given year. NSWCDD hosts more than 11,000 civilian, contractor, and active duty military personnel and constitutes the largest single employer in King George County, Virginia.

Meet EEO Specialist Ashley Vanderjagt By MCSN Ashley Croom commander, navy region mid atlantic public affairs NORFOLK

Even with the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, the Equal Employment Opportunity Office at Norfolk’s Fleet and Family Support Center has remained as busy as ever. The schedule is packed with diversity and inclusion group meetings, day-to-day operations, and coordination of the open command discussion “Real Talk with Admiral Rock.” With all that going on, it can be hard for newcomers to know who’s who, but with all that hard work and effort our counselors and specialists put in, it’s important to recognize the civilians who continue to work tirelessly to support our military community. Ashley Vanderjagt, a Tuscon, Arizona native and equal employment opportunity specialist at Naval Station Norfolk, recently sat down to shine a bit of light on who she is and her decision to move from her the insurance industry to her current position. “I had been in insurance claims before this. I spent about seven years total doing that, all while applying for federal employment,” she said. “Fortunately I was able to take a break in work in order to earn a graduate degree in public administration.”

At the time, Vanderjagt, along with her active duty U.S. Coast Guard husband and kids, were stationed in Petaluma, California. “It was the best little town. Everyone was so nice and they had amazing food and wine,” said Vanderjagt. “But where we lived, there were no jobs. And a daily twohour commute down to San Francisco didn’t make sense.” After her husband took order to the East Coast, Vanderjagt’s persistence eventually paid off when she was able to secure an interview for her current position. “Once my husband actually received orders for a job in Chesapeake, I started applying,” said Vanderjagt. “I was overjoyed when I got the news that I was hired. I had wanted to work in this field for a long time.” As an EEO specialist, Vanderjagt is part of a team that serves as mediation for individuals who feel they have been discriminated against, as well as those on the other side of that complaint. Even though she’s moved on from insurance, Vanderjagt said she’s found similarities which have made her transition easier. “It’s more human claims than property claims,” she said. “It’s still investigating and trying to come to an agreed middle ground.”

MCSN Ashley Croom

With the current world climate surrounding race and politics, the EEO team wants to be sure that they are making the necessary moves to stay ahead of and lead the charge on neutralizing division. “It isn’t just race and gender,” said Vanderjagt. “We’re constantly trying to spearhead initiatives to raise awareness of the importance and benefits of diversity.” Part of Vanderjagt’s involvement in that improvement includes attending diversity

and inclusion meetings. Her department is also teaming up with Human Resources to make sure diversity goals are being met, recruiting from colleges with more diverse campuses, and assisting people in requesting reasonable accommodations. “I’ve been very happy with my current position,” said Vanderjagt. “I’m always looking for ways to improve the climate for my peers and those I serve, and hope to be doing this for as long time to come.”

Commander,Navy Region Mid-Atlantic(CNRMA): Rear Adm.Charles W. “Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA):

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A3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

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A4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

NAVSUP WSS, PEO USC establish Strategic Supply Support Plan ensuring FFG 62 is war-ready at delivery By Kelly Luster

NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support Public Affairs

MECHANICSBURG, Pa.

Rear Adm. Doug Noble, commander, Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, and Rear. Adm. Casey Moton, Program Executive Officer, Unmanned and Small Combatants, signed a strategic Memorandum of Agreement on Dec. 4, 2020 regarding supply support for the Guided Missile Frigate, also known as FFG 62 Constellation Class. The MOA establishes a mutual framework governing the organizational goals, relationships, responsibilities, and acquisition activities between NAVSUP WSS and PEO USC, as they relate to the Constellation Class Frigate (CCF) Program Office. “NAVSUP WSS is very excited about this partnership agreement, particularly for its strong alignment with Naval Sustainment System (NSS)-Supply goals,” said Noble. “The teams at NAVSUP Headquarters, NAVSUP WSS, PEO USC and the CCF Program Office have been working tirelessly to bring this to fruition. Not only will it help our teams perform their jobs to meet the mission, but ultimately prepares a more lethal, war-ready Navy faster than ever before!” The agreement institutes a strategy to implement accelerated support of the entire FFG 62 class during the outfitting, post-delivery, and initial operating stages of the program. By capturing technical and configuration data in the detail design and construction phase, modeling and simulating performance outcomes to determine readiness requirements, and leveraging strategic contracting between NAVSEA and NAVSUP WSS, this agreement will expedite spares delivery to the supply

An artist rendering of the guided-missile frigate FFG(X).

shelves and the fleet. “We see this MOA as the vehicle to facilitate better supply support and readiness for our shipmates around the globe through sustainment of the Navy’s Constellation Class Frigates,” said Rear Adm. Moton. “This is a blueprint for success that leads to war readiness at delivery for these ships which will be critical for our Navy,” he added. Reduction of interim supply support arrangements between the CCF program office and NAVSUP WSS are specifically targeted as a primary goal of the MOA based on the technical maturity and robust understanding of the reliability of the proposed Frigate parent design and associated Government Furnished Equipment. “Historically, in maritime surface programs, a PEO and NAVSUP WSS have never been so integrated during ship design selection phases and early acquisition planning,” said Stephanie Enck, Maritime Unmanned and Small Combatant Deputy Director, NAVSUP WSS. “This will enable us to strate-

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gically plan product support, life cycle sustainment, and budget requirements to support the required operational availability of the FFG 62 class. I truly believe through using the MOA and through continued transparency of data transfer between both organizations, FFG 62 class will be able to achieve full NAVSUP material support upon the delivery of the ship.” The CCF Program Office acquisition strategy is predicated upon leveraging existing programs of record, with the primary hull, mechanical, and electrical systems based upon an established parent design. Additional benefits that will be realized through establishment of this MOA include improved design and construction processes by utilizing cross-Systems Command (SYSCOM) personnel; establishing a framework for validation and verification of a singular readiness model for use as the authoritative FFG 62 class sustainment and sparing model; and, rooting metric tracking in those that most directly impact FFG 62 class key performance parameters.

Courtesy graphic

“This MOA represents both SYSCOMS recognizing and acting upon the need for robust planning for sustainment from ship design and construction phases all the way through fleet introduction and beyond,” said Jonas Brown, Director of Product Support & Readiness for the CCF Program Office. “By leveraging better modeling, by better integrating our teams, and by building accountability into every step of our processes, the PEO USC and NAVSUP teams are well positioned to deliver and sustain a world class ship that will be first to fight for the next 50 years.” NAVSUP WSS is one of 11 commands under Commander, NAVSUP. Headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, and employing a diverse, worldwide workforce of more than 22,500 military and civilian personnel, NAVSUP’s mission is to provide supplies, services, and quality-of-life support to the Navy and joint warfighter. Learn more at www.navsup.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/navsupwss and https://twitter.com/navsupsyscom.


A5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Kirsten St. Peter Six engineers from Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD), (top row from left to right: Fred Williams, Taylor nae Million, Chedric Waters; bottom row from left to right: Yaseen Farooq, Chelsea Kpodi, Jabril Muhammad) were recognized with the 2021 Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA) in the Modern-Day Technology Leader and the Science Spectrum Trailblazers categories.

NSWCPD engineers honored with 2021 Black Engineer of the Year Awards By Keegan Rammel

Naval Surface Warfare Center Philadelphia Division Public Affairs

PHILADELPHIA

Six engineers from Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD) were recognized with the 2021 Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA) in the Modern-Day Technology Leader and the Science Spectrum Trailblazers categories, the U.S. Black Engineer Magazine recently announced. The BEYA Science Technology EngineeringandMathematics(STEM)Conferenceisa yearlyconferencecelebratingtheoutstanding achievements of Black engineers, as well as connecting students and professionals in the STEM field. NSWCPD’s winners will be honored during the 2021 BEYA STEM Virtual Conference on Feb. 12, 2021. These awards are grantedtoindividualsintheSTEMworkforce with the nominations reviewed and recommended for an award by a panel of leaders from industry, government, and academia. While this was the first BEYA award for all of the Command’s 2021 winners, NSWCPD has recruited at the STEM conference for years. Science Spectrum Trailblazer award winnerYaseenFarooq,NSWCPD’sNavalInnovative Science and Engineering (NISE) program manager, recruited Modern-Day Technology Leader winner Fred Williams, Logistics Product Readiness data manager, during the 2017 conference. “This award kind of brings things full-circleforme.Iwasattendingtheconferencewith a friend and had a few job offers on the table, but I was approached by Yaseen, and after talking to him I changed my plans and accepted a position at NSWCPD,” Williams said. “The importance of the event is to highlight Black excellence in STEM and the accomplishments of other Black engineers.” Williams has spent his three-year career modernizing and creating more efficient tools from the Command’s Reference Desk, providingengineeringandlogisticssupporttothe fleet,andimplementingautomatedprocesses, thus saving time and increasing accountability across the Command. Beyond his accomplishments at

NSWCPD, Williams volunteers as a mentor for several STEM programs, facilitates workshops for college students, and recruits for the Command. “I’m starting down the path of being a role model and I want to help others achieve success in their fields and mentor students who haven’t found one yet,” Williams said. Farooq, who won the Science Spectrum Trailblazer award after 5 years of recruiting at BEYA, was recognized for his work on the college recruitment team and his role in enhancing the Command’s diversity. He has served as chairperson for the Command’s Equal Employment Opportunity Advisory Committee, is actively involved with the Survey Committee for the NSWCPD Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) Organizational Climate Survey (DEOCS), and is an active member of the NSWCPD African American Employee Resource Group (AAERG). “It is an honor to me to be recognized by BEYA and nominated by Philly,” Farooq said. “I’ve always wanted to win an award from BEYA; they are an organization I have a lot of respect for.” The Science Spectrum Trailblazer award honors “men and women actively creating newpathsforothersinscience,research,technology, and development … they distinguish themselves by constantly setting their sights higher, striving to innovate and open doors for others.” Farooq was nominated for the award, in part, for his passion for volunteering in STEM outreach programs and his outreach efforts with local schools, as well as for his role mentoring students in NSWCPD’s internship programs. “IvolunteerbecauseIwanttogivebackand define direction to our youth. I was encouraged to try STEM and I found my passion. I wanttobethatpersontobringthenextgeneration into STEM,” Farooq said. Modern Day Technology Leaders are defined by BEYA as, “professionals shaping the future of engineering, science, and technology.” Chedric Waters, NSWCPD’s Ship Controls: Surface Combatants branch head and Modern-Day Technology Leader award winner, defines it as, “an individual that can re-

main fluent and competent with the times, and someone that can navigate and bridge the gap between the generations. There are currently three generations in the workforce with three different mentalities and work ethics. Bridging those gaps and staying fluent and competent in all the tools available will bring success.” As work has been forced to go digital since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic Waters has lead his team while continuing to provide mission-critical services to the Ship Control Systems encompassing multiple combatant ship classes. His leadership of his branch has resulted in a safer and more reliable fleet. “It is extremely humbling to be acknowledged for impacting those around me,” Waters said. “Being recognized by my supervisors and peers is an indescribable feeling.” Chelsea Kpodi, Littoral Combat Ship Machinery Control Systems Lead Systems Engineer and Modern-Day Technology Leader Award winner, has spent her career implementing lean processes and increasing accountability in her branch and across the Command. In her current role she is responsible for implementingSystemEngineeringProcesses to manage risk, cost, and effort for LCS Freedom and Independence Class Control System programs and projects. She helps establish and execute goals for the program while providing reliable support for the Sailors. Kpodi has developed automated tools usingNSWCPD’scollaborativedigitalenvironment and has enhanced accountability through improving systems, processes, and metrics tracking. “I’m proud to be a front runner in Code 50 (Cybersecure Hull, Mechanical & Engineering Control Systems & Networks Department) using existing tools and finding new ways to use them. We have a lot of processes here so I’ve spent my career becoming an expert for these in my team,” Kpodi said. “BEYA’s message resonates very deeply with me as a Black woman, I hope to further promote STEM to minorities.” Jabril Muhammad, Sonar Dome Pressurization System In-Service Engineering Agent (ISEA) and Science Spectrum Trailblazer award winner is a member of the NSWCPD Strategic Team where he focuses on STEM and Vice-Chairperson, Co-Chairperson, and Outreach Committee Chairperson for NSWCPD’s AAERG.

