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STYLE

Different Class

Issue #47 - August 2017

Q&A JONATHAN ANDERSON

FASHION DESIGN VIRGIL ABLOH

THE TOPIC IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR

FASHION WHO READS JONNY PIERCE

Cultural Instigator

Aesthetics and its new language

Family run fashion businesses

It is not only a question of fashion

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FASHION&CINEMA

INFLUENCER ANTE LITTERAM Suit and polo shirt by Gucci

Poste italiane Sped. in A.P. - D.L. 353/2003 conv. L. 46/2004, art. 1, c. 1, DCB Milano

Between vintage and contemporary, between sportswear and luxury

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TREND

Private Banker

Hevò

A style inspired by the most requested professional figure in Italy

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ACCESSORIES

Fancy Patterns

Boots by Fendi

Prints inspired by nature vs contemporary patterns

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C

oming soon to our screens: Borg McEnroe, a Swedish film from director Janus Metz Pedersen, telling the story of the rivalry in the seventies between two super champions of tennis, Björn Borg and John McEnroe. As well as the riveting story of the pair’s battles on and off

Sverrir Gudnason e Shia LaBeouf in Borg McEnroe (Photo Courtesy of Lucky Red)

court, the film is a chance to lose oneself in the atmosphere of a fascinating era, one in which tennis stars were treated the same way rockstars and footballers are today. They filled the tabloids and they were of course true icons of style: influencers ante litteram. As can be seen from the picture, the pair’s sponsors were two well-established Italian sportswear

brands, Sergio Tacchini for McEnroe and Fila for Björn Borg. To really understand just how much of a cult the duo’s style became, just think how many times over the next decades, even recently, the two brands have re-edited the polo and tracksuits worn by the two champions on the winners’ podium. Perhaps for this reason the film seems so current.


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Tela Genova reproduces an hiGh qualiTy piece of arT accordinG To The TradiTional iTalian

sTyle.

The selecTion of maTerial and an accuraTe manufacTurinG Technique make of every jeans a very fine exemplar, unique and revoluTionary in The conTemporary markeT.

iTs hisTory has already become a myTh.

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Editor’s Letter 5

AUGUST 2017

Where did the fashion shows go?

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hat is happening in the world of men’s fashion? I am not referring to the aesthetic side of the matter, but that which is strictly linked to the dynamics of promotion, communication and sales, starting with industry events. What is striking about this roundabout of presentations of the men’s collections, starting with London and finishing in New York in July, is in fact the new dimension of Milano Moda Uomo. How did, what had been up to about 10 years ago the main international date for menswear, come to be reduced to three days and today counts more absent excellence than symbolic names of our prêt-à-porter on its calendar? Paradoxically, this has happened in tandem with exponential growth in the Lombardy capital’s international popularity, involving all of the city’s events and shows. Design Week, which registers record breaking numbers of visitors and turnover year after year, is the perfect example of this success. At the opposite end of the spectrum is Pitti Immagine Uomo, which recovers territory every year, thanks to innovative and contemporary proposals, with distinctly international appeal. Of course, it is not possible to make a direct comparison between the two events; the first is three days of runway shows with a plethora of accompanying events and presentations and the other is a trade fair enriched by runway shows and selected events andfollows the philosophy of not quantity but quality. One has to ask if this is not the right formula to give value to menswear, when compared to an industry fashion week: on paper more glamourous but, when all is said and done, empty of surprises. However, when we look abroad, things are not so very different. Apart from Paris, whose menswear week maintains its traditional richness and grandeur with all the established big names, and not only French, within a solid calendar; London and New York, who came later with events linked to men’s fashion, still have difficulty in gaining international appeal. Apart from sporadic participation by some influential designer name, they struggle to involve symbolic industry names in a stable manner. The main reason for this crisis is apparently the choice, made by many, to bring together menswear and womenswear during their respective women’s fashion weeks. It is in many aspects a sensible choice, saving money to be able to invest in a show which is by nature more glamourous. I am asking myself a different question: by so doing won’t men’s ready to wear lose its own identity?

