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2012

TOMAS A. AVILA

ARGYLE AIRPORT

This book represent a celebration of Your "Strength to Accomplish the Unthinkable" while moving Our Saint Vincent & The Grenadines Forward into the millennium. This book preserves and documents the memories of such a magnum achievement.

MILENIO PUBLISHING, LLC 61 TAPPAN STREET PROVIDENCE, RI 02903 401.274.5204 mileniopublishing@gmail.com


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent

Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Congratulations Saint Vincent & The Grenadines: A Historic Past and a Brilliant Future awaits my Brothers and Sisters in My Mother Country Yurumei, and this book represent a celebration of Your "Strength to Accomplish the Unthinkable" while moving Our Saint Vincent & The Grenadines Forward into the millennium. This book preserves and documents the memories of such a magnum achievement. Tomテ。s Alberto テ」ila "Where there is no vision, the People Perish" Proverb 29:18 Providence, Rhode Island U.S.A. December 8, 2012

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent ________ 2 Argyle International Airport, St Vincent & the Grenadines ______ 57 Background _______________________________________________ 57 The Master Plan ___________________________________________ 58 Runway __________________________________________________ 59 Aprons ___________________________________________________ 60 Terminal Building Designs ___________________________________ 61 Control Tower _____________________________________________ 62 29.01.2009 ___________________________________________________ 65

Preserving our national heritage ______________________________ 65 30.01.2009____________________________________________________ 65

Roman Catholic Church, Cemetery and Shrine _________________ 65 30.01.2009____________________________________________________ 65

The National Trust received three Archaeologists. ______________ 65 30.01.2009____________________________________________________ 66

Our New Communications Officer ___________________________ 66 10.03.09 _____________________________________________________ 66

Two thousand years of civilization ____________________________ 66 23.03.2009____________________________________________________ 67

BIRDS NOT LIKELY TO AFFECT AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION 67 3


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 18.05.09 _____________________________________________________ 69

ECCB Governor applauds airport development ________________ 69 10.07.09 _____________________________________________________ 70

Launch of Argyle International Airport Contributory Fund ______ 70 03.09.09 _____________________________________________________ 71

Rose Hall Community supports International Airport Project _____ 71 29.10.11 _____________________________________________________ 72

More Heavy equipment For Argyle International Airport ________ 72 24.11.09 _____________________________________________________ 73

Additional Heavy Equipment for Argyle Airport ________________ 73 27.11.2009 ___________________________________________________ 75

Work on the Argyle International Airport on Schedule __________ 75 23.12.2009 ___________________________________________________ 78

Remarkable Progress in 2009: Full Speed Ahead in 2010 _________ 78 26.01.10 _____________________________________________________ 79

Cuban contingent returns from Christmas break _______________ 79 23.02.10 _____________________________________________________ 81

Earthworks resume while history is preserved at Argyle _________ 81 04.05.2010 ___________________________________________________ 83

Prequalification of Contractors for Landside Facilities. Argyle International Airport Project. _______________________________ 83 4


08.06.2010____________________________________________________ 84

Pressing on through challenging times ________________________ 84 16.07.2010____________________________________________________ 86

Argyle International Airport: Benefits and Opportunities ________ 86 01.10.2010____________________________________________________ 89

Airlines Express Wish to Fly to SVG __________________________ 89 05.10.2010____________________________________________________ 91

CDF $14 million for Argyle International Airport. ______________ 91 05.10.2010____________________________________________________ 92

Portugal Pledges Support for Argyle International Airport _______ 92 01.12.2010____________________________________________________ 93

Terminal Building Contract Awarded ________________________ 93 30.03.2011____________________________________________________ 94

Constructing the Argyle International Airport: Where are we? ___ 94 12.07.2011____________________________________________________ 95

Argyle Int'l Airport Terminal Building Contract Signed. _________ 95 9.06.2011 ____________________________________________________ 97

Argyle Terminal Building to Begin Next Month ________________ 97 12.08.2011____________________________________________________ 99

Full Speed Ahead As Work On Terminal Building Begins ________ 99 5


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent “Our Terminal Building has: ________________________________ 99 2011, Accomplishments: Looking ahead to 2012 _______________ 101 20.01.2012 __________________________________________________ 101 18.04.2012 __________________________________________________ 103

IADC to hold Town Hall Meeting ___________________________ 103 11.06.2012 __________________________________________________ 104

Spanning the Yambou River ________________________________ 104 10.05.2012 __________________________________________________ 105

Returning Nationals donate to the Argyle Airport Contributory Fund ________________________________________________________ 105 16.10.2012 __________________________________________________ 107

More CDF Funding for Argyle Int'l Airport ___________________ 107 18.10.2012 __________________________________________________ 108

St. Vincent gets offer of free asphalt for airport ________________ 108 02.11.2012 __________________________________________________ 109

United Vincie Group Donates to Argyle Airport Project _________ 109

SVG Brilliant Future ____________________________________ 110 November 29, 2008Planned Tourism Development Sites _________ 110 Planned Tourism Development Sites _________________________ 111 8.8 Cultural Properties, Customs, Aspirations and Attitudes _______ 113

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9.4.4 Impact on Tourism ___________________________________ 115 9.4.5 Impact on Geological Resources _________________________ 115 9.5 Positive Impacts _______________________________________ 117 9.6.6 Yambou Watershed Management ________________________ 118 10.3.4 Cultural Heritage____________________________________ 118 UNESCO Master Pieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity ________________________________________________________ 126

SVG Historic Past ______________________________________ 131 Saint Vincent & The Granedine History ________________________ 131 Joseph Chatoyer __________________________________________ 135

Address Delivered By Hon. James Mitchell in La Ceiba, Honduras 140 Garifuna American Leadership Delegation to Saint Vincent & The Grenadines ___________________________________________ 144 Goals Of The Delegation Program_________________________________ 144 Background __________________________________________________ 144 Criteria & Selection Of The 2008 Delegation ________________________ 145 Selection Criteria include: _______________________________________ 146

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Argyle International Airport Project Background Having studied and understood the very real problem of air access to and from St Vincent and the Grenadines, the government, headed by Prime Minister Dr. The Honourable Ralph Gonsalves, went about finding a solution. Some argued for an improvement to the E.T. Joshua Airport, even in the face of technical evidence that showed, convincingly, that E.T. Joshua’s development was severely constrained, both in terms of the width and length of the runway, and would be an uneconomical investment. There are also several natural obstacles at Arnos Vale that could not be eliminated. The technical studies, however, recommended two alternative sites on mainland St Vincent: one at an area called Kitchen (on the South Eastern side of St Vincent), and the other at Argyle (on the Eastern side of the country). Both sites could accommodate an airstrip of 3,000 metres. On August 8th 2005, at the Methodist Church Hall, the Prime Minister announced his government’s decision to build a new international airport at Argyle. With that announcement, we embarked on a journey, that has taken us to this point today. The Argyle International Airport is being built on about 290 acres of land, with a paved runway 2,743 metres (9,000 feet) long, and 45 metres (150 feet) wide. The airport is designed to accommodate jets as large as the Boeing 747-400s. The terminal building, which is at a pre-design stage, will have about 8,700 square metres of floor space, to handle about 1.4 million passengers per year. The financing of this considerable investment is a reflection of agility of our minds, the hard work of our leaders, the enduring international friendships we have built, and the astute use of foreign policy! These traits have allowed our country to benefit from grant funds and pledges from a diverse group of friendly countries, including the Republic of Cuba, 38


the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Austria, Malaysia, Turkey and Iran. In considering the major achievements for the Argyle International Airport, it is important to go back to where it all began, with a Cabinet Oversight Committee, which had its first meeting at Cabinet room in January 2004. This Committee was chaired by the Hon. Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves and included senior ministers of government and senior technical officers from various ministries and state agencies. It was this Committee, after months of careful analysis of the various studies available on airport development on mainland St Vincent, made the recommendation to Cabinet to select Argyle as the site for the new international airport. This Committee also recommended that the moratorium on the kitchen site be terminated and one be placed on Argyle. It was also at this meeting that it was suggested that Cabinet requests the Central Planning Division to prepare a proposal for the development of an Airport Development Implementation Unit, which was to be housed in the Ministry of Finance and Planning. This idea gave birth to the International Airport Development Company (IADC), with a mandate to construct the Argyle International Airport, and thereafter to arrange for its effective management. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS OF THE ARGYLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 2005 It was August 8th 2005 when Prime Minister Dr Ralph Gonsalves addressed a gathering at the Methodist Church Hall on the issue of airport development in St Vincent and the Grenadines, and made clear the intentions of the government to construct an international airport at Argyle. In what is now an historic speech, Prime Minister Dr. Gonsalves addressed two crucial questions. The following is a quote from Dr Gonsalves speech.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent WHY DO WE NEED AN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT? “I begin first by answering two queries posed by some persons: Does St. Vincent and the Grenadines really need an international airport? And if we need one, can we afford one Fundamentally, both questions are inter-related. Having studied this issue for many years, it is clear to the ULP administration and its leadership that the full realization of the potential of our country’s growth and development hinge on an international airport, among other vital considerations. The requisites of economic diversification and regional and international competitiveness demand an international airport.” Following this speech, work on the Argyle International Airport began in earnest. In September 2005, a team of Cuban and Venezuelan engineers and technicians began preliminary studies on the project. These studies included (a) complete topographic surveys of the area earmarked for the international airport; (b) testing of the rocks and soils within the airport zone; and (c) commencement of wind studies, to determine the best orientation of the main runway, and the need, if any, for a shorter “cross-wind” runway for smaller planes. With the exception of the wind studies, these works concluded by December 2006. Year 2006 In April 2006, the IADC relocated its office from the Administrative Building in Kingstown to Argyle, to make it more accessible to property owners who were soon to be relocated. It also made for more effective management of the project. Continuing from prior meetings in early 2006, negotiators from the IADC sat down in March 2006 with Mr. Murray Hadaway, to discuss the purchase of some of his lands at Harmony Hall. These negotiations concluded with IADC purchasing 21 acres of Hadaway’s land to be developed and sold to affected Mt Pleasant/Argyle property owners for rebuilding their homes. Shortly after purchasing the land, 40


prisoners from Her Majesty’s Prisons began a year and a half long process of clearing the land to make it ready for infrastructure works. In addition to the Harmony Hall lands, 3½ acres of land at Carapan were also negotiated and bought from Randolph Bradshaw and family and approximately 3 acres at Diamond were acquired from Mr. Theodore Browne. The Diamond site was initially earmarked for Argyle property owners who had business interests. But with only limited interests expressed by the affected business persons, some parcels of this land were sold for residential purposes. The firm Civil Design and Surveying Services was contracted by IADC to do the development plan, surveying and supervision of the development works at Harmony Hall. And Housing and Land Development Corporation (HLDC) won the competitive bid for the contract for the infrastructure works at Harmony Hall. As an add-on to their contract, HLDC was retained to do the infrastructure works at the two other sites, at Carapan and Diamond. April 10th 2006, Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, members of staff of the IADC and other officials held a public consultation with residents of the Argyle/Mt Pleasant area to explain to them how the government intended to compensate them for their properties and what concessions were being offered. Among the many things discussed was the fact that property owners would be paid market value for their properties as well as a $10,000.00 relocation allowance. Homeowners were also allowed to take whatever they

could from their houses after they were sold to the IADC. The Prime Minister had met with the residents one year prior to that to make them aware of the decision to build the international airport and how it was going to affect them. In July 2006, the IADC began in earnest, negotiations with homeowners whose homes fell within the airport fence area. There were approximately 131 houses within the fenced area. This followed the submission of valuation reports for built properties and vacant land parcels by

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Brown and Compay, the British firm contracted by IADC to value the properties at Argyle and Mt Pleasant. Year 2007 The final designs were presented to the Government in December 2007 by the Cuban authorities. These designs were the two other sites, at Carapan and Diamond.

April 10th 2006, Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, members of staff of the IADC and other officials held a public consultation with residents of the Argyle/Mt Pleasant area to explain to them how the government intended to compensate them for their properties and what concessions were being offered. Among the many things discussed was the fact that property owners would be paid market value for their properties as well as a $10,000.00 relocation allowance. Homeowners were also allowed to take whatever they could from their houses after they were sold to the IADC. The Prime Minister had met with the residents one year prior to that to make them aware of the decision to build the international airport and how it was going to affect them. In July 2006, the IADC began in earnest, negotiations with homeowners whose homes fell within the airport fence area. There were approximately 131 houses within the fenced area. This followed the submission of valuation reports for built properties and vacant land parcels by Brown and Compay, the British firm contracted by IADC to value the properties at Argyle and Mt Pleasant. Year 2007 The final designs were presented to the Government in December 2007 by the Cuban authorities. These designs were presented to the public at P’tani Resorts on May 27th 2008. The designs provided detailed information for the earthworks, and proposed location of the terminal building, control tower, roads and other support services. These designs were used, among other things, to guide the earthworks. For the first 12 months of earthworks, the plan was to concentrate on the first kilometre of the runway. This covers the area from the Southern end of the runway (Stubbs Bay end) to the Junction 42


at Argyle, near the properties of the Heir of Colonel Sydney Anderson and the Johnsons. Construction of the new Windward Highway (Argyle bye-pass road) began on July 16th, 2007. The completion of this road would allow for the closure of the segment of the Windward Highway that runs across the airport runway and would also allow work to proceed on the 2nd kilometre of the runway without causing disruption to vehicular traffic. Year 2008 It was on April 23rd, 2008 that Cabinet granted approval for the acquisition of all vacant land parcels within the area at Mt Pleasant for the first kilometer of the runway. The estimated value of the vacant lands within the first kilometer at the time of the acquisition was $22,017,242.00. On May 19th 2008, the first 13 pieces of presented to the public at P’tani Resorts on May 27th 2008. The designs provided detailed information for the earthworks, and proposed location of the terminal building, control tower, roads and other support services. These designs were used, among other things, to guide the earthworks. For the first 12 months of earthworks, the plan was to concentrate on the first kilometre of the runway. This covers the area from the Southern end of the runway (Stubbs Bay end) to the Junction at Argyle, near the properties of the Heir of Colonel Sydney Anderson and the Johnsons. Construction of the new Windward Highway (Argyle bye-pass road) began on July 16th, 2007. The completion of this road would allow for the closure of the segment of the Windward Highway that runs across the airport runway and would also allow work to proceed on the 2nd kilometre of the runway without causing disruption to vehicular traffic. Year 2008 It was on April 23rd, 2008 that Cabinet granted approval for the acquisition of all vacant land parcels within the area at Mt Pleasant for the first kilometer of the runway. The estimated value of the vacant 43


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent lands within the first kilometer at the time of the acquisition was $22,017,242.00. On May 19th 2008, the first 13 pieces of heavy earth moving equipment promised by the government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for earthworks on the airport project arrived. These first pieces were followed by several other shipments, altogether numbering 37 pieces of heavy equipment and a variety of spares, costing US$10 million (EC$27 million). Austria too made to the that runs across the airport runway and would also allow work to proceed on the 2nd kilometre of the runway without causing disruption to vehicular traffic. Year 2008 It was on April 23rd, 2008 that Cabinet granted approval for the acquisition of all vacant land parcels within the area at Mt Pleasant for the first kilometer of the runway. The estimated value of the vacant lands within the first kilometer at the time of the acquisition was $22,017,242.00. On May 19th 2008, the first 13 pieces of heavy earth moving equipment promised by the government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for earthworks on the airport project arrived. These first pieces were followed by several other shipments, altogether numbering 37 pieces of heavy equipment and a variety of spares, costing US$10 million (EC$27 million). Austria too made to the Government of St Vincent and the Grenadines a grant of US$185,000, to assist with the purchase of three compactors needed, as part of the full complement of heavy machinery, for the earthworks. In June 2008, a complement of Cuban workers arrived in St Vincent bringing the total then to 47. Shortly thereafter, another 4 (including a doctor) arrived and they all eventually joined a team of 50 Vincentian workers to form the Chatoyer-Che Contingent to do the earthworks on the project. July 13th 2008 saw the groundbreaking ceremony to signal

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the start of construction of the Argyle International Airport. This date marked a defining moment, as thousands of Vincentians flocked to Argyle to witness the symbolic blast on Johnson Hill and to hear from Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, C.E.O. of the IADC Dr. Rudy Mathias, representatives from the Eastern Caribbean Aviation Authority and well wishers from friendly and supporting governments, regarding plans for the construction of the airport. To many, the ground breaking ceremony signaled the beginning of the realization of a dream. Earthworks began on 13th August 2008. Since then, the work team has concentrated on clearing and grubbing the area, demolishing the houses, and removing the top soil in the first kilometre of the runway, which stretches from the Stubbs Bay cliff to the intersection at the Estates of Colonel Sydney Anderson and the Johnsons at Argyle. Later that same year, on November 10th, 2008 St Vincent and the Grenadines welcomed Airline Operators and Managers to the first symposium dealing with the international airport. They were welcomed by Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves and C.E.O. of the International Airport Development Company (IADC) Dr. Rudolph Matthias. In his address to the delegates, Prime Minister Gonsalves noted that: “In August 2005, my government accepted the advice of experts, both local and foreign, to build a new international airport on mainland, St. Vincent. The decision to construct on a green field site at Argyle was based mainly on the potential contribution of the international airport to tourism and agriculture development, and the physical restrictions on expanding the E.T. Joshua Airport. The Argyle International Airport will replace the E. T. Joshua Airport at Arnos Vale as the only international airport on mainland St. Vincent. This new airport will have a runway 2,743 metres long and 45 metres wide, and a terminal building of about 8,700 square metres of floor space, designed to handle 1.4 million passengers annually. This airport would allow us direct flights to North, Central and South America, and Europe, using commercial jets as large as the Boeing 747-400."