Muhammad has been instrumental in several projects resulting in a safer, more reliable fleet. His support of the Chilled Water System and Electro-Mechanical Actuator Team resolvedobsolescence issues across severalsurface ship classes. As the Sonar Dome Pressurization System inspector for the Inspection and Survey teams, he uncovered potential risks and helped plan the timely delivery of replacement parts to keep the inspection timeline on track. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Muhammad has continued his crucial role as an ISEA, finding new ways to provide support to the Sailors remotely. Muhammad’s passion for STEM and outreach shines through in his role on the NSWCPD recruitment team and has helped define the Command’s outreach, recruiting, and onboarding strategies. “This award lets me know that there is so much more to be done. People have done so much for me that it gives me great inspiration to give back and to chart a course and lead,” Muhammad said. “It let me know that I’m on the right track in doing what I love in STEM.” Taylor Jánae Million, DDG Modernization Back Fit Project Lead and Modern-Day Technology Leader award winner, has only been with NSWCPD since September 2019, but has immediately made an impact on the DDG-51Integrated Bridge Control Program. SheimplementedanewScrumagileframework for the DDG-51 Systems Engineering Process and Software Delivery process that increased efficiency and accountability by effectively tracking deliverables and productivity metrics. This new process reduced the team’s time inefficacies generating thousands of dollars in savings with each delivery. “Being a modern day technology leader means a lot personally. I’ve always aspired to innovate. I’ve always had a passion for creation. This really reinforces that passion of mine to find different ways to pursue continuous improvement,” Million said. NSWCPD employs approximately 2,700 civilian engineers, scientists, technicians, and support personnel. The NSWCPD team does the research and development, test and evaluation, acquisition support, and in-service and logistics engineering for the non-nuclear machinery, ship machinery systems, and related equipment and material for Navy surface ships and submarines. NSWCPD is also the lead organization providing cybersecurity for all ship systems.

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A6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Virtual Leadership – Leveraging technology to facilitate leadership development during COVID-19 By MC1 Arthurgwain Marquez

Commander, Navy Reserve Force Public Affairs

NORFOLK

With the COVID-19 pandemic threatening an “all stop” to required career milestone leadership and ethics training, the staff of Navy Reserve Naval Leadership and Ethics Center (NR NLEC) used innovation and teamwork to meet the moment — and the Reserve Force mission — head-on. Navy Reserve officers are required to complete a formal leadership course every five years. This professional development continuum is not only essential to the continuous improvement of the officer corps, but is also a prerequisite for attaining the Additional Qualification Designation (AQD) for Navy Reserve command qualification. As the Chief of Navy Reserve’s executive agent for officer leadership development, NR NLEC is responsible for preparing, scheduling, and facilitating the three courses that make up the continuum. Traditionally, NR NLEC facilitators travel to various Navy Reserve Activities throughout the year to facilitate Senior Officer Leadership Courses (SOLC) for commanders (select), commanders, and captains; Reserve Intermediate Leadership Courses (RILC) for chief warrant officers, lieutenants and lieutenant commanders; and Reserve Division Officer Leadership Courses (RDIVOLC) for ensigns and lieutenants junior grade. Each course is a two-day seminar promoting professional development in leadership, ethics, self-awareness and decision making, enabling the development of more than 2,000 Navy Reserve officers each year. Between October 2019 and March 2020, NR NLEC facilitators conducted 36 officer leadership courses, positively impacting the leadership development of 827 Reserve officers. The unit was on track to complete 90 courses by the end of Fiscal Year 2020. When the COVID-19 pandemic set in and the Restriction of Movement (ROM) orders were put into effect, 29 classes from the end of March through the beginning of June were cancelled — jeopardizing the command’s mission.

MCC Stephen Hickok

“When we shut down the in-person courses we were at first unsure what our options could be,” said Capt. Clay Green, NR NLEC training department head. “Several facilitators at NLEC, including myself and Lt. Cmdr. Ashley Prisant, teach courses at universities, and were already delivering our university courses online by the FebruaryMarch time frame as the pandemic unfolded.” According to Prisant, the prospect of transitioning to a virtual environment, particularly within the military construct, presented many potential roadblocks. “Many people think that you can simply transform an in-person course to a virtual one, and that is simply not the case,” said Prisant, the RILC course lead. “The content or material may transfer to some extent, but the engagement does not. Conversations that were natural in face-to-face discussions are awkward in a virtual format.” NR NLEC transformed the curricula of three courses into virtual formats without sacrificing any critical elements or exercises vital to accomplishing course goals. It wasn’t easy. Facilitator guides had to be revised to translate to virtual presentations. Instruction on the use of the platform, its features and capabilities, had to be conducted for each of NR NLEC’s 28 Facilitators until they were proficient. NR NLEC required every member of its staff to attend at least a portion of the pilot course to see, firsthand, how the content translated to a virtual environment and what, if any, additional challenges would need to be made. The staff began compiling a list of lessons learned from each succeeding virtual course. One critical issue the staff was forced to tackle with the transition to a virtual environment was the inclusion of Senior Enlisted Leaders (SEL) in the RILC

course. In the traditional format, the NR NLEC staff typically relied on the SEL of the command where the course was being hosted to speak to students about the importance of the relationship between chiefs and officers. “A good Chiefs Mess or wardroom alone cannot achieve command excellence,” said Navy Reserve Force Master Chief Chris Kotz during a recent session “It is only when these two vital bodies of leaders work closely together can the command achieve and sustain excellence. It is at the chief petty officer and junior officer leadership level that trust forms great and lasting relationships. The senior enlisted leader participation in the Officer Leadership Courses is a great way to explain and foster this relationship.” From the early stages of the pandemic, all NR NLEC team members pulled together to brainstorm, creating a plan that could be executed in a short amount of time. “I’m truly amazed at the professionalism and teamwork of this unit,” said Capt. Mark Haigis, NR NLEC’s commanding officer. “Within one month of providing commander’s guidance to make the transformation to a virtual construct, this team had worked through the curricula, information technology and administrative challenges of doing so and were ready to start executing.” Through the several months that the virtual construct has been utilized, the team has continued to meet virtually in large and small forums to update, adjust and fine-tune the three courses. Course leads and unit leadership monitor course surveys to continuously improve the product, and unit members continue to work closely with the active staff at NLEC to coordinate IT tool usage, licenses and to develop and maintain facilitator and student portals. NR NLEC worked closely with its

active component counterparts at NETC, NLEC and with CNRFC to complete its first, virtual test course, June 6. Since that time, NR NLEC’s 28 members have completed over 50 virtual OLC courses, reaching over 1,100 officers and ensuring the Reserve Force is able to continue meeting the five-year mandatory Officer Leadership Course requirement. Cmdr. Chris Herrick, NR NLEC’s executive officer praised his team’s effort, an “adapt and overcome” style push. “The entire team took each challenge presented and pushed through them,” said Herrick. “Not one person said ‘that belongs to someone else to figure out, not me.’ I had tremendous pride in our team before COVID and it has only grown with how everyone has worked together to make this happen.” The NR NLEC staff continues to execute its mission seamlessly, conducting virtual versions of all three leadership continuum courses multiple times per month for Reserve Officers across the globe, while continuously improving the quality of each course along the way. “The NR NLEC augment unit’s mission, a vital component of the Naval Education and Training Command/ Force Development Reserve Enterprise, directly supports the Chief of Navy Reserve’s Fighting Instructions 2020 ‘Theory of the Fight’ methodology to maximize ourReserve Sailors’warfighting readiness — which is priority one,” said Rear Adm. Robert Nowakowski, Deputy Commander, Naval Education and Training Command. Course schedules for SOLC, RILC and RDIVOLC supporting officer leadership development can be accessed via the Catalog of Navy Courses (CANTRAC) at https:// app.prod.cetars.training.nav.mil/ cantrac/vol2.html.

Elevated Equipment: DoD awards $50 million for defense-related scientific research By Warren Duffie

Office of Naval Research Public Affairs

ARLINGTON

The Department of Defense (DoD) recently awarded $50 million in grants to 150 university scientists—54 of whom are sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR)—via the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP). Through DURIP, the DoD supports the purchase of state-of-the-art equipment and instrumentation to boost university research capabilities and accelerate defense-related basic research. “DURIP funds support university research infrastructure that is essential to the development of high-quality, naval-relevant science and technology,” said Chief of Naval Research Lorin C. Selby. “In this era of great power competition, it is critical to ensure our scientific partners have the tools they need to carry out cuttingedge basic research that secures our nation’s technological advantage.” The highly competitive DURIP program is administered jointly by ONR, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Army Research Office. They seek specific proposals from universities conducting foundational science and engineering research relevant to national defense. The three agencies oversee the

John Williams Dr. Robert Rapp, left, Hawaii Institute for Geophysics Extreme Materials Laboratory Manager, left, at the University of Hawai at noa, briefs Anthony C. Smith, director of the Department of the Navy (DoN) Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program, during a visit to discuss current DoN-funded material science research.

DURIP program via the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, which is responsible for research, development and prototyping activities across the DoD. The annual DURIP awards not only enable universities to perform research expanding U.S. technical prowess— they also bolster the nation’s future science, technology, engineering and mathematics workforce.

The current DURIPs provide for equipment and instruments used in research areas that include quantum sciences; materials design, development and characterization; machine learning; hypersonics; and more. “DURIP awards are extremely valuable in maintaining the research capabilities of America’s academic institutions—allowing our most innovative thinkers to focus on expanding the limits of science and technology,” said

Dr. Joan S. Cleveland, director of ONR’s University Research Initiatives. “The awards underscore the importance of basic research in driving scientific excellence for our military and cultivating a strong STEM workforce.” Learn more at https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Releases/Release/Article/2430566/dodawards-50-million-in-university-research-equipment-awards/.


A7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Stephen Campbell Hospital Corpsman Christian Monieno, with Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune, prepares to conduct a COVID-19 screening on U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Menelik Collins, a combat photographer with Communication Strategy and Operations Company, II Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, at the new Combined Respiratory Aid Station on Camp Lejeune N.C., Jan. 8, 2021.

USMC, DoD commence Operation Warp Speed By Cpl. Stephen Campbell

II MEF Information Group Public Affairs

U.S. MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.

Nearly one year after COVID-19 arrived in the U.S., the vaccine was approved for emergency use authorization (EUA) on Dec. 19, 2020. The U.S. government commenced phase one of Operation Warp Speed (OWS) following the vaccine’s arrival in January 2021. According to the CDC, “Operation Warp Speed is a partnership among components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the DoD to help develop, make, and distribute millions of vaccine doses for COVID-19 as quickly as possible while ensuring that the vaccines are safe and that they work.” The operation will have three phases. Phase 1 focuses on administration planning, establishing policy and sending the

limited doses to first responders and key personnel. Phase 2 will have three additional stages, and phase 3 will be universal availability of vaccines. Phase 2a, will focus on limited distribution as the controlled pilot, and 2b will focus on expanded distribution, which transitions from a controlled geographic distribution process to a service-based distribution. Lastly, phase 2c is the saturation phase and begins once 60% of the DoD’s total 11.1 million personnel have been allocated a vaccine; this phase will resemble annual influenza vaccinations. All DoD personnel will also be provided with vaccination-specific education materials and given the opportunity to ask questions to informed healthcare professionals. They and their beneficiaries have the freedom to receive or decline the vaccine released under the EUA. While the vaccine is not mandated, and no adverse action will be taken toward

any DoD personnel for declination, failure to take the vaccine poses reduction in readiness to the U.S. Navy’s and Marine Corps’ global operations tempo and allyinteroperability. “When we travel for deployments or train with our allies it is important that we don’t put their forces at risk, and that we are respectful of what is going on within their country so we are able to work as a team,” said U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cecily Dye, the Surgeon with II Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group. “Ensuring our Marines and Sailors are disease free to the best of our ability allows for everyone to participate in training with minimal risk.” Dye also expressed that testing, quarantining and treating service members that come to the combined respiratory aid station are separated from symptomatic and asymptomatic to prevent the virus’ spread even further.