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Contributors

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Special Guest

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FASHION WHO READS

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JONNY PIERCE THE DRUMS

EMANUELE BASSETTI

TANIA VISHNYAKOVA A degree in business, a Master in Counseling, owner of the vintage store Vecchiamosca in Milan, blogger (amanteperfetta.com) and designer of furs and jewellery. Muscovite by birth, she could have been an engineer or an economist, she is a Parisian spirit adopted by Milan. Her style doesn’t follow the masses, she sees it as a fascinating game. Her favourite pastime is to seek out grandmother’s headscarves and wear them with everything. She never leaves home without lipstick, vintage glasses and at least one unusual accessory.

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Scientist of communication and sociologist, working in the field of communication and new media, particularly involved in innovation in communicative processes. In academia he has collaborated with the University of Bologna for the last 11 years lecturing in degree courses on international and diplomatic science, sociology and communication sciences. At research level he has examined the theme of e-democracy and is the author of one of the first Italian studies on the social impact of web 2.0 as an instrument of social participation, particularly considering the new generations (L’ e-democracy per i giovani, Franco Angeli, 2010). At a corporate level, he is a strategic consultant for branding development with particular reference to internationally leaning public and private enterprise. He is currently collaborating with the Menabò Group for the creation of high added value communication projects, in particular those regarding the fashion sector.

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ENRICO MARIA ALBAMONTE

Born in Rome but based in Milan, he is a curious and keen observer of trends in fashion and lifestyle phenomena. Over time, he has matured a personal interest in the world of masculine passions and cinema. With a law degree from Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, he has been a freelance journalist from 2001 and writes about fashion, lifestyle and the economy for Gruppo Editoriale l’Espresso.

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MAURIZIO SAPIA (STUDIO H2O)

Born in Sanremo, after high school he moved to Milan to do a course in photography at the IED (European Institute of Design). After his diploma he began his profession as a photographer first as an assistant and then working directly with several magazines both in Italy and abroad. In collaboration with Studio H2O, of which he is one of the founding partners, he is currently producing photographs and videos for numerous brands and magazines, mainly but not exclusively linked to fashion. Parallel to this commercial activity, over the years he has developed his own artistic research, which, supported by art galleries, has brought him to show his work in numerous group and personal exhibitions.

NICOLA GOBBETTO GIULIO DI SABATO President of Assomoda since 2003, founder and honorary President of Assotemporary, member of the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana. He sits on the Consiglio Direttivo of Fnaarc, the most important Italian organisation for sales agents. He founded Sari Spazio in 1988, one of the most famous showrooms in Milan. Over the years, he has developed a significant distribution and representation business, not only on Italian and European soil, but also in the continuously growing markets of the Middle and Far East, CSI and Russia and Eastern European countries, enlarging his business and developing a distribution network in over 50 countries worldwide.

Editorial Director MARCO POLI m.poli@fashionillustrated.eu Editor in Chief GIULIANO DEIDDA g.deidda@fashionillustrated.eu Art Director FABRIZIO MAJERNA f.majerna@maj-fm.com Editorial Staff FRANCESCA MANUZZI ANNA PAOLA STRONA info@fashionillustrated.eu Contributors ENRICO MARIA ALBAMONTE, EMANUELE BASSETTI, ALBERTO CORRADO, TANYA DOUBLEDAY-RUDKIN (TRANSLATIONS), NICOLA GOBBETTO, CESARE MEDRI, STUDIO H2O, TANIA VISHNYAKOVA Editorial Office Corso Colombo 7 20144 Milano Tel. +39 0287365694

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Born in 1980 in Milan, he gained his diploma from the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera. His gallery of reference is Galleria Fonti di Napoli. In 2011 he won the Prada Manga Contest and in 2012 made the animated short film “The Golden Fish” for Vogue.it. His research weaves around fantastic narrative, myths and legends, magic and esotericism. Metamorphosis and transformation are the key words for his artistic production which embraces divers experimental techniques.