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Year 2009 What is arguably one of the most significant developments to have taken place in St Vincent and the Grenadines and possibly the Caribbean took place on the site of the Argyle International Airport between January 20th and March 11th 2009. A team of archaeologists from Canada working in the Escape area of Argyle uncovered evidence suggesting that there was civilization in St Vincent as far back as 2000 years ago and possibly beyond.During their archaeological excavations, the team led by Jo Moravetz, and including Margarita Guzman, Jode Mackay and Taylor Graham discovered pottery dating back 2000 years and other trinkets buried inside shallow graves with people remains. the physical restrictions on expanding the E.T. Joshua Airport. The Argyle International Airport will replace the E. T. Joshua Airport at Arnos Vale as the only international airport on mainland St. Vincent. This new airport will have a runway 2,743 metres long and 45 metres wide, and a terminal building of about 8,700 square metres of floor space, designed to handle 1.4 million passengers annually. This airport would allow us direct flights to North, Central and South America, and Europe, using commercial jets as large as the Boeing 747-400." Year 2009 What is arguably one of the most significant developments to have taken place in St Vincent and the Grenadines and possibly the Caribbean took place on the site of the Argyle International Airport between January 20th and March 11th 2009. A team of archaeologists from Canada working in the Escape area of Argyle uncovered evidence suggesting that there was civilization in St Vincent as far back as 2000 years ago and possibly beyond. During their archaeological excavations, the team led by Jo Moravetz, and including Margarita Guzman, Jode Mackay and Taylor Graham discovered pottery dating back 2000 years and other trinkets buried inside shallow graves with people remains. Moravetz noted that the style of some of the pottery is indicative of the saladoid, a pottery style 46


associated with the Arawaks who first came to St Vincent, before the Caribs and the Europeans who followed Christopher Columbus. Moravetz also noted that the style of pottery later changed reflecting the change in the types of people who lived here at varying times. He noted that some of them are reflective of those (Suazey) produced by the Caribs some 1500 years ago. The discovery of several types of stone axes and trinkets made from material not indigenous to St Vincent, also provide evidence that the people who came were well versed in the use of the sea and that they engaged in a significant volume of trade. What has not been determined as yet is with whom they would have traded. It is noted by many on the island that such a find has the potential to significantly change the history of St Vincent and the Grenadines. A second team of archaeologists and students from the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University, Netherlands arrived in the state in June 2009 to investigate an adjacent site thought to be rich in Cayo deposits. During the year, work also started on developing the Stubbs, Mt Pleasant, Argyle road to provide continued access to persons living on the Eastern side of the project and those wishing to use the Rawacou recreational facility. The development of this road would be done in three phases. that such a find has the potential to significantly change the history of St Vincent and the Grenadines. A second team of archaeologists and students from the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University, Netherlands arrived in the state in June 2009 to investigate an adjacent site thought to be rich in Cayo deposits. During the year, work also started on developing the Stubbs, Mt Pleasant, Argyle road to provide continued access to persons living on the Eastern side of the project and those wishing to use the Rawacou recreational facility. The development of this road would be done in three phases.

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Argyle International Airport, St Vincent & the Grenadines St Vincent and the Grenadines' Argyle International Airport is scheduled for completion in 2012. Not only is this the largest capital project ever to be undertaken in the country - estimated cost is EC$ 600 million - but it is being built at one of the most challenging times in the economy. St. Vincent and the Grenadines is located in the Eastern Caribbean, just 100 miles west of Barbados, and the Argyle International Airport is located on the eastern coastline of St. Vincent. The project is being managed by the International Airport Development Company Limited (IADC), a private limited liability company wholly owned by the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The company's mandate is to arrange for the financing and construction of the Argyle International Airport, and thereafter to manage the facility. To date, the Government has secured financing for the project from grant funds and pledges from a diverse group of friendly countries, including the Republic of Cuba, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Taiwan, Trinidad & Tobago, Mexico, Austria, Malaysia, Turkey and Iran. The Government's contribution to the project is estimated at around 30% of the total costs. Supportive Vincentians have also been making their own contributions.

Background Having studied and understood the problem of air access from St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the Government, headed by Prime Minister Dr. The Honourable Ralph Gonsalves went about finding a solution. Technical evidence showed that improving the existing E.T. Joshua Airport at Arnos Vale would constrain development in terms of the width and length of the runway and it would be an uneconomical investment. So the decision was made to build a new airport at Argyle, on the eastern side of the country. The policy decision to invest in the new Argyle Airport was tied to the decision to develop the original airport facility at Arnos Vale into a 57


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent commercial centre. St. Vincent and the Grenadine's National Properties hired one of Canada's leading architectural firms to prepare a Master Plan for the development of the 63 acres of land at Arnos Vale. The plan is expected to include hotels, residential villas, condominiums, restaurants, shopping, business centres and entertainment complexes. Dr. Rudy Matthias, Chairman of IADC points out, "When one remembers that the about $600 million, one can see right away that if we were to sell off the developed lands at Arnos Vale, we should be able to pay for Argyle Airport. But we are not doing so." He continues, "One thing the analysis makes clear though, is that, when we consider the policy decision on the two airport projects, the policy decisions are mutually supportive."

The Master Plan

The Government secured the assistance of Professor Federico Dovali of the Airport and Auxiliary Services (ASA) of Mexico to assist the IADC with the preparation of an Airport Master Plan. ASA is a Mexican Government owned company that designs, builds and operates about 20 airports in Mexico. The support from ASA is part of the assistance promised by the Government of Mexico to the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines on the project. 58


Work on the master plan was completed in December 2009 and the plan was handed over to the IADC. The master plan will guide the development of the Argyle International Airport over the next 30 years and beyond, in a way that meets the demands for growth in local industries, protection of the environment and demands for aviation services. The airport must also grow in a way that is consistent with broader national development plans. As work progressed on the long-term orientated master plan, IADC seized the opportunity to modify the plan with which it had been working to incorporate some of the ideas in the master plan. One of the ideas was to increase the area for the terminal building and other landside facilities to allow for a more spacious layout and to accommodate their growth in a cost effective way. The airport master plan calls for the first stage construction of the facilities listed below:

Runway

Length - 2743 metres (9,000 feet) Width - 45 metres (148 feet) Max longitudinal slope 1.25% Landing distance available - 2,623metres Take off runway available - 2743 metres

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Aprons Three distinct interconnecting apron areas will be provided and are categorized as Commercial, General Aviation, and Cargo aprons.

1. Commercial Apron: This apron will serve international passengers, with one position for aircraft such as B747-400 and B767-200, one position for small to medium aircraft such as B737-800, and six positions for DHC-8 or similar aircraft. The apron is 300m x 130m. However, in the airport master plan, space to the north of the apron has been earmarked for its future expansion. 2. General Aviation Apron: This is located south of the commercial apron, with dimension 290m x 130m. Space has been earmarked for expansion westwards. In the first phase of construction, the general aviation apron will park a mixed fleet, such as executive jets (Global Express, Challenger), DHC-6 Twin Otters and Islanders. The general aviation apron will be flanked on the north by four hangars, one of which is earmarked for Fixed-Base Operation (FBO).

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3. Cargo Apron: These facilities, located immediately south of the general aviation facilities, will allow for simultaneous parking of two aircraft of the size of the B727 jets.

Terminal Building Designs A single modern terminal building will be located in front of the commercial apron to serve both domestic and international passengers, in the first stage. Future provision is made in the Master Plan for a separate domestic/general aviation terminal near the general aviation apron.

Telescopic air bridges are also being considered. The Taiwanese firm, CECI Engineering Consultants Inc., was awarded the contract to design the airport's terminal building. They submitted the preliminary designs to the IADC in November 2009. Taiwan is financing the design and construction of the terminal building to the tune of US$30 million dollars, US$20 million of which is a grant, and the other US$10 million is a soft loan to the Government.

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Control Tower

The control tower will be located immediately to the south of the cargo facilities and will be positioned on elevated land. The control tower will house the aerodrome and ground control at the upper level with complete view of the runway, taxiways, apron, and the approach and takeoff zones of the runway. The approach control and instrument room will be on the mid level. An emergency operation centre will be located on the lower level. Development After a year of preliminary studies, Venezuela helped jump start the earthworks at Argyle Airport in August 2008, with a donation of 37 pieces of heavy earth moving equipment. Cuba too has been playing a lead role. Cuban engineers and technicians have been involved since the inception, doing the preliminary technical work in soil testing, topographic surveys and wind studies.

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In 2008, many Cuban heavy equipment operators, together with their Vincentian counterparts, began the much anticipated process of leveling the mountains in Mt. Pleasant and Argyle to start the physical construction of the airport. Today, the Argyle International Airport is being built on approximately 290 acres of land, with a paved runway 2,743 metres (9000 feet) long and 45 metres(150 feet) wide, designed to accommodate jets as large as Boeing 747-400s. A cargo terminal building will also be constructed alongside the passenger terminal. By the end of 2010 it is expected that 70 percent of earthworks will be completed. The runway is already taking shape and one trench has already been prepared to create a culvert within the 1st kilometer of the runway. The land on which the terminal building is to be constructed is nearing the control and instrument room will be on the mid level. An emergency operation centre will be located on the lower level.

Meanwhile, the detailed designs for the terminal building have been completed and the process of tendering for the construction of the terminal building and other facilities has already begun. The passenger terminal has about 8,700 square metres of floor space, to handle about 1.4 million passengers per year. Construction is scheduled to 63


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent get underway and technicians have been involved since the inception, doing the preliminary technical work in soil testing, topographic surveys and wind studies. Quick Facts 1. The Argyle International Airport is scheduled to be completed by the end of March, 2012. 2. The project is being managed by the International Airport Development Company Limited (IADCL). 3. The IADCL is a wholly owned Government company, governed by a twelve member board of directors. 4. Earthworks on the project began on 13th August 2008 and are being carried out by the Chatoyer-Che contingent, made up of Vincentian and Cuban workers. 5. Several foreign governments have so far contributed to the financing of the airport project. These countries have been referred to by the Hon. Prime Minister, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, as the Coalition-of-theWilling. 6. The Coalition-of-the-Willing consists of: St Vincent and the Grenadines, Cuba, Venezuela, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Austria, and Malaysia. 7. An Environmental Impact Assessment of the project was done by Kocks Consult GMBH of Germany. Many of the recommendations from this study are being implemented by the IADCL. Discoveries of artifacts and human remains have been discovered at an excavation site within the airport zone at Escape, Argyle. The unearthing of artifacts and remains, which date back some 2000 years, was done as a collaborative effort between the IADCL and the St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Trust, and carried out by a team of Archaeologists from Canada and Leiden University the Netherlands.

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29.01.2009

Preserving our national heritage The IADC and the National Trust have now agreed on a plan to preserve the heritage sites within the Argyle airport zone. IADC considered and approved an amount of EC$460,000 requested by the National Trust to implement its cultural Heritage Action Plan. This plan covers work on (a) retrieval and documentation of archaeological artefacts discovered during the earthworks, (b) preservation of the derelict sugar mills at Escape and Argyle Gardens (The Escape area, is thought to be a prehistoric habitation site), and (c) preparation of a book to document the cultural heritage of Argyle. IADC and the National Trust continue to collaborate on finding the best solution for the safe relocation of the affected petroglyphs at Yambou. 30.01.2009

Roman Catholic Church, Cemetery and Shrine IADC is working with both the Roman Catholic Community and the Ministry of Health on the relocation of the RC Church, Cemetery and Shrine. The infrastructure works are nearing completion, and the tender for the construction of the Church has been sent out. Infrastructural works commenced on the 22nd of October 2008. To date the road and parking lots have been established and base has been placed on 90% of the roadway. Road concrete pavement has been placed on 80% of roadway. The entire site is being prepared utilizing IADC equipment. The Ministry of Health, RC Community and the IADC are making final plans for the relocation of the cemetery to the new site. The Ministry of Health is spearheading the relocation of the cemetery. The next-of-kin of those known to have been buried at the cemetery have already been contacted for their input with the removal and reburial of the remains at the new cemetery. 30.01.2009

The National Trust received three Archaeologists. In January 2009, the National Trust received three archaeologists who worked for a six week period on the archaeological excavations in the escape area.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Those works attracted the interest of students who visited the site to experience firsthand the work done by archaeologists. Some of them expressed interest in becoming archaeologists themselves. Others were students of history who were mainly interested in learning how their ancestors lived. Indeed some artifacts were found and changes in soil patterns which would give clues as to how the early settlers lived were detected. 30.01.2009

Our New Communications Officer IADCL continues to inform the public about its work and of maintaining records of the transformation taking place at Argyle. As part of this thrust, we have recruited a Communications Officer, Mrs. Jennifer RichardsonHerbert, whom we have been successful in attracting from her position as Producer and Presenter at the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation in Barbados. 10.03.09