Furthermore, the medical personnel have proven to competently handle a large amount of service members for testing prior to a short-notice deployment. “Once we are made aware of a shortnotice deployment, we open the entire building and test all of the personnel with a II MIG augment quickly, and we have been able to do so within 24 hours’ notice,” said Dye. Even with the vaccine, U.S. Navy medical personnel intend to keep testing service members by maintaining asymptomatic and symptomatic testing sites for members at separate locations. Service members are required to quarantine up to 14 days after their results come in. II MIG are to keep wearing masks, practice social distancing and sanitary standards as recommended by medical professionals. It is stressed that these methods will remain necessary until a large proportion of the population is vaccinated and the vaccine is proven to provide long-term protection.

VACCINE |

Navy Expeditionary Combat Command leadership receives COVID-19 vaccine ContinuedfromA1 “It’s important we get this vaccine, to protect each other, to ensure the readiness of the force and to operate in the denied environment this virus has created.” Said Rear Adm. DiGuardo. “We are all in this together.” The Navy began distributing the vaccine to personnel earlier in the year. All eligible personnel are encouraged to receive the vaccine. Contact your local military treatment facility to find out more about receiving the vaccine. Read more about the benefits of the vaccine: https://www.usff.navy.mil/PressRoom/News-Stories/Article/2464764/benefits-of-getting-a-covid-19-vaccine/ Additional information can be found on the CDC’s website; https://www.cdc.gov/.

SUBFOR |

SUBFOR announces 2020 Junior Officers of the Year ContinuedfromA1 marine Squadron 20, Kings Bay, Georgia - Lt. Rebecca A. Greenberg, USS Mississippi (SSN 782), Commander, Submarine Squadron 1, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - Lt. Sean F. Reilly, USS Connecticut (SSN 22), Commander, Submarine Development Squadron 5, Bangor, Washington - Lt. Aaron M. Sims, USS Jefferson City (SSN 759), Commander, Submarine Squadron 7, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - Lt. Scott T. Chrisfield, USS Hampton (SSN 767), Commander, Submarine Squadron 11, San Diego - Lt. Matthew A. Flores, USS Asheville

Spencer R. Layne Rear Adm. Joseph A. DiGuardo Jr., commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, receives the COVID-19 vaccine at Sewells Point Branch Medical Clinic in Norfolk, Jan. 11, 2021.

(SSN 758), Commander, Submarine Squadron 15, Guam - Lt. David M. Gordeuk, USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) (Blue), Commander, Submarine Squadron 17, Bangor, Washington - Lt. j.g. Daniel S. Yassuda, Michigan (SSGN 727) (Blue), Commander, Submarine Squadron 19, Bangor, Washington - Lt. Denealia C. Peterson, USS Emory S. Land (AS 39), Commander, Submarine Group 7, Yokosuka, Japan “Every Junior Officer of the Year should be proud of their lasting contributions to the Submarine Force,” Caudle said. “They demonstrated unparalleled leadership, superior technical expertise, and unmatched tactical prowess.”

WOLFSON |

Captain Dianna Wolfson becomes 110th commander, first female leader of Norfolk Naval Shipyard ContinuedfromA1 from 2004 to 2007. “Captain Wolfson is truly the right leader at the right time for NNSY,” said departing Shipyard Commander Rear Admiral Howard Markle. “Her deep sense of care and commitment to our Navy and the NNSY workforce will be at the forefront of meeting the shipyard’s priorities of developing our

people and delivering on our mission.” One of Wolfson’s initial aims is meeting with the shipyard’s production work groups and ensuring understanding of open lines of communication in improving the organization’s leadership performance, organizational culture, employee development, and mission execution. “I believe in the mantra that ‘if you take care of your people, they’ll take care of you,’” she said. “I think the ‘people piece’ of the business is so important because it’s the people who do the work. It’s the people who make change. It’s the people who drive results. I want our workforce to hear that directly from me, to know I value each one of you and will strive every day to make sure you feel valued.” NNSY, a field activity of Naval Sea Systems Command, is one of the oldest, largest and most multifaceted industrial facilities belonging to the U.S. Navy, and specializes in repairing, overhauling and modernizing ships and submarines.


A8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

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TO QUALIFY FOR THE INCENTIVE, AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE OR LEASE YOU MUST (1) BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD; OR A MILITARY VETERAN OR RETIREE (RETIREES HONORABLY DISCHARGED) OF THE U.S. MILITARY WITHIN TWO YEARS OF THEIR DISCHARGE/RETIREMENT DATE; OR A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER OF AN ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL, INCLUDING GOLD STAR FAMILY MEMBERS; AND (2) PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE; (3) RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENT FOR YOUR NEW VEHICLE; AND (4) RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL FROM AND EXECUTE A FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. 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USSMount Whitney celebrates50 years of excellence TheU.S. SixthFleetflagship, Blue Ridge-classcommand andcontrol ship USSMountWhitney (LCC 20), celebrated its50th birthdaywith a small ceremony inGaeta, Italy, Jan.14. SeeB3

SECTION B | FLAGSHIPNEWS.COM | 1.21.2021

CNO releases Navigation Plan 2021 From Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs WASHINGTON

Courtesy graphic

SECNAV names future vessels while aboard historic Navy ship From Secretary of the Navy Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite announced Jan. 15 that the Navy will name three future vessels after ships steeped in naval history and two others after a after a Medal of Honor recipient and a Native American tribe. Braithwaite detailed the announcement Jan. 8 during a visit to one of the Navy’s first heavy frigates and oldest commissioned ship afloat – USS Constitution. “The decks and lines of this proud ship speak to our storied past, and the Sailors who operate her reveal the strength of our future,” said Braithwaite. “We must always look to our wake to help chart our future course. Together, these future ships will strengthen our Navy and carry on our sacred mission to secure the sea lanes, stand by our allies, and protect our nation against all adversaries.” The future ships will bear the names and hull numbers: USS Chesapeake (FFG 64) USS Silversides (SSN 807) USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31) USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9) USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7) The future Constellation-class frigate

USS Chesapeake (FFG 64) will be named for one of the first six Navy frigates authorized by the Naval Act of 1794. The first USS Chesapeake served with honor against the Barbary Pirates in the early 1800. Following an at-sea battle with HMS Shannon in 1813, the ship was captured by the Royal Navy and commissioned her HMS Chesapeake. Braithwaite recently travelled to England where he retrieved a piece of the original frigate from the Chesapeake Mill in Hampshire. “Like Constitution and Constellation, the first Chesapeake was a mighty sailing ship that declared our nation a maritime power,” said Braithwaite. “The new USS Chesapeake, FFG-64, will proudly carry on the legacy of that name into the new era of great power competition.” Last year, Braithwaite named future Constellation-class frigates USS Constellation (FFG 62) and USS Congress (FFG 63) to honor the first six heavy frigates. To honor the Silent Service, the future Virginia-class attack submarine USS Silversides (SSN 807) will carry the name of a WWII Gato-class submarine. The first Silversides (SS 236) completed 14 tours beneath the Pacific Ocean spanning the entire length of WWII. She inflicted heavy damage on enemy shipping, saved downed aviators,

and even drew enemy fire to protect a fellow submarine. A second Silversides (SSN 679) was a Sturgeon-class submarine that served during the Cold War. This will be the third naval vessel to carry the name Silversides. The name comes from a small fish marked with a silvery stripe along each side of its body. “Those who run silent and deep in this new attack submarine will inherit a proud legacy, and the capabilities to forge a strong future for our nation and our allies,” said Braithwaite. The future San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31) will be the fifth Navy vessel to bear the name. The first was an ironclad gunboat that served during the American Civil War. The second USS Pittsburgh (CA 4) was an armored cruiser that served during WWI, and a third USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) was a Baltimoreclass cruiser that served during WWII – supporting the landing at Iwo Jima. The fourth USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) was a Los Angeles-class submarine that served the Navy from December1984 to August 2019. To honor the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, a future Navajo-class towing, salvage, and rescue ship will be named USNS Lenni 

See SECNAV | B7

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Gilday announced the release of his Navigation Plan to the Fleet during virtual remarks at the Surface Navy Association Symposium January 11. “America is a maritime nation - our security and stability depend on the seas,” Gilday said. “The U.S. Navy is America’s away team, and alongside our allies and partners, we defend freedom, preserve economic prosperity, and keep the seas open and free. Today, we are engaged in a long-term competition. China and Russia are rapidly modernizing their militaries to challenge the international order that has benefited so many for so long. To defend our Nation and interests around the globe, we must be prepared to flawlessly execute our Navy’s timeless roles of sea control and power projection. Joining with the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, we will generate decisive Integrated All-Domain Naval Power. There is no time to waste; our actions in this decade will set the maritime balance of power for the rest of the century.” This Navigation Plan nests under the recently-released Tri-Service Maritime Strategy and outlines how the U.S. Navy will grow its naval power to control the seas and project power across all domains, both now and in the future. It builds off the progress made under FRAGO and lays out what must be done this decade to deliver the naval power America needs to compete and win. This will be done by focusing on four key areas:

-SAILORS: DEVELOP A SEASONED TEAM OF NAVAL WARRIORS Objective: A dominant naval force that can outthink and outfight any adversary. Our Sailors will remain the best trained and educated force in the world. We will cultivate a culture of warfighting excellence rooted in our core values.

-READINESS: DELIVER A MORE READY FLEET Objective: A Navy that is manned, trained, and equipped to deploy forward and win in day-to-day competition, in crisis, and in conflict. We will consistently deliver maintenance on

See CNO | B7

Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group conducts bilateral exercise with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force From USS Theodore Roosevelt Public Affairs PACIFIC OCEAN

The Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (TRCSG) conducted a bilateral maritime exercise with the Japan Maritime SelfDefense Force (JMSDF) on January 15. The exercise, which focused on increasing combat readiness and warfighting excellence, included USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), USS John Finn (DDG 113), JS Kongo (DDG 173), and JS Asahi (DD 119). “Carrier Strike Group Nine is grateful for the opportunity to work with our partners in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force to increase our proficiency and interoperability,” said Rear Adm. Doug Verissimo, com

See ROOSEVELT | B7

MC2 Brandie Nuzzi The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), left, and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Kongo-class guided-missile destroyer JS Kongo (DDG 173) transit the Pacific Ocean Jan. 15, 2021.


HeroesatHome The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | 1.21.2021 | B2

I LIVE IN PPV HOUSING NOW. MAY I GO ON A WAITING LIST TO MOVE TO ANOTHER AREA? Ifyou complete your minimumlease period, you maymoveout into the community. In some circumstances you can negotiatea movetoanother area throughyour PPV Property ManagementOffice.