With The Drums new album, Abysmal Thoughts, the band’s founder Jonny Pierce has made the record he always had in his heart. Of course, because they are The Drums this is a broken heart we are dealing with, but there is beauty in this pain. It is a glorious madness which manages to absorb everything that life gives us and in spite of everything, manages to emerge triumphant. The album’s sound is not entirely abysmal given Pierce’s extreme pop talent, and also because the message is to imagine for oneself what happiness means once the worst is over. “Happiness confuses me”, says Pierce, “It comes from nowhere and before you can get used to it, it disappears.” After the first cycle of The Drums, which concluded with the last album, and the ending of the relationship with his partner, Pierce withdrew from music for a while, to be able to re-connect with himself and find new inspiration. Determined to make changes he left New York and isolated himself in a huge Los Angeles apartment. And so the difficulties and internal confusion became Abysmal Thoughts, an undiluted autobiography, with Pierce in total control. In this issue, the artist recounts this journey in an interview on page. 56, as well as talking about his relationship with fashion as author of the column Fashion Who Reads.

www.fashionillustrated.eu Publishing House MILANO FASHION LIBRARY Via Alessandria, 8 - 20144 Milano - Tel. +39 0258153208 Chairman DIEGO VALISI dvalisi@milanofashionlibrary.it Assistant Publisher PRASANNA CONTI pconti@milanofashionlibrary.it Advertising Via Alessandria, 8 20144 Milano Tel. +39 0258153208 Distribuzione Italia m-dis S.p.A. Distribuzione Media S.p.A Via C. Cazzaniga, 19 20132 Milano Tel. 0225821 Fax 0225825306 info-service@m-dis.it

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Contents

AUGUST 2017

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HIGHLIGHTS 1 STYLE TIPS

By Editorial Staff

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Q&A JONATHAN ANDERSON By Francesca Manuzzi

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PROFILE VIRGIL ABLOH

By Alberto Corrado

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THE TOPIC IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR By Emanuele Bassetti

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FASHION E CINEMA WEARABLE TECHNOLOGIES FOR AN UNKNOWN FUTURE By Enrico Maria Albamonte

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TREND PRIVATE BANKER

By Francesca Manuzzi

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S/S 2018 YUCCIE A.K.A. YOUNG URBAN CREATIVES By Francesca Manuzzi

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RESORT 2018 SPRING TOP 6

By Anna Paola Strona

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SCOUTING LABELS TO WATCH By Anna Paola Strona

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EXHIBITION THE FLEETING MUSEUM By Francesca Manuzzi

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DIFFERENT CLASS STYLE Giuliano Deidda PHOTOGRAPHY Cesare Medri

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FANCY PATTERNS STYLE Anna Paola Strona PHOTOGRAPHY H2O

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HIGHLIGHTS 2 LIFESTYLE

By Editorial Staff

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DESTINATION LIGURIA: AN UNFORGETTABLE DAY By Editorial Staff

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FASHION WHO READS Pringle of Scotland, moodboard della collezione primavera estate 2018

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IT IS NOT ONLY A QUESTION OF FASHION By Jonny Pierce