Two thousand years of civilization The history of St Vincent and the Grenadines is looking much different now as archaeologists who worked at Escape in Argyle, part of the international airport site, conclude that civilization existed here at least two thousand years ago and possible beyond. During their archaeological excavations the team led by Jo Moravetz, and including Margarita Guzman, Jode Mackay and Taylor Graham discovered pottery dating back 2000 years and other trinkets buried inside shallow graves with people remains. Moravetz noted that the style of some of the pottery are indicative of the saladoid, a pottery style associated with the Arawaks who first came to St Vincent, before the Caribs and the Europeans, who followed Christopher Columbus. Moravetz also noted that the style of pottery later changed reflecting the change in the types of people who lived here at varying times. He noted that some of them are reflective of those (Suazey) produced by the Caribs some 1500 years ago. Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves visited the site on Friday March 6th and expressed satisfaction with the work done by the Team of Canadian Archaeologists. In addition to the numerous pieces of pottery and stone axes, they also unearthed 22 skeletons and found some 500 post holes, evidence that back then houses were built on the site. 66


Lead archaeologist Jo Moravetz, noted that the site cannot be considered a burial ground in the same way that we know burial grounds today, since it was tradition for the people at that time to burry their dead under or just outside the house. The Archaeologists wrap up their work today Tuesday and leave the state tomorrow Wednesday March 11th. In related news, Prime Minister Dr Ralph Gonsalves, has revealed that a master plan is being developed by Mexican Professor and expert in the development of international airports Professor Fredrico Dovali, for the international airport at Argyle which will chart the airports development for 25 years after its built. The Prime Minister said they are thinking of as many things as possible to make the project complete so that it does not create problems later for those who would be managing it. He also expressed satisfaction with the advancement of the work on the airport project so far, but noted that another 5 pieces of equipment are needed to advance the work even further. He noted that these equipment are being sourced through a mixture of lease and purchase. In addition to the heavy earthworks underway, a fuel station has been set up on the site and a workshop is nearing completion. The new Argyle main road is also nearing completion and infrastructure on the site to house the new Roman Catholic Church, Rectory, Parking Lot, Cemetery and Shrine are in place. The international airport at Argyle is expected to be completed by early 2012. 23.03.2009

BIRDS NOT LIKELY CONSTRUCTION

TO

AFFECT

AIRPORT

A group of three bird experts from the CITMA, the Cuban Environmental Agency says the bird population in and around the airport site is not likely to affect the construction of the international airport at Argyle. The objectives of the team headed by Dr. C. Hiram Gonzalez, were: to determine the type of bird species around the construction area, the impact of birds on the airport and the impact of the airport on the birds. Four localities were selected, these were; The Argyle Hotel, Mt Pleasant, Brighton and Milligan Cay. Twenty-one species were reported, 16 of which they say do not cause a threat to aviation due to their weight and size. However it was noted that three of the species referred to as Raptors (Peregrine Falcon, Barn Owl, Broad Winged Hawk) may pose a threat because of their great size. 67


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Thirteen species of birds were found around the Diamond landfill. These include the Barn Swallow and Cattle Egrett which may also pose a threat to aviation. The Cuban experts are recommending a system for continued monitoring. The Magnificent Frigate Bird an aquatic bird is the biggest bird around the airport construction site and may also pose a threat to aviation due to its size and weight. Dr. Gonzalez has indicated that there are measures that are put in place internationally to cause birds to migrate to other areas, and pending further studies, this is something that could be done here. The experts say some birds will migrate on their own as construction increases, while others will remain due to remaining vegetation plots and agricultural ecosystem. They have recommended that the airport company establish a monitoring plan in these areas after the construction of the airport. They also recommend that after the birds migrate to a new location that a monitoring plan be set up in this new location to monitor future movement. The Cuban experts concluded that St Vincent and the Grenadines has existing forest reserves, important bird areas and gardens that should guarantee the existence of these birds. They noted that the 21 species are endemic to SVG, and the areas surrounding the airport, and can be found elsewhere. As a result, the construction of the international airport will not affect the existence of the bird species in this country. The three bird experts; Dr. C. Hiram Gonzalez, Alejandro Llanes, and Eneider Perez are expected back in the country during the migratory season to continue their study.

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18.05.09

ECCB Governor applauds airport development Governor of the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank Sir Dwight Venner, has described the Argyle International Airport Project as fascinating and long overdue.

Following a visit to the site on Thursday May 14th, Sir Dwight noted that the construction of an international airport in St Vincent and the Grenadines is the fulfillment of a want by Vincentians for proper airport facilities. Sir Dwight in commenting said that all Vincentians should be proud of the efforts by the government to fulfill their years old dream. He pointed out that St Vincent and the Grenadines and Dominica are the only two countries in the region without an international airport, the result of which is reflected in the fact that these two countries also boast the lowest per capita income in the region. Regarding the viability of the project, Sir Dwight hinted that when one is calculating the viability of any project one must take everything into consideration. He said some projects may not appear to be viable, however viability must be looked at in its totality, financial, economic and social. He then posed these questions: What happens if St Vincent and the Grenadines becomes a modern state? What is one of the most important things needed for any modern state? Sir Dwight says an international airport in St Vincent and the Grenadines will provide access and increased level of security for vital things coming into the country. He hailed the decision by government to go ahead with the construction of the international airport as a good one and said that personally he is very happy with the project. The Central Bank Governor noted that given the scope of work, 2012 for completion is feasible providing that the pace of work is kept up. He however cautioned that finishing will take time and that those doing the finishing touches on the terminal building will have to be monitored very closely to avoid undue delays. 69


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 10.07.09

Launch of Argyle International Airport Contributory Fund Members of the public wishing to contribute to the construction of the Argyle International Airport can now do so through a contributory fund set up at the National Commercial Bank.

The fund called the Argyle International Airport Contributory Fund was launched on Wednesday July 8th, at the NIS conference room. It is being managed by a board of trustees in the persons of His Excellency the Governor General Sir Frederick Ballantyne, Mr. Christian Martin CMG, Mr. Syd Hazel and the Hon. Brian Alexander. Persons contributing to the fund would be given a certificate of recognition, while those contributing one thousand dollars or more would have their names specially engraved on a wall which is to be built inside the terminal building for this purpose. Those giving over a thousand dollars would also be granted a tax exemption. The account number for the Argyle International Airport Contributory Fund is 200884.

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03.09.09

Rose Hall Community supports International Airport Project Community Support for the Argyle International Airport went up several notches when the Rose Hall Cultural and Development Organization staged a Cultural Display on the project site on Sunday August 30th, 2009.

Residents of North Leeward supported by residents of other communities including: Stubbs, Argyle, Mt Pleasant and surrounding areas turned out in fair numbers to view the cultural package and to see the progress being made on the construction of the airport. CEO of the International Airport Development Company Dr. Rudy Matthias, welcomed the gathering and expressed gratitude to the Rose Hall Cultural and Development Organization, whose initiative it was to stage the display. He also used his vantage point to explain to those in attendance exactly what is taking place at Argyle. President of the Rose Hall Cultural and Development Organization, Hayden Ferdinand, explained that the Argyle International Airport is very important to Rose Hall and generally to North Leeward. According to him, they see the potential for development in the agriculture sector which is an important part of their local economy and for tourism as North Leeward boasts many tourism sites. Describing the construction of the Argyle International Airport as a do or die situation, Ferdinand said, the airport can be built and the country go forward or don't build it and get left behind. During his presentation, area representative for North Leeward, Dr. the Hon. Jerold Thompson called on every Vincentian to support the airport project. Speaking at Sunday's event Dr. Thompson said this is the largest project in St. Vincent and the Grenadines and its impact is going to be tremendous. He said the government has been creative in the way it has gone about financing the airport, and it is important for Vincentians to contribute to this project. According to Minister Thompson if other countries are helping us then we need to play our part. 71


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent He further congratulated the Rose Hall Cultural and Development Organization for playing its part no matter how small it may seem. Sunday's Cultural Display saw performances from the South East Steel Orchestra, Renaissance Dancers, Zamfair Adams (Calypso) and the Rose Hall Cultural and Development Organization with their Maypole, Quadrille, and Boom Drum, among others. A total of $869.00 was collected at Sunday's event. This money was deposited in the account of the AIA Contributory Fund. In other related news, the biggest contribution made to the Argyle International Airport Contributory fund to date, was made at Sunday's Cultural Display in Argyle. The contribution of $50,000.00 was made by National Properties limited. The presentation was made by Merle Williams of National Properties Limited and was accepted by Dr. Rudy Matthias on behalf of the Trustees of the fund. 29.10.11

More Heavy equipment For Argyle International Airport The pace at which work is being done on the Argyle International Airport is picking up speed thanks to an increase in the compliment of equipment currently being used on the international airport site. The IADC has bought a number of pieces of used heavy earthmoving equipment to add to its fleet to ensure that construction work on the airport is completed by March 2012. Earlier this month saw the arrival of two motor scrapers, purchased from Politiri Holdings Ltd of Canada. Seven (7) of twelve (12) trucks, previously owned by the British Army, and bought from the British firm, L. Jackson & Co. arrived here on Wednesday October 28th and were taken to the Airport site last evening. The other five (5) trucks purchased are scheduled to arrive in St Vincent over the next few weeks. The IADC has already begun earthworks on the 2nd kilometer of the airport runway, as well as the area for the terminal building and other landside facilities. With these additional pieces of equipment and the increased work day to 12 hours for field workers, the volume of work done every day will rise significantly in the coming months. 72


Earlier this year, IADC purchased, from its own resources, several pieces of used equipment, which are now fully utilized on the project site. Additional equipment are still needed and the company is continuing to source such.

24.11.09

Additional Heavy Equipment for Argyle Airport The final five (5) of twelve (12) trucks formerly owned by the British Army and bought by the International Airport Development Company (IADC) have arrived in the country. The trucks that were bought from the British firm, L. Jackson & Co. were moved to the airport site yesterday, November 23rd. Seven (7) of the twelve (12) trucks arrived earlier, on October 28th. All of the trucks are being used to assist with the transportation of soil and rocks on the airport site. IADC also received last month two motor scrapers, purchased from Politiri Holdings Ltd of Canada. With the additional equipment on site, IADC projects to complete 30% of the total earthworks by December. The pace of work on the site is expected to increase even further with additional equipment expected to arrive here within the first quarter of 2010.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent According to Professorr Leonardo Perez, Consultant Engineer, work on the project has advanced significantly and is now one week ahead of schedule. From now until December 2009, work on the site would be concentrated on the 1st kilometer of the runway, which represents 65% of the total earthworks to be done. The Cuban workers are scheduled to leave St. Vincent and the Grenadines by mid December for one month vacation in Cuba. This would allow them time to spend Christmas with their families before returning here in mid January to resume work on the project.

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27.11.2009

Work on the Argyle International Airport on Schedule Recently, Vincentians living at home and abroad had the opportunity to seek answers to questions they had about the construction of the Argyle International Airport. This was made possible when the International Airport Development Company, IADC, took its message directly to the people at the recently held Vincy Homecoming Conference and Expo. Some of the more frequently asked questions included: Is the project on time? When is it scheduled to be completed? How would you be dealing with the water flowing under the runway? What about the wind at Argyle? And do you have enough money to finish the airport? Having their questions answered, most of them walked away a lot more confident that the project is a good one and that it would be operational in 2012. Some who had lingering doubts and needed to further convince themselves made a special trip to the airport site. The group comprised of Vincentians living in the UK, the US, Canada, Trinidad and Tobago and a few living here at home. At the end of the tour many remarked on how impressive the project is and pledged to spread the word when they return to their respective homes. Meantime, as the word continues to spread about the progress of the work on the airport, the work continues to pick up pace with the addition of more equipment. This includes two motor scrapers and seven of 12 used trucks bought from the firm L. Jackson and Co. The trucks were previously owned by the British Army. Seven of them landed at Port Campden Park on Wednesday October 28th, and are employed on the project site. They are assisting in the speedier removal of material generated from excavation; the other 5 are expected here soon. Consultant Engineer, “Professor� Leonardo Perez has also been talking about the progress being made on the construction of the Argyle International Airport. Following are two questions posed to the Professor and his response. Jennifer: Professor, can you tell us how much of the total earthworks on the project is completed already? Answer: At this time we are at a better place than the last time we spoke. A few weeks ago we received some new equipment on site. Now we have 75


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent more trucks, we have more excavation capacity and we have been able to put the project back on schedule. We also feel very good about what we would be able to complete by the end of 2009. The general progress up to two weeks ago was 25.75% and by the end of 2009 we are hoping to complete 30% of the total earthworks on the project. We want to make specific mention of certain activities that we are doing, because talking generally like this, you might not understand what we are talking about. There are different areas within the general project: There are the runway, taxi ways, the platform area, and the area where the terminal building would be constructed. When we are talking, we are talking about the general project, so when we say we have 25.75%, we are talking about all the different areas together, and when we say we are going to complete 30% we are also making reference to earthworks in all the different areas. We also have to talk about the different activities that we have to do, such as the excavation, the transportation of the excavated material and the construction of the embankment. First, we are going to talk about the runway. At this moment we have completed 30% of the earthworks for the runway. Some weeks aback, we started work in the technical area, that is, where the terminal building and other facilities will be. We have already cleared more than 90% of that area, and we have also started the removal of the top soil in that area, so that at this moment this part of the project is at 10% overall completion. Talking about the principal activities such as excavation, one part of that work is done by bulldozers and another with the aid of explosives. When you start projects of this nature, of this magnitude, at the beginning of the year you set forward a figure which you would like to accomplish by the end of the year, and sometimes what was proposed is not accomplished. In our case, inadequate transportation to remove excavated material caused some setbacks for us. However, in recent weeks we have had another seven trucks and two scrapers added to the complement of equipment. This has allowed us to complete 95% of what was initially programmed to be completed by the end of this year. Jennifer: So, is the project on schedule? Answer: I want to talk to you in a way that would explain more or less what has been happening on the site. For example, in the excavation, on a daily basis we excavate more than 7,000m3 of material and with the new trucks our transportation capacity has increased immensely, so that now we are able to move up to 12,000m3 per day. These are very important figures, figures 76


that are only accomplished by very big companies. On a daily basis, in the construction of embankment, we are seeing more than 4,000m3 of embankment being constructed. If memory serves me well, I could remember the last time we spoke we were about ten days behind schedule. Today, with reference to the program that we have, we are 1.5 days ahead of schedule. For the next year, we are hoping have more equipment working on the project. At the end of this year we should be about one week ahead of our own schedule. I want to end by saying why this has been possible. Whoever has a neighbor who is working on the project would know that that neighbor doesn’t spend much time in his house because you’d notice that they are working 12 hours a day, every day of the week, so it is very hard work. Once we continue next year with this same rhythm, you can rest assure that the Vincentians and the Cubans would complete this project within the stipulated time. I am sure that with the support of the people and the government we are going to complete this project.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 23.12.2009

Remarkable Progress in 2009: Full Speed Ahead in 2010 Work on the Argyle International Airport continued throughout 2009 with significant progress being made. Even in the face of limited equipment, members of the Chatoyer-Che Contingent were able to keep the work rolling at a commendable pace. This pace picked up tremendously in October and November with the arrival of two additional Motor Scrapers and 12 used trucks that were previously owned by the British Army. This addition of heavy equipment to the existing fleet allowed the workers to end the year one week ahead of schedule and with 30% of the total earthworks completed. This included a tremendous volume of work in the 1st kilometer of the project which accounts for 65% of the total work on the runway. It also allowed for the commencement of work in the 2nd kilometer which saw the clearing of the areas for the terminal buildings, apron, and taxiway. In 2009, we achieved, among other things, the relocation of the Argyle cemetery to a new site in Peruvian Vale: 69 remains were uncovered, 67 of which were reburied at Peruvian and 2 reburied at Stubbs on the request of the next-of-kin. During the year, a retaining wall was constructed at Harmony Hall and currently roads are being built at the Carapan development. In addition to the commendable work being done in the field, good work is also being done by the support and administration staff. These people have been making an invaluable contribution to the development of the Argyle International Airport. And as the work winds down for the year, the International Airport Development Company took the opportunity to say thank you to its workers and an extra special thank you to those who went above and beyond their call of duty to ensure that the airport becomes operational by the end of March 2012. Those being specially acknowledged under the category of Best Overall Employee of the Year – Non Supervisory Staff, were: Caldric (Walley) John - (Office Staff), Wadie Pompey - Best Field Worker - Vincentian (ChatoyerChe Contingent), Rochelle Jackson - Best Housekeeper - Vincentian (Chatoyer-Che Contingent), Mario Brito Gonzalez - Employee of the Year Cuban (Chatoyer-Che contingent). Under the category Best Overall Supervisor/Manager: Keisha Fraser (Vincentian) Administration, and Juan Arnaldo Antuch Suarez (Cuban) Chatoyer-Che Contingent. 78


Currently work in the field is suspended for one month until mid January 2010 to allow the Cubans to spend time during the holiday season with their families in Cuba. Consultant Engineer Leonardo Perez is forecasting that they will end next year with 70% of the earthworks completed. Meantime, trenches have already been dug in preparation for the installation of box culverts, which will channel runoff water from the runway in the 1st kilometer down to the sea. These culverts are to be installed early in the New Year. The runway is almost at the required height in the 1st kilometer and will reach that height by early next year. Detailed design work on the terminal building and other landside facilities will continue into the New Year, and construction of these facilities is likely to get underway by mid 2010. Work on clearing the areas where these buildings are to be constructed has already begun in the 2nd kilometer of the project. IADC extends its gratitude to all persons and institutions that have assisted us with our work during the year. We also take this opportunity to wish all a Merry Christmas, good health and prosperity throughout the New Year.