Learning to lose for the win By Lisa Smith Molinari

This month, we all bore witness to the horrific extremes that some people will go to in order to avoid losing. Although no one wants to fail, the vast majority of us won’t turn to insurrection, violent assault, or malicious destruction of property to win. Besides, for most of us, personal success or failure is not gauged by national elections, the stock market report, or the Super Bowl. Winning and losing happens in small moments throughout our daily lives. We all experience failure when we burn the toast, are late for a meeting, or eat too much dessert. We succeed when we have a good hair day, make it to the gym, or have a bonding moment with our teenage daughter. Hands down, my husband, Francis, has the most selfesteem in our family. He nurtures his iron-clad ego by remaining in complete denial of his shortcomings, and celebrating himself daily. I, on the other hand, am one of those annoying women who can’t accept a compliment, point out my flaws, and minimize my

accomplishments. I recognize those tendencies in our children, too. Our son overcame symptoms of autism as a child but has a limited sense of social awareness, so he is generally secure and oblivious to judgement from others. Our middle child inherited Francis’ self assuredness, but our youngest struggles with confidence at times. When Francis and I witnessed each child’s sense of self emerge during adolescence, it was hard not to panic. Knowing that parenting contributes to whether a person feels like a winner or a loser was daunting. Of course, we recognized our children’s accomplishments, and told them they were smart, funny, beautiful, and talented. But being a self-doubter, I wondered if I was making mistakes. When I was in tenth grade, I came home one day with big news. Throughout middle school, my self image was skewed: Fat, desperate, goofy, not very good at anything in particular. But a small personal triumph in ninth grade (I improved from worst swimmer on the team to middle of the pack) instilled a twinge of

newfound ambition. “Dad, guess what?” I announced at dinner. “What is it, Lee Lae,” my father said affectionately, between bites of Swiss steak. My older brother, the family super star, was a new plebe at the Naval Academy, and of course they were thrilled with his accomplishments. This was my chance to make them proud of me, too. “I’m my homeroom’s new representative for Student Government Association. They voted for me!” I stared at my father, waiting for his reaction. He scooped a forkful of potatoes dotted with peas and chewed, his eyes glued to his plate…another bite of steak…more chewing. Finally, he raised his eyes and his fork, and proclaimed, “You know what you need to do? You need to become President of Student Government. That’s what you should do.” My father meant well. He was trying to say that he believed in me, that I had the potential to do anything. But what my fragile constitution heard was, “You’re not good enough.” This simple moment

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had the potential to bolster my burgeoning sense of confidence, but instead, it reinforced my insecurities. In my adolescent mind, I had failed. As parents, how do we encourage our kids to try, to improve, to practice, to achieve, without making them feel they aren’t good enough? Ironically, experts say that we must teach our kids to fail if we want them to succeed. Disappointments represent a learning experience, when children can develop coping skills, resilience, creative thinking and perseverance. At the same time, parents should help kids build self esteem without showering them with so much praise that they become dependent on validation. Studies show that “[s]uccess leads to feeling good about yourself, not the other way around.” And one of the best ways parents can build a child’s self worth? To model confidence themselves. I never did run for SGA President, but I survived the gauntlet of adolescence and went on to become a lawyer, a writer, a Navy wife, and a mother of three resilient military children. I guess I am a winner after all.

Thrive Helps Military Parents and Children From Military Onesource

The Department of Defense is committed to the health and well-being of military children and families. That’s why DOD teamed with the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness at Penn State to create a parenting-education program. Thrive is a free online program for busy parents like you. It promotes positive parenting, stress management and healthy lifestyle practices. Find out how Thrive can help you raise healthy, resilient children from birth to 18. How does Thrive work? Thrive has four interactive modules organized by age group: Take Root: for children ages 0-3 Sprout: for children ages 3-5 Grow: for children ages 5-10 Branch Out: for children ages 10-18 (Coming in 2021) Each module has tips for your child’s age group. Build on strengths you have and develop new skills as your child grows and changes. Suggestions include how to: Find a parenting style that works for your family. Help your child make good decisions, master new skills and more. Support your child with positive discipline techniques. Model an active lifestyle. Manage stress. Be a positive role model. Communicate with your partner or support circle.

Courtesy Photo

Plan and prepare healthy meals. Manage screen time. Check out these helpful parent-resource infographics for a sample of the program. How is Thrive different from other parenting programs? Thrive grows with your child. The four age-group tracks are free, available in online formats and immediately accessible. Other benefits of Thrive include: It provides program choices that fit your family.

It promotes social-emotional, cognitive and physical health. It is flexible. Pause your session at any time. It is interactive and fun. It is available to the public and shareable with family members and caregivers. Whether you are expecting your first baby or raising teens, let Thrive support you along the way. Learn more and enroll in the program today. Find information about other parenting resources on Military OneSource.

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Functionsand/or servicesFFSCprovides:

nClinicalCounseling(Individual,Couples,and ChildCounseling) nPersonalFinancial Management nInformation&Referral nFamilyEmployment Assistance nTransitionAssistance nFamilyAdvocacy Program nDeploymentand MobilizationSupport nOmbudsmanSupport nRelocationAssistance nParentingPrograms nStressandAnger Management nCommandSupport nCrisisSupport nSuicidePrevention nSAPRSupport


B3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

MCC Justin Stumberg Cosmo Mitrano, mayor of Gaeta, left, Vice Adm. Gene Black, commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, center, and Capt. Dave Pollard, USS Mount Whitney commanding officer, cut cake aboard the U.S. Sixth Fleet command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20) during the ship 50th anniversary celebration, Jan. 14, 2021, in Gaeta, Italy.

USS Mount Whitney celebrates 50 years of excellence From U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. Sixth Fleet Public Affairs GAETA, Italy

The U.S. Sixth Fleet flag ship, Blue Ridge-class command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), celebrated its 50th birthday with a small ceremony in Gaeta, Italy, Jan. 14. Vice Adm. Gene Black, commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet, gave remarks as the crew, local dignitaries, and Navy leadership reflected on the storied history and distinguished role Mount Whitney has played in key operations and exercises around the world since the ship’s commissioning. “This ship’s history and accomplishments are truly remarkable,” said Black. “You’ve enabled operations at sea, participated in joint service and multi-national exercises, and provided humanitarian assistance to our partners in need.” Over the years, Mount Whitney was on scene for many major world events including Operation Uphold Democracy, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Assured Delivery, and Operation Odyssey Dawn.

“From Trident Juncture to Trident Jupiter, from Juniper Cobra to BALTOPS, Mount Whitney has been the lynchpin of our fleet from the Arctic to the Mediterranean,” said Adm. Robert P. Burke, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa and commander, Allied Joint Force CommandNaples, via virtual remarks. “From routine operations to the enforcement of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973 against Libya and then directing kinetic operations as Flagship during Odyssey Dawn and NATO’s Unified Protector, Mount Whitney is our enduring ‘Vox Maris,’ our ‘Voice of the Sea.’” As one of two Blue Ridge-class command ships in the United States Navy, Mount Whitney also serves as the afloat command ship for Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO (STRIKFORNATO), which Black also commands. “Here on Mount Whitney, I know you’re fond of saying your ‘comms are bombs,’ and these comms are incredible, ensuring that I, or any embarked commander, can confidently and effectively command and control widelydispersed air, ground, and maritime units in an integrated fashion,” said

Black. “These accomplishments do not happen without your collective knowledge, skill, and expertise.” Capt. David Pollard, commanding officer of Mount Whitney, also provided remarks on the capabilities of his ship. “Mount Whitney is the most sophisticated Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Combat Systems, and Intelligence (C5I) ship in the world, and the hybrid crew of Military Sealift Command Civilian Mariners and United States Navy Sailors are phenomenal, ready to support operations across all domains,” said Pollard. The Mount Whitney has hosted countless distinguished visitors, ambassadors, military leaders, and heads of state, including the Prince of Monaco and the presidents of Lithuania and Ukraine. “Today, Mount Whitney continues the legacy of the Sailors and Civilian Mariners of our great nation that have come before us as warriors, teachers, leaders, and ambassadors,” said Pollard. “We stand ready to demonstrate ‘Power for Peace’ across 20 million square nautical miles of ocean, from the Barents to the Baltic, to the Medi-

terranean to the Black Sea, to the waters surrounding the African continent.” The ship is named for Mount Whitney, a peak in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California. Mount Whitney is the highest summit in the contiguous United States with an elevation of 14,505 feet. She is the first Navy ship to bear the name. The ship’s unit awards include two Navy Unit Commendations, three Meritorious Unit Commendations, 10 Battle “E” Awards, and a Humanitarian Service Medal. Mount Whitney was the first U.S. naval combatant to permanently accommodate female Sailors and has the distinct accomplishment of being the only commissioned U.S. warship to operate south of the equator and north of the Arctic Circle in the same year. Mount Whitney was commissioned as a unit of Commander, Amphibious Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, homeported in Norfolk, Virginia. The ship served for years as the Commander, Striking Fleet Atlantic and U.S. Second Fleet flag ship. In 2005, Mount Whitney was forward-deployed to Gaeta and assumed her current role as the U.S. Sixth Fleet flagship. U.S. Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conduct the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.

SWORD 7: Optimizing radiation detection for Homeland Security, DoD By Paul Cage

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) integrated an accurate and efficient model of nuclear fission into a new software suite to provide users a powerful and flexible tool to quickly and accurately model new and highly complex nuclear detection scenarios. SoftWare for Optimization of Radiation Detectors (SWORD) is an integrated software package that offers an interface to radiation transport codes, allowing users to design and optimize radiation detectors, which results in the faster development and evaluation of radiation detection equipment. “Our sponsors and end users are focused on preventing nuclear weapons and other radiological devices from being smuggled into the country or into areas where the Department of Defense operates,” Wade Duvall, Ph.D., an NRL research physicist said. “SWORD uses one of several standard radiation transport codes to simulate a scenario, from a medical isotope being transported to a legitimate background source.” Program users, like the Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, currently evaluate complex particle interactions by Monte Carlo techniques designed to track particle types over broad ranges of energies. The Monte Carlo uses a number of simulation libraries that

have a variety of adjustable parameters; however, these parameters require significant expertise to configure appropriately for the scenario to be modeled. “These difficulties motivated us to make a tool that could be used by a person without any nuclear physics expertise to quickly build complex scenarios and simulate them,” Duvall said. “Now, with fission, SWORD 7 allows the Navy and users to model scenarios involving active interrogation, space-based and ship-based nuclear reactors and shielding.” The SWORD implementation was a threefold effort. First, the SWORD simulation engine was updated to accommodate a new physics library and increase performance. Then, a new fission physics library was integrated into SWORD. “The physics of particle interactions is well understood, but solving the equations gets complicated quickly,” Duvall said. “Despite using industry standard radiation transport codes, SWORD struggled to simulate fission accurately.” After the integrated library was validated to ensure it had been properly incorporated and that fission physics was accurately modeled, Duvall said they are now working on getting SWORD 7 ready for release. “SWORD can now model nuclear reactors and other fission sources, as well as the next-generation of fissionbased detectors,” Duvall said. “This will allow SWORD to model the latest

Courtesy graphic This simulated image of the SoftWare for Optimization of Radiation Detectors (SWORD) illustrates a detected radiation dispersal device inside a vehicle crossing the San Ysidro, California Port of Entry radiation portal monitor.

and greatest technologies being developed by the Navy and the greater defense community.” SWORD 7 is scheduled to roll out in mid-2021 through the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at https://www.ornl.gov/onramp/rsicc

ABOUT THE U.S. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

NRL is a scientific and engineering command dedicated to research that drives innovative advances for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps from the seafloor to space and in the information domain. NRL is located in Washington, D.C. with major field sites in Stennis Space Center, Mississippi; Key West, Florida; Monterey, California, and employs approximately 2,500 civilian scientists, engineers and support personnel.


B4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Navy Readiness: CIWT’s LREC Team provides worldwide language, regional expertise, cultural training resources By Glenn Sircy

Center for Information Warfare Training Public Affairs

PENSACOLA, FLA.