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Highlights 1

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STYLE TIPS

TESSUTI DI SONDRIO Synonymous with cotton, it is a unique and exceptional company built from culture, history and land, which sinks deep roots into its namesake town in the Italian Alps. The company was actually started in Switzerland at the end of the 19th century by the weavers Spelty and Keller. To avoid onerous Swiss taxes, they decided to move to Italy, making Sondrio their headquarters. In the following year, the company was taken over by the Fossati family and the factory registered significant growth thanks to financial development bringing about an increase in the size of the area dedicated to weaving. Thus, in the middle of the 1900’s the company was able to guarantee work for over 50% of the population who worked for them in manufacturing. After the flourishing Fossati period, the structure came into the hands of ENI, thereby becoming a parastatal company. After the decision of the Italian State to break up manufacturing structures, Cotone di Sondrio, as was the company’s name at the time, during the second half of the 20th century was absorbed by Marzotto capital. The European leader in the textiles industry saw in the Valtellinese cotton an extremely rare and unique opportunity; what most took the eye of the Counts of Valdagno was in particular the type of territory. Sondrio is in fact in a rather unusual area in so much as it is completely outside any textile district, but it does have a special characteristic: water. This is an element which is industry fundamental for the whole of the textile industry, but most of all for cotton. It is actually the famous Alpine water which allows Sondrio to obtain such exclusive and precious fabrics. With this rich background, Tessuti di Sondrio was able to demonstrate its value in a world market which recognises and respects it as the queen of cotton. A crown which Sondrio is able to wear thanks to efforts across the board in innovation; on the one hand large investments into research with the Tessuti di Sondrio, Dalsasso and Igloo and on the other the updating of the factory, with exclusive avant garde machinery. It is enough to refer to the latest arrival – named Aquasoft, a prototype machine built as a worldwide exclusive for the company. This technological pearl is able to create a handle to fabrics which is unique and simulates the precious Italian tradition of washing at the wash house. This is only one example of the attention to culture which Sondrio weaves into the warp and weft of fabrics which are presented to the panorama of men’s fashion during only the most important trade fairs and the foremost events. Latest of these was Milano Unica, the last edition saw an impressive effort on the part of the factory, due above all to the date being brought forward by almost two months compared to the traditional calendar. This effort was repaid with the presence of almost 400 brands and over 1200 visitors only three days. To amaze and attract visitors was the industrial style display: pipes, beams and other structures created a frame for high-end suits, jackets and trousers made using the best fabrics from the company by the elite of men’s fashion. Another of Tessuti di Sondrio’s priorities is of course, social and environmental awareness, this has become a keystone for the company and is recognized and guaranteed by Bureau Veritas della SA 8000 and ISO14001.

ALLEGRI

THE NEW GEOGRAPHY OF MALE FASHION BY GIULIO DI SABATO FOUNDER OF Sari

Spazio

This year, once again at the start of a new summer sales campaign, we are confronted with great fervour and interesting proposals from the many brands who populate the world of men’s fashion, many of whom will be presenting their creations at the upcoming Pitti Uomo in Florence. As far as Sari Spazio’s turnover is concerned, men’s fashion represents around 50%. There is an ongoing tendency to create products which put manufacturing and design together, proposing clothing and accessories which exist between history and the avant garde. Spring Summer 2018 reaffirms denim for men with the luxury world of Jacob Cohen, athleisure which takes from the world of sport inserting details, colours and big printed logos. There are sneakers in worked and refined leathers, such as those by Golden Goose Deluxe Brand and Studswar which reconfirm the image of the modern dandy and the contemporary turned towards a very young clientele evermore on the lookout for innovative and seriously trendy clothes. This season, on behalf of Sari Spazio, I was able to close deals with extremely high end brands both from an innovative and qualitative stand point, from high-tech textiles to the contemporary, taking in luxury and sartorial creations with brands such as Esemplare, a leading company for refined outerwear and Tonello,a contemporary product from a great artisanal structure. My mission, as I take care of markets ranging from the Middle East to the Far East and all of the eastern countries, is that of finding brands to satisfy the tastes of the most important retailers in the world. The selection of new brands in fact takes into consideration our clients’ requests both from the point of view of taste and from that of the fit taking into account that the Russian man has a style in this sense which is very different to the Asian one.

It is a precise direction, the one taken by Allegri for the Spring Summer collection 2018 presented at Pitti Uomo. Matteo Zara, brand manager, explains the details: “Since last season we have begun a collaboration with two designers: Leonardo Fasolo who takes care of research and experiment and Andrea Mazzanti hired to give value to the brand’s heritage. This season we have dedicated a part of the collection to garment dyeing, proposed in special nylons with polyurethane treatments distinguished by 3d colour. I call it tech-elegance; it is a city-wearer’s product and is typical of the technological side of Allegri. With these proposals, the colour range increases too. The rest of the collection under Andrea Mazzanti, follows the line of “contemporary heritage.” Furthermore, the brand has in reserve important news for the near future. Zara goes on to say: “We are closing the contract for a licensing deal for a women’s collection with an important company, still top secret. The first capsule for Spring Summer 2018 is being worked on now. Our plan is to have four collections per year. The company is very interested in opening up to licensing deals. What we will control is the coherence between brand and distribution. The women’s collection will rejuvenate the brand’s image. We are thinking of involving an important designer, but for the moment I can’t say any more than that”.