26.01.10

Cuban contingent returns from Christmas break Earthworks on the Argyle International Airport are scheduled to resume on Thursday January 28th, following the return of the Cuban Contingent to St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Tuesday January 26th, 2010. A complement of 53 Cuban workers arrived in the country. This contingent includes 5 new members, among them 2 doctors. The workers will have a rest day tomorrow but will resume work on Thursday. Prior to the Christmas break last year, the Chatoyer-Che contingent had completed 30 percent of the total earthworks on the project. It is projected that they will complete an additional 35 percent by the close of work in December this year. Blasting operations will also resume. So far earthworks have been concentrated in the 1st and 2nd kilometers of the runway, but are expected to extend into the 3rd kilometer later this year. Currently there are 63 pieces of heavy equipment on the project site, several of which were purchased in October of 2009 to advance the work on the

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent project. During the first quarter of this year, additional equipment would again be purchased to ensure the project remains on schedule. In addition to the work involved in the transportation, excavation and creation of embankments, work will begin on installing box culverts to channel under the runway in the first kilometer. The detailed designs of the terminal building and other landside facilities are expected to be completed by the end of the 1st quarter of this year, after which the process of selecting a construction firm will begin to allow construction of the terminal building to get underway by July 2010. The terminal building, apron, taxiway and other landside facilities will be located within the 2nd kilometer of the project site. IADC also intends to complete the Stubbs/Rawacou/Argyle access road: This is among a number of other things the public can look forward to hearing about from the IADC in the coming months.

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23.02.10

Earthworks resume while history is preserved at Argyle Earthworks at the Argyle International Airport project site resumed on January 28th, following the return to the state of the Cuban workers, who spent their Christmas break in Cuba. The Vincentian and Cuban workers, known as the Chatoyer-Che contingent, returned to the field revived, refreshed and full of vigour and a renewed sense of commitment. It was full speed ahead! With most of the work concentrated on the 2nd kilometer during the first week after resumption, one could have been easily misled into believing that they were there for the entire month of January. The volume of work done within that first week was indeed tremendous. Work also continued in the 1st kilometer. Blasting operations resumed in the area formerly owned by Charles Agard, but will return to the area of Fort Hill in March. Meantime, Consultant Engineer Leonardo Perez is forecasting that they will end this year with 65% of the earthworks completed. Trenches have already been dug in preparation for the installation of box culverts, which will channel the water under the runway in the 1st kilometer down to the sea. These culverts are to be installed early this year. The runway is almost at the required height in the 1st kilometer and will reach that height early this year. Detailed design work on the terminal building and other landside facilities is expected to be completed by March 2010, in readiness for submission to firms that are to be pre-qualified for bidding for the contract for construction services. The contract for the construction of these facilities is expected to be awarded in time to allow construction work on the facilities to begin by 1st July 2010. Meantime the IADC and the St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Trust continue to collaborate to ensure that this country’s heritage is preserved. Following two previous working visits by archaeologists, the IADC and the National Trust in January welcomed again a third set of archaeologists, the second team coming from Leiden University in the Netherlands. Unlike the previous archaeologists who between January and March 2009 concentrated on the pre-colonial settlements of the saladoids (Arawak), the five member archaeology team from Leiden University focused on the ridge just above the Argyle River, which is believed to be the Cayo or Island Carib 81


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent habitat. The Island Caribs are the ancestors of the Black Caribs who we now refer to as the Garifuna People. One of the objectives was to combine their findings with those from similar sites in other Windward Islands to determine how these people, whom they described as mysterious, lived from the pre-Colonial era right up to the 18th century. According to Alistair Bright of the five member Leiden team, the assistance from the SVG National Trust and IADC enabled them to identify a small Amerindian village consisting of three small structures, kilos of Amerindian pottery and pieces of colonial pottery. Bright highlighted the importance of this as one of the few sites that yielded the type of material for which they are looking. He noted that the site is the first to be excavated in this way leading to the discovery remnants of Cayo’s house post holes. With the successes to date, the team plans to return in the summer with more members to continue their excavations as they have so far exposed only about 1/3 of the site. Chairperson of the SVG National Trust Archaeology committee, Kathy Martin has again appealed to Vincentians to support the National Trust, which facilitates these sorts of investigations. She noted that it is also important to have the political will to support historical documentation of primary sources of our history and took the opportunity to thank the International Airport Development Company for its foresight and assistance in helping to document the history and preserve the heritage of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Mrs. Martin also revealed that from the excavations St. Vincent and the Grenadines has recorded two major discoveries: the first being the discovery of a long house, 35 meters long, the first one to be discovered in the entire Caribbean. This was exposed by a team of Canadian Archaeologists headed by Jo Moravetz. The second is the first Cayo habitation site exposed in part by post holes by the archaeologists from Leiden University. Meantime, help is on the way to assist with the removal and relocation of the Petroglyphs at Yambou one. According to Kathy Martin, thanks to interventions by Minister of Foreign Affairs, Sir Louis Straker, Chairman of the St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Trust, Mrs. Louise MitchellJoseph, and Minister of Culture Hon. Rene’ Baptiste, a team from Egypt is expected here shortly to assist with this venture.

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04.05.2010

Prequalification of Contractors for Landside Facilities. Argyle International Airport Project. The Government of St Vincent and the Grenadines has received grant and loan from The Republic of China on Taiwan towards the cost of the Landside Facilities of the Argyle International Airport Airport. >>>>Ã Description of works >>>>Ã The project is managed by the International Airport Development Company Ltd and will include the construction of a Terminal building, Control Tower, Cargo building, Fire fighting/Crash and Rescue building, Electrical Substation, Access and Circulation roads, Parking, and associated civil works. >>>>Ã Prequalification will be available for inspection and collection as of April 22,2010 and will be provided upon request. Documents may be collected directly from the International Airport Development Company, Argyle. >>>>Ã The closing date and time for prequalification applications is May 10, 2010 and not later than 1400 hours. Application must be delivered in closed envelope bearing the Title Application for prequalification landside facilities Argyle International Airport, and should be submitted to: >>>>Ã CEO International Airport Development Company Ltd P O Box 2817 Argyle Gardens St Vincent Phone 784-458-0333, Fax 784-458-0773 E-mail iadc@vincysurf.com >>>>Ã Applications will be opened immediately after the closure of the invitation for evaluation. Invitation would be extended to prequalified contractors within 1 week. >>>>Ã For further information please contact the Chief Project Engineer at the address stated for the submission of applications. >>>>Ã >>>>Ã >>>>Ã

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 08.06.2010

Pressing on through challenging times The Argyle International Airport is being built at undoubtedly one of the most challenging times in our nation’s history. Not only is it the largest capital project ever to be undertaken in this country, but also it is being built at a time when major economies across the world are going through financial turmoil. And St. Vincent and the Grenadines is not insulated. We too are feeling the adverse financial shocks. So, how are we managing to press on with a project of this magnitude? The answer: Through creative thinking and prudent management. It is now common knowledge, that the government, led by Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, realizing that this country needs improved air access and knowing that this country on its own could not finance this project, set about, in a creative way, to find the resources and funding to get it built. After a year of preliminary studies, Venezuela help to jump start the earthworks in August 2008, with a donation of 37 pieces of heavy earth moving equipment. But this is not all; Venezuela continues to assist the airport project by making funds available, by way of loans at very concessionary rates, through the Alba Bank and the PetroCaribe Fund. Cuba too has been playing a leading role. Cuban engineers and technicians have been here from inception, doing the preliminary technical work in soil testing, topographic surveys and wind studies. And in August 2008, many Cuban heavy equipment operators, together with their Vincentian counterparts, began the much anticipated process of leveling the mountains in Mt Pleasant and Argyle to start the physical construction of our airport – the dream of all Vincentians. Our long-standing ally, Taiwan, has come to our assistance beautifully, with a grant of US$ 20 million and a soft loan of US$10 million to pay for the designs, supervision and construction of the terminal building and other landside facilities for the airport project. Similarly, we have received assistance from Trinidad, which made a grant of US$10 million, Mexico assisted with the Airport Master Plan, and Austria and Iran made financial grant contributions of various amounts. The funding for this project has however not only come from external sources. Our government has been making its contribution to the project with funds raised from the sale of Crown lands on mainland and Bequia. These 84


lands are sold on the IADC’s behalf by its sister company, National Properties Ltd. In more recent times, Vincentians, at home and abroad, have also been making their contributions to the project through the Argyle Airport Contributory Fund, which is set up at the National Commercial Bank. As that process of finding money to build this most important infrastructure project continues, so too is the construction of the Airport. Moving rapidly along, 42 percent of the total earthworks that is to be done has already been completed to date, and by the end of this year, 2010, we expect to complete 70 percent of the total earthworks. This means that in the year 2011, we would have only 30 percent of earthworks remaining to be done. The runway is already taking shape in the 1st and 2nd kilometers, and within the next month (when the utility companies - Vinlec, Lime and CWSA) have removed or relocated their power, communication and water lines, we will begin excavating a segment of the Windward Highway to link the 1st and 2nd kilometers of the runway. As we prepare to do this work, we are also making a temporary new access road for residents of Mt. Pleasant and visitors to the Rawacou Beach Resort. One trench has already been prepared to create a culvert within the 1st kilometer of the runway to convey rain water under the runway down to the sea. And adjacent to the 2nd kilometer of the runway, the land on which the terminal building is to be constructed is nearly at the desired level to allow construction of the terminal building to begin in July/August 2010. Meanwhile, the detailed designs for the terminal building have been completed and the process of tendering for the construction of the terminal building and other landside facilities has already begun. What is significant and worthy of note in all of this is that since the start of construction of the Argyle Airport, at no time has the project stalled, as a result of a lack of funds. This is not only testimony to the tireless work of the Hon. Prime Minister, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves, and his government in seeking funding and the success in doing so, but also points to the astute management by Dr. Rudy Matthias, CEO, and the Finance Department of the IADC, of the limited funds available to build the Argyle International Airport. Every Vincentian is encouraged to make this project his or her own, and support it. Every development has a price, but also has its benefits. Let us all 85


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent think about and carefully measure the direct and indirect benefits and future opportunities that will arise in our country, from having the Argyle International Airport. When we do this, we are certain that everyone will arrive at the view that the potential benefits are worth the investment we are now making, in these challenging times. 16.07.2010

Argyle International Airport: Benefits and Opportunities Indeed the opportunities that may arise as a result of the construction of the Argyle International Airport are many. Looking at this topic, the first question that someone might ask is, will there be opportunities for new businesses? Simply put, the answer is yes. And the opportunities are endless. Another question is, who should be putting strategies in place to capitalize on these endless opportunities? In this respect, both the government and the private sector must work together. Government must help to set the stage as it is doing partly by building the airport - for private businesses to grow and develop. Once the stage is set though, private interests should seize the opportunities that are available. What is IADC’s role in all of this? IADC’s mandate is to arrange for the financing and construction of the Argyle International Airport, and thereafter to manage it effectively and efficiently. In the near future, Vincentians would therefore be invited to bid for space for concession stands within the airport terminal building and invited to submit requests for rental of land space on the airport site to set up airport related businesses. The IADC is also involved in at least two collaborative efforts: One with the Tourism Authority, Invest SVG, and the Director of Airports, to implement a marketing plan to attract new passenger and cargo airlines, as well as other related services to this country; and the other with the Planning Division, to develop a land use plan, to guide development within the airport zone. Vincentians who are interested in doing business at the new Argyle Airport are encouraged to put on their business caps and to become first movers, so that they become the first choice for concession space and the other business opportunities within the airport compound. Let us face it, in many respects, St. Vincent and the Grenadines is virgin territory for business and investment, and with the opening of the Argyle 86


International Airport, the country will become far more accessible and attractive to foreigner investors for investment in businesses of all sorts. Perhaps two of the most obvious areas for development are the services sector, particularly tourism, and as a natural extension, the agricultural sector. But with increased airlift, the manufacturing sector may see a boost as well. We already have the example of the Buccament Bay Resorts, which was started with the understanding that along with that development would come improved airport facilities. We have already seen the massive employment created by this project during its construction phase. We have also seen other businesses being set up in that area and undoubtedly there will be more. With the international airport development and the marketing of this facility, we expect a significant increase in stay over tourist arrivals. Obviously not all of these tourists would be going to Buccament. We are certain the other hotels established here will benefit from the enhance airport facilities as well. There are also opportunities for other investors, similar to those at Buccament Bay, to set up new businesses within the hospitality sector. With the increase in hotel rooms and stay over tourists and the resulting increased demand for food, there will be enhanced opportunities for farmers to sell their products locally. Careful and well targeted investment in agriculture must now be foremost in the minds of farmers and other investors. The opportunities to make money in agriculture results not only from selling locally, but also with the new airport, freight charges for airlifting goods to foreign markets is likely to be less than it is now. This means that far more of the farmers’ money will remain in their pockets. How about for example, planting more flowers, so that we can export more cut flowers. Regarding the communities around the airport: What sort of business opportunities might be available to them? Here are a few suggestions: Set up businesses that would attract tourists into the rural villages. For example, at present when tourists come to St. Vincent they go up to Belmont to view the Marriaqua valley. And from all accounts, they are “blown away� by the breath-taking beauty of the valley. But really, what is in the valley to attract the tourists to come down and spend money? There are rivers in the valley; there is the Roman Catholic Church; and there is the Montreal Gardens. Let us think about how we can capitalize on these and other aspects of our communities, as the tourists travel through our country. How about setting up a restaurant that sells local foods done in a variety of attractive ways? This way, taxi operators will have choices when considering 87


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent where to take visitors for a taste of St. Vincent. How about setting up Bed and Breakfast establishments in our villages? Finally, the construction and operation of the Argyle International Airport means that the land at the E.T. Joshua Airport would now be converted into a new commercial centre: New Kingstown? Within this new development, there will be significant opportunities for business of all kinds. Let us start planning to take advantage of these opportunities, all of which arise as a result of our decision to build our new airport, the Argyle International Airport – coming in 2012.