It’s no secret effective communication, enabled through skill in foreign languages and understanding of foreign cultures and regional dynamics, is paramount to Navy readiness in order to fight and win during Great Power Competition. So, did you know there is a dedicated team of professionals onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida, persistently working to develop, update, and provide various culture orientation and foreign language training resources, free of charge, for Department of the Navy personnel and family members? As a critical force multiplier, the Navy’s Language, Regional Expertise, and Culture team, as a part of the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT), delivers training on foreign cultures and languages to prepare Navy personnel for global engagements to strengthen ties with enduring allies and cultivate relationships with emerging partners. The Navy’s LREC program is part of the DoD-wide program, and managed to maximize LREC capabilities through recruitment and accession policies, skill development, maintenance, enhancement, employment, and incentivizing of skills aligned to mission needs. LREC courses, presentations, and working aids present general information about the nature of culture and specific information about particular cultures, including history, geography, ethnic groups, religious institutions, societal norms, culturally-driven individual behaviors and etiquette, and culturally-appropriate and taboo behaviors of many nations. All resources support the Ready Relevant Learning, or RRL, initiative of Sailor 2025 by providing the right training, at the right time, in the most effective manner for our Sailors. The Every Deployment - Global Engagement, better known as Navy EDGE, Cross-Cultural Competence course talks to cultural barriers and the importance of cross cultural communication. The EDGE course, Culture Shock, describes the phenomenon and its effects. It also identifies symptoms of culture shock and provides strategies to avoid and mitigate it. Culture-specific EDGE courses exist for the overseas fleet concentration areas of Bahrain, Italy, Korea, Japan, and Spain and for China, Iran, and Russia, nations of strategic interest. Cultural Orientation Training presentations, or COTs, are for the Sailor visiting a foreign country or

MCSA Oswald Felix Jr Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force liaisons receive a tour in the forecastle from Chief Boatswain’s Mate Talitha Miller on the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during Keen Sword 21.

engaging with someone from a foreign culture. Currently, COTs are available for 37 nations with more under development. EDGE courses and COT presentations are on Navy e-Learning, Navy e-Learning Afloat, and the Navy Global Deployer Application for mobile devices. The Global Deployer App works on Apple and Android devices and is tied to the Navy’s Learning Management System; Sailors completing EDGE or COT courses via the app receive credit for course completion in Navy e-Learning and their Electronic Training Jacket. To find CLREC training on Navy e-Learning, navigate to the course catalog and search for the key words, “EDGE” and “COT”. The Navy Global Deployer App is free and available for download by anyone from iTunes and Google Play. Numbered fleet operations orders mandate commanding officers ensure their crews establish and maintain cultural awareness when visiting foreign ports and when operating in and transiting foreign operating areas. “We have designed our cultural and language training to support Navy mission and to permit commanding officers to satisfy combatant commanders’ theater-entry training requirements,” said Christopher Wise, director of the Navy’s LREC office. “Satisfying training mandates is…well…mandated, but our goal is to have those using our training materials and participating in our instruction acquire the knowledge and skills to feel comfortable in the foreign environment,

to help them have positive experiences and interactions, and to be great ambassadors for our Navy and nation,” said Wise. “Sailors who understand others’ cultural perspectives better understand their environment and are better able to shape their own attitudes and behaviors.” In addition to culture and language training, LREC manages foreign language testing administered for Navy personnel at various sites throughout the world. “We’re excited to be able to provide language testing services,” added Wise. “Measuring foreign language proficiency through testing gives Navy leaders insight to the language capabilities available to them and, for a Sailor, a language proficiency score can establish eligibility for training, a new career field, or a special assignment. Demonstrated proficiency may result in award of secondary Navy Enlisted Classifications, Foreign Language Proficiency Bonus pay, and / or college credit. There are many benefits to testing.” Presently, due to COVID, testing is limited to those who require testing. Normally, Navy foreign language testing sites offer the Defense Language Aptitude Battery (DLAB), the Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT), and the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI). The DLAB measures the aptitude for foreign language learning by the typical native English speaker and screens personnel for: • assignments requiring foreign language training (e.g., Personnel Exchange

Program; Attaché duty; Defense Threat Reduction Agency; Olmsted Scholar Program; foreign war college) • cryptologic technician (interpretive), or CTI rating • foreign area officer, or FAO community Don’t hesitate to explore and utilize these resources to better prepare yourself and your teams to succeed in sustained, day-to-day deck-plate diplomacy. To order culture or language training materials, schedule language training or testing, access pertinent instructions, or just ask a question, please contact the LREC team: Commercial: 850-452-6736; DSN: 312459-6736; culturetraining@navy.mil; languagetraining@navy.mil; and languagetesting@navy.mil. To learn more about LREC along with their products and services, visit: https:// www.netc.navy.mil/CIWT/NavyLREC/ With four schoolhouse commands, a detachment, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains over 22,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community. For more news from the Center for Information Warfare Training domain, visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/CIWT, www.facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter.com/NavyCIWT.

USS William P. Lawrence returns from U.S. 4th Fleet deployment From U.S. Third Fleet Public Affairs PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii

William P. Lawrence, along with Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 37 Detachment 7, deployed in September to conduct U.S. Southern Command and Joint Interagency Task Force South’s enhanced counternarcotics operations missions in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific Ocean. “I am overcome with pride when I reflect on the accomplishments of the crew while we were deployed,” said Cmdr. Dawn Allen, the commanding officer of William P. Lawrence. “The crew executed a broad spectrum of missions over the past few months with unsurpassed professionalism.” Along with their embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment 101, William P. Lawrence disrupted approximately 2,921 kilograms of cocaine which has an estimated street value of 204 million dollars. In addition, William P. Lawrence was instrumental in providing hurricane assistance and disaster relief in Honduras, collecting and delivering more than 25,600 pounds of supplies, conducting 19 rescues and two medical evacuations in support of U.S. Southern Command’s Hurricane Iota relief efforts in Central America. Additionally, William P. Lawrence participated in

MC2 Charles Oki Damage Controlman 3rd Class John Fritz, assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), gets the first kiss with his spouse upon returning to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, January 11.

two passing exercises with the Brazilian training ship BNS Brazil (U 27), an air defense joint exercise with Colombian Air Force Kfir fighter jets, and performed freedom of navigation operations off the coast of Venezuela. William P. Lawrence partnered with U.S. Navy and international warships, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Drug

Enforcement Administration, FBI, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, as well as other allied partners and international agencies, all of which are playing a role in counter-narcotics operations in the area. For additional information about William P. Lawrence, please visit https://www.public.navy.mil/ surfor/ddg110/Pages/default.aspx.


B5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Fleet manning is now the highest since 2015 - CNP tells Surface Navy Association Symposium By MC1 Mark D. Faram, Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Chief of Naval Personnel has re-dedicated the nearly 20,000 MyNavy HR personnel to the task of making sure the fleet has enough sailors to meet its missions, stating that his first strategic goal in 2021 is to “Build a Navy that Can Fight and Win.” As the Navy moves into 2021, more Sailors are serving at sea today than at any time in the past seven years, Vice Adm. John B. Nowell, Jr., the Navy’s chief of personnel, told an online audience at the 33rd annual Surface Navy Association symposium on Jan. 13. A career SWO, Nowell is no stranger to the association, whose annual gathering brings together the Navy and industry experts to tackle the most challenging topics facing the Navy’s surface community. And this year, he re-dedicated nearly 20,000 MyNavy HR personnel to the task of making sure the fleet has enough sailors to meet its missions, stating that his first strategic goal in 2021 is to “Build a Navy that Can Fight and Win.” Nowell also detailed the progress made -and the work yet to do -- in transforming accessions training for both enlisted and officers, with an eye on delivering a more qualified and mentally tough Sailor upon arrival in the fleet, something he said improves individual readiness. Also, Nowell is actively encouraging everyone in the fleet to get the COVID-19 vaccine when it is available to them. He says it is a readiness issue that everyone needs to opt into to keep the fleet ready and protect themselves, their shipmates and their families. “To be clear, Fleet Manning remains my number one imperative,” Nowell said. “Now is the time to remain vigilant, defend freedom, patrol the seas and project power -- that is what surface warriors do.” To support that, he noted that right now, the Navy has more sailors serving in Operational Sea Duty units anytime since 2014. “At the start of FY-21, the Navy had 137,500 sailors in 275 operational units,” he said. “We’ve maintained more than 137,000 sailors at sea since May 2020, despite the challenges of COVID, and that represents 5000 additional sailors at sea now compared with a low point in October of 2015.” Simultaneous growth in billets and the closing of existing gaps, he said, will both “continue to trend higher into FY-21 and beyond,” Most in the fleet have heard about the numbers of gapped billets on sea duty, but what many don’t know is many gaps at sea right now are there because the Navy has upped its sea-duty manning levels. These increases, he said, came after a 2017 surface fleet workforce review, which

resulted in the Navy upping the shipboard manpower requirements and the funding needed to add those billets. “Guided Missile destroyers - DDGs - the ship class with the most units are a perfect example of where we’ve been and where we’re going,” he said. In FY-20, on average, DDGs had 25 more sailors on board as compared to FY-12 and by FY-23, on average, DDGs are projected to have 45 more sailors on board." Those sailors, he said, will be onboard 12-months before deployment. “You need to understand that some of these gaps are due to increased billet growth in the Fleet,” Nowell said. “This increased manning directly contributes to Fleet Readiness and we are working hard to increase this number.” These increases, he said, were “achieved through a combination of increasing the authorized end strength, resource sponsors buying more manpower for their platforms, and multiple Sailor-focused process improvements, incentives and policy mechanisms that expanded career progression and retention opportunities for our Sailors.” Key to this effort was the most Sailorfacing part of the process, the change from the Career Management System/Interactive Detailing to the fielding of the MyNavy Assignment platform, which started in 2019. He said this “has added transparency, functionality and a much more userfriendly interface for Sailors” in their detailing window. Already, he said, the Navy is developing new policies, as well as monetary and nonmonetary incentives to get sailors to take and stay in sea-duty billets, such as the Advance to Position initiative that “incentivizes Sailors to take orders for priority, or hard to feel billets across the fleet, by linking service in the position to [permanent] advancements to the next pay grade,” Nowell said. This program, he said, is primarily designed to address at sea billets. It has also been used recently to fill critical shore billets such as Recruit Division Commander billets at Recruit Training Command and hard to fill overseas duty. “For the sea shore flow, we’ve begun working on a replacement to this with a personnel policy that will leverage our detailing marketplace and take advantage of other transformation initiatives like Ready Relevant Learning, our Rating Commonality Matrix and Advanced to Position to more effectively and efficiently manage a fleet,” he said. Fleet Readiness is already getting a boost from training changes, Nowell said, an effort that is gaining steam not only at boot camp, but also in the Navy’s schoolhouses. At Boot Camp, he said, the Navy is pressing hard to increase the readiness level of sailors coming out of training. “We’re working hard with Navy leader-

ship to build a Level One Firefighting and Damage Control wet trainer at RTC Great Lakes to certify every sailor entering the fleet,” Nowell said. “This will give time back to the fleet by sending Level One qualified sailors to ships and submarines, enabling commands to focus on getting firefighting and damage control quotas for those whose certifications are expiring.” It’s an effort in progress that Nowell said: “just can’t happen soon enough.” Another effort he says that is already paying dividends in the fleet are the efforts to teach “Warrior Toughness.” By promoting resilience and toughness in recruits and officers in the accessions pipeline, they create sailors who can not only survive but thrive in adversity. “While complementary, these attributes are not the same,” he said. “Resiliency is the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties, while toughness is the ability to deal with hardship or to cope in different situations.” Currently, about 11 hours of training are given on the subject. He said that practicing what is learned is encouraged throughout training and beyond in the fleet. “It’s a holistic approach that emphasizes spiritual, mental and physical strength to prepare Sailors to manage stress and execute the mission,” Nowell said. The idea is to develop a “warrior mindset,” using mental and spiritual preparation and performance psychology techniques to improve individual physical and cognitive performance. “The SEALs have been doing it for years, we’ve now brought it on board and it’s paying dividends,” Nowell said. “The goal is that when called upon, sailors will be prepared to act and perform at the needed level.” Nowell also outlined the progress of the Navy’s “Ready, Relevant Learning” efforts -- which is the way forward for most of the Navy’s enlisted career fields. Nowell said this effort began a few years ago, identifying the training needed throughout a career for a Sailor who starts at

the apprentice level to move through journeyman to a master level by receiving training “blocks” when they are ready. Already, 47 ratings have developed their block learning curriculum at the apprentice level and each year, more are moving into the delivery of this new content for new Sailors on their way to the fleet. “Moving beyond apprentice-level training, we’ve started requirements development efforts for the journeyman and master level learning continuums for five ratings and expect to start another ten ratings this year,” Nowell said. “This consists of leadership and professional training that builds upon the technical aspects gained as an apprentice.” As the Navy’s chief of personnel, Nowell has seen first-hand the impact COVID-19 has had on the Navy’s readiness and spent time during his talk to encourage everyone in the service to opt into getting the COVID-19 vaccine. “The only way to end this pandemic sooner is to get vaccinated when it’s your turn,” Nowell said. Vaccination, he said, is the best way to mitigate the risk of the virus to individual Sailors, but it’s more than that. “You are also contributing to mitigating the risk to mission by increasing the numbers of those vaccinated at your command,“ he said. ”The Navy will continue to monitor this roll-out and keep you posted -- but just like CNO and MCPON did, it is vital that we all roll up our sleeves to end this pandemic." The vaccine is just the first part of the plan to beat COVID in 2021. Nowell said it can’t succeed without “continuing to do the lowtech steps needed to protect yourself, your family and each other, like wearing a mask, implementing physical distancing and washing your hands often -- we know what works and we have to stay disciplined in doing it.” For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, follow us on Facebook at https:// www.facebook.com/usnpeople, Twitter at https://twitter.com/usnpeople or visit https://www.navy.mil/cnp.