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Highlights 1

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STYLE TIPS

L’UOMO MILANESE BY TANIA VISHNYAKOVA When I think about the Milanese man’s style, I immediately think about Marcello Mastroianni, even if he isn’t exactly Milanese with his way of rolling up his trousers French style and then imagine the casual elegance of Richard Gere and his male sensuality in American Gigolò, dressed by Giorgio Armani. Two male icons so diverse and yet so similar. When I arrived in this city I fell immediately in love with the Milanese man’s way of doing things, I was about to faint when I saw someone wearing ‘50’s style ankle length trousers and shoes and no socks as well as a white shirt with rolled up sleeves. To summarize, to my eyes the Milanese man is a little bourgeois and a little Hapsburghian, absolutely metropolitan style a little cold outwardly but with an innate tendency to dress well. Tradition dictates that the Milanese man seems to behave in a way which in slang is called ‘sprezzatura’ a term which denotes studied carelessness, a little tousled but also a little British, a little bit dandy and care taken over every least detail. Congenital good dressing knows how to be chic in an ironic way, dares, tries out colourful socks and a jeans shirt with a classic jacket on top et voilà! Oh! I almost forgot, he likes pochettes and rigorously hand-made Hermes shoes. Notwithstanding my passion for retro I took a peek at the latest high end trends from the runway and I noticed the autumn winter collection from Salvatore Ferragamo, pure class, where modern elegance meets classic tailoring using researched fabrics. An almost Nordic man, but not at all cold is the one proposed by Miuccia Prada, dressed in velvet, flannel and wool, an urban style with a hint of the past. A little seventies and a slight air of bourgeois Milan. To conclude, a little light-hearted post scriptum: now that it is hot in the city I suggest a nice Panama hat, an Ungaro white shirt and a pair of linen trousers and very fashionable raffia shoes. Only however if you’re not in the office. And forget about Hawaian colours, let’s leave those to Caribbean dances. Don’t say no to a beautiful watch which reflects your personality or even a beautiful piece of jewellery or a bracelet with the Paul Hewitt anchor.

natural colour palette scattered with British inspired touches of green. This links the warm chromatic group to the series of blue and azures. What are your next steps? We want to create a complete style, we don’t set ourselves any limits. We have several ideas, from a women’s capsule to furniture. Everything is planned, but we will take it one step at a time. This year there will be in fact, an investment in outerwear. This starts with the summer collection and it will be significantly developed with Autumn Winter 2018.

Remember that trends anticipate and burn out. Style remains. Your Russian girl.

INTERVIEW WITH PIER PAOLO PENNESI, BRAND MANAGER OF ROYAL ROW How did Royal Row begin? It was founded two and a half years ago, or rather, five seasons ago. The logo is inspired by British sartorial style. The word Row in fact does hark to Saville Row on the one hand and on the other it means rank. The brand is intended for a selected and refined rank of people, obviously not regal in the strict sense of the word. It is a collection intended to dress a man throughout his day and week, and we suggest different selections: bespoke, black tie, business and performance. You come from an international background. How does this translate into Royal Row style? Certainly, my collaborations with English designers have defined my vision of style, my way of constructing a piece and a collection. The experience which most cleared my mind as to what I wanted to propose was working with Alexander McQueen. Who is the Royal Row man? I would define him as forever thirty. The sector of thirty-year-old professionals is the most suitable but naturally it can go further, up to sixty. The important thing is to continue to have a thirty-year-old’s attention to style. Let’s talk about distribution. The collection is well distributed in Asia; above all in China, in Japan – our main markets – and in South Korea. Followed closely by Northern Europe and Italy. Tell us about the Spring Summer 2018 collection, present at Pitti Immagine Uomo. The new collection is called African Memories. We imagined an urban man who has travelled to Africa. We used a warm and

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Q.&A.