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01.10.2010

Airlines Express Wish to Fly to SVG Article Compliments Searchlight Newspaper! A number of major airlines have expressed interest in making St. Vincent and the Grenadines a destination on their flight lists when the international airport is completed. Minister of Tourism Glen Beache made this announcement on Tuesday, September 28, at a press conference, following his return from a two-and-ahalf week trip to Venezuela and Canada. “I can guarantee this, that we will have at least one major airline coming in from each of the big three countries. When I say that, I mean Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom.” The Minister was speaking about feedback from executives of West Jet Airlines, Jet Blue, British Airways and Virgin Atlantic Airlines, among others, following a number of trade shows in Canada. Beache, who was accompanied by a number of the Ministry’s overseas public relations and consultant agencies, indicated that he was pleased that the general consensus of the airlines’ spokespersons and with whom they interacted was that they are enthused excited about the progress and promise of the airport, which is being constructed in Argyle and is slated to open in April 2012. “I think out of all the meetings that took place, British Airways was the most promising,” the Minister said. “I think if we had finished negotiations in terms of certain things being put in place, British Airways was ready to sign on the dotted line. As a matter of fact, they would be here around the end of November to meet with me… they are looking at two flights into St. Vincent and the Grenadines per week, and these flights will be tagged.” “West Jet out of Canada was very positive, and I must say I was very impressed with our discussions with them.” According to Beache, one of the major selling points to the airlines was the current work being done with the Buccama project, with other tourism developments in Canouan and other Grenadine islands. 89


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent He said that the possibility that this country could become a hub for Piano Cruises may become a reality, following talks he had with its parent company TUI Travel PLC. He said that this means that their chartered flights will be coming into St. Vincent and the Grenadines, which will be a positive investment in the country. “It just goes to show you all [what] that this international airport can do and is doing for the development of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and it puts us on the map.” “It shows you the magnitude and what it means, because there are many people who have made it clear that St. Vincent and the Grenadines will not develop unless the construction of this airport takes place.” “I know there have been talks from some people that this airport is not serious because we haven’t started negotiating with the airlines. Let me make this clear, we have been negotiating with the airlines for approximately four to five years, and I think that shows in what took place in Vancouver. We have a lot more negotiation to do, but I think this step is significant, and I think the response we received was positive, and we are looking for great things to come.” The Minister also announced that talks with Venezuelan officials may soon produce more direct flights between the two countries, and that the officials there have also offered to mediate with Spain’s national airline Iberia. He also said that the two countries will also look at the possibility of working closely on a number of issues, including the development of that country’s community tourism product and the installation of a cable car system to run to and from La Soufriere. “We have our strengths and weaknesses here. They have their strengths and weaknesses there. It’s a matter of us just trying to help each other out and see how we can work together.”(JJ - SEARCHLIGHT)

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05.10.2010

CDF $14 million for Argyle International Airport. Article compliments Searchlight Newspaper! The CARICOM Development Fund (CDF) will be injecting approximately EC$14 million into the Argyle International Airport. On Thursday, September 30, the CDF announced that its Board of Directors has approved a Country Assistance Programme (CAP) to the Government of St.Vincent and the Grenadines for US $4,210,000 to be used by the Argyle International Airport Development Company (IADC). The provision will be divided into a grant of US$1,640,000 and a concessional loan of US$2,570,000. In announcing the Board’s decision, the Chief Executive Officer, Ambassador Lorne McDonnough, noted that the funds approved will allow for the acquisition of equipment to facilitate the runway paving works, which will commence in the first quarter of 2011. The CDF, he said, will also provide US$1,000,000 for the supply and installation of runway lights and emergency generators. The new Argyle Airport will provide St.Vincent & the Grenadines with direct regional and international jet air access to CARICOM, North America and Europe. This development, McDonnough said, will reduce a disparity which places the people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines at a disadvantage within CARICOM and could constrain their economic development and their ability to participate effectively in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME).(SEARCHLIGHT)

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 05.10.2010

Portugal Pledges Support for Argyle International Airport Article Compliments Searchlight Newspaper! Portugal has reiterated its pledge to provide assistance for the Argyle International Airport Project, says Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves. Gonsalves said José Sócrates, Portugal’s Prime Minister, two weeks ago at the United Nations General Assembly, expressed his interest in having Aeroportos de Portugal (ANA), the Airport Authority of Portugal, which manages various airports including Portugal’s largest airport, Lisbon-Portela, give the local project a push. Gonsalves said Iran’s President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, at the same meeting committed to provide additional assistance beyond the US$2 million that Iran gave to the project. “I continue to expand and consolidate the coalition of the willing on the Argyle International Airport Project,” said Gonsalves. The Prime Minister mentioned that the Emir of Qatar, Hamad bin Khalifa, is also keen to support the airport project and has committed his Minister of International Cooperation to follow up with the Government of St.Vincent and the Grenadines and the International Airport Development Company (IADC). He said they are interested in exploring ways that the Qatar Government could invest the project. Gonsalves said an invitation was extended to him to visit Qatar, but he does not know whether he’ll be able to go before March 2011. Additionally, Gonsalves said the Foreign Ministers of Serbia and Morocco made commitments to explore ways in which their governments could support the airport project. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister disclosed that he also held extensive discussions with bin Khalifa on ways in which Qatar’s Investment Authority, “the government’s massive sovereign wealth fund,” could invest in Tourism in St.Vincent and the Grenadines. “He specifically wants me to come to Qatar to discuss this matter about tourism investment and also to discuss assistance with the airport,” said Gonsalves.(HN - SEARCHLIGHT) 92


01.12.2010

Terminal Building Contract Awarded Construction of the terminal building for the Argyle International Airport is set to commence soon. At its meeting on Tuesday November 30th, The Board of Directors of the International Airport Development Company Limited (IADC) approved the awarding of contract for the construction of the terminal building to the Taiwanese firm, Overseas Engineering and Construction Company Ltd. (OECC). This contract will see the terminal building constructed at a cost of US$25,094,530. Construction work is set to commence in January 2011. The modern terminal building was designed by another Taiwanese firm, CECI Engineering Consultants Inc. The terminal building will have three floors, with 139 thousand square feet of floor space. The building is designed to accommodate approximately 1.4 million passengers per year.> This capacity is more than 5 times the number of passengers currently passing through the E. T. Joshua Airport in any year.> At the expected rate of growth of passengers, the Argyle International Airport terminal building, as designed, is expected to meet our needs for the next 20 years.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 30.03.2011

Constructing the Argyle International Airport: Where are we? ue to a delay in the start of construction work on the Argyle International Airport Passenger Terminal Building the completion date for the airport has been moved from mid 2012 to mid 2013 when the airport is now expected to be completed and operationalize. Construction work on the terminal building was scheduled to commence in August of 2010. A tender for its construction was issued on 7th June 2010, but for a variety of reasons, no tender was received by the appointed time for submission of tender. The Board of Directors subsequently approved the awarding of a contract for the construction of the terminal building to the Taiwanese firm, Overseas Engineering and Construction Company Ltd. (OECC). This contract is worth US$25,094,530.00 and covers construction of the terminal building, electrical substation, internal and external signage, and related preliminaries. Contractual negotiations with OECC are now finalized and work is due to begin in April 2011. The IADC will, at some stage this year, enter into contracts with other private firms for the construction of the Fire and Rescue Station, Cargo Terminal Building and Control Tower. However, IADC has decided to do the site works, internal roads, drains and parking areas, using resources already at its disposal. Meanwhile, as the IADC prepares for the start of construction of the terminal building the pace of the earthworks has picked up to keep the airport on schedule to begin operations by mid-2013. With more than half of the earthworks having been completed, the Chatoyer-Che Contingent is looking to complete most of the remaining earth works by the end of this year. These works include: (a) the continuation of construction of the runway, aprons and taxiways, (b) preparation of the area for the construction of the cargo terminal building, fire and rescue station, and control tower, (c) construction of the culvert in the first kilometre of the runway, (d) commencement of construction work on the culvert for the Yambou River, and (e) work on the sea defenses, at the North-eastern end of the runway.

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12.07.2011

Argyle Int'l Airport Terminal Building Contract Signed. Today was indeed an historic day in life of St. Vincent and the Grenadines with the Argyle international Airport moving one step closer to completion. This, with the signing of a contract for the construction of the terminal building this morning July 12, 2011 at Cabinet room. The contract was signed between the International Airport Development Company (IADC) and Taiwanese firm, Overseas Engineering and Construction Company Ltd (OECC). Chairman and CEO of the IADC Dr. Rudolph Matthias and Corporate Secretary Rochelle Forde signed on behalf of the IADC, while, Mr. Peter Chung-Zen signed on behalf of the OECC. The signing ceremony also heard brief remarks from Dr. Matthias, Mr. Peter Chung-Zen, Taiwanese Ambassador Weber Shih, Minister of Foreign Affairs Hon. Dr. Douglas Slater and Acting Prime Minister Hon. Girlyn Miguel. This morning’s signing ceremony saw attendances from several government ministers, senior civil servants including ambassadors based at some of SVG’s overseas missions, members of the IADC staff and the media. The contract is worth US$26, 500,000.00. It covers construction of the passenger terminal building, electrical substation, internal and external signage, and related preliminaries. Background on the Terminal Building During the year 2009, IADC finalized its design objectives for the passenger terminal building and other landside facilities and awarded the contract for the design and supervision to a Taiwanese firm, CECI Engineering Consultants Inc. This design contract is valued at US$3.3 million. The landside facilities include: the Terminal building, Cargo Terminal building, Signage, Fire and Rescue Station, Control Tower, Roads, Drainage and Parking lot. The passenger terminal building will have 3 floors, with 12,065 square meters of floor space. This total floor area is more than 3 times the floor area of the terminal building at the E.T. Joshua Airport. The Argyle terminal building is designed to accommodate 1.4 million passengers per year. This is more than 5 times the number of passengers currently passing through the E. T. Joshua Airport in any one year. The 95


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Argyle Airport Terminal Building is therefore sized to accommodate the expected growth in passenger traffic in the medium and long term. Construction of the passenger terminal building is expected within 28 months and should begin by early August 2011. Later this year, IADC will enter into contracts with other private firms for the construction of the Fire and Rescue Station, Cargo Terminal Building and Control Tower. However, IADC has decided to do the site works, internal roads, drains and parking areas, using resources already at its disposal.

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9.06.2011

Argyle Terminal Building to Begin Next Month Published on 27.05.2011 Searchlight Newspaper Written by: HAWKINS NANTON THE New Democratic Party (NDP) is not in a position to lecture him or to pose a lecture in the form of a question on the delay of the terminal building to be constructed at the Argyle International Airport project, says Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves. At Tuesday’s sitting of Parliament, Dr. Godwin Friday, Member of Parliament for the Northern Grenadines, asked why was there a delay with the construction on the Argyle International Airport Terminal Building; had the Government secured funding for the terminal building; will contributions be made by the Taiwanese Government and if so, how much. Responding to Friday’s questions, Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves said his administration had already explained that by July 2010, CECI Engineering Consultants of Taiwan had completed the designs for the terminal building and other landside facilities and that the issue had been put to tender. The tender for the construction of the facilities was issued on June 7, 2010, with a tender submission date set for July 9, 2010. He said all prospective tenderers requested an extension, and August 16, 2010, was given as the new deadline date. Dr. Gonsalves said after the extension period had passed, some prospective tenderers had again requested another exntension of about 10 – 12 weeks, but this was not granted and the International Airport Development Company (IADC) proceeded to negotiate with Overseas Engineering Construction Company Ltd (OECC), of Taiwan. The Prime Minister disclosed that on November 30, 2010, the Board of Directors of IADC took the decision to award the contract to OECC. He said OECC communicated its acceptance of the contract and this was followed by protracted negotiations. “These negotiations are now complete. In fact, every time we thought that there was an agreement, something else came back,” said Dr. Gonsalves, noting that he did not know whether the representative of the Northern Grenadines had ever been involved in the contract for a building beyond his house. Dr. Gonsalves said it was finally agreed that the price for the construction of the terminal building would be $26.5 million, which covers the cost for the construction of the passenger terminal building, the electrical sub-station and external signs. He said the contract requires OECC to complete construction of the terminal buildings within 28 months, which is set to start by June 2011. Dr. Gonsalves said failing to complete the project within the set time frame, with completion due date being September 2013, there will be a penalty. 97


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Dr. Gonsalves said in the meantime, earthworks are being carried out at the airport site and 90 per cent will be completed by year’s end. The construction of the international airport project is the largest capital project that has been undertaken by this country, said Gonsalves. Secondly, the Prime Minister said for 50 years, elected governments here had talked about constructing one, including the last New Democratic Party (NDP) administration. “In the case of Sir James, in the 1998 elections, he said he had US$100 million in his back pocket for it. This is the same project which Sir James in his autobiography ‘Beyond the Islands’ expressed his profound disappointment in the lack of wisdom of his successor. He said it is his biggest regret in his entire life not to have done something about airport development in St.Vincent,” said Dr. Gonsalves. Dr. Gonsalves said that the project is one that the NDP opposed at every stage until one week before the December 2010 General Elections. In terms of financing, Dr. Gonsalves said the Government of Taiwan has pledged US$30 million or EC$81.5 million for the design and construction of the terminal building.

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12.08.2011

Full Speed Ahead As Work On Terminal Building Begins Construction work on the Argyle International Airport Terminal Building has begun. Work on the terminal building got going on Wednesday August 10th, 2011 two days earlier than expected. The actual start of construction followed the symbolic turning of the sod which took place on Sunday August 7th, 2011. Hundreds of Vincentians journeyed to Argyle to witness the ground breaking. It was an occasion that heard addresses from Chairman and CEO of the IADC, Dr. Rudy Matthias who expressed satisfaction in seeing those who once doubted the project become converted and have been made believers. “When we set off on this journey in August 2005, there were many who did not believe. Today I see, as we get closer and closer to the finish line, we are being joined by those who were unbelievers and “faint of heart”. But it is better late than never. I am happy that now they believe! As a small nation, we can hardly accomplish anything meaningful if we are consumed by self-doubt, and lack self-confidence. To achieve anything meaningful, we have to be brave, bold and confident!” Dr. Matthias also outlined the makeup of the terminal building.

“Our Terminal Building has: 3 floors - total floor area: 171,100 sq ft (E.T. Joshua – 30,000 sq ft) Peak passenger hour: 800 persons, - 400 in and 400 out! Accommodate 1.5 million passengers per year. (This is more than 7 times the number of passengers currently passing through E. T. Joshua Airport in any one year.) Departure lounge and concessions area (21,000 sq ft) Roof top restaurant and waving gallery area (13,000 sq ft) Conference centre facility, with roof top garden area 11,000 sq ft Several car parks: Commercial car park (250 cars), 10 large buses, and ample space for taxis and rental cars. We are building a truly first class facility that caters for future growth and development! 99


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Chairman of Caricom, Dr. Denzil Douglas, Prime Minister of St. Kitts/Nevis also addressed the gathering. In his very brief remarks, Dr. Douglas noted that the terminal building was being commenced during a week when the global economic crisis especially impacted the United States, which saw its credit ratings downgraded from a perfect AAA to AA+ for the first time. Douglas added that the effects would be felt within CARICOM, including its sub-regional grouping, the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States, where St. Kitts and Nevis and SVG are part of an economic and political union. Ambassador Weber Shih of Taiwan also addressed Sunday’s ground breaking. Ambassador Shih noted the similarities of Taiwan and SVG. He Highlighted the benefits that this international airport will bring to the country whilst stressing the need for it in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The feature address was delivered by Prime Minister Dr. the Hon. Ralph Gonsalves. During his address Dr. Gonsalves among other things updated Vincentians on the amount of money paid out so far to property owners at Argyle and the amount which remains to be paid out. According to the Prime Minister, 22 million dollars have already been paid out for 131 parcels of vacant land, and there is another 25 million dollars still to be paid out for 174 additional parcels of vacant land. Dr. Gonsalves assured those gathered that negotiations are ongoing and noted that they will get through by the grace of God. He urged Vincentians to have faith, stressing that our faith in God and the grace of God will see us through. Taiwan is financing the US$26.5 million dollar terminal building, which is being constructed by Taiwanese firm OECC. CECI Engineering Consultants Inc., another Taiwanese firm, was awarded the US$3.9 million contract for the design and supervision of construction of the landside facilities which include the passenger and cargo terminal buildings.

