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CHRISTMAS 2011 2013 CHRISTMAS

T H E M AG A Z I N E O F T H E A R C H D I O C E S E F O R T H E M I L I T A R Y S E RV I C E S , U S A

The T he W Word ord became became flesh flesh a and nd p pitched itched H His is ttent ent a among mong u us. s.


Dear Friends of the Archdiocese for the Military Services,

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he Word became flesh and pitched His tent among us.” John’s poetic communication of the fundamental reality of the Annunciation and the Nativity comes to mind as we celebrate Christmas. We are grateful that Almighty God so loved us that He sent His only Son to offer us the unreachable gift of salvation. As a Church and a people, we gather to celebrate such great love and we pray that the joyful announcement by the angels might reach all women and men of good will.

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ecember brings many people together to celebrate the mystery of divine love. For the Bishops of the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, it also means that rather than hang stockings we pack bags! Bishops Higgins, Spencer, Buckon, and Coyle, and I plan to visit the faithful at different installations in order to announce the joy of the Savior’s coming to the faithful. God willing, I will celebrate the Savior’s Nativity once again in the Middle East! Your prayers for the successful completion of our pastoral wanderings are deeply appreciated.

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n addition to the articles written by the five of us, this issue of the AMS quarterly publication Salute will tell us a bit about the contract priests who serve this vast Archdiocese and open the window on some pastoral activities in the Department of Veterans Affairs. You will also learn about this year’s celebration of the Memorial Mass for the Servant of God Vincent Capodanno.

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here is always more to tell. These pages will have been prepared before the conclusion of the archdiocesan pilgrimage to the Holy Land to conclude the Year of Faith. However, the memory of standing in the Basilica of the Nativity in Bethlehem will make the mystery of the Word made flesh even more vivid this year.

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njoy the following pages of Salute. Invoking abundant blessings from the Christ Child upon all of you, I wish you and all your loved ones the experience of that divine love and the lasting peace that only Christ can give! Sincerely in Christ,

Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio Archbishop

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THE MAGAZINE OF THE ARCHDIOCESE FOR THE MILITARY SERVICES, USA VOLUME 7. NUMBER 4 CHRISTMAS 2013

TA B L E

of

CONTENTS

4 It is Right and Just to Give Thanks Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio

8 Taking Care of the Next Generation of Soldiers, Extraordinary Service Provided by the Catholic War Veterans Bishop Richard B. Higgins

10 Christmas Traditions — Combat Style 101! Bishop F. Richard Spencer

12 The Healing Ministry Bishop Neal J. Buckon

14 Spending Time with the Saviour in the Eternal City Bishop Robert J. Coyle

16 Archdiocesan Process for Father Capodanno’s Beatification and Canonization Moves Forward Monsignor Frank A. Pugliese

28 Archdiocese Celebrates Ordination of Permanent Deacons Taylor Henry

32 Archbishop Broglio Announces the Establishment of the Capodanno Guild at Televised Memorial Mass Taylor Henry

37 Shutdown Prevented Mass at 50 Installations Taylor Henry The Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA publishes SALUTE for the nation’s Bishops, active and retired military chaplains, and financial supporters of the Archdiocese.

CHRISTMAS 2011 2013 CHRISTMAS

T H E M AG A G A Z I N E O F T H E A R C H D I O C E S E F O R T H E M I L I T A R Y S E RV I C E S , U S A

ADDRESS CHANGES AND NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS: Please send title, name, address, and phone number to: support@milarch.org or call: 202-719-3600 or write: Development Office, Archdiocese for

the Military Services, P.O. Box 4469, Washington, D.C. 20017-0469 Feedback, letters to the editor, & advertising inquiries: editor@milarch.org Website: www.milarch.org ON THE COVER: “A Light to the Gentiles” © GREG OLSEN. Used with permission.

The T he W Word ord became became flesh flesh a and nd p pitched itched H His is ttent ent a among mong u us. s.

For more information, please visit: www.GregOlsen.com ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO President

MONSIGNOR JOHN J.M. FOSTER Editorial Director

JO ANN REDMOND Editor

ERIC NEUNER | RPISTUDIOS Design Director

© 2013 - A PUBLICATION OF THE ARCHDIOCESE FOR THE MILITARY SERVICES, USA - SERVING CATHOLICS IN THE ARMY, NAVY, AIR FORCE, MARINE CORPS, COAST GUARD,VA MEDICAL CENTERS, AND GOVERNMENT SERVICES OVERSEAS.


By ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO

IT IS RIGHT AND JUST TO

GIVE THANKS

L-R: ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO CONGRATULATING BISHOP FRANCIS X. ROQUE ON THE OCCASION OF THE 60TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS PRIESTLY ORDINATION.

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hristmas celebrates the most precious gift that Almighty God has ever given to humanity, the Redeemer Jesus Christ, who accepted our human condition so as to open for us the gate to eternal life. Of course, we celebrate this gift in a variety of ways. We might even look back every year –to borrow an expression from Charles Dickens—to Christmases in the past. 4

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SEMINARIANS POSE FOR PHOTO BEFORE DEPARTING TO SEE THE SIGHTS ON THE POTOMAC RIVER, DURING THE LABOR DAY WEEKEND GATHERING

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am reminded of my first one as a young diplomatic secretary to the Apostolic Nunciature in Abidjan, Ivory Coast (West Africa). An Italian missionary had invited me to join him for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. If I came, he said, all of the mission stations in his parish would have at least one Mass on this great solemnity. The invitation attracted me a great deal. It would be so pastorally useful to bring the Mass to these poor people. However, my boss, the Apostolic Nuncio would have to be convinced. Understandably, he did not want to see the “family” of the Nunciature separated at such an important time. Some good friends of his intervened behind the scenes and convinced him not to dampen the spirits of the young (32 years old) priest. The morning of the 24th I set out for the appointed meeting place, Aboisso, where we had lunch with some other Italian missionary priests. Then it was time to go to the tiny parish at Ayamé. Late in the afternoon the pastor set out for the mission stations he would cover. He told me that I could begin to hear confessions around 11 pm., before the Midnight Mass. The first person came to confession and, to my chagrin, did not speak French.

Only the local language was known. I soon discovered that everyone confessed in either the local language or Moré, one of the languages of Burkina Faso, a neighboring nation from which many laborers came. Needless to write, I do not speak any of those languages. Midnight Mass was very long. My homily was preached in French, but I would pause at the end of each sentence while it was translated into the two most common local languages. I revised and shortened the homily as I preached it! Even at night the heat and humidity were high. The next morning there were two more Masses. One was at the parish and the other was in a little village buried in the brush. After that second Mass, the religious woman who accompanied me announced that we were staying for lunch. I was not too eager. The town was poor and the surroundings were rustic. She told me that it was significant that they were offering a meal, because they generally did not. It was a rather meager Christmas dinner: a very tough chicken (obviously similar to the very scrawny ones I could see walking about) and some yam (a staple in that part of Africa). I thought to myself about the directive given by the Lord Jesus to those (continued on page 6) christmas 2013 |

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IT IS RIGHT AND JUST TO GIVE THANKS

(continued from page 5)

ARCHBISHOP BROGLIO PRESENTS TO THE PRIESTS DURING THE OCTOBER 2013 CONVOCATION IN ROME

He sent forth:“Whatever house you find, stay there and leave from there.” (Lk. 9:4). However, it was so good to have been able to celebrate Christmas Mass for the faithful. It reminded me once again of the gift received so that it could be given to others. “Fast-forwarding” from Christmas 1983, to what will be my sixth celebration of the Nativity as the Archbishop for the Military Services, USA, I see that some things are constant. The joyful proclamation of the Savior’s Birth, being far from home, and helping other priests to provide for the important pastoral needs remain constant. I confess, however, that I have not seen any more scrawny chickens on a Christmas table! There have been some significant events since I last prepared an article for Salute. The convocations this year experienced an incredible increase in the number of participants. San Diego, Washington, San Antonio, and Rome all had larger numbers than two years ago. The inclusion of contract priests in the equation accounts for some of the increase. In general, however, the priests see the importance of these gatherings and make the sacrifice to be there. The Government shutdown had some

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impact on the conference scheduled for the VA Catholic Chaplains at Mundelein Seminary in Chicago. However, there were over ninety priests registered for the annual event. These convocations and conferences allow the priests time for renewal, up-dating about the AMS, and the dissemination of more information about the new archdiocesan religious education curriculum. The moments of fraternity among the priests of different branches of the Armed Forces are also appreciated by all. The highlight of the autumn, however, was the privilege of joining the Most Reverend Francis X. Roque as he and Father James J. Hamilton celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of their ordination to the priesthood for the Diocese of Providence. The setting was the chapel of the Jeanne Jugan Residence in Pawtucket, R.I., where Bishop Roque lives and ministers. He presided at the Mass for the Feast of St. Matthew and recalled his years of ministry. Bishops Gelineau, Mulvee, Reilly, and Boland (a Dominican who was Bishop in Pakistan) and I concelebrated along with a number of priests. The chapel was filled with relatives and friends. In fact, many of the residents assisted from the balcony so as to leave more space for the guests.


C hristmas past, present, and future always celebrate the love of Almighty God for us, His children. It is right and just to give thanks!

ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO MEETS POPE FRANCIS WHILE ATTENDING CONVOCATION IN ROME.

At the end of the celebration, it was my privilege to read the message of congratulations sent on behalf of Pope Francis. I also thanked Bishop Roque for his many years of service as an Army chaplain and an Auxiliary Bishop of the AMS. When he was ordained a priest, I was just approaching my second birthday! The archdiocesan family gives thanks to Almighty God for three score years of generous service by Bishop Roque and we wish him many more years of health and faithful ministry. We also give thanks to the Little Sisters of the Poor both in Rhode Island and here in Washington, D.C. for the efficient and gentle care that they offer to both Bishop Roque and Archbishop Dimino. This year both of them celebrated thirty years as bishops. Once again the co-sponsored seminarians were in good spirits as they gathered at the Washington Retreat House over the Labor Day weekend (see page 24). It was a good opportunity for them to spend time with one another, with some members of the archdiocesan team, and with me. We gathered in prayer at the retreat house, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, and at Joint Base Anacostia Bolling where the community

also treated all of us to tables groaning under the platters of home-cooked specialties and desserts. No one headed back to his seminary with an empty stomach. Celebrations were also organized to mark the fortieth anniversary of the outreach to the Armed Forces by Saint Leo University. This university was among the first to make courses available at times when military men and women might be free. Prior to on-line courses there were not many other opportunities. The university even conferred a degree on the grounds of MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla. To mark this relationship, the University President invited me to celebrate the Mass of the Holy Spirit in the Abbey Church on the university grounds. Their Virginia Beach Campus asked me to lecture on my pastoral letter, Seek Peace, for the Year of Faith. These initiatives gave me an opportunity to thank the university community for its continued service in furthering the education of the men and women in uniform. C hristmas past, present, and future always celebrate the love of Almighty God for us, His children. It is right and just to give thanks! ✞ christmas 2013 |

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By BISHOP RICHARD B. HIGGINS

Taking Care of the Next Generation of Soldiers: Extraordinary Service Provided by the Catholic War Veterans

BATCH OF INDUCTEES LEAVING THE WILL ROGERS 'OASIS' BOARDING THE BUS FOR FORT SILL, OKLA.

was expecting to see Jose Garcia, National Service Officer of the Catholic War Veterans, as I headed for the baggage claim area in the Will Rogers Oklahoma City Airport. As I searched for the familiar face among the strangers, I was greeted instead by Bob Lambert, 1st Vice Commander of Oklahoma Memorial Post 168. We climbed aboard his SUV and Bob asked if I had a little extra time as he wanted me to see something on the way to the convention site. “No problem, Bob, I guess I’m somewhat your captive and it’s a long walk to downtown!”

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xiting the airport we pulled into the Cargo Area where Bob parked his truck in front of the YMCA Welcome Center. “Bishop, I wanted you to see this, as it’s somewhat unique. We don’t have a USO here at the Oklahoma City airport and the airport folks wanted to do something for the thousands of recruits who pass through the airport at all hours of the day on their way to Fort Sill. The “kids” used to wander L-R: RON PAINCHAUD, RANDY GILREATH, SHARON GILREATH, ROGER THIBEAULT, KEN throughout the airport and the PROVOST, BOB LAMBERT, AND BISHOP RICHARD HIGGINS management decided there must be a better way to treat our young people who raffic through the center was light that have signed up to serve their country. So, they evening and as I wandered from table to found this space over here in the Cargo Area table I encountered “kids” from all walks of and it opened in June 2007. Members of our life, some recent high-school grads clutching Post have been volunteering here ever since. I the ubiquitous manila envelope, a few who had thought you’d like to see it.” never been out of state or away from family,

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aturally there was a well-ridden Harley parked outside flying both the American and POW/MIA flags! I suspected I was in for a treat and some stories as I climbed the few steps leading to the Welcome Center. Sure enough, there are a handful of crusty, battle-hardened veterans and their wives/ lady friends bedecked with medals, patches, badges, pins, tattoos and the occasional battle scar, all evidence of a life of sacrifice in the line of duty. And they were here to take care of the next generation of soldiers!

some nervous, others excited, many insecure and scared. Then there were the self-confident, highly motivated, patriotic “always wanted to join”, family tradition, fourth generation military. A few had previous careers like the personal trainer who was joining the Army to become a physical therapist, a nurse’s aide whose goal was to become a pediatrician, an Eagle Scout determined to become a Ranger, a CAP cadet who wanted to fly helicopters, a Junior ROTC grad intent on becoming a general officer! They wondered why a Catholic bishop would stop by.

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he 5,000 square-foot center can accommodate roughly 100 recruits. There are tables, chairs, sofas, computer stations, video games, free-Wi-Fi, free drinks and snacks, blankets, pillows and most all the comforts of home available almost 24/7. Local civic and veterans organizations underwrite the expenses of the center. In 2012 over 11,000 transit personnel availed themselves of the hospitality offered by the volunteers at this oasis on Will Rogers.

he chatter came to an abrupt halt when one of the substantial Vietnam veterans called the room to attention and proceeded to introduce a semblance of order into the gathering. Reality set in as the designer bags, accessories, cell phones, buds, i-Pads and various personal items were collected. Somewhere in the now-silent room came a voice “You probably won’t need these for a while.” From a distance I could hear the rumble of the (continued on page 41) christmas 2013 |

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By BISHOP F. RICHARD SPENCER

CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS –

COMBAT STYLE 101!

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here is great joy living the Christmas experience in one of our deployed military chapels with our women and men in uniform, as well as our contractors while stationed overseas! Celebrating in a combat environment actually heightens the meaning as to why we pray and celebrate “Peace on Earth!” Yes, for sure, we all miss our loved ones back in the U.S.A., at these special times of the year, but as an AMS “family” we find strength being connected through our faith in Jesus Christ. As Catholics, we are bonded and spiritually supported through the efforts of this global Archdiocese. My thoughts during this time of year while on remote mountain tops, far from the U.S.A., turns towards the simple Nativity scene and holiday meal traditions.

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God has appeared – as a child. It is in this guise that He pits Himself against all violence and brings a message that is peace.

PAGE 10 (LEFT): HOLIDAY DINNER | ABOVE: EAST MEETS WEST

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nside our combat chapels, on the ground and inside our ships, the settings may not be as elaborately decorated as those back home or on Garrison compounds, but they all tend to take on a unique ambience. Most of our chapels on land are simple plywood “huts” as shared in the picture above “East meets West” with His Excellency Bishop Matti Warda Bashar of Chaldea, Iraq, as he and I venerated a small Nativity set next to the Tabernacle of our Lord. The diversity, yet the common bond, that unites us as Catholics is very strong. Many of our chapels are decorated very simply. Perhaps this is what draws my admiration and attention. Almost every chapel has a Nativity set displayed for veneration. Some are plastic, some are wood, and others I have seen are even made out of cardboard with the Holy Family and Magi drawn by magic-marker pens!

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ND there is always the famous Christmas dinner together. Again, combat style, of course! And speaking of “courses” – there always seems to be a plethora of courses of food and special delights in our military dining facilities, as shown in the photo on page 10, where I can be seen looking at those multiple choices.

uring the 2013 Holidays from Thanksgiving through Christmas, I am visiting military bases, posts, camps and ports in Japan and Korea. Hopefully my presence can bring a touch of the U.S.A. to our deployed military and contract personnel through word and action. It is truly a blessing to be present with our military communities during these holiday periods. It reminds me of Pope Benedict when he said: “God has appeared – as a child. It is in this guise that He pits Himself against all violence and brings a message that is peace.” Merry Christmas and Blessings to all of our AMS Family in the New Year! ✞ christmas 2013 |

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By BISHOP NEAL J. BUCKON

THE HEALING

MINISTRY

L-R: RP3 ASHLEY SCHUMACHER, FATHER CURTIS DWYER, STG3 KATHERINE BRAVO, BISHOP NEAL J. BUCKON, FATHER JULIAN GNALL, FATHER ROBERT SPENCER (BACK)

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uring his public life Jesus Christ performed miracles that healed many afflictions. His unprecedented power enabled the blind to see; the deaf to hear; and the lame to walk. Many sought him out for a remedy for their infirmities. One woman was healed by simply touching his garment. Ten lepers were cured of their leprosy by simply following his instructions to “go and see the priests.” The good news is that the healing ministry continues in present times. The powerful love and grace of our Lord are made known to the sick, the wounded, and the dying through His priests and sacramental signs. Some Catholic priests of the Archdiocese for the Military Services are assigned to hospitals for this privileged ministry.