USS Porter begins ninth FNDF-E patrol By MC2 Damon Grosvenor, NPASE East Det. Europe Public Affairs NAVAL STATION ROTA, Spain

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) departed Naval Station Rota, Spain, on its ninth Forward-Deployed Naval Forces-Europe (FDNF-E) patrol, Jan. 12. Porter is scheduled to work alongside regional partners in various training exercises and conduct maritime security operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe and Africa. “Porter is more than ready to make this patrol a success,” said Cmdr. Thomas Ralston, commanding officer of Porter. “No matter where the mission takes us, we will be ready.” During the COVID-19 global pandemic, Porter’s crew accomplished necessary maintenance while continuing social distancing measures and adhering to minimal manning procedures. Porter’s eight patrol, which spanned from April to July of 2020, included at-sea training with the Romanian Navy in the Black Sea; joint interoperability exercises with the Italian and French

MC2 Damon Grosvenor The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer transits the Bay of Cadiz after departing from Rota, Spain for its ninth patrol, Jan. 12, 2021.

navies in the Mediterranean Sea; operations within a Surface Action Group with the Royal Navy in the High North and Barents Sea; passing exercises (PASSEXes) with the Tunisian Navy; exercise Sea Breeze 2020 with Ukrainian, Romanian, Turkish, Georgian, Bulgarian, and Spanish Navies; and a Black Sea protection operation with NATO and other U.S. European Com-

mand components that focused on both Joint and NATO interoperability. Porter is one of four U.S. Navy destroyers based in Rota, Spain, and assigned to Commander, Task Force 65 in support of NATO’s Integrated Air Missile Defense architecture. These FDNF-E ships have the flexibility to operate throughout the waters of Europe and Africa, from the Cape of Good

Hope to the Arctic Circle, demonstrating their mastery of the maritime domain. U.S. Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.


B6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

MC2 Juan S. Sua Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Russell Smith, speaks to chief petty officers assigned to the “Fighting Tigers'' of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8, deployed with Commander, Task Force (CTF) 57, during a senior enlisted round table in the 5th Fleet area of operations, Jan. 14.

CNO, MCPON visit Bahrain, meet with Bahrain senior leadership, Sailors From U.S. Naval Forces Central Command / U.S. 5th Fleet Public Affairs WASHINGTON

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Gilday and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith traveled to Manama, Bahrain, Jan. 13-14 to meet with senior Bahrain leadership as well as forward-deployed Sailors in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. “This has been a great opportunity to see the region first-hand and meet with Bahrain, coalition, and U.S. Navy senior leadership here,” Gilday said. “Make no

mistake, we are committed to further strengthening and expanding cooperation with all of our Coalition Partners in the region. It is our hope that we will continue to identify new areas for collaboration in order to maintain security, stability, and prosperity within the region and keep the seas free and open.” During his visit, Gilday met with His Royal Highness Crown Prince, Deputy Supreme Commander, First Deputy Prime Minister Salman bin Hamad Al-Khalifa and Bahrain Defence Force Commanderin-Chief Field Marshal Shaikh Khalifa bin Ahmad Al-Khalifa. “Bahrain is a valued and trusted defense

partner, a crucial friend, and we greatly value the contributions and capabilities that they bring to regional security,” Gilday said. “Our relationship with Bahrain continues to grow across the board, and we cooperate on a wide range of issues at the highest levels.” At Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Gilday and Smith met with U.S. 5th Fleet leadership, and were briefed on Combined Maritime Forces operations by representatives from the 33-partner nations. Gilday and Smith also visited Sailors deployed to Bahrain and aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) at sea, and spoke with the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group leadership by phone during the trip.

“I’ve spoken with Nimitz Strike Group Leadership and they understand the mission, expectations, and why they are needed in the region right now,” Gilday said. “Nimitz’s presence in the region highlights that there is a demand for maritime forces across the globe and the U. S. Navy is meeting that demand.” Smith said that Sailors here demonstrate the very best of the U. S. Navy. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to spend time with our forward-deployed Sailors here in 5th Fleet,” Smith said. “The work they do every day helps us provide security and stability and demonstrates a maritime combat prowess that gives any potential adversary pause.” This visit by Gilday and Smith has been long-planned to meet with deployed Sailors and Bahrain officials who graciously host the U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces.

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Meritorious Advancement Program updates for Navy Reserve Sailors By Lt. Adam M Demeter

Commander, Navy Reserve Force Public Affairs

WASHINGTON

Commander, Navy Reserve Force (CNRF) has released ALNAVRESFOR 001/21, announcing the latest changes and improvements to the Navy Reserve’s Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP-R). The changes align MAP-R seasons with the Navy-wide advancement exam (NWAE) cycles, effectively doubling the advancement opportunity for Sailors and further supporting the intent of MAP-R to select and reward the right Sailors for possible advancement.

MAP-R is a Navy Reserve program to meritoriously advance eligible personnel in paygrades E-5 and below to the next higher paygrade. The program is intended to give commanding officers the opportunity to recognize their best Sailors by nominating them for advancement when they are ready for the next level of responsibility. “We’ve refined and improved the program to further empower command triads the ability to recognize their most talented Sailors through immediate advancement,” said Master Chief Kimberly Cedar, Reserve Force Command Career Counselor. “We’ve also eliminated several manual administra-

tive processes by automatically verifying candidate eligibility and correctly routing the nomination submissions.” Beginning in season one of calendar year (CY) 2021 (March 1, 2021 – April 30, 2021), MAP-R will utilize a new automated system in the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS) to track the process from beginning to end. Commands will no longer be required to manually calculate eligibility, submit nominations, and track their paper trail. Instead, the updated MAP-R system will manage nomination opportunities, determine eligibility, and adjudicate the Sailors approved for advancement in a central-

ized location. The MAP-R initiative aligns with the Navy Reserve’s overall efforts to modernize its administrative processes throughout the Force. Similar to MAP-R, new systems are regularly being released to automate pay processes, orders processing, personnel data, and more. Prior to this announcement, ALNAVRESFOR 029/20 directed commands and units to set up their MAP-R user roles by February 1, 2021 in preparation for the first advancement season of CY-21. Reserve Component Commands (RCC) and Immediate Supervisors in Command (ISIC) must designate an RCC Approver or ISIC Approver, to include account access in order to support subordinate unit MAP-R nominations as delineated in the MAP-R hierarchy structure in NSIPS.


B7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

| CNO releases Navigation Plan 2021

CNO

ContinuedfromB1 time and in full, refurbish our critical readiness infrastructure, master alldomain fleet operations, and exercise with like-minded navies to enhance our collective strength.

-CAPABILITIES: DELIVERING A MORE LETHAL, BETTER-CONNECTED FLEET Objective: A Navy capable of projecting synchronized lethal and nonlethal effects across all domains. We will deploy the Naval Operational Architecture by the middle of this decade; an array of counter-C5ISRT capabilities; weapons of increasing range and speed; and a directed-energy system capable of defeating anti-ship cruise missiles.

-CAPACITY: DELIVER A LARGER, HYBRID FLEET Objective: A larger, hybrid fleet of manned and unmanned platforms – under, on, and above the sea – that meets the strategic and operational demands of our force. We will deliver the Columbia-class program on time; incorporate unmanned systems into the fleet; expand our undersea advantage, and field the platforms necessary for Distributed Maritime Operations. “For 245 years, in both calm and rough waters, our Navy has stood the watch to protect the homeland, preserve freedom of the seas, and defend our way of life,” Gilday said. “The decisions and investments we make this decade will set the maritime balance of power for the rest of this century. We can accept nothing less than success. I am counting on you to take in all lines and get us where we need to go – and to do so at a flank bell.”

QUICK FACTS For more information about the U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations, please contact the Public Affairs Office or visit: www.navy.mil/cno.

| SECNAV names future vessels while aboard historic Navy ship SECNAV

ContinuedfromB1 Lenape (T-ATS 9). This will be the first naval vessel to carry the name of the Lenni Lenape tribe who are indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, and the first tribe to sign a treaty with the United States in 1778. “As a resident of the Keystone State, I know that Pittsburgh is a proud city with a strong legacy of service. I am confident that the crew of the future Pittsburgh will demonstrate the same excellence in support of amphibious and littoral operations around the world,” said Braithwaite. “And, the future USS Lenni Lenape will carry the legacy of the Lenape people for generations to come. The future USNS Lenni Lenape will join USNS Muscogee Creek Nation (T-ATS 10), USNS Navajo (T-ATS 6), USNS Cherokee Nation (T-ATS 7), and USNS Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek (T-ATS 8) providing a wide range of missions including open ocean towing, oil spill response, humanitarian assistance and wide area search and surveillance. Also joining the fleet will be the first Expeditionary Sea Base USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7), carrying the name of Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipient Private First Class Robert Ernest Simanek who earned the nation’s highest medal for valor for his actions during the Korean War when he unhesitatingly threw himself on a deadly missile to shield his fellow Marines from serious injury or death.

MC1 Raymond D. Diaz III

“Private Simanek stands in the unbroken line of heroes extending from the early Marines who once stood in the fighting tops of our original frigates, to the Marines holding the line around the world today, and those who will deploy from the future USS Robert Simanek for years to come,” said Braithwaite. “This Expeditionary Sea Base continues the honored legacy of warriors from the sea, exemplified by her namesake.” Simanek, a Detroit, Michigan, native, joined the Marine Corps in August 1951. He was just 22 years old when he sailed for Korea, joining Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines in May 1952 to serve as a rifleman and as a radioman when needed. In addition to the Medal of Honor and Purple Heart, he was also awarded the Korean Service Medal with two bronze stars. Simanek, now 90, lives in Farmington Hills, Michigan. Along with the ship names, Braithwaite also selected individuals who will be recognized as sponsors for several ships he recently named. The sponsor plays an important role in the life of each ship and is typically selected because of a relationship to the namesake or to the ship’s current mission. The following individuals were identified as sponsors: Melissa Braithwaite will sponsor the future USS Constellation (FFG 62). Barbara Strasser will sponsor the future USS Chesapeake (FFG 64). Gail Fritsch will sponsor the future USS Barb (SSN 804). Mimi Donnelly will sponsor the future USS Tang (SSN 805). Michelle Rogeness will sponsor the future USS Wahoo (SSN 806). Cindy Foggo will sponsor the future USS Silversides (SSN 807). Kelly Geurts will sponsor the future USS Wisconsin (SSBN-827). Nancy Urban will sponsor the future USS

ROOSEVELT |

Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group conducts bilateral exercise with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ContinuedfromB1 mander, Carrier Strike Group Nine. “The longstanding relationship between our two great nations is critical to maintaining security and stability in the Indo-Pacific. It is only alongside allies and partners that we can maintain the rules-based order that has allowed continued prosperity around the world.” Working together provided both countries the opportunity to continue to build their capabilities while practicing for the high-end fight. This is the first bilateral exercise between the U.S. and Japan of 2021. “It is a great honor for me to conduct the first bilateral exercise in 2021 with CSG-9, USS Theodore Roosevelt, USS Bunker Hill, and USS John Finn as the senior officer of the JMSDF participants”, said CAPT Masaru Fujisaki, Kongo’s commanding officer. “This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Operation Tomodachi, which proved the importance of close cooperation between the JMSDF and the U.S. Navy. I would like to express my gratitude to our friends who have worked day and night to strengthen the relationship between us, and I am confident that our ties are an enduring pillar to safeguard the peace and prosperity of the IndoPacific region.”