AUGUST 2017

FASHION DESIGN

JONATHAN ANDERSON

CULTURAL INSTIGATOR BY FRANCESCA MANUZZI

Portrait of Jonathan Anderson (photo Scott Trindle)

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is fashion is intimate but shouts out and has made clamorous reviews across the world. Jonathan Anderson, from Northern Ireland, is at the head of JW Anderson and Loewe, the Spanish brand belonging to LVMH, a crowd agitator a cultural instigator, who manages to photograph the moments in history, lived by society. He is a hot name, so hot that Pitti Immagine Uomo chose him as special guest for the 92nd edition. His collections which are social snapshots as fast as Instagram’s 3.0 are considered so that, first of all he himself, is not bored, as he tells us in this interview. What does being a hot ticket mean? Can you feel it? I don’t shy away from it (laughs). It will probably be because I give 100% to everything I do. Tell us about the Florence show. JW Anderson menswear is celebrating 10 years. We presented a new direction for the brand, an easy canvas with a relaxed attitude. And the location we chose, Villa La Pietra, was absolutely perfect for this, so cinematographic slightly romantic. It is a calm and spell-binding place. It seemed perfect for us to show in Italy, with this collection in particular, which represents a change in atmosphere. It is a great moment for us, we are also collaborating with an artist. What is the moodboard of your life? Lucie Rie, Virginia Woolf, Barbara Hepworth, Anthea Hamilton, Magali Reus, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, the sculptures of Richard Tuttle, John Ward, Harry Napper, Rihanna, A$AP Rocky… (laughs). It is fairly eclectic. What is your creative vision? Fashion is an archetype. When you work, you try to make a silhouette, this is something akin to building a palace because you are creating a new structure and you are using a fabric which is to be cut in a completely mathematical way. What guides me is the idea of seeking something new in terms of proportions and I do it in a very compulsive way. When I fall in love with something it becomes an obsession. My only dependency is to live the sensation of this process.

Backstage runway shows Autumn Winter 2017 (photo Daisy Walker)

And your most revolutionary idea? I don’t want to talk about radical revolutions, about breaking points. We showed lace shirts less than 5 years ago and the reviews were so terrible that I thought the next day: “This isn’t working perhaps I should give up fashion.” It is possible that society wasn’t ready, or that my concept was too hardcore and not sufficiently sophisticated. Or perhaps both. But when I look back, I realize that that show was probably the most meaningful I ever did. It talked about gender confusion, which is now the order of the day, and as a designer, my job is to reflect on what is happening today. What fascinates me most is asking myself how this reflects on the clothes. What does a lace or a silk mean? What represents a man or a woman? And what does the word originality mean? At the precise moment in which your brand is predictable, you have to move at the speed at which the world evolves and today it is very fast. We live in an era of content. We put something on Instagram, it is reposted straight away and is immediately everywhere and the next minute it has disappeared, it’s over. And let’s be honest I don’t see this as a negative thing because it is the same way my brain works. It is not only about preventing the customers from becoming bored, the first person who mustn’t get tired of it is me. Where will you be in 5 years time? I will be amplifying the force of JW Anderson as a cultural agitator.

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Profile

AUGUST 2017

FASHION DESIGN

VIRGIL ABLOH

AESTHETICS AND ITS NEW LANGUAGE BY ALBERTO CORRADO

Visionary sensitivity, marketing contaminated by architecture and a passion for fashion as fil rouge. These are the elements which pervade the work of Virgil Abloh, the multifaceted creative, guest at the latest Pitti Immagine Uomo edition.