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here are three hospitals in southern Calif., San Diego County, with connections to the military. Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD), informally known as Balboa Hospital is the largest. There are 250,000 residents of San Diego that are eligible for care at Balboa Hospital. Father (Commander) Robert Spencer is the Navy’s active duty Catholic chaplain assigned to the hospital. He shares the duty of providing pastoral care and sacramental support to service members, veterans, family members, and the 6,500 hospital employees with a contract priest, Father Bill Kernan, of the Diocese of San Diego. Father Spencer and Father Kernan guarantee the presence of a priest during the day, seven days per week. Father Terry Lacombe, a contract priest, of the Diocese of Green Bay, Wis., is on call for emergency situations at night. During a recent visit Father Spencer took me to a barracks on the hospital campus to meet some of our Wounded Warriors (WII). Balboa Hospital has a special unit for soldiers, sailors, Airmen, and Marines who were wounded or injured during a deployment. A sailor assigned to the unit thanked Father Spencer for anointing him and praying with him before his 11th surgery! WII Wellness is a therapeutic program designed to restore and rehabilitate wounded, ill, or injured service members. Chaplains are a part of the medical team that seeks to improve the WII’s resiliency, health, enjoyment, socialization, function, and interdependence in daily life. It is holistic medicine at its best! The Veterans Affairs (VA) San Diego Healthcare System has a 225 bed facility that was built 41 years ago. Father Jeff Blangiardi S.J., of the Jesuit’s Northeastern Province, has been working at the San Diego VA Hospital for 5 years. He and Father Moses Chikwe, a priest of the Diocese of Owerri (Nigeria), are

(LEFT FRONT) FATHER JEFF BLANGIARDI S.J., (CENTER) MARINES FROM THE 3RD MAW (MCAS-MIRAMAR), (RIGHT FRONT) BISHOP NEAL J. BUCKON

fully integrated into the hospital’s ministry team. The hospital is full and so the chaplains are busy. Many Vietnam War Veterans are inpatients with age-related medical problems. Our priests are busy visiting the patients in their rooms to encourage, counsel, pray, make Communion calls, and anoint the sick. Oftentimes, members of the patient’s family are in the room and they participate in the conversation and the prayers. The priests also interact with the doctors and the nurses as they bound from room to room. As Father Jeff and I were visiting patients we met several Marines from the Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) in Miramar, Cailf. They were visiting the Vietnam War Veterans. It was wonderful to see warriors of today demonstrating care and compassion for the warriors of a past conflict. I concluded my visit by celebrating Mass with Father Blangiardi in the hospital chapel. The congregation consisted of hospital staff members, Red Cross volunteers, patients, and the family members of patients. The sizable attendance at the daily Mass is a reminder that although modern medicine is a means of healing and comfort, we ultimately rely upon God for our spiritual and physical well-being. The new Camp Pendleton Naval Hospital opens in mid-December, 2013. The hospital will have 60 inpatient beds, nine operating rooms and an array of outpatient departments and dental suites. A staff of about 1,100 is expected to serve some 70,000 active duty and veteran Marines, sailors and family members, including delivery of a projected 140 babies a month! (continued on page 42) christmas 2013 |

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By ROBERT J. COYLE

Spending Time with the Saviour in the eternal city

15 SEPTEMBER 2013, PRAYING AT THE TOMB OF ST. PETER AFTER MASS AT THE BASILICA WITH NEW BISHOPS ATTENDING THE CONFERENCE IN ROME.

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recently participated in a wonderful course for newly ordained bishops in Rome. I had not been to the Eternal City for over 21 years. I joined with bishops from many parts of the world including Ireland, Canada, most of Europe and the Middle East. This experience was a grace-filled one. It offered me a special opportunity to observe the universality of the Church and meet the Savior who established the Church upon the Rock of St. Peter.

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stayed at a seminary residence in suburban Rome during this time. Each day we prayed together in Latin. The music provided by the seminary community was outstanding. They kindly included many English hymns during the two weeks of the program. In addition to prayer, the newly appointed bishops attended several lectures and special discussions, as well as offsite visits to St. Peter’s and the Vatican. The high point of any visit to Rome is time spent in St. Peter’s Basilica. One Sunday morning our group celebrated Mass in the Basilica which concluded with a visit to the Tomb of St. Peter. After Mass, we visited the Sistine Chapel and finished up with the address of the Holy Father to the amazing crowds in the square. In addition, I was able to say a prayer at the tomb of Blessed Pope John Paul (I had the privilege of meeting him on my previous trip to the Vatican). During my free afternoon, I took a stroll around the many sites in Rome. This walk encouraged me to reflect on the mission of the Church to reach out Her arms to the world, just as the impressive architecture around St. Peter’s Square invokes. The ministry of the Church is universal and is present in so many ways throughout the Eternal City, where one spends time with Christ. Returning to Rome as a newly ordained bishop and as a pilgrim in faith I was reminded of the ways the Church faithfully carries on the work of the Lord. I passed by several missions that assist the poor and needy. The Missionaries of Charity is just one of many that provide a significant outreach in this city every day. Upon entering the church dedicated to St. Agnes, patroness of the diocese where I was ordained to the priesthood, there was a man at the entrance gate. He did not have legs and had only one arm. He quietly looked at everyone who entered the church. He was in need. He has many challenges to face every day. Most people gave him some financial support. He received my prayers and support. I wish I could have done more. When I was a freshman at St. Mary’s High

School in Manhasset, N.Y., my freshman year French teacher, Brother Kenneth of the Marist Brothers one day shared a story with the class. He told about a boy in postwar Germany. The city was reduced to rubble. There was very little to eat and any good shelter was in limited supply. A boy complained to his mother about the fate of his family and that he did not have shoes. He left their apartment and was walking along a side street when he saw a boy his age sitting on the ground. He looked down and could clearly see he no longer had feet. He ran home to his mother’s arms. “Mother I cried when I had no shoes until I saw a boy who had no feet.” Often, especially in larger towns and cities, we encounter people in need. I saw many in need in Rome. There are many in need all around the world. The outstretched arms of the Church continues to embrace and reach out and minister in the name of Jesus. You and I as fellow pilgrims on this earth are called to do so. We bring the love and healing of Jesus. We bring healing, mercy and compassion. We meet Christ in the poor of Rome, in our own towns and cities, in our homes and bases as well as our encounters with one another. This Christmas we will once again journey to another city, Royal David’s City, Bethlehem. We will pause and kneel at the crib in prayer. We pray to the Christ Child. We seek His blessing. We give thanks that He walked this earth for us and asks us to walk about the city representing Him. The savior of the world was born in time in a little city. He is present in great cities like the Eternal City and will lead us to the Heavenly Jerusalem. I offer the words from the Christmas Hymn, Once in Royal David’s City for reflection: And our eyes at last shall see Him, Through His own redeeming love; For that Child so dear and gentle, Is our Lord in heaven above: And He leads His children on, To the place where He is gone. (continued on page 43)

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By MONSIGNOR FRANK A. PUGLIESE

Archdiocesan Process for Father Capodanno’s Beatification and Canonization Moves Forward

ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO TAKING THE OATH OF FIDELITY, OPENING THE CAUSE FOR THE BEATIFICATION AND CANONIZATION OF FATHER CAPODANNO AS MS. MADELAINE KUNS BRUSCHINI WATCHES.

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n Tuesday evening, October 1st, the process of the cause for the beatification and canonization of the Servant of God, Father Vincent Capodanno took a another step forward. This took place at Evening Prayer celebrating the Memorial of St. Therese of Lisieux.

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ather Capodanno, a U.S. Navy chaplain and a Maryknoll priest died in combat in Vietnam on September 4, 1967. When he was killed, he was fearlessly ministering to the Marines on the battlefield. He administered the sacraments to Catholic Marines and sheltered others from the enemy fire that took his life. For his gallantry, Father Capodanno was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously. It is now time to complete the gathering of information to prove his holiness of life in order that the Church may hold him up as a witness to the holiness to which we are all called. “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” (John 15:13) This ceremony began the final years of the archdiocesan process for Father Capodanno’s beatification and canonization. Dr. Andrea Ambrosi, a lawyer and an expert in the canonization process, will serve as the postulator throughout the canonical iter, both during the local stage of the process and thereafter when the acts of the cause are being considered by the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. In his homily at Evening Prayer, Archbishop Broglio described the purpose for the cause. “We would like to see the heroism of Father Capodanno, of Father Kapaun, and of Father Lafleur presented for the inspiration of believers everywhere. What we do this afternoon will bring nothing to Father Capodanno. This is not some posthumous medal. It is for those who will learn about his faith and courage. He gave the utmost so that others might live or at least maintain hope in those last moments of the pilgrimage. It is hoped that his virtues will be imitated and that he will be an intercessor for priestchaplains in the challenging days ahead.”

L-R: MR. JOHN L. SCHLAGETER, ESQ., MONSIGNOR FRANK A. PUGLIESE AND MONSIGNOR THOMAS P. OLSZYK TAKING THEIR OATHS OF FIDELITY DURING EVENING PRAYER.