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2011, Accomplishments: Looking ahead to 2012 20.01.2012 History continues to be made at the Argyle International Airport site as the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and the International Airport Development Company (IADC) continue, what at first seemed near impossible, to build an international airport at Argyle. Over the last three years there have been major accomplishments, and this trend continues in 2011. After nearly one year of negotiations, IADC and the Overseas Engineering and Construction Company (OECC) signed the contract valued at US$26.5 million for the construction of the Argyle airport passenger terminal building and electrical sub-station building. This was a highly anticipated event, one that Vincentians had eagerly awaited. Hence, when it was announced that the ground breaking ceremony was to take place on August 7th 2011, many persons journeyed to Argyle to witness the symbolic start of the construction of the terminal building. Actual construction work on the terminal building began five days after the ground breaking ceremony. While this was taking place, work continued on the removal and leveling of Fort and McConnie Yammie Hills. Much of the rocks in this area has been blasted and excavated down to the level of the runway. Work in this area will continue in 2012. Of great significance as well was the completion of the box culverts in the 1st kilometer of the project and the start of construction of a second drainage system in the 2nd kilometer. In preparation for the pavement works, our engineers, with the help of environmentalists from Cuba, have identified several suitable areas on site for the location of Asphalt, Concrete and Stone Crushing Plants. IADC has decided to purchase these equipment and to hire an in-house work force of 70 persons to do the asphalt and concrete pavement works on the project thereby keeping the cost of these installations at a minimum. LOOKING AHEAD The year 2012 is expected to be a watershed year for IADC as it revves up the construction engine to ensure that the project remains on schedule for completion by the end of 2013. Included among the works for 2012 are: (a) the installation of the Asphalt, Concrete and Stone Crushing Plants, (b) the start of pavement works for the 101


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent runway and aprons, (c) the removal of the Catholic Church, Argyle Apartments, P’tani Resorts, (d) the cutting of the hill on which the church and Argyle Apartments stand, (e) the construction of a set of culverts under the runway for the Yambou River, (f) the continuation of work on McConnie Yammie Hill, Fort Hill, Colonel Anderson Hill and Johnson Hill, (g) the completion of the drainage system in the 2nd kilometer. Additionally, work will begin on the creation of embankments in the 3rd kilometer of the project, as well as work on the sea defenses at the North Eastern end of the runway. Work will also continue on the construction of the passenger terminal Building, while tenders are expected to go out for the construction of the other landside facilities including, the Fire and Rescue Station, the control tower and cargo terminal Buildings. Attention will be paid to the completion of the Mt. Pleasant and Argyle Gardens Roads to provide good quality access to persons residing and visiting those areas. Indeed much work lies ahead of us, but much has also been done. As we close 2011, the IADC says thanks to everyone for continued support on this most important project, as we work hand in hand for the future economic development of our beautiful country. We trust that everyone has a beautiful Christmas and a very prosperous new year.

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18.04.2012

IADC to hold Town Hall Meeting A national discussion on preparing ourselves to embrace our international airport is expected to get started here on Thursday April 19th 2012, when the International Airport Development Company, IADC hosts a town hall meeting at Frenches House. With the expected completion and subsequent operation of the airport, several things will have to be in place if Vincentians generally are to maximize the opportunities that are likely to come with the operation of the airport. It is expected that specific sectors including, business, tourism, agriculture, fisheries etc will be impacted, therefore persons in these areas need to be particularly aware of what they must be doing now to take advantage of the economic opportunities that will arise. Thursday’s town hall meeting will hear addresses from, CEO of the IADC, Dr. Rudy Matthias, Minister of Agriculture, lands and Fisheries, Hon. Saboto Caesar, Director of the Tourism Authority, Glen Beache, President of the SVG Hotel and Tourism Association, Kim Halbich, Chairman of WINFA, Renwick Rose, Chief Fisheries Officer, Raymond Ryan, Marketing Manager at Invest SVG Tonya Fraser and a representative from the Bank of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Presentations would be of ten minutes duration with questions and general discussion to follow. This of course would be preceded by a video update on the project. Persons in the various sectors in and around Kingstown are being invited to attend the meeting. Two other similar town hall meetings are also being planned for the Leeward and Windward sides of the island in the near future. Thursday’s meeting is scheduled to begin at 7pm.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 11.06.2012

Spanning the Yambou River As work continues on the construction of the Argyle International Airport, it was long recognized that one of the major challenges in constructing this airport would be the spanning of the Yambou River. Two years into the designing of plans for the spanning of the river those designs are just about completed and with the help of engineers from Mexico the spanning process should get going in September and should be completed within six months, all things being equal. Recently a team of Mexican Engineers directly involved with designing the plan for the spanning of the river, visited the site. Their visit was facilitated by Engineer Consultant Leonardo Perez who over the last two years kept them informed regarding the Yambou River and the needs of the International Airport Development Company in relation to the spanning of the river. The material to be used for the spanning of the river is corrugated steel pipes which have been sourced from a Mexican company called Formet. This company has also been contracted to design and work on the spanning of the river. Engineers from Formet have given the assurance that they have the experience and the expertise to get the job done. The Yambou River is a combination of three rivers flowing from the Marriaqua Valley and which drains into the Argyle Sea. Part of the airport’s runway crosses the river thus making it necessary to span that part of the river. A new bridge was constructed over the river when the New Windward Highway was built. That highway was opened in September of 2009.

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10.05.2012

Returning Nationals donate to the Argyle Airport Contributory Fund Dozens of Vincentian nationals who have lived most of their working lives outside St. Vincent and the Grenadines have returned home and are continuing to make a contribution to the development of their homeland through tangible support to the construction of the Argyle International Airport. The Nationals who continue to travel frequently to and from St. Vincent and the Grenadines say they are fed up of the treatment meted out to them at neighbouring international airports. They are therefore determined to see an end to this type of treatment through the construction of the Argyle International Airport, and in so doing they are “putting their money where their mouths are”. Last November, in its first outing, the group dubbed “Returning Nationals SVG” organized its first fund raiser which was a post independence dinner held at the Aquatic Club. From the proceeds they were on December 13th 2011 able to hand- over EC$25,000.00 to Governor General Sir Frederick Ballantyne, for the Argyle International Airport (AIA) Contributory Fund. The donation up to that time was the single largest local donation to the fund. On May 9th 2012, Governor General Sir Frederick Ballantyne, was again on hand to receive yet another donation from the “Returning Nationals SVG”. On this occasion the amount of money donated was EC$20,000.00, monies raised at a fund raising barbeque held at Black point on Easter Monday April 9th 2012. This brings to EC$45,000.00 donated to the Contributory Fund by “Returning Nationals SVG” over a six months period. Speaking at the handing over ceremony the Governor General expressed appreciation to the group for the very tangible effort they continue to make towards the completion of the airport. He congratulated them on their efforts and the hard work that they put in to be able to raise the funds. CEO of the International Airport Development Company (IADC) Dr. Rudy Matthias, speaking prior to the Governor General also congratulated the group for their efforts, and brought them up to date on the work completed thus far at the airport site. They were also given some insights into future works to be carried out at the airport site.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent President of the group Mrs. Nyoka Clouden, took the opportunity to thank those who in one way or the other generously supported the fund raising effort making it the success that it was. She is encouraging Vincentians to continue supporting their fund raising efforts as they (Returning Nationals SVG) will soon be putting on other fund raising events in support of the Argyle International Airport. The Argyle International Airport is scheduled to be completed at the end of 2013 with operations set for 2014.

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16.10.2012

More CDF Funding for Argyle Int'l Airport The Argyle International Airport continues to benefit from loan funding from the CARICOM Development Fund (CDF). In May 2011, the Argyle International Airport was the recipient of 4.2 million US dollars in loan and grants from the CDF. This earlier loan was used to procure a Stone Crushing Plant, Quarry and base laying equipment which included; five Dump Trucks, A Paver, two Rock Trucks, two Front End Loaders, Rock Hammer and the Airfield lighting system and generators. On October 9th the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines was notified that the CDF has approved a second loan for the Argyle International Airport to the tune of eight million eight hundred and seven thousand four hundred Eastern Caribbean Dollars (EC$8,807,400.00). According to the CDF the approved financing is in support of the national development objectives of the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines as well as the mandate of the CDF relating to the reduction of disparity among member states of CARICOM. The money is to be used for the purchasing of equipment for the paving works and laboratory testing. The International Airport Development Company (IADC) is pleased that the CDF continues to show confidence in the Argyle Airport project and the potential it holds for the overall development of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent 18.10.2012

St. Vincent gets offer of free asphalt for airport Story Created: Oct 15, 2012 at 10:59 PM ECT Story Updated: Oct 16, 2012 at 1:03 AM ECT l kingston Trinidad and Tobago says it is willing to provide asphalt free of charge to St Vincent and the Grenadines as the island constructs its new international airport at Argyle, on the east coast, Prime Minister Dr Ralph Gonsalves has said. Gonsalves told parliament he had received a telephone call last week from Kuarlal Rampersad, chairman of the board of directors of Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Ltd, who was willing to provide asphalt to the Argyle International Airport project free of cost for the paving of the airstrip. "On Tuesday, Mr Speaker, I received a phone call from Mr Kuarlal Rampersad of Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Ltd. It is a Stateowned company in Trinidad, they control the pitch lake and the whole apparatus there. ... "He called me to tell me that as chairman of the board he is indicating that he is supportive of providing asphalt for us free of cost for the airstrip and has asked me to seek the approval of Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar." Gonsalves told legislators that "on the very same day I sent off a letter to my dear friend, the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago requesting it (asphalt) either as a grant or at concessionary rates because of how things are all around. "I think this is an important breakthrough between two Caricom (Caribbean Community) countries which have a very long-standing relationship," he said, adding that he is satisfied that the island was on "track for an international airport". The airport is being developed by the International Airport Development Company (IADC), a private limited liability company, wholly-owned by the government. The Argyle International Airport will sit on roughly 275 acres of land, with a paved runway 9,000 feet long and 150 feet wide, and is designed to accommodate jets as large as Boeing 747-400s. The project which began in 2008 is expected to be complete by 2013. 108


02.11.2012

United Vincie Group Donates to Argyle Airport Project The Argyle International Airport continues to benefit from donations being made by Vincentians at home and in the diaspora. On Tuesday October 30, 2012, eight members of the visiting United Vincie Cultural Group of Brooklyn, New York took a detour from their mission which involves donating medical supplies to rural clinics across St. Vincent and the Grenadines to make a special donation of two-thousand US dollars to the Argyle International Airport. According to Founder and President of the group, Dr. Roxie Irish, most of the money was taken from the grouppâ₏s funds to add to cash donations received for the airport during one of their fundraising events in New York. Dr. Irish also made an additional donation of $300.00 US dollars on behalf of the Irish-Bobb family in memory of her grandmother Caryl Wiseman, who according to Irish was a Vincentian patriot in every sense of the word. Dr. Irish says they are happy to see an international airport for St. Vincent and the Grenadines becoming a reality and they are happy to be a part of it. She says they are pleased with the progress being made with its construction and pledged the groups continued support for the construction of the airport noting that it would ease the travel woes they experience at other regional airports enroute to SVG. Construction of the Argyle International Airport is slated to be completed by the end of 2013 with operations to commence early to mid 2014. It is being constructed at a cost of EC$652 million.

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SVG Brilliant Future

Government of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines International Airport Development Company Argyle International Airport Project Environmental Impact Assessment

Tomテ。s Alberto テ」ila

November 29, 2008

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Planned Tourism Development Sites The Tourism Development Project (TDP) is an EU-funded, 5.74 million ₏ development programme, which will be implemented by the National Parks, Rivers and Beaches Authority (NPA). The programme originally comprised 20 sites, 18 of which are located on mainland St. Vincent. Out of these 3 are located in the Project’s potential area of influence. According to NPA officials, the Argyle beach site has been recently removed from the programme in view of uncertain access to the site after Project implementation and its nearness to the proposed runway. The proposed Rawacou Recreation Park is located immediately east of the southern part of the future runway. The development of this recreational site aims at realizing the full potential of Rawacou Beach as a public recreational and tourism asset, targeted to resident users and visitors. The concept includes an integrated set of facilities, including, public washrooms, service concessions, picnic areas and fire pits, bandstand for performances, multipurpose recreational field for beach sports and a hard court for basket ball and netball. The development cost for the Rawacou Beach site will be at about EC$ 1.5 million, not including land acquisition cost (I. Jackson & Ass., 2004). The site will be managed by NPA in accordance with its legal mandate for the management of beaches (National Parks, Rivers and Beaches Authority Act, 2002). The proposed site for the Rabacca River Recreation Park is an open space located to the north of the mouth of the Rabacca River, 1.2 km north of Georgetown1. In its present condition and exposure the site is inhospitable to recreational uses. Current occasional events include parties, fun sports, church outings etc., and mainly taking place on weekends and public holidays in the area between the Highway and the sea. The proposed development of this site includes gradual improvements and provision of limited facilities for accommodating occasional events by community groups or persons wishing to rent the site. Proposed measures

1 Even though located outside the immediate study area Rabacca will be indirectly affected by the Project by

material extraction and future material requirements resulting from induced development.

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Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent include shifting the access to the site and delineating an area for parking of vehicles. The future arrangements will probably include public toilets, seating, camping ground and picnic shelters at the site. Ongoing erosion of the banks of the Rabacca dry river north of the site could affect the proposed development in the longer term (I. Jackson, 2004). The continued mining activity will also threaten the integrity of the bridge. The planned development cost of this site is about EC$ 372,000. Project implementation is currently planned to start in April 2008 and to continue until about May 2009 (Dr. D. Lee, personal communication). In this respect it will be crucial to ensure permanent access to the site. The Rabacca River site remains under design. The TDP activities will now comprise a small part of a larger project being developed by the GoSVG (see below). A technical team including the Ministry of Housing, Planning Department, Ministry of Tourism, the NPA, and the Project Support Unit of the TDP will be involved in the refinement of the design concepts, designs, financing, construction and operation of the project. The project is still in its conceptual phase and fluid in its development. The TDP is committed to developing the original plans in the north eastern corner of the site. The development of the Rabacca National Park is a concept that is jointly promoted by the Ministries of Tourism, Agriculture and the NPA in the area between the Rabacca River and Miss Jane River, immediately to the South of the Rabacca River. A theme for that park was not yet determined by the time of writing this report, but according to PPU / TDP-representatives it is likely to be a mixture of recreation and a Carib theme village with a memorial statue of Chief Chatoyer, shops, play area, parking, rest stop, cabins along with the camping and picnic facilities to be developed under TDP. The following figure indicates the approximate location of existing and planned recreational and tourism development sites that may be directly or indirectly affected by the Project.