The bilateral exercise supported the U.S. Navy and JMSDF mission to develop regional capabilities that provide layered defensive options to protect each nation’s interests and those of their allies and partners. The participating forces exercised a wide range of capabilities, from maritime security operations to more complex air defense exercises, which demonstrated the inherent flexibility of the two combined forces. The TRCSG is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to build partnerships that foster maritime security and to conduct a wide range of operations that support humanitarian efforts and freedom of the seas. The TRCSG consists of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, the Ticonderoga-class guidedmissile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), Destroyer Squadron 23, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG 59) and USS John Finn (DDG 113). Theodore Roosevelt’s embarked air wing consists of the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 31, “Golden Warriors” of VFA-87, “Blue Diamonds” of VFA-146, “Black Knights” of VFA-154, “Liberty Bells” of Airborne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 115, “The Gray Wolves” of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 142, “Wolf Pack” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75, “Eightballers” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8 and “Providers” of Fleet Logistic Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Detachment 3. Theodore Roosevelt departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment to the IndoPacific on December 23. For more news from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), visit www.navy.mil/ local/cvn71/

For more military news visit FlagshipNews.com


B8 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

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Black History Month To Be Honored at Mariners’ Museum With Expanded Virtual Programming From The Mariners’Museum NEWPORT NEWS, VA.

The Mariners’ Museum and Park will expand its virtual programming lineup in February when it celebrates Black History Month and adds two new series. All of the programs fortheMuseum’sBlackHistoryMonthSeries will be available online and free of charge. With an ongoing global health pandemic, the Mariners’ is offering a variety of virtual programs focusing on the rich history and culture of Blacks, Africans, and African Americans who helped to shape the world, including an evening lecture with Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander, a distinguished author and current Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and history professor at Norfolk State University. While the galleries have been closed for most of last year, the Mariners’ team has been hard at work further exploring its Collection. This additional time with the Collection has resulted in a pair of exciting program series with the introduction of Hidden Histories and the intriguing worlds of African kingdoms and waterways. Hidden Histories will give names, agency, and interpretation of the unidentified Black people depicted in the Museum’s Image Collection. Part of this series will seek community engagement in helping gather names and personal stories to bring recognition, and thereby allowing the Museum to tell a more completehistory ofour sharedmaritime heritage.

The second new program series will highlight Africa’s kingdoms, maritime cultures, and waterways that populated the African continent and how each has influenced African and world culture, past and present. Both of these series will also be offered throughout the year to showcase how Black and African history is intertwined with incredible stories that illustrate adversity and diversity. “Black History Month at The Mariners’ Museum and Park is always about celebrating the rich maritime heritage of Blacks and AfricanAmericans,“saidWisteriaPerry,manager of interpretation and community outreach at theMariners'.”Nowthatwearevirtual,weare excited to offer these incredible programs beyond our local community. We are also introducing two new series that will allow us throughout the year to reflect and recognize theirpowerfulstoriesandlegacyandhighlight the many ways that connect us as one human race." Full virtual schedule of The Mariners’ Museum’s Black History Month Series All virtual programming is FREE. Advance registration and a personal Zoom account is required. Times are Eastern. Celebrating Black History Month Monday, February1, 2021•1p.m. TheMariners’MuseumwillcelebrateAfrica and its people and the key role they played in maritime trade and global expansion for centuries through a variety of virtual programs focusing on the rich history and culture of Blacks, Africans, and African Americans who helped to shape the world.

Maritime Mondays Anna Carries Water, written by Olive Senior and illustrated by Laura James Monday, February1, 2021•1p.m. Anna fetches water from the spring every day, but she can’t carry it on her head like her older siblings. Set in Jamaica, this charming and poetic family story by Commonwealth Prize-winning author Olive Senior shows young readers the power of determination, as Anna achieves her goal and overcomes her fear. Speakers Bureau: Jack Tar on the Waterfront Wednesday, February 3, 2021•1p.m. EdMoore,adocentatTheMariners’Museum and Park, will provide an online look into the Jack Tars and how their influence on the ColonialAmericawaterfrontcreatedaculture that valued freedom and led to a revolution. Evening Lecture Series Virginia Waterways and the Stories of Freedom Seekers in the Underground Railroad Thursday, February 4, 2021• 7 p.m. Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander, a distinguished author and current Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and history professor at Norfolk State University, will reveal the fascinating details of a secret network that served as a road to freedom for many enslaved Virginians. Maritime Mondays The Little Hippo, written by Géraldine Elschner and illustrated by Anja Klauss Monday, February 8, 2021•1p.m. In this delightful children’s story, a young

boy befriends a little hippo and together they live out their days along the banks of the Nile. After many years, when the boy’s life comes to an end, the hippo finds himself in a strange world populated with deserts, cities, forests, and finally a museum where he is reunited with his friends. Hidden Histories Tuesday, February 9, 2021•1p.m. A new virtual series seeking to give names, agency and interpretation of the unidentified Black people depicted in The Mariners’ Collection, “Hidden Histories” will allow the Museum to tell a more complete history of its shared maritime heritage while engaging the local community. Maritime Mondays If Dominican Were a Color, written by Sili Recio and illustrated by Brianna McCarthy Monday, February15, 2021•1p.m. ThecolorsofHispaniolaburstintolifecelebrating the joy of being Dominican. This exuberantly colorful, softlyrhymingpicturebook beautifully illustrates a mami’s words to her daughter on what Blackness looks like across her home country. Africa’s Kingdoms and Maritime Cultures: Carthage Tuesday, February18, 2021•1p.m. A new program series highlighting ancient cities that populated the African continent, “Africa’s Kingdoms and Maritime Cultures” will highlight the key role its people played in maritime trade and global expansion. In the first of this series, the ancient city of Carthage will be featured and how its history has influenced present-day Tunisia will be discussed. Civil War Lecture Series African American Medal of Honor Recipients during the Civil War Wednesday, February19, 2021•12 p.m. Notable author and historian John V. Quarstein will give a virtual presentation on African Americans who fought in the Civil War to free their people from slavery. Maritime Mondays Anansi and the Magic Stick, written by Eric A. Kimmel and illustrated by Janet Stevens Monday, February 22, 2021•1p.m. When Anansi finds out that Hyena has a magic stick that could fix his messy problem, he begins to conspire a way to steal it. But will the magic be more than Anansi bargained for? Based on tales originating in West Africa and familiar in Caribbean culture, this funny story is part of a five-book Anansi the Trickster series filled with slapstick humor and mischief. Africa’s Kingdoms and Maritime Cultures: The Swahili Coast Tuesday, February 23, 2021•1p.m. Highlighting ancient cities that populated the African continent, “Africa’s Kingdoms and Maritime Cultures” is a new virtual programseriesthatwillbelaunchedduringBlack History Month and continue throughout the year. In the second of this series this month, a coastal area of the Indian Ocean in Southeast Africa will be explored including the Swahili people who inhabit the area. Waterways of Africa: The Nile Saturday, February 27, 2021•1p.m. This new virtual series will be presented throughout the year, and focus on the different waters that have influenced African and world culture, past and present. In the first of the series, one of the world’s largest rivers and one of Africa’s most relied upon bodies of water will be examined – the Nile River.

Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Restoration Project to be Complete Summer 2021 From City of Norfolk NORFOLK, VA

Restoration on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is underway, and the project is expected to be complete in Summer 2021. The restoration project is repairing structural components and exterior panels after a structural engineer found the steel supports and granite panels had deteriorated. A contractor removed the panels in October 2020. In April, the contractor will repair the masonry and install plumb-

ing and electrical components. The steel tower installation will start in May and once complete, the granite sections will be attached. Lane closures will be announced in advance of the installation. The memorial was dedicated in 2000 and was conceived by former Norfolk Councilman and General District Court Judge, Joseph A. Jordan, Jr. The granite memorial stands at 83-feet tall and is inscribed with quotations by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a reminder of the importance of civil rights. For more information, review the Project Plan.

Andrew Coope

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages C6-7


C2 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Community

n Submit YOUR events, news and photos TheFlagshipwelcomessubmissionsfromourreadersonline. Pleasesubmit events here:www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Pleasesubmit news and photos here:www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

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SCCA Living LARGE image of Chesapeake artist Ken Wright, with artwork, Landscape Mood.

Suffolk Center is ‘Living LARGE’ in 2021 From Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts

COASTAL VA

Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts is going big, kicking off the new year with ‘Living LARGE’. This first exhibition of 2021 features artwork by 18 talented artists who like to supersize their artwork. Living LARGE opens with the Suffolk Center’s first virtual Art Opening on Thursday, January 21, 2021 at 5 PM, live-streaming to Facebook. Living LARGE is on display in the Suffolk Center’s BB&T and Norfolk Foundation galleries January 21 – February 19, 2021, and is FREE and open to the public on Tuesday – Saturday 11 AM – 4 PM. Join the fun on January 21 at 5 PM on-line at https://www.facebook.com/ suffolkcenter. Gallery Managers, Sandy Waters and Pat Eelman, will share artful facts about featured artwork and review artist’s art techniques. The virtual art opening will weave in pre-taped videos of the featured artists discussing their artwork. Hosting a virtual art opening

allows viewers to essentially meet the artists and get a glimpse inside their creative process. Conducting the Center’s first livestreaming virtual art opening requires a new approach, as well as some new equipment. Working LIVE is a bit tricky, there are no ‘do-overs’ in realtime. Staff members will be using laptops, cell phone cameras, a gimbal and lavaliere mics to coordinate the 30minute, live-streaming event. Although patrons cannot attend the opening inperson – utilizing new technology offers art lovers a great way to see the artwork from anywhere. Artist’s relatives from across the country can participate, art students that are virtually learning can take part, and everyone will stay safe viewing the exhibit from the comfort of their own homes. Living LARGE artwork is also available for purchase in the Suffolk Center’s Online Art Gallery. Living LARGE featured ARTISTS: Hye Ja Billie, Chesapeake VA Alex Burdett, Virginia Beach VA Rick Byrd, Suffolk VA

SCCA Living LARGE artwork by Norfolk artist Karen Rudd, Bubblebee Breathing

Pat Eelman, Smithfield VA Barbara Harris, Suffolk VA Petya Ivanova, Virginia Beach VA Chris Jeanguenat, Suffolk VA Hope Kinard, Suffolk VA Charlie Lindauer, Virginia Beach VA Glen McClure, Norfolk VA Tom Paulk, Chesapeake VA Alex Rahn, Chesapeake VA Karen Rudd, Norfolk VA

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Karen Sallaz, Suffolk VA Wayne Thomas, Suffolk VA Sandy West, Chesapeake VA Ken Wright, Chesapeake VA For more information on the ‘Living LARGE’ exhibition, please visit https:// suffolkcenter.org. The Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts is conveniently located in beautiful Downtown Suffolk at 110 W. Finney Ave., Suffolk, VA 23434.

JIM BRICKMAN SUPPORTS THE ARTS WITH SHARE THE LOVE LIVE! VIRTUALLY From The Sandler Center VIRGINIA BEACH, VA.