Dr. Andrea Ambrosi assumed the role of postulator and appointed Mrs. Mary Preece as vice-postulator. They will ensure that the proceedings are done in accordance with canon law and the particular procedure of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. The tribunal, composed of Monsignor Frank Pugliese (Episcopal Delegate), Monsignor Thomas Olszyk (Promoter of Justice), Mr. John Schlageter, Reverend John Kaul, Reverend James Joslyn and Reverend James Danner (Notaries) will continue to interview witnesses and prepare their testimony for presentation to the Congregation the Vatican. Ms. Brenda Finch and Mrs. Jo Ann Redmond will type the transcripts of the testimony. Two historians, Reverend Monsignors Stephen M. and Robert Trisco, along with Father Daniel Mode will collect all unpublished writings of Father Capodanno and all historical documents relating to the cause and make a judgment on the personality of the Servant of God drawn from these documents. At the same time, three theologians, Fathers Gabriel B. O’Donnell, Stephen D. Ryan, O.P., and Brian P. Chrzastek, O.P. will examine the published documents of Father Capodanno and judge their orthodoxy in matters of faith and morals. Evidence of possible miracles through the intercession of Father Capodanno is also being collected, studied, and evaluated. (continued on page 41) christmas 2013 |

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By FATHER ERIC HOOG, CSSR

“If you want to make God laugh,tell God your plans” — Mother Teresa

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ather Eric, do you think you can put your name in as a possible candidate to be the Catholic priest at MCAS New River?” That’s how the phone conversation started. The conversation finished with me saying that I would think about submitting my name as an applicant for the position. I had been on active duty as a Navy Chaplain for nine years. I did a one year contract position as Catholic priest on Camp Lejeune. If I left the parish, there was no relief priest. Then about three weeks after that conversation, a priest requested to come to our parish in Ephrata, Pa. This began a process that has me writing this article at my desk here at the chapel on MCAS New River. COFFEE TIME” AFTER THE 9AM SUNDAY MASS AT THE MCAS NEW RIVER CHAPEL.

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FATHER ERIC HOOG CELEBRATING THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED 9AM SUNDAY MASS.

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e know that there is a shortage of Catholic priests. The pinch is being more acutely felt by the Archdiocese for the Military Services due to the drop of active duty and reserve Catholic priests in our nation’s Chaplain Corps over the years. At present, some part of that need is being filled by contract civilian priests … Like me.

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have been asked, “What does a priest do at a military chapel?” I respond by saying, “What does any priest do in any Catholic community?" Military Chaplains and civilian priests working on military installations celebrate Sunday and weekday Masses. We prepare couples for the Sacrament of marriage. We baptize. We counsel individuals and families. We attend staff meetings. We offer the Sacrament of Reconciliation. We provide direction for the religious education programs. One of things we do not have to worry about is “How am I am going to pay for the heating bill for the church, the school and the rectory?” The upkeep and maintenance of the chapel buildings and offices is done by the military budget. This takes away a little of the headache of being a priest.

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ilitary families identify strongly with their priest. When a priest preaches

to a Catholic military congregation, the message is taken from the same Gospel text that is proclaimed in all Catholic churches. The message however, is crafted and shaped to his special military family. Because many families have a spouse on a readiness or alert status, world events can impact them in a unique way. The active duty priest chaplain or the contracted civilian priest knows this special need and can tailor his words to let the grace of Christ help and heal them.

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n active duty and as a “hired” priest on a military installation, I have met many generous, wonderful people. I think that I have received much more than I have given. I read somewhere that Mother Teresa once offered a quotation by which we can live. “If you want to make God laugh, tell God your plans.” I am sure all of us have had God laughing at various times in our lives. I hope that God is still laughing with me. As our life plans take different twists and turns, may we place our trust in God’s all providing care. ✞ Editor’s note: Father Eric Hoog, CSsR is a Redemptorist priest serving as the Catholic priest on MCAS New River in Jacksonville NC. This past June 17th 2013, Father Hoog celebrated 40 years of priestly ordination and service to the Church.

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The Harvest Brian W. Ebenau DIOCESE: Monterey, Calif. RANK / BRANCH OF SERVICE: Formerly Staff Sergeant/ E-5. Formerly USAF (’02-’08), active duty, finished inactive reserves 21 September 2009 HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDED: Ridgefield Park Jr./Sr. High School COLLEGE ATTENDED: The College Seminary at St. Andrew’s Hall & Immaculate Conception Seminary, N.J.; Saint John’s Seminary, Calif. HOBBIES: Baseball, shooting hoops, exercising, reading academic works, traveling to see new lands and peoples, card games. WHEN WAS THE FIRST TIME YOU THOUGHT YOU MIGHT HAVE A VOCATION TO THE PRIESTHOOD? The first time was shortly after my return from Bagram/Kandahar, Afghanistan (June 2006). The insights and changes that took place then were strengthened and affirmed in the midst of my next deployment to the United Arab Emirates. I returned to the Sacraments on a regular basis and established a great rapport with the Catholic Chaplain, Father Ernie Berthelette. This is when I first experienced communion with priests in a real way and acknowledged my growing interest in Church affairs and Catholic doctrine. WHO OR WHAT EVENTS INFLUENCED OR INSPIRED YOU IN YOUR DISCERNMENT JOURNEY? The USAF Chaplains were fine examples who demonstrated that living the priestly life is a reality that can be for me. The support of my immediate family helped to the utmost degree. The Rector of my two seminaries in Newark and my spiritual director encouraged me to continue discerning even after I discontinued with Newark. God’s Providence in all 4 deployments and my time in the desert brought me closer to God. WHAT WOULD PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO KNOW ABOUT YOU? I have two homes: N.J. by birth and the Mojave Desert by faith. The latter is the place of both my initial conversion and hearing of the priestly call. I am greatly interested in historical Spanish and Church ties. Because of this, I have a great respect for the Latino culture and brand of Catholicism. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SCRIPTURE PASSAGE, WHY? The Psalms, Wisdom, and Proverbs hold a special place in my faith because they were the first books that God used to introduce Himself to me. Proverbs 2 truly captures the essence of my conversion and initial understanding of God – that He is Wisdom Itself. It recalls my initial encounter with God and the reality that my own life and experiences passed through the truth contained within the text. HOW DID YOU COME TO KNOW JESUS CHRIST PERSONALLY? I noticed over the years at Edwards AFB, and on each deployment, more of “losing” myself, while gaining morality, charity, and reading. God’s Providence introduced me to the interior life and concern for virtue & justice. This began the “overhaul” of my priorities and relationships in life. My

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Continues... reading ultimately led me to the Bible and silent prayer. The Book of Proverbs, Psalms, and ultimately the NT brought me back to my Christian faith in an intense manner. As I let Christ move in me, He reconciled me with Catholic doctrine, teachings, and the Sacraments. I came to desire the Mass and Holy Eucharist again. But before that happened, I discerned the Lord calling me to the Sacrament of Confession. I would say just when I thought to have had the world figured out He came to me when the world failed me. WHAT WERE SOME OF THE SPIRITUAL EVENTS OR ACTIVITIES THAT HELPED YOU DEVELOP AND SHARE YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH CHRIST AND HIS CHURCH? The best interaction I shared with His Church was my final deployment where I had great enthusiasm for daily Mass and genuine friendship with Catholic chaplains. I supported my home parish during my three college seminary years. In the major seminary, I had the privilege of being assigned to a parish for my academic-year apostolate. That apostolate exposed me to numerous facets of parish life and was very rewarding. The communion with Newark priests has provided me a confident foundation as a man discerning the priesthood. HAVE ANY SAINTS OR CHURCH LEADERS PARTICULARLY INSPIRED YOUR DISCERNMENT JOURNEY? Blessed Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI have supplied the Church with invaluable and timeless material to read and pray with it. Saints Peter and Paul are monumental figures whose messages are constantly being reapplied to my prayer life. Saint Ignatius of Loyola and the Spanish saints, and countless missionaries who first preached in the Americas truly capture my interest. The autobiographies of the missionaries are invaluable to my faith. WHAT WAS YOUR PROFESSIONAL AND/OR ACADEMIC AND/OR MILITARY BACKGROUND BEFORE APPLYING TO BE A SEMINARIAN APPLICANT? I enlisted into the USAF at the age of 17 with no intention of attending college. I enjoyed enlisted duty as a Security Forces member up until being awarded a 7 skill level for my AFSC and the rank of Staff Sergeant. With over a year remaining in my enlistment, I had a strong conversion that caused me to lose interest in my former profession. My passion for the working lifestyle was replaced with one rather contemplative that desired higher education and faith-based education. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SPIRITUAL BOOK? Saint M. Faustina’s autobiography Divine Mercy in My Soul. I share her expression of devotion – a preference for the Blessed Sacrament and adoration. She is a clear model of incorporating charity and personal/private prayer into communal living. WHO ARE YOUR HEROES OR PEOPLE YOU SIGNIFICANTLY ADMIRE? Heroes come with countless faces. I would call anyone who lives life according to the Gospel, for the sake of the Gospel, a hero. I have a great affection for the early martyrs of the Church, the Apostles, and popes who served at crucial times in history. HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE YOUR PRAYER LIFE? WHAT COMPRISES YOUR DAILY PRAYER? DO YOU PARTICIPATE IN THE LITURGICAL LIFE OF THE CHURCH? WHEN, WHERE, HOW? Ignatian Spirituality is the best overall description of my daily practice, emphasizing discernment, examination of conscience, and prayer “reviews”. I am growing into the habit of the journal because it serves as a reliable source to consult and “map out” my journey with God. A desirable daily routine consists of three elements: celebrate the Hours with the Church, attend Holy Mass, and “give God thirty minutes or an hour of YOUR best time, each day.” christmas 2013 |

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By MARY LAVIN

SERVICE AND PHILANTHROPY

Faith in Action T

FATHER WILLIAM DEVINE DISTRIBUTES COMMUNION TO U.S. MARINES ON DEPLOYMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST

he first national collection to benefit the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA (AMS) was taken at parishes throughout the country on November 9-10, 2013. As approved by the General Assembly of the Bishops’ Conference, a collection will be taken every three years to defray the operational costs of the AMS, especially those associated with the education of the seminarians through the Co-Sponsored Seminarian Program. Thirty-four seminarians are currently enrolled and the numbers are only expected to increase; more than $2.5 million will be needed over just the next five years. In addition to the funds collected, Catholics across the country not familiar with the mission of the AMS were able to learn about its global reach and impact.