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Fig. 18: Planned Tourism Development Sites directly or indirectly affected by the Project. 8.8 Cultural Properties, Customs, Aspirations and Attitudes St. Vincent and the Grenadines became independent from Britain in 1979. Most of the population is of African descent. According to the World Fact Book the break down of ethnic groupings is as follows: • Black 66% • Mixed 19% • East Indian 6% • Carib Amerindian 2% • Other 7%. Therefore SVG reflects traces of many cultures. The lasting influence of the French and the English still can be observed in cultural traditions, language and local architecture. 113


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent A culturally distinctive group is represented by the small community of person of Carib ancestry, concentrated in the North of St. Vincent. This group has links with the Garifuna community of Belize and there are also contacts between the Carib populations of St. Vincent and Dominica. It is noteworthy that the petroglyphs that are present on the Project site are remnants of the ancestors of the Carib Indian population. There is also a minority of East Indians, which are descendants of last century immigration.

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Fig. 20: Schematic overview of expected Project-induced impacts on regional 9.4.4 Impact on Tourism It is to be assumed that the new international airport will generally give further impetus to the development of the tourism sector on mainland St. Vincent. The related infrastructure development is expected to follow the coastline to the northern and southern direction and also in the area of Greater Kingstown. The new Cross Country Road will reduce the travelling time between the east and the west coast of the island and thus improve the accessibility of some parts of the island, which were so far too remote for short-term visitors. Improved access creates opportunities for the development of tailored tour packages for day trippers from the cruise ships or other short-term visitors of St. Vincent. Such development may also induce a demand for new services in various parts of the island, which again will have implications on regional traffic development and traffic patterns. The relocation of the airport from Arnos Vale to Argyle will increase travelling time between the airport and the ferry terminal by at least one hour. This factor together with the potential risk of incalculable delays caused by congestions on the Windward Highway may complicate the quick and easy sea transfer of travelers from or to the Grenadine islands. The demand for short time accommodation facilities between the new airport and the ferry terminal and for related services and arrangements may thus increase. The demand for more visitor accommodation near beaches, eco tourism sites etc. can be disastrous if no physical plans are in place to guide development in good locations and to ensure that quality facilities are developed. Tourism sites should be better managed and carrying capacities be established for management purposes. 9.4.5 Impact on Geological Resources Besides the new airport there are four other infrastructure projects in the area that are currently at various stages of planning or implementation respectively: • Rehabilitation of the Windward Highway Phase 2 (20 km); • Construction of the Cross-Country Road (~21.6 km); • Realignment of the Windward Highway (2.8 km); 115


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent • Southern Link Road from Calder Junction to seaside agricultural, residential and recreational areas (~2.5 – 3 km). Aggregates required for the construction of the Windward Highway and the Cross Country Road are mined at the Rabacca quarry north of Georgetown. Due to their location it is assumed that this site will also be used for constructing parts of the other two projects592. All mentioned projects will be built within a relatively short period and together require relatively large amounts of aggregates60. Quantitative data on aggregates required for the implementation of the various ongoing and forthcoming development projects in the area are not available. However, OECC staff interviewed at the site assumed that in the past mining comprised about 40% of continuously replenished and 60% of old deposits.

2 Note: Rabacca quarry, together with Brighton and Chateaubelair has been declared as the primary source for

aggregates under the Beach Protection Act of 1987

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9.5 Positive Impacts Positive Impacts As described in chapter 1.5 it is the intention of the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines to diversify the economic base and to achieve balanced growth and sustainable development by promoting agriculture, industry and tourism. Especially tourism has an outstanding potential and could be developed to become the greatest foreign exchange earner of the country. The existing airport facilities have been identified as a major constraint for the future economic development. As described in chapter 2 and according to conclusions of previous studies extension of the existing E. T. Joshua Airport is technically not feasible. The new airport will contribute to overcome the main obstacle for future economic development. Therefore the positive impacts will be complex and nationwide. As described in the previous chapters the most important positive impacts are socioeconomic and spatial development effects. Positive Socioeconomic Impacts The airport alone will create an estimated 500 to 1,000 new jobs, which will add to the locally growing demand for housing, shopping and other commercial activities in the south east of St. Vincent. Thus the new airport is expected to contribute considerably to future economic growth and public welfare. Prerequisite for creation of a more spatially balanced development on mainland St. Vincent As described in Chapter 9.4.1 there is need for more spatially balanced development on mainland St Vincent. The new airport as a growth pole can help with the reversal of the current polarization, ultimately leading to a relief of the overdeveloped and congested central Kingstown area. In addition the new commercial centre expected to emerge at Argyle has potential to gradually spur development into the lagging areas in the north and to make them more attractive for population and settlement. In the longer term there may be a trend of dispersed concentration. In conjunction with the future cross country road the Argyle Airport will help to improve the currently disparate distribution of economic activities. People living on the leeward side will have easy access to the economically 117


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent expanding Argyle area. In addition increased development is expected on the leeward site due to tourism development and better access from Argyle area via the new cross country road. Expected positive development trends are shown in Figure 20. 9.6.6 Yambou Watershed Management The Argyle International Airport is the key item of strategic infrastructure for SVG’s future economy. As such, it is essential that all risks to the uninterrupted operation of the airport be minimized. One such risk is damage to the runway as a result of flooding of the Yambou River and blocking of the river crossing. This risk is directly related to the condition of the Yambou catchment: lower watershed condition is associated with more and faster runoff and an increase in floating debris, and vice versa. 10.3.4 Cultural Heritage As was shown in chapter 7 of this report, parts of the planned physical development will be in an area of utmost cultural and historical significance. The rock with the petroglyph (as described in section 7.1.2 of this report) is relatively unstable material. The site is located in a fill area to the north west of the runway at about km 2+170 (see Fig. 22). The rocks in question are above the eventual height of the airstrip and will thus be crushed to achieve the required stability for the construction of the runway. Therefore it will not be technically feasible to preserve and ‘entomb’ the petroglyph at its present site as was initially proposed by the SVGNT. As the site cannot be preserved there is a need to explore the possibilities for relocation of the rock with the stone carvings. The rock on which these artifacts are located is obviously highly fractioned and any physical intervention bears a high risk of the rock falling apart. Site operations will be delicate and risky and will require the assignment of highly experienced experts (with imported, specialized tools) – most likely people who work stones for decorative purposes (stonemason or somebody who works in the marble industry). As was described in chapter 7.1 a joint site visit has been made with a geologist who had done scientific research on the rocks at the site. The conclusions from this visit are summarized in the box next page. Due to the alignment of the runway various technical constraints and the dimensions of the required earthworks there will be no option but to impact significant cultural heritage, both partially and wholly. 118


Under such circumstances and according to international practice it is up to the developer to undertake any archaeological or salvation measures considered necessary to conserve archaeological information or important cultural heritage. This proposed approach is supported by Principle 12 / Strategy 39 of the SGD signed by the GoSVG, which reads: ‘Institute appropriate measures‌ to provide for the researching, documenting, protecting, conserving, rehabilitating and management of cultural, historic and natural monuments, buildings and symbols, as well as areas of outstanding scientific, cultural, spiritual, ecological, scenic or aesthetic significance’. To mitigate the scale of the overall impact of the Project on cultural heritage and to avoid the ultimate loss of cultural assets and important information on the history of St. Vincent a Cultural Heritage Action Plan is proposed for implementation under the Project. This plan will comprise four main components, viz the petroglyph, the remnants of the Argyle sugar mill, ancient habitation sites and procedures for the chance finds consisting of graves. Petroglyph: Based on the information provided in this report consult with specialists to identify the most appropriate approach for the recovery and relocation of the original petroglyph from the site; Prior to pulling down the cliffs in the vicinity of the petroglyph clear all vegetation alongside the cliffs that are going to be demolished during site preparation. The SVGNT should be informed in due time and invited to systematically inspect these cliffs to ensure that no other artifacts would be incidentally destroyed. This operation should take place early enough in the process to ensure that action may be taken in due time in case that further petroglyphs are discovered at the site; Conduct consultations and reach consensus with the SVGNT on the site to which the original rock would be brought after its successful removal from the present site (e.g. display in the future airport or in a museum; or, as suggested by a member of the NTSVG, relocation to the site of the other petroglyphs in the upper part of the Yambou valley). Regarding the latter option it would, however, have to be considered that the site in the upper Yambou valley is difficult to access. Upon successful removal of the rock from the Argyle site transport of the fractioned rock to this location may entail an additional risk of it breaking apart; Old sugar mill: Prior to the beginning of earthworks rescue any machinery from the old sugar mill site (located in the south west of the IADC office at Argyle). To avoid theft all machinery from the Argyle sugar mill site shall as soon as possible be brought to the Archaeology Museum at the projected Youroumei Heritage 119


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Village in Orange Hill. All old brick materials and partly hand-shaped stones shall be collected and stored centrally at a safe place as a stock for the future restoration work on other old buildings in Saint Vincent. Ancient habitation sites: allocate appropriate funds for carrying out archaeological excavations at sites KuCe 5, KuCe 6, JtCe 1 and JtCe 2 at Escape and Argyle respectively69. The partly low-lying site KuCe 570 would have to be protected effectively during construction, e.g. by instructing the construction crew accordingly and by fencing the excavation area to avoid unintended damage through large construction machinery. At fenced sites provide physical security to protect against treasure seekers; Prehistoric burials: During excavations and earthworks there is a high possibility of chance finds consisting of graves. The IADC, in conjunction with the SVGNT and relevant stakeholders should establish agreed procedures to deal with such cases. These procedures would have to address options of potential research possibilities based on any recovered skeleton (see following box) and / or the reburial of human skeletal remains. Prior to the beginning of earthworks a member of the SVGNT together with the representatives of the IADC and the Construction Unit should inform the workforce accordingly. As regards the proposed archaeological excavations in the Escape area a potential risk could arise from the fact that land reclamation works at the end of the runway are located close to the proposed archaeological excavation sites and that these construction activities are likely to take place at an early stage of construction. This underlines the necessity to comprehensively inform the Construction Unit about the archaeological sites and their importance; Provide a protective fence around the area proposed for archaeological investigations prior to the beginning of land reclamation works. This measure is important, as one of the sites in question would be ideally located for the parking of heavy construction machinery and material. The following figure shows the approximate extent of the sites that are suggested for archaeological excavations. During the construction of the relocated Windward Highway chance finds have recently resulted in unintended destruction of artifacts and potentially relevant prehistoric habitation sites. Given the high risk of further construction-related damage on cultural heritage and considering that the SVGNT does not have the capacity to permanently provide suitably qualified 120


specialists at the site it is suggested that the IADC would appoint a full time ‘Cultural Officer’ throughout the construction phase of the Project who would be fluent in both English and Spanish. The IADC would be responsible • to allocate appropriate funds for the proposed activities under the Cultural Heritage Action Plan; and • to plan the concrete further proceeding in consultation with the SVGN, including • the selection and appointment of archaeological consultants and a Cultural Officer; • the practical coordination of the implementation process. An extract from the cost proposal for archaeological excavations at Argyle is provided in Appendix IV. The due implementation of the set of measures proposed under the Cultural Heritage Action Plan will require optimal communication between the IADC and the SVGNT. To this regard it is suggested to establish such formal communication procedures as to ensure that the NT will be given suitable notice when any planned action is to take place at the cultural heritage sites and invited to be present.

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Fig. 15: Integrated Volcanic Hazard Map of St. Vincent

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Fig. 14: Main vegetation types of St. Vincent prior to disturbance34

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Fig. 10: Geology of St. Vincent (Robertson, 2003)

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Fig. 3: Physical boundaries of the study area

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UNESCO Master Pieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity

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SVG Historic Past Saint Vincent & The Granedine History http://www.svgtourism.com/channels/1.asp?id=60 () Known by the Caribs as Hairoun (“Land of the Blessed�), St. Vincent was first inhabited by the Ciboney, a grouping of MesoIndians. The economy of these unter-gatherers depended heavily on marine resources as well as the land. They used basic tools and weapons and built rock shelters and semi permanent villages. Another indigenous group, the Arawak, who entered the West Indies from Venezuela and moved gradually north and west along the islands, gradually displaced the Ciboney. They practiced a highly productive form of agriculture and had a more advanced social structure and material culture. The peaceloving Arawak fished and collectively formed plots of land. The bountiful harvests and abundant fish, combined with the compact and stable island population, permitted the development of an elaborate political and social structure. The Caribs, arriving in St. Vincent perhaps no more than 100 years before the Europeans, conquered the Arawak and began a new chapter in Vincentian history. More warlike than their predecessors, the Caribs were extremely efficient at keeping unwanted settlers from their shores. While it is doubtful that Christopher Columbus ever set foot on the island, he may have sighted it on his third voyage to the New World (1498-1500). Heavy Carib resistance prevented St. Vincent from being colonized long after most other Caribbean islands had well-established European settlements. In 1627 Charles I of England granted the island to Lord Carlisle and then, in 1672 Charles II granted it to Lord Willoughby. 131


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent While the British, French and Spanish disputed possession, the Caribs resisted all these claims. The first permanent settlers arrived on the shores of St. Vincent in 1635. These new inhabitants were African slaves who survived the sinking of the Dutch slave ship on which they were being transported. The escaped Africans merged with the Caribs and gradually adopted their language. Referred to as Black Caribs,” to differentiate them from the original. “Yellow Caribs,” the progeny of this group became the foundation of the Garifuna (which means“cassava eating people”) who today populate Belize and Honduras. After several skirmishes both groups had agreed in 1700 to subdivide the island between themselves, the Yellow Caribsoccupying the Leeward and the Black Caribs the Windward. The British, who claimed Carib land by royal grants, were more despised by the Caribs than the French who were permitted to set up settlements in the early 1700’s. The 1748 TreatyofAix -la-Chapelle officially ended the War of the Austrian Succession. This treaty included the proviso that St. Vincent remain officially “neutral.” The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded St. Vincent to the British. During the period 1772-1773 (referred to as the First Carib War), the Caribs engaged in guerrilla warfare and destroyed plantations by setting them on fire. With Carib aid, the French forcibly seized the island in1779, but restored it to Britain in 1783, underthe Treaty of Versailles. In 1795, with the country under the governership of James Seton, the Caribs began the two years of attack known as the Second Carib War. With the aid of French rebels from Martinique, the Caribs plotted the removal of the British. Chatoyer and DuValle (the two main Carib chiefs) planned that Chatoyer would lead the rebellion on the Leeward side and DuValle would lead on the Windward side. News came to Kingstown on March 8th thatwar had broken out. Chatoyer directed his fury at the settlers themselves rather than destroying their property. His belief was that the land would be extremely useful to the Caribs after the removal of the British. He worked his way along the Leeward, joined in battle by the French at Chateaublair, to unite with DuValle at Dorsetshire Hill. The 132


amalgamated forces then set their sights on Kingstown. A battalion of British soldiers from recently arrived warships marched towards Dorsetshire Hill on March 14th. On this night, Chatoyerwas killed by Major Alexander Leith. Considered a hero to the nation, a monument in Chatoyer’s honour is placed at Dorsetshire Hill. Battles raged throughout St. Vincent overthe nextyear with both sides bearing heavy losses. The final battle took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796. After a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approach the British with a truce flag. Submission terms were negotiatead and during the next four months over 5,000 Caribs surrendered. The Caribs were exiled to the neighbouring island of Balliceaux and in February 1797, the defeated Caribs were loaded onto a convoy of eight vessels and transported to the coast of Honduras. The few remaining Caribs scattered to the north of the island nearSandy Bay where their descendants can still be found. The plantation economy, based on slave labour, flourished and St. Vincent produced sugar, cotton, coffee and cocoa. In 1812 La Soufiiére erupted and devastated much of the island. After the emancipation of slaves in 1833, indentured labour from Portugal and the East Indies was brought in to rectify the Labour shortage. St. Vincent became a part of the British colony of the Windward Islands in 1871. In the latter half of the 19th century sugar slumped and a depression lasted until the end of the century. In 1902 La Soufrière erupted again, devastating the northern half of the island and killing 2,000 people. In 1925 a Legislative Council was inaugurated but it was not until 1951 that universal adult suffrage was introduced. St.Vincent and the Grenadines belonged to the Windward Islands Federation until 1959 and the West Indies Federation between 1958 and 1962. Britain granted internal self-government to the isLand in 1969 and as a 133


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent British Assodated State, Vincentians were responsible for their internal affairs while Great Britain handled foreign affairs and defense. In 1972 james Mitchell (an independent) formed a coalition government with the People’s Political Party (PPP) which collapsed in 1974. Followingthe 1974 elections MiLton Cato formed a coalition government with the PPP and the St. Vincent LabourParty (SVLP). On Oct. 27, 1979 St. Vincent gained full independence within the Commonwealth from Britain. The New Democratic Party (NDP) formed a majority government with Mitchell as Prime Minister in1984. Politically, the island remained under the leadership of Sir james Mitchell until March 2001 when the Unity Labour Party (ULP), led by Dr. RalpGonsalves, won 12 of the 15 parliamentary seats. St. Vincent and the Grenadines continue to be a stable democratic society welcoming visitors from around the world.