GRAMMY-Nominated Songwriter and piano sensation, Jim Brickman, will continue to entertain fans in February with “Share The Love” LIVE Virtually. A portion of each ticket purchased to this LIVE event will be benefit theatres across the country, including the Sandler Center. Fans and their families can enjoy this unique virtual concert experience from the comfort of home while supporting the arts during this challenging time. Brickman will bring the LIVE concert experience up close and personal with his LOVE BY REQUEST: concerts filled with his hit songs such as, “Love of My Life,” “Destiny,” “Angel Eyes” and “Valentine.” Brickman will warm the hearts of all as sweet sounds love bringing family and friends together to Share the Love. The Jim Brickman’s Valentine’s tradition continues, with a front-row experience

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like never before. WHEN: Friday, February 12 9pm ET, Saturday, February 13 7pm ET & 10pm ET, Sunday, February 14 7pm ET & 10pm ET WHERE: Comfort of your home PRICES: Early Bird $40 ($50 starting February 1st) TICKETS: Tickets On Sale Now EXCLUSIVELY at https://bit.ly/3ipSJY6. CODE: Please use code LOVESCVB at checkout. ABOUT JIM BRICKMAN: Jim Brickman is the best-selling solo pianist of our time earning 22 Number One albums and 34 Top 20 Radio Singles in the industry bible, Billboard Magazine. He has garnered two GRAMMY nominations,

gospel music’s Dove Award, two SESAC Songwriter of the Year Awards, and the Canadian Country Music Award. He also has a music scholarship named for him by his alma mater, the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music. Brickman is one of pop music’s most fascinating success stories. He jumped from a career as a jingle writer of famous tunes for advertising to reviving the romantic standard of the popular song. His first album release was 1995’s “No Words,” and he’s gone on to sell eight million albums worldwide. His star-studded vocal collaborations have crossed genres to feature luminaries like, Lady Antebellum, Carly Simon, Michael W. Smith, Herb Alpert, Michael Bolton, Donny Osmond, Kenny Rogers,

Olivia Newton-John, Johnny Mathis, Kenny Loggins, John Oates, Martina McBride, Wayne Brady, Jane Krakowski, and countless country, Broadway, pop, and jazz musicians. He has written three best-selling books, starred in five TV concert specials, and is in the 22nd season of hosting the popular syndicated radio show: “The Jim Brickman Show.” New in 2020, Brickman Bedtime Story podcast every Tuesday night can be seen on Facebook LIVE and heard on Pandora, Apple, Spotify, and iHeart podcasts. A true artist that lives and breathes the music he creates; Jim Brickman is thrilled to provide this groundbreaking LIVE virtual concert experience to fans of all ages.


C3 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Deciding Where to Live When You Leave the Military From Military Onesource

The day will come when you’re preparing to transition out of the military. You might have spent time thinking about where you want to live when this day arrives. As you decide where toYour family’s wishes • Career opportunities • Education • Cost of living • Talk with your family The decision about your next home will affect the entire family, so include them in every step of the process. Here are some things you might want to think about: • Career and educational opportunities – Do you want to start a new career? Does your spouse want to continue their career or start a new one? What about the kids? Where are the best schools? Base your decisions on what will be good for the whole family. • Extended family – How close do you want to be to your extended family – “See you tomorrow” close, or “See you on holidays” close? Take a careful look at your hometown and evaluate the job market, schools and cost of living. • Career goals – The Department of Defense’s mandatory Transition Assistance Program will help you prepare for life after active duty. Whether you plan to pursue a civilian job, continue your education or join the Reserves, the Transition Assistance Program will help you develop a plan and make sure you are ready to pursue your goals. For more information, contact your installation Transition Assistance Program. In addition, the Military Spouse Transition Program provides guidance to help MilSpouses transition to civilian life, including starting or continuing a career. Learn more about your career path and finding the right job. Consider your options Make a list and prioritize what is most important to you, like job opportunities, schools, climate or cost of living. Then, do your research to find the best match. The following can help you make the military-to-civilian transition a little easier: • Take advantage of resources like the

CareerOneStop Veteran and Military Transition Center, sponsored by the Department of Labor. The CareerOneStop Veteran and Military Transition Center website allows you to access free interest and skills assessments, explore civilian careers and education options, search for jobs, learn about benefits, and much more. • Search websites – Many websites can help you find the best places to live by letting you order the importance of categories like education, crime rates, climate and housing costs. You can narrow your search by preferences or compare your favorite cities. • Find local information – Eligible users can search for local community information on the MilitaryINSTALLATIONS website. On the MilitaryINSTALLATIONS home page, after the words “I’m looking for a …” choose the option “State resources.” Then click on the words “VIEW ALL STATE RESOURCES” located under the magnifying glass. This brings up a list of all 50 states. Click on any state, then look for the box titled “Local Community Information.” Click on the link for eligible users. You will need to enter your Military OneSource user identification and password to access the tool. • Identify unique, personal preferences – Some preferences can’t be factored into a test on a website. You may want to live close to a military installation so you and your family can take advantage of military benefits. Or you may want to move near a particular reserve unit where you can train in a specialized area. • Weigh your options – Write down the available choices and assess the pros and cons of each. Use your list to help you look objectively at options. • Prepare for mixed emotions – Be prepared for different kinds of feelings as you transition from active duty. It’s normal to be nervous about big life changes like this. No decision is 100% guaranteed, but the better you prepare, the more likely you are to set up yourself and your family for success. Access military support

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Your relocation benefits include one final move from your last duty station within the time and geographic limits listed below. If you live in installation housing, you may be allowed one move out of housing into the local community and another final move within these limits. Check with your installation transportation office for details on benefits specific to your final move. Retirement – You may be moved anywhere within the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) or to your home of record outside the United States within one year of your retirement date. (This is called a home of selection.) • Involuntary separation (honorable discharge) – You may be moved anywhere within the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) or to your home of record outside the United States within one year of your separation date. • Voluntary separation (honorable discharge) – You may be moved to your home of record (or an equal or lesser distance) within 180 days of your separation date. If you choose a destination of greater distance, you will be obligated to pay the additional costs.

• General discharge (under honorable conditions) – You may be moved to your home of record (or an equal or lesser distance) within 180 days of your separation. Once you have made your decision where to move, contact your installation transportation office about scheduling your move. The earlier you start to plan, the more likely you are to get the move dates you want. If you or another veteran is without a home or facing eviction or foreclosure while transitioning out of military service, the Department of Veterans Affairs may be able to help. For more information, call 877-4AID-VET, or visit the VA Veterans Experiencing Homelessness webpage. Finding a place to call home after you separate from the military is one of the first big steps in civilian life. Fortunately, you have access to a number of benefits and resources that can help you with this transition. Educate yourself with the right information and you’ll be enjoying home sweet home very soon. live after your military separation, it’s helpful to consider:

Look! 4 corners! Everyday moments can be learning moments with your kids. For more tips, visit bornlearning.org


C4 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Food

Pumpkin-Cherry Breakfast Cookies By Good Housekeeping test kitchen

These delicious on-the-go treats are packed with protein (and fiber!) to keep you energized till noon! Ingredients • 2 c. whole wheat flour • 1 c. old-fashioned oats

• 1 tsp. baking soda • 1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice • 1/4 tsp. salt • 1 15-oz. can pure pumpkin • 1 c. coconut oil • 1 c. brown sugar • 1 large egg

Mike Garten

• 1/2 c. roasted, salted pepitas • 1/2 c. dried cherries Directions • Whisk together whole wheat flour, old-fashioned oats, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. At medium speed, beat pure pumpkin, coconut oil, brown sugar, and egg until well combined; gradually beat in flour mixture, then pepitas and dried cherries. • Scoop onto large parchment-paper-lined cookie sheet to form 16 mounds, spaced 2-inches apart; flatten into disks. • Bake at 350 degrees F for 20 to 25 minutes or until dark brown on bottoms. Cool on wire rack. Cooled cookies can be wrapped in plastic and stored at room temperature up to 2 days or frozen up to 2 weeks. Reheat in toaster until crisp.

Fried Plantains | Who needs French fries? By Gabriella Vigoreaux

Think beyond potatoes and fry up sweet, starchy plantains to pair with your next burger or sammie. Plantains look like large bananas but don’t taste like 'em (plus, bananas won’t fry like plantains), so make sure you seek out the right crop at the grocery store. Ingredients • Canola oil, for frying • 2 very ripe plantains (skin should be very black and soft) • Kosher salt Directions • Heat 1/4 inch oil (about 1 1/2 cups) in a large, heavy skillet on medium. • Peel plantains by cutting off the ends and making a long, shallow cut through the peel. Slice at an angle into 1/2-inch-thick pieces. • Lower the heat to medium-low and, in 2 batches, fry plantains until golden brown and caramelized, 3 to 6 minutes per side. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt.

Mike Garten


C5 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

Health

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Annika Hutsler celebrates winning four gold medals in swimming during the 2020 U.S. Marine Corps Trials in Camp Pendleton, California.

Roger Wollenberg, DOD/

One Marine’s journey to recovery through adaptive sports By: Warrior Care- Recovery Coordination Program

This article is written through the eyes of a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, Lance Cpl. Annika Hutsler. The Wounded Warrior Regiment maintains an adaptive sports program called the Warrior Athlete Reconditioning Program (WAR-P). WAR-P provides adaptive reconditioning activities and competitive athletic opportunities to all wounded, ill, and injured recovering service members (RSMs) to improve their well-being physically and mentally thereby enhancing their quality of life throughout the continuum of recovery, reintegration, and transition. After joining the Wounded Warrior Regiment in July 2018, Hutsler was required to participate in at least one activity to the best of her abilities. “I was assigned to the U.S. Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment in July 2018. I was classified as a limb salvage patient for the doctors had discovered a giant mass in my right foot. As a Marine, I was struggling a lot mentally more than anything else. At the time, I was pretty much bound to a wheelchair or on crunches. I had to wear a walking boot for over 400 days. It was an extremely rough time in my life until I was exposed to the Wounded Warrior requirement that all Marines will do something active and productive to enhance their resiliency and recovery.” Archery was the first adaptive sport and therapeutic activity I was introduced to, which opened a whole new world for me. I loved going to archery practice and from there I kind of just expanded my possibilities. Archery was the one thing that got me up in the morning, especially on days I didn’t want to get up. WAR-P adaptive reconditioning activities and sports gave me a sense of purpose at a time where I felt I had no purpose in the Marine Corps anymore. Renewed Passion to Compete

Track is my favorite adaptive sport to compete in. As a Marine and someone with two legs, I hated running. But when I was limb salvaged for 14 months, I missed what I couldn’t do, and running was the biggest thing for me. I love running now. I’m on a track team now and it’s a freeing experience to be able to run again. My participation in various adaptive sports and reconditioning activities in the WAR-P led to my selection to participate in the Marine Corps Trials at Camp Pendleton, California. During my first Marine Corps Trials in 2019, I competed in six adaptive sports: wheelchair racing, wheelchair rugby, seated volleyball, archery, shooting, and swimming. Two weeks after the Trials, I had my right leg amputated below the knee. I begged and asked, ‘If I heal enough can I do the Warrior Games?’ Nobody believed I could do it. I worked hard and showed up a month before the Warrior Games with my doctor’s approval to compete. In only eight weeks post amputation, I competed in the 2019 Warrior Games, in Tampa, Florida, representing the USMC as one of 40 Marine team members. I competed in four adaptive sports: wheelchair racing, wheelchair rugby, archery, and swimming. I competed with over 300 RSMs and veterans representing teams from the Army, Navy, Air Force, SOCOM, and a couple of international teams from the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia. Being able to compete in the Warrior Games was incredible. It felt good to see all these other athletes because either someone is inspiring you or you are inspiring someone. As military we’re all competitive against each other but there’s still such a comradery. The Warrior Games is a competition like nothing else in the world. The Road Ahead My biggest takeaway that I’ve learned from Military Adaptive Sports is don’t let

Nathan Cleary/ U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Hutsler competing in track by crossing the finish line at the 2020 U.S. Marine Corps Trials in Camp Pendleton, California, March 2020. She won gold in the event.

anyone tell you what you can or can’t do. When I was limb salvaged everyone was like, ‘you’re not going to run track.’ I did it in a wheelchair and now that I’m an amputee, I can run on a blade. If you set your mind to it, you can do whatever you want. I see myself continuing with the adaptive sport community for the rest of my life. I’m connected to a lot of adaptive sport and recreation organizations. It gives me a sense of belonging when I’m with people like me. Now, I’m training for the Paralympics in snowboarding and I credit that to Military Adaptive Sports Program and WAR-P. Because of the Warrior Games, various adaptive sports contacts, and my confidence level in my own adaptive sports abilities, I realized that making the U.S. Paralympics team is a dream that I can make a reality.

When I achieve my goals [now] it’s so much more rewarding because I had to work harder to get there. Connecting Disabled Veterans Anytime I meet someone who is a disabled veteran, I ask ‘Have you ever done the Warrior Games?’ I give them contacts if they are interested in participating in adaptive sports. The Warrior Games was such a big thing for me mentally and emotionally that I feel like everybody should have the chance to participate.” To learn more about Military Adaptive Sports, visit Warrior Care. To learn more about the USMC Wounded Warrior Regiment and the WAR-P Program visit https://www.woundedwarrior.marines.mil/.


C6 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

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C7 | www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | 1.21.2021

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