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or many who support the AMS, philanthropy – the gift of time or money – is just one example of their faith in action. In FY2013 (September 1, 2012-August 31, 2013) more than 24,000 individuals made financial contributions to the AMS. This included personal donations from active duty military men and women and their families, veterans who reside in a Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, and AMS military chaplains – those who are most familiar with the AMS.

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ieutenant Colonel John Zavage (USAF), his wife, Christy, and their family, know that the AMS is the only mission of its kind. According to Lieutenant Colonel Zavage, “My family and I are just so thankful for the holy mission and the holy priests of AMS.

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For myself, having been deployed several times to the farthest reaches of the earth I cannot say enough about what our priests sacrifice to bring Christ to service members in far-away places. And my wife and children and I can share countless stories of energetic, compassionate, holy priests who have made all the difference for a garrison community of families struggling to cope with the hardships of recurring deployments. AMS and its priests and its mission are so important to the health of our church in the military and we so firmly believe that. We only hope we can continue to help!” everend William Dorwart, C.S.C. (Naval District Washington [NDW] Religious Services), has served in the Navy three separate times, and was promoted to

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lieutenant commander for a second time in September. On September 16, Father Dorwart was one of the first chaplains to respond to the shootings at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. A beneficiary of AMS services since 1985 when Archbishop Ryan was in office, Father Dorwart remarked, “I am deeply grateful for AMS’ support over the course of many decades, and each year I make a contribution for its vital work by way of the Combined Federal Campaign.” Father Dorwart is currently seeking an age waiver to allow him to continue serving sailors and Marines for several more years.

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s you celebrate the true meaning of Christmas with family and friends, please pray for all the members of the US Armed Forces and their families, especially those on active duty, in harm’s way, and the veterans who will spend Christmas in a VA Medical Center. With your continued prayers and philanthropic support you will ensure that the faith of military men and women, veterans, and their families, need not be part of the sacrifice they make in service to our country. To make a year-end donation by December 31, 2013, please go to: www.milarch.org/development.✞

The NEW iBreviary Widget i

Breviary was created by Father Paolo Padrini to make the Liturgy of the Hours and other prayers of the Church available via apps for smartphones. Recently, a widget for websites has been created to offer the same prayers to anyone with an online connection. Through the generosity of Father Padrini the iBreviary is now available on the AMS website in the Resource tab, www.milarch.org/resource. Visit for daily updates and pray the Liturgy of the Hours, learn about the Saint of the Day, and reflect upon the daily readings prior to Mass. ✞

AMS WISHES YOU A VERY HAPPY, HEALTHY AND BLESSED HOLIDAY!

Merry Christmas! christmas 2013 |

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By FATHER JOHN KAUL

Labor Day Weekend Gathering Report

LEFT: SEMINARIANS ON BOARD THE CAPITAL ELITE RELAXING AND TAKING IN THE SIGHTS ON THE POTOMAC RIVER RIGHT: SEMINARIANS WAITING FOR DINNER FRIDAY EVENING ENJOYING EACH OTHER’S COMPANY

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he Knights of Columbus sponsored the annual Labor Day Gathering of our Co-Sponsorship Program (CSP) seminarians at the Washington Retreat House and the AMS Pastoral Center. Thirty- four seminarians from twenty-two seminaries across the country joined Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio, the AMS staff, and priest-recruiters from the Army, Navy, and Air Force for three days of prayer, reflection, informational briefs, and fellowship. Friday evening found us on a Dinner Cruise of the Potomac River (see group photo page 5). Saturday featured morning Mass in the crypt church of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception and a noontime BBQ sponsored by the Knights of Columbus. The balance of Saturday afternoon was left for the men to enjoy each other’s company and independently explore Washington D.C. They attended Sunday morning Mass at Joint Base Anacostia Bolling hosted by Father Larry Smith, a retired Navy chaplain, after which all departed for the airport to return to their respective seminaries for the beginning of their new academic year. There is much cause for hope in the future of military priestly ministry. Praise God! ✞

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By FATHER ERIC ALBERTSON

The price and a prayer: on life in the military PHOTOS © FATHER ALBERTSON

LEFT: FATHER ERIC ALBERTSON GREETS SERVICE MEMBERS AFTER MASS ON BAGRAM AIRFIELD IN AFGHANISTAN. RIGHT: HELICOPTER LANDING AT A COMBAT OUTPOST IN AFGHANISTAN.

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uring my first deployment to Iraq, I flew into Atlanta for mid-tour leave, often called R&R (rest and recuperation), for a needed break from the front. The fighting had been particularly fierce in our area, and as the unit chaplain, I had been very involved in providing care for our wounded and honoring our fallen.

tlanta’s airport has a very long escalator from the lower level up to the baggage claim area. There were a number of troops on the plane that day, as well as many other travelers. I was delayed heading up the escalator, so I was alone as it carried me to the baggage claim area. Upon reaching the upper level, I immediately noticed a large crowd of people waiting to greet passengers, a common site “ at this busy airport. I also noticed they were cheering and waving flags. As I checked the

display screen to determine where to pick up my bags, I also looked behind me to see who they might be cheering for. Perhaps it was travel fatigue, but it was not until I was approached directly and told they were cheering for me that I realized what was happening. Several people hugged me and one of the children put a small teddy bear in my hand that held a heart that said “thank you for your service.” As I looked at the crowd, they cheered even more, waved flags and shouted “thank you!” (continued on page 40) christmas 2013 |

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By REVEREND W. CARROLL PAYSSE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE BLACK AND INDIAN MISSION OFFICE

BAPTISM DEPLOYS US ON ANOTHER MISSION

STUDENTS FROM SAINT PETER'S SCHOOL IN THE DIOCESE OF LITTLE ROCK, ARK. POINT OUT THEIR HOME! (CNAMB PHOTO / FATHER PAYSSE)

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emories of my father and some of my uncles conjure up images of framed photos of “men in uniform” and stories of boot camp or being deployed on a mission. My dad and uncles were Navy, my grandfather was Army. I chuckle recalling how even as older men they still teased each other with a long-standing air of competition.

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oday as a Catholic priest and the Executive Director of the Black and Indian Mission Office in Washington, D.C., I seek to raise consciousness to another type of mission. The call of the baptized is to be “missionary,” continuing the mission of Jesus. I feel privileged to collaborate with Archbishop Broglio and chaplains of the Archdiocese for Military Services to help address the pressing needs of children’s religious education and adult evangelization on military bases world-wide.

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he Black and Indian Mission Office is comprised of three distinct but interrelated organizations, each with its own purpose and history, but all seeking to fulfill the one Mission to the Missions! • Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions (established 1874) • Commission for the Catholic Missions (the annual collection established 1884)

• Catholic Negro-American Mission Board (established 1907, united with BIMO 1980)

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ach organization cooperates with local diocesan communities to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ.

he Black and Indian Mission Collection, usually the first Sunday of Lent in most Dioceses, was established by the bishops of the United States for the sole purpose of supporting the evangelization of Native Americans, Alaska Natives and African Americans. With the approval of the Black and Indian Mission Office Board of three archbishops: Board President – Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York; Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia; and Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore, funds are disburse among dioceses who apply for grants. Indeed, military men and women continue to demonstrate both their patriotism and their faithfulness and I am honored to be a part of the camaraderie between the Black and Indian Mission Office and the Archdiocese for the Military Services.

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aptized into the mission of Jesus and with the support of the laity, we are able to distribute approximately 6 to 8 million dollars annually in grants. We provide Bibles, hymnals, catechism books and small stipends to our missionaries – priests, religious and laity – who are passionate in their service to the poor on reservations and in urban communities from the Diocese of Jackson, Mississippi to Gallup, New Mexico as well as military bases across the globe.

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’ve loved my priesthood from day one – celebrating Mass and sacraments with the people to administering a national evangelization program. I do count on you, our Catholic military personnel, for help. Your prayers and financial sacrifices supporting the national collection, can multiply the good that is being done by the Black and Indian Mission Office on our U.S. military bases and in small, needy Black and Native American Catholic parishes, mission schools and parish religious education programs. ✞ I invite you to read more about our evangelization efforts on our website www.blackandindianmission.org and join us on a Mission to the Missions! christmas 2013 |

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By TAYLOR HENRY

Archdiocese Celebrates

Ordination of Permanent Deacons

LEFT: ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY BROGLIO ORDAINS DEACON JOSEPH RIGHT: PAK (LEFT) AND DEACON ROY MELLON (RIGHT) THROUGHT THE IMPOSITION OF HANDS.