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Joseph Chatoyer SVG Hero Ministry of Urban Development, Labour, Culture and Electoral Matters Culture - Culture General Administration

The Black Carib wars against the English were in three phases. It was during the closing stages of the second phase that Chatoyer, the great Carib Chief, met his death. In March 1795 Duvallier, the Windward Carib Chief, pulled down the British flag at Dorsetshire Hill and made his headquarters there. Chatoyer eventually joined Duvallier at Dorsetshire Hill where he took command. However, on the night of 14th March of that same year, the English stormed Dorsetshire Hill to fight against the Caribs. Chatoyer, by this time, was convinced that he could not be killed by mortal means so he challenged Major Alexander Leith to a duel. Leith was a trained army officer and as such, he was a good swordsman and so Chatoyer was killed in the duel. The French account of the duel says that while Chatoyer was getting the upper hand over Major Leith, an English soldier shot the Carib Chief in the back. No matter how Chatoyer was killed, the limited information available on him indicates that he was a great leader. We know that his home and headquarters were at Morne Ronde on the North Western end of the island however, there is no clue as to his final resting place. To become a chief of the Caribs, one had to distinguish oneself in war or in other respects. Chatoyer appears not only to have been the paramount military chief, but also the civilian one. In war Chatoyer was an outstanding leader. His forces included not only his fellow Caribs but also Europeans who were French troops. Neither the French nor his fiercely individualistic countrymen would have respected him had he not been an outstanding general. During battle Chatoyer did not destroy property for the sake of vandalism, as Duvallier had done on the Windward side of the island. Instead, Chatoyer preserved it so that he could use it in the future. This action shows remarkable foresight. Chatoyer, despite the great 135


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent odds against him, was able to defeat the English twice. He was able to mould his army into a remarkable fighting force. The strategies he used, to inflict blows on and to negotiate with the English, indicate he was a man of great character. Perhaps the most pointed indication of his leadership was what happened to his troops: when he died most of the French soldiers immediately forsook the Carib cause and fled to Layou. The Caribs themselves were so shocked at their leader’s death that retreated to their villages. From then on the very character of the Carib war took on an entirely different complexion. It is possible that had this great man Chatoyer lived, the English might not have been able to so quickly suppress the Caribs and transport them from their homeland to Central America. Chatoyer remains a hero even though his Carib empire has long been destroyed. The most recent development in this quest for reclaiming identity and reconstructing their history took place on March 14, 2002 when the Great Carib (Garifuna) Chief, Chatoyer, was declared first National Hero of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and the day made a national holiday. Chatoyer, who is also revered by the Garifuna people in Central America, was Paramount Chief at a very critical period in the struggle to retain the independence of St. Vincent and to preserve the lands on which his people lived. He died in 1795 during the battle that led to the final defeat of the Caribs. The recognition of the importance of the Carib Chief to the life and struggles of his people has long been recognized. The British have established a monument in a prominent place in the Anglican Cathedral to their Major Leith who, it was alleged, had killed Chatoyer in a duel. The account of his death given by the British has been disputed, and is believed to have been part of efforts at psychological warfare. Chatoyer was also immortalized in a play, the “Drama of King Shotaway” , that was performed in NewYork in 1823, twenty-eight years after his death. The play was written by Mr. William Henry Browne. It is believed that he was a Garifuna member who had experienced the battle of 1795 in which Chatoyer was killed. Mr. 136


Browne is regarded as the Father of Black Theatre in the United States of America and this play is said to be the first about a black person. The recognition given on March 14 to this leading figure in the history of the Garifuna/Black Carib people will undoubtedly focus attention on his and his people’s contribution to the history of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. They had held the might of Europe at bay for centuries, St. Vincent being among the last of the Caribbean countries to be colonized. It will also contribute to restoring the confidence and reconstructing the identity of a people who had been victims of a colonial past and who have had over the years to face the accusation of being cannibals that had been widely propagated in colonial history. The Black Carib/Garifuna population in St. Vincent that remained following the exile, had for long lived on the margin of society, many of them in communities that had been devastated by volcanic eruptions in 1812 and 1902 and had, to all intents and purposes, been cut off from mainstream Vincentian life. A lot has changed over the years, a result of political developments and the growing consciousness of the people. The reconnection of the people, among other things, will help in the reclaiming of their history, identity and pride; and in reconstructing and restoring their central place in the eady history and development of St. Vincent, or Yuremi as it is known in Garifuna language. The history, artifacts and other symbols of the Black Caribs (Garifuna people) are essential parts of the history and culture of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Many of the forts and places where the different encounters took place, remain and tell their own story, among them the cannons at Fort Charlotte that point inland. Beside the information they provide to the Vincentian people, they also add to the rich heritage and cultural-tourism infrastructure. Sections of the Central American Garifuna community are developing a case for reparations and are seeking ‘symbolic’ citizenship of this country. The story of the Garifuna people is a unique one that needs to be told, since among other things, it is pivotal to understanding their position in Central America and also the history of St. Vincent and the 137


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent Grenadines; and indeed the rest of the Caribbean region in which St. Vincent was one of the last outposts of Carib resistance.

Š2005 Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines

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Address Delivered By Hon. James Mitchell in La Ceiba, Honduras April 11, 1997 Representatives of the government and the people of Honduras, and of the cities of Honduras, representatives of the Garifuna people and the black organization, Garifuna people, people of Honduras, I am very pleased to be here. It is the first time I have come to Honduras. I have visited other parts of Central America - Belize, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. The most important job I have done in Central America was when I helped to supervise the elections in Nicaragua when Violetta Chamorro took power from the Sandinistas. I more recently worked in West Africa to help the transformation of a military government in the Gambia to a newly elected government in the Gambia. As I travelled from St Vincent yesterday - and it took me only one day - on the plane, I reflected on the history of the Garifuna people, how difficult it must have been for you coming across the sea 200 years ago. It is very funny - as it were -- that we are the only country in the Caribbean that has a human link with a part of Central America in the Garifuna people, between St Vincent and Central America. I bring you greetings from the government o and the people of St Vincent and the Grenadines. I want to let you know what caused you to be here. Your ancestors fought very hard in St Vincent, then called Yuremei, against the British, and you lost the battle because of the superior naval power of the British. You had friends among the French but they abandoned you. You put up a heavy fight that the British decided they could not let the Garifuna people remain in St Vincent. When your chief, the Caribs Chief Chatoyer died in battle, then the Garifuna people, in the struggle, were demoralized. But however, some of the Garifuna people hid in various parts of St. 140


Vincent and they are still there today to create a link with you the people of Central America. Now, I want to let you know that the remaining people whom we call the Caribs, were given, by the British, some very isolated and difficult lands on which to live. My political party was founded on the principle of land for the landless and when we took power in 1984 we did the same thing one of our largest plantations was for sale, and it was to be sold to a foreign company. I refused to let the foreign company purchase those lands, and working within the framework of the constitution we purchased those lands. Then we set about getting the lands to the people. The secret is very simple. A government always has time, and a country is forever. A government has got to find a way to use time to give substance to the people. Therefore we raised bonds, and with our taxes we were able to purchase those lands. Our government could not afford to give those lands away, but we could afford to give time away. So, we found a framework where all the lands were given to the people and a framework given of time for them to pay for them. Following that, we were able to get a great deal of international support to develop those lands. I was very pleased that we were able to distribute one-third of the lands to women. Today, all of those communities where we have done our land-reform program are thriving communities, with people having their own homes, good quality homes with electricity and telephones. When we took over those lands, also there were no roads, and that transformation began in 1984, and it is a success in a very short space of time. I have one message to give you, the first is that it is necessary that secure economic and intellectual independence. That is the way to success. By that I do not mean going to school. You have got to work hard, and discipline yourself. If you are at the bottom, you will never get on the top without discipline. It is important that you understand that, when once you have education, you do not have to be rich. But, if you are rich in your mind, and you are productive, everybody in Latin America will respect you. 141


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent At our Independence celebrations this year, we will be establishing, for the first time our national honors. We did not do it before because we were contemplating working with creating a new country united among other islands in the Caribbean. We already have honours which we receive from our sovereign, the Queen, and our national honours will co-exist with the international honours which we receive in our country. In this process, and, to respect the historic origins of our country we will be recognizing the first Garifuna Chief, Chief Chatoyer. You cannot, in this country, forever live in the past. Nor could we, in our country live in the past. But it is important that we use our history to guide us in the future. For, if you ignore history, it will repeat itself. Now the future of our region is tied very much with the American Free Trade Area, organized already between Mexico, the United States and Canada. We attend the meeting in Miami, and we are part of the process of preparation for the free trade of the Americas to come into being in the year 2005 While we are working at organizing trade, I want you, the Garifuna people, to realize that that can create opportunities for you to have practical and profitable linkages with the Caribbean. And while it might be very far in the future, nevertheless we must understand what the future holds, and begin to prepare to secure some of that future. I am very pleased with what I have seen of your organization. Your 200th anniversary has been a good focus of attention. I shall carry back a very important message to the people of St Vincent and the Grenadines, and it is that we have brothers and sisters in another part of the world who in their memories and in their songs and in their culture, think very kindly of St Vincent. While we know that our people came here, we were not aware that there is such a strong sentimental link between Central America, the Garifuna people and our people in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. I am very pleased that I was able to bring a delegation from St Vincent with me, and the Minister who represents the Garifuna people is here with me today. Honourable Monty Roberts, will you please stand. 142


And also the other members of our delegation so, you could at least see what Garifuna people look like in St. Vincent. I now conclude by letting you know that you are welcome to Saint Vincent. We have our Independence celebrations in October this year, and I would like to invite your Garifuna Organization to select people to attend our Independence celebration. As long as you arrive in St Vincent, you will be our guests. It is important that we establish permanent working relations between the Garifuna organization and the organization in St Vincent and the Grenadines. I wish finally to thank the mayor of La Ceiba; I want to thank you, Madam, for your hospitality in your city. I want to thank you to pass on our greetings to the President and Vice Minister, and all of those who made our visit here so welcome. And I wish to congratulate all those people who have used their leadership ability from the United States Garifuna and here in Honduras to put this show together. Long live! Thank You

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Garifuna American Leadership Delegation to Saint Vincent & The Grenadines Tomテ。s Alberto テ」ila June 15, 2007 The Garifuna Coalition USA, Inc (GCUSA), in partnership with New Horizon Investment Club, invite Garifuna American leaders who are selected from various parts of the United States. The trip creates an opportunity for Garifuna American leaders to get to know and reconnect with Saint Vincent and The Grenadine and to meet and exchange information with Saint Vincent leaders in the government, business, political, non-profit, and cultural sectors during their weeklong visit to the country. The program also enables Saint Vincent leaders to gain a greater understanding about multicultural Garifunas through the experiences of a diverse group of Garifuna Americans. Upon returning, the Delegation members work with former Delegates, the local Consulates, the Garifuna Coalition USA, Inc (GCUSA) and other community organizations, to organize and participate in programs and activities related to building Garifuna Americans - Saint Vincent and The Grenadine relations. Goals Of The Delegation Program 1. Improve understanding and strengthen long-term relations between Garifuna Americans and Saint Vincent and The Grenadine. 2. Develop and implement on-going strategies to expand the role of Garifuna Americans in advancing Garifuna Americans - Saint Vincent and The Grenadine relations. 3. Develop a network of Garifuna American leaders that will continue to advance Garifuna Americans - Saint Vincent and The Grenadine relations long-term. Background

While the relationship between the Garifuna community and Saint Vincent and The Grenadine is considered by many as the most 144


important bilateral relationship in the world, the connection between Saint Vincent Garifunas and Garifuna Americans is atypical and more complex than that shared by other Americans and their ancestral peoples and lands. While the final battle that took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796, after a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approach the British with a truce flag. Submission terms were negotiated and during the next four months over 5,000 Caribs surrendered. The Caribs were exiled to the neighboring island of Balliceaux and in February 1797, the defeated Caribs were loaded onto a convoy of eight vessels and transported to the coast of Honduras. The few remaining Caribs scattered to the north of the island near Sandy Bay where their descendants can still be found. The political, business, and cultural milieu that both nations face today requires a new look at the Saint Vincent Garifuna and Garifuna American relationship, and its role in the future of Garifuna Americans - Saint Vincent and The Grenadine relations. The first Delegation invited by the Garifuna Coalition is plan for July 2008. The delegation included third and fourth generation Garifuna Americans from New York and other states. These individuals will be selected from various professional fields including educational, cultural, philanthropic, legal and political sectors. The Delegation, which consists of 10 to 15 males and females, visits Saint Vincent and the Grenadines the month of July every year. Criteria & Selection Of The 2008 Delegation

Fifteen Garifuna American leaders will be selected by the Garifuna Coalition. Decisions will be based upon recommendations by the local constituency and recommendations from an Advisory Committee. The 2008 delegation will include leaders who have expressed an interest and commitment to strengthening Garifuna American – Saint Vincent relations, have demonstrated involvement in the Garifuna American community, and will be committed to future efforts to build linkages 145


Argyle International Airport: The Future of Saint Vincent between the Garifuna American community and Saint Vincent and the Grenadine. Selection Criteria include:

- Leadership in profession - Involvement in the Garifuna American community - Interest in Garifuna American – Saint Vincent relations - Potential for future involvement in building Garifuna American– Saint Vincent relations - In principle, delegates should be in their early 20s to late 50s in order to enable them longer term opportunities to build Garifuna American– Saint Vincent relations in their respective professional and community activities. - In reflecting the goals of the Delegation program, priority will also be given to young professionals. INFORMATION: Application and recommendation of candidates will be accepted at the Garifuna Coalition-USA offices. For further information, please contact:

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"Vincentian Strength to Accomplish the Unthinkable." SVG-IADC

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.� Margaret Mead

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