Portrait of Virgil Abloh

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Cover of My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy by Kanye West

Off-White collection Conversazioni con Caravaggio

n a present day which changes from one minute to the next, the rules cannot stay immutable. The innovators draw conclusions from the past, throw open their visions of the future and take suggestions from them. Because nothing can be as it was before. Virgil Abloh – the singular figure of communicator, designer, very digital story teller –unites to the fascination of creation, a love for fashion and, in particular, knowing how to mix up the traditional hierarchies between fashion and streetwear. From this union comes a mix of aesthetic sensitivity and marketing, tinged with the schizophrenia of architecture which led him, in 2013, to launch Milan based Off-White™, which has men’s and women’s collections, a line of objects and interior design elements and a series of extraordinary publications. Since its launch, Off-WhiteTM has attracted a phenomenal following. As well as 569.000 followers on Instagram to add to the 600.000 of the founder’s personal profile, it has carved out a moment for itself in Paris Fashion Week’s official calendar. The brand, which was classed as a finalist for the 2015 LVMH prize, today employs fourteen people and can count on an elite distribution network. With the temperament of a poet, he started out with a creative collective reminiscent of Bauhaus, going on to collaborate with numerous artists of the calibre of Nick Knight, Riccardo Tisci, Kim Jones, Takashi Murakami, Olivier Rousteing, Giuseppe Zanotti and George Condo and he has worked with Silvia Venturini at Fendi. “The drive of my life is passion in what I do, shining a light on my courage to face the world”, declares Virgil. “From when I was a boy, I knew what I wanted, this is why I left Illinois to study architecture, always carried forward by an incredible passion and by the hope of becoming someone. After many years, I went back to those places to meet up again with people I care about and my family and I was proud to say that I had become what I had said I would.” In a short space of time he wins Kanye West’s trust, becoming creative director and visual artist, and creates for him five covers for the album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. “Kanye’s music is the idealisation of oneself like the egoistic, emotive gesture of a personality as revolutionary as my own, this is why I thought I would be able to collaborate, to express two parallel versions in the research into this expansion through the union of music and art.” Interpreter of so called design thinking, that is to say of the experimental faculty of choosing and combining aesthetic surroundings, languages and services, he is the author of collections where the key element of every single piece is contained in fabrics and technical details, shiny PVC, thermo-applied reflective materials, zips with a personalized pull-tag recalling the easy puller of wetsuits, deconstructed clothes and off-kilter silhouettes. Tapes and lazer-cuts abound. The recognisability factor is determined by the logo of the brand applied onto various models, often placed very visibly along the length of the sleeve. “When I thought about the Conversazioni con Caravaggio collection, I thought straight away about the contrast between light and dark within Caravaggio’s canvasses and the suggestive counter-positioning of the dark and light of a painting style which makes the implicit and the explicit talk chromatically, and by the fascinating and violent modulation of the shadows and the vital ascensions. These thoughts gave rise to a collection of sweatshirts and T-shirts with prints on the front and diagonal stripes on the back and on the sleeves, with a street feel to them. If I have become what I am (they say an artist), the reason lies in what I think and do.” His debut at Pitti Uomo 92 was much awaited, on the evening of the 16th of June in the splendid architectural frame of Piazza Pitti. “It is with great honour that I presented my work for the first time at Pitti Immagine Uomo,” says Virgil Abloh, “a platform among the most important which has marked the history of fashion over the years.” A once in a lifetime opportunity which didn’t escape him. The perfect example of the interdisciplinary revolution underway in communication and in the fashion markets, which abandons the centric economic version of capitalism which is being re-scaled world-wide, to leave a place for a general concept based on talent and on the free flow of expressions and aspirations.

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Your office in Milan

The ideal place for meetings, press days, sales campaignes and temporary showroom. Within the picturesque location of Milan Fashion Library in Milan in Tortona/Navigli/Darsena area. The location has 6 indipendent spaces in a 1500 mq area available by reservation: Meeting rooms • Kitchen and Living • Cinema • Library with over than 68.000 magazines ARE INCLUDED: secretarial service • postal address • wifi For more info info@milanofashionlibrary.it tel. + 39 02 83311200 www.milanofashionlibrary.it FASHION ILLUSTRATED


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The Topic

AUGUST 2017

FASHION SOCIOLOGY

IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR BY EMANUELE BASSETTI

Family run businesses are still key players in a fashion system which is hungry for coherent, solid companies respectful of their own heritage

The Missoni family: Jennifer, Angela, Ottavio, Margherita Maccapani Missoni Amos, Rosita, Marco, Luca, Teresa Maccapani Missoni, Giacomo and Francesco Maccapani Missoni

I Donatella Versace (