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he Archdiocese for the Military Services (AMS) celebrated the ordination of two permanent deacons for service to those who serve. Roy Mellon and Joseph Pak, both American citizens and members of the AMS faithful working in the Republic of Korea, were ordained Saturday 24 August 2013 to a solemn Mass in the crypt church of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

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hile dozens of deacons incardinated in other dioceses already serve with faculties and endorsement from the AMS on United States military installations, at VA Medical Centers and in the archdiocesan chancery, Deacons Mellon and Pak have been incardinated directly for the archdiocese. Both will minister to U.S. military personnel and their families in Korea, where the new deacons are longtime residents and active leaders in the Knights of Columbus (K of C), the world’s largest Catholic fraternal service organization.

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is Excellency, the Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio, J.C.D., Archbishop for the Military Services, ordained them through the imposition of hands and the invocation of the Holy Spirit on the Feast of Saint Bartholomew. The Mass was concelebrated by all four AMS Auxiliary Bishops: the Most Reverend Richard B. Higgins, the Most Reverend F. Richard Spencer, the Most Reverend Neal J. Buckon, and the Most Reverend Robert J. Coyle, along with other priests, including the AMS Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia, Monsignor John J.M. Foster, J.C.D. Fathers Michael Albano and Kenneth Carlson, who were instrumental in the last phase of the formation of the new deacons, were also among the concelebrants. The AMS Chancellor, Deacon Mike Yakir assisted. Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson participated in the Mass, along with a K of C honor guard, members of the new deacons’ families, AMS staffers and others.

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n his homily just before administering ordination, Archbishop Broglio addressed the two candidates directly: “… I wanted to ordain you on the Feast of an Apostle, because you are being sent forth in the context of this Year of Faith. Your ordination and incardination represent an experiment in the

Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA. You will make an important contribution to the life of the faithful of this Archdiocese in Korea, but none of us knows how everything will work out. None of us is certain about the dimensions of your future service. None of us is certain if you will also be the only deacons ordained directly to serve the AMS. I imagine that the Apostles did not know that most of those first deacons would die martyrs. You will certainly be martyrs in the sense of witnesses, but the specifics of the development of your ministry remain in the mind of God.”

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or Deacons Mellon and Pak, ordination represents the culmination of years of academic and spiritual preparation during which each earned a Master of Arts degree in Pastoral Theology from St. Joseph’s College of Maine. Deacon Mellon said he sensed the call of the Holy Spirit to pursue the diaconate while preparing for Archbishop Broglio’s 2008 Christmas visit to Korea.

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eacon Mellon, originally from Saginaw, Mich., spent more than 20 years in the U.S. Air Force working primarily in airborne reconnaissance before embarking on a private sector career as a software and systems engineer and corporate division manager for L-3 Communications. He and wife Song Hui have a daughter, Margaret, who is a junior at Boston University, and a son, who lives in Las Vegas, Nev.

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eacon Pak served 22 years in the U.S. Army—14 years of that time in Special Forces—before joining civil service as a planner, strategist and analyst for the Department of Defense. He and wife Sunyong have a son, Nicholas, who is a seminarian for the Archdiocese of Seattle, and a daughter, Theresa, who is a medical student in New York City. ✞ christmas 2013 |

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By TAYLOR HENRY

AMS WEBSITE WINS DIOCESAN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

RONI ARGETSINGER, DISC BOARD OF DIRECTORS VICE-PRESIDENT; MARGARET BETIT, AMS; JOINED FIG LEAF VICE-PRESIDENT BRET PETERS

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he official website of the Archdiocese for the Military Services (AMS) — www.milarch.org — was honored with a Diocesan Achievement Award at the 2013 Diocesan Information Systems Conference (DISC).

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he AMS was chosen from among 254 Catholic dioceses and archdioceses throughout North America to receive the honor, which “recognizes a diocese that has made significant strides with and has become a model for the use of technology to serve parishes, schools and parishioners within their diocese.”

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he 2013 DISC Award contest was sponsored by Fig Leaf Software, an award-winning web and mobile design and development firm. Entries were judged by peer dioceses based on a variety of criteria, including overall professional appearance, ease of navigation, currency of information and links to other Catholic resources. Roni Argetsinger, DISC Board of Directors Vice-President, joined Fig Leaf Vice-President Bret Peters in presenting the crystal trophy to AMS Webmaster and Evangelization Associate Meg Betit in a ceremony on 20 June at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel in Texas. Ms. Argetsinger said, “On behalf of the DISC Board of Directors and Membership, as well as Fig Leaf Software, I congratulate the Archdiocese for the Military Services in receiving this award for your exemplary model for use of technology to serve your organizations and the faithful. Thank you for your support of DISC.” Mr. Peters said, “We are especially excited that the Archdiocese for the Military Services achieved such high recognition considering that Fig Leaf Software is a Veteran-Owned Small Business, and we hold our military service men and women in high regard.” Expressing appreciation, Dr. Mark Moitoza, AMS Vice-Chancellor and Director of Evangelization, said, “It is an honor to be

recognized by the members of DISC who work every day to share the Gospel through personal relationships and technology. In this era of the New Evangelization we rely on these personal networks to learn and implement new methods to share the message and person of Jesus Christ. It is critically important in this global archdiocese with so many Catholic young adults to be actively present in the digital world. These new technologies challenge all of us to develop and assure dynamic content that encourages reflection, prayer, and response in both gathered and non-gathered settings. There is always more to learn by networking with the members and sponsors of DISC who serve the Church with tremendous skill and compassionate hearts. The archdiocese is grateful to Margaret Betit whose skills and passion for new media continue to improve the functionality of the AMS website and help believers around the globe stay connected in faith.” The AMS website, which first went online in January 2011, replacing an earlier version, gives visitors new and improved fingertip access to a wide range of information about the AMS and its mission “serving those who serve,” including how to grow deeper in the Catholic Faith, how to discern a possible vocation as a Catholic U.S. military chaplain, how to obtain sacramental records, and how to make a donation. ✞ christmas 2013 |

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By TAYLOR HENRY

Archbishop Broglio

Announces Establishment of Capodanno Guild at Televised Memorial Mass

L-R: THOMAS SLATTERY (TRAVELING FROM OHIO WITH HIS BROTHER), SERVED WITH FATHER CAPODANNO, AND ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY P. BROGLIO.

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n a homily televised live across North America on EWTN the night of 4 September, Military Archbishop Timothy Broglio delivered a major announcement: the Archdiocese for the Military Services (AMS) has established the Capodanno Guild. Speaking from the pulpit at the annual memorial Mass for Vietnam War hero and U.S. Navy Chaplain Vincent Robert Capodanno, MM, His Excellency said the Guild will be “the only organization authorized to serve as the promoter and supporter of ” Father Capodanno’s Cause for canonization.

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CRYPT CHURCH, 4 SEPTEMBER 2013 ANNUAL MEMORIAL MASS.

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congregation of 400 listened with rapt attention as Archbishop Broglio broke the news in the serene Crypt Church of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, 46 years to the day since Father Capodanno died in combat on a bloody hillside in Vietnam’s Que Son Valley. Witnesses told Father Daniel L. Mode in his biography, The Grunt Padre, the priest suffered at least 27 bullet wounds while moving fearlessly around the battlefield to bless and aid the “grunts” in the foxholes—U.S. Marines pinned down under ambush by a vastly larger force of North Vietnamese regulars in “fixed bayonet” combat. Some among those gathered in the pews served alongside the legendary Maryknoll priest from Staten Island, N.Y., whom the Church in 2006 declared a “Servant of God,” formally initiating his Cause. The Vatican’s Congregation for the Causes of Saints is now considering reports of favors following intercessory prayers to the hero chaplain and Medal of Honor recipient. They include the case of a Vietnamese nun whose recovery from advanced cancer came without apparent medical explanation. In his homily, Archbishop Broglio, crozier in hand, explained the new Guild “will raise funds to meet the expenses of the collection of data, the interviews of those who knew the Servant of God, and the other requirements for the advancement of the Cause.” The archbishop added, “I am very grateful to those who have supported and will continue to support

this important project of the Archdiocese for the Military Services and the Capodanno Guild.” The announcement met warm welcome from Marine survivors of “Operation Swift,” the tactical initiative that culminated in the deadly battle. Tom Slattery, a 20-year-old private barely out of high school when he served in Vietnam, said “Father Capodanno’s memory has been with me for 46 years now and I ask him every morning and night to join me in prayer.” Retired Marine Captain Thomas Byrne said, “The Marine Corps could use a Saint. I hope to go to Rome when he is canonized.” The splendor of the Mass matched the portentous occasion, replete with a Knights of Columbus color guard escorting dozens of white-vested concelebrants, including Bishops Richard B. Higgins and Robert J. Coyle, in procession. Seated near the altar, they watched along with the congregation and the international television audience as Archbishop Broglio gave a heartfelt tribute to Father Capodanno: “The Cause for his canonization is not for him, but for us. Others should know of his dedication and hisdesire to serve others. His was a response filled with faith to the Master who laid down His life for the sheep…Good chaplains accomplish things ‘in and out of the box’. May the life and legacy of Vincent Capodanno, Maryknoll priest, Marine Chaplain, and devoted servant of others continue to inspire men and women to imitate the Lord Jesus, take stock of their gifts, and get up and serve.” ✞ christmas 2013 |

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By SISTER MAUREEN COLLEARY, FSP

RENEW AND AMS — A Deepening Relationship

SISTER MAUREEN COLLEARY WITH THE TEAM FROM REDSTONE ARSENAL, ALA.

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ENEW International’s relationship with AMS is in its seventh year. We believe that Why Catholic? Journey Through the Catechism, a RENEW process, benefits our men and women in uniform because many of life’s adversities are best addressed within a group setting, using faith and prayer to foster greater connectedness to and understanding of God at work in our lives.

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PARTICIPANTS AT THE MCCW MALVERN RETREAT – OCT. 4 - 7 OCTOBER 2013 WITH MONSIGNOR PHILIP HILL (BACK ROW 4TH FROM THE LEFT) AND SISTER MAUREEN COLLEARY (DIRECTLY BELOW MONSIGNOR HILL)

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t the core of Why Catholic? is the formation of small Christian communities for prayer, reflection, and sharing. These small groups provide an ideal, supportive environment for awakening and deepening faith in a way that is both effective and engaging. The resources then encourage small group members to put their deeper faith into action in their lives.

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his past September and October, we completed Why Catholic? training at two installations in Germany – Vilseck and Grafenwoehr. While in Germany, I had the opportunity to accept invitations from the MCCW (Military Council of Catholic Women) communities at Wiesbaden, Vilseck and Grafenwoehr to do presentations on Mary. One of the suggestions from Pope Benedict XVI at the beginning of the Year of Faith was to encourage us to recognize the special role of Mary in our faith lives, in the New Evangelization and to follow her as a model of faith and virtue. At RENEW we have a faith sharing resource called “At Prayer with Mary” and we created a presentation entitled Mary: Her Story as First Disciple and Evangelizer to introduce the resource and to highlight how Mary can be the instrument through which our relationship with Jesus is deepened. Catholic women from Ft. Belvoir, Ft. Lee and Aberdeen Proving Ground, on a retreat at St. Joseph Retreat House in Malvern, PA, reflected on the importance of Mary in their lives. More than 75 women and several men participated in prayer and sharing. Bishop Richard Spencer and Father Ed Ohm joined us in Wiesbaden and Monsignor Philip Hill attend the Malvern Retreat. Some reflections from the participants include: “As military faith communities and sisters in faith we are unique and very blessed. Nourishing our relationship to God is a must in this time of deployments and family commitments. We were blessed to enjoy the spiritual leadership on this retreat of Monsignor Philip Hill, Father Vincent Fortunato, O.F.M.Cap. and Sister Maureen Colleary, F.S.P. They helped to remind me of our need for faith sharing and support of our continued journey in the footsteps of our Master, Jesus.” — Bernadette Kovalsick, Aberdeen Proving Ground MCCW (continued on page 36) christmas 2013 |

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RENEW AND AMS – A Deepening Relationship (continued from page 35)

ABOVE: SISTER MAUREEN WITH MEMBERS OF THE FT. LEE MCCW BELOW: SISTER MAUREEN WITH MEMBERS OF THE ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MCCW

“Sharing our faith together as mothers, wives, daughters and friends was very rewarding!” – Members of the Ft. Lee MCCW

“This retreat far exceeded my expectations – I gained many new spiritual insights and I found the experience was exactly what I needed at this time.” – Florence Gantt, Ft. Belvoir MCCW

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ext Spring, the last of four Why Catholic? trainings will be presented at Ft. Belvoir, VA and MacDill AFB, FL for the EASTERN Vicariate. Chapel teams and small community leaders have access to ongoing pastoral consultation and a library of web-based resources to ensure a positive on-going experience. Through a partnership between Catholic Extension, RENEW International, and the Archdiocese for the Military Services, bases can take full advantage of this proven process with no service fees. ✞ For more information, please contact Sister Maureen Colleary at maureenc@renewintl.org or Dr. Mark Moitoza at mmoitoza@milarch.org. To learn more about Why Catholic? Journey Through the Catechism visit our website at www.whycatholic.org

About RENEW International RENEW International is a Catholic ministry organization based in the Archdiocese of Newark that fosters spiritual renewal in the Catholic tradition. It can be found on the web at www.renewintl.org or at www.facebook.com/renewintl

36 christmas 2013 |


By TAYLOR HENRY

SHUTDOWN Prevented Mass at 50 U.S. Military Installations

T FATHER RAY LEONARD CELEBRATING MASS

he 1-16 Oct. government shutdown brought a surprise consequence for thousands of Catholics on at least 50 United States military installations worldwide. For two weekends in a row, they could not attend Sunday Mass or receive sacraments on base because their civilian contract priests were on furlough.

A

lthough priests expressed willingness to volunteer without pay, an 1870 law called the Antideficiency Act prohibits the government from accepting voluntary services in the event of a shutdown “except for emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property.” Affected were many among the 374 civilian priests currently endorsed by the Archdiocese for the Military Services (AMS) to serve the Department of Defense (DoD) as either “General Schedule” (GS) employees or contractors. Their positions have been created over the years to fill the chronic shortage of Catholic chaplains on active duty. The Pay Our Military Act, passed by Congress and signed by the president on 30 Sept., allowed the 234 active-duty priests to continue serving uninterrupted throughout the shutdown. The civilian furloughs prompted a barrage of national media attention and outcry from the faithful. In Washington, D.C., the AMS pressed for a solution, questioning the open challenge to religious freedom. AMS General Counsel John Schlageter issued a 3 Oct. op-ed

NOTE POSTED ON THE CHAPEL DOORS OF OUR LADY STAR OF THE SEA.

asking: “At a time when the military is considering alternative sources of funding for sporting events at the service academies, no one seems to be looking for funding to ensure the Free Exercise rights of Catholics in uniform. Why not?” On Saturday, 5 Oct., Congressman Doug Collins (R-Ga.), himself an Air Force Reserve chaplain, introduced a House concurrent resolution to bring the furloughed priests back to service. The House sent the resolution to (continued on page 42) christmas 2013 |

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By MARK MOITOZA

Sharing the Faith

The following reflection from a previously deployed soldier depicts well the need to share the faith with those far from home. While the AMS app and the Digital Media Center serve both those at home and abroad this e-mail highlights the impact of these resources on Catholic young adults in uniform in deployed settings.

Content submitted via the service mailbox of the AMS app by an anonymous deployed soldier: “I would actually like to comment due to the fact that my own deployment experience likely echoes some of the problems that will inflict [sic] troops in Afghanistan. During my time in Iraq we experienced the large-scale draw down of troops, much as Afghanistan is shifting into at this time. This time period focuses largely on having Afghan forces take over the security that ISAF troops had previously been responsible for. This task calls for a large number of "trigger pullers" troops that can assist in teaching the Afghan troops how to take over security in their own country, usually consisting of Armour, Infantry and Artillery Soldiers. Due to the fact that an overall troop draw down is occurring, this means that if you are not one of the above-mentioned branches, there is a good chance that your branch will be highly reduced across the theater. We saw this very clearly on the Medical side of the house, but it also quickly became apparent to any Soldier who was Catholic. Early in my deployment

38 christmas 2013 |


before the drawdown began there was a Catholic Mass every Sunday on our FOB (forward operating base). However, we were soon relegated to Mass twice a month as the number of Catholic chaplains was reduced across the county and soon it was once a month. If the weather was bad then it may be even longer before a Mass could be celebrated. It is important to remember that I was assigned to a decent medium sized FOB, there were many smaller FOBs in which Soldiers were likely lucky to even see a Catholic priest during their deployment. That is why apps such as AMS Catholic Faith Deployed is nice for deployed service members. If anyone is given time off, it is usually on Sunday so someone can have a moment to observe his or her faith, even if it is only for a few hours. Having apps like this helps make the most out of that time for Soldiers, especially when Catholic Mass is unreachable. Afghanistan is undergoing the same challenges we faced in Iraq. Add in the even more unforgiving terrain and it increases the likelihood of Catholic Soldiers being unable to attend Mass or speak with a priest. If I were to offer a suggestion it would be to make sure Soldiers know about the app prior to their deployment. Soldiers almost always bring their cell phones and iPads with them on deployment, they serve as easily portable tools and entertainment devices. But internet connections can sometimes be spotty and far between. Being able to “load up” the devices every few weeks makes it easier for them in the long run.” [end of e-mail submission.] In the last paragraph the author refers to a feature of the AMS Catholic Faith Deployed app that allows for a monthly update to better support those without constant wireless and /or mobile connections overseas or underway on ships. Half of the app is designed to link to other resources when wireless connections permit. The other half is designed for monthly updates to better support those deployed. Specific features found in monthly updates include daily readings and reflections, three minute video retreats, Gospel meditations, Catholic Heroes podcasts, and imagery of religious art with quotes from religious leaders.

AMS DIGITAL RESOURCE CENTER — http://resources.milarch.org/ Find resources online to support:

• Catechesis • Young Adults • Small Faith Groups • Catholic Bible Study

• Adult Faith Formation • The Liturgical Seasons • Catholic News

— Post content from your military Catholic Faith Community. — Use the Search section to find relevant media such as: video, photo, document, podcast, or spoken word The Digital Media Center is online, linked to the AMS website and the AMS app. Stay connected in faith via the AMS Digital Media Center. christmas 2013 |

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The price and a prayer: on life in the military (continued from page 25)

I was deeply moved, especially when I discovered they were only there to welcome home the troops.

At risk of complacency —————————

O

ur direct involvement in Iraq is over and our presence in the war in Afghanistan is drawing to a close. We now see fewer Service Members in uniform at airports. Still, the importance of expressing our appreciation must continue, or we risk becoming complacent and take our freedom for granted. The threat to freedom is a constant and will always require defense, even if we are not engaged in sustained combat operations. Military veterans continue to serve honorably at home and at installations around the world, and new Service Members continue to step forward, all with the same common dominator: a brave willingness to pay the price to defend freedom.

many other ways: extended time away from family, long duty days, training injuries, cumulative stress from working in a threat environment, the missing of graduations, anniversaries, birthdays and even the birth of a child. Understanding the price helps us extend appreciation more sincerely. Further, this understanding challenges us to consider how we are going to live our lives, and what we are going to do with the freedoms that have been purchased for us. More graphically, this man gave his right leg for freedom, this woman gave her arm in the service of freedom, this group of Service Members spent a year away from their families for freedom so that I can live in what our national anthem proudly calls “… the land of the free.” Such reflections help us appreciate not only the veteran, but the freedoms we enjoy as a consequence of their service. Taking time to reflect on how we are doing with our use of freedom helps us to appreciate all the more where it comes from and the heavy price that is paid to defend and sustain it.

High cost of service Spiritual support ————————— ————————

P

ressing beyond the popular use of the phrase “freedom isn’t free,” our appreciation goes deeper when we consider more exactly what that price is, and make no mistake about it, freedom is expensive. However, I am not making reference to the monetary cost. Rather, the price of freedom and our associated appreciation for those who serve to pay that price is better understood if we consider it more personally. The personal price is paid by individual Service Members themselves, and this is most pronounced among our wounded, especially those who have lost limbs or been disabled as a result of combat. Yet the price is paid in

40

christmas 2013 |

T

he American people have been generous in thanking the troops, but often desire to do more. This explains the welcome-home crowds and care packages. As our military is downsizing and our deployments diminishing, I am often asked what more can be done to thank our troops. My response is always the same: “Remember us in your prayers.” Most veterans have a story of a “close call” — a moment in combat or in training when their survival was based on an inch, a few seconds, a sudden change in location or a last-minute change of mission. I still remember a soldier showing me his St. Michael’s medal with a piece of shrapnel (continued on page 43)


Taking Care of the Next Generation of Soldiers: Extraordinary Service Provided by the Catholic War Veterans (continued from page 9)

diesel and soon the room was empty and a new batch of inductees boarded the bus and was on its way to Fort Sill. I thanked the wonderful folks who staff the center, returned to Bob Lambert’s SUV and together we headed downtown to the CWV Convention.

T

he outreach and ministry at the Will Rogers Airport is but one example of the extraordinary service provided by the members of Catholic War Veterans of America (CWV) Posts across the country. The CWV website www.cwv.org tells their story.

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s you read this I hope to be winding up a “road trip” through Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada and Arizona visiting our Catholic chaplains who serve in VA Medical Centers. I wish you a Christmas season filled with joy, peace and tranquility and pray God’s blessings on each of you throughout the New Year. ✞

Archdiocesan Process for Father Capodanno’s Beatification and Canonization Moves Forward (continued from page 17)

During these next two years, please pray for the beatification and canonization of Father Capodanno. Each year, on 4 September, the archbishop for the Military Services celebrates a memorial Mass for Father Capodanno at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C., which, for the last few years has been televised over EWTN. Prayer cards are also available. Anyone with knowledge of Father Capodanno, or anyone who has received favors through his intercession should contact the tribunal for the cause. ✞

For more information about Father Capodanno or about the cause, go to: http://goo.gl/Fifjhu You can also contact Mary Preece at: mpreece@milarch.org

Save the Date

20TH Annual Memorial Mass 18 MAY 2014 at 4:30pm Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception Washington, D.C. christmas 2013 |

41


THE HEALING MINISTRY

(continued from page 13)

Father Michael Diaz, priest of St. Mary Church in Oceanside, Calif., is the contract priest for the hospital. Father Diaz is a retired Navy chaplain who enjoys working with the military community. He is contracted to celebrate Mass every Wednesday, and is on-call for emergencies which require a Catholic priest. The chaplains at Camp Pendleton are seeking a way to broadcast “live” the celebration of the Sunday Mass at the South Mesa Chapel to the hospital in-patients. Studies have shown that a lively faith is very helpful in the healing process. Advocates of holistic medicine will certainly want to see this initiative through to completion. Father Julian M. Gnall, a priest of the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Phoenix,

served as a Catholic chaplain on active duty in the Navy for 23 years. He retired as a Navy Captain and then served as the contract priest at Balboa Hospital for another 15 years. He is admired by many for his life of service. Father Julian says that at first he was not too eager to be a hospital chaplain because of the trauma and dealing with the issues of suffering, life, and death. But, Jesus gives his priests the graces and strength they need to minister in the most difficult of situations. For every sorrowful mystery, there is a joyful, luminous, and glorious mystery. When I asked Father Julian what he enjoyed most about hospital ministry he answered, “I enjoyed blessing mothers and their new babies, I must have blessed over 7,000!” ✞

SHUTDOWN

Prevents Mass at 50 U.S. Military Installations (continued from page 37)

the Senate on a 400-1 vote. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called the GS priests back to work on Monday, 7 Oct., but priests with expired contracts remained in limbo as Congress haggled over spending and borrowing. Meanwhile, on Thursday, 10 Oct., the Senate unanimously approved an amended version of Congressman Collins’ resolution, sending it back to the House for further consideration. With Catholics in the armed forces facing a second consecutive weekend without Sunday Mass, Military Archbishop Timothy Broglio called on the nation’s leaders for immediate action. “It seems beyond the pale of belief that elected officials are taking so long to resolve this denial of constitutional rights to the men and women in uniform,” he said; “It is not a controversial issue, but merely a

42 christmas 2013 |

lacuna in an old law that could be fixed to respond to current situations. I continue to hope for the good will of those in Congress and the administration.” On Monday, 14 Oct., the Michiganbased Thomas More Law Center filed a federal lawsuit against the Department of Defense, seeking to restore Catholic services at Kings Bay Submarine Base in Georgia where Father Ray Leonard was among AMSendorsed contract priests still on furlough. With pressure building, the Secretaries of both the Navy and the Air Force gave orders for their contract priests to return to service. The crisis finally resolved itself with the 16 Oct. passage of legislation in Congress to raise the debt ceiling and reopen the government. ✞


Archbishop Joseph T. Dimino and

ARCHBISHOP DIMINO

Bishop Francis X. Roque celebrate 30 years as Bishops.

BISHOP ROQUE

—————————————————— Salute congratulates Bishop Higgins on the 45TH anniversary of his priestly ordination. The price and a prayer: on life in the military embedded in it. Although he was wounded, the doctor confirmed that the medal prevented the shrapnel from hitting his heart, which most certainly would have killed him. My own personal reflection is that surviving these “close calls” is the direct result of prayer and produce what I call “miracles on the battlefield.” Combat will never be without the wounded or those killed in action, but I am convinced prayers minimize our losses and reduce the severity of those who are wounded. I believe this is confirmed by the sheer volume of “close call” experiences by our veterans. Perhaps the most generous gift we can offer our veterans is our prayers. Heaven will ultimately reveal the complete fruit of our spiritual labors, but some prayers produce

(continued from page 40)

very temporal and visible results. As we honor our veterans, in addition to thanking them for their service, assure them of your prayers and follow through by offering up some specific devotion. Rest assured such efforts will bear fruit, sometimes even producing miracles, but always providing temporal protection for whom they are offered — the brave men and women who serve our country, and who pay the required price to defend freedom. ✞ Father Eric Albertson is a priest from the Diocese of Arlington, Va., serving with the Archdiocese for the Military Services as an Army chaplain. His current assignment is the Command Chaplain, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/United States Forces Korea (UNC/CFC/USFK), Yongsan, Korea.

Spending Time with the Saviour in the eternal city (continued from page 15)

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s is customary, I tossed a coin in the Trevi Fountain. It may well be another 21 years before I will return again, but I know I will have the blessing to encounter Christ in many other places and cities. I look forward to my ongoing travels in the Eastern Vicariate. I will go to places where I have never been before. As fellow pilgrims in faith, may we help each other to find our way in prayer, love and service to the Lord. God love you. Merry Christmas! ✞ christmas 2013 |

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CPS

PAID

Nonprofit Org. US POSTAGE

— Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio

Invoking abundant blessings from the Christ Child upon all of you, I wish you and all your loved ones the experience of that divine love and the lasting peace that only Christ can give!

“Serving Those Who Serve”

P.O. Box 4469 Washington, DC 20017-0469

Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA

Salute fall winter 2013  

The Winter/Fall 2013 edition of Salute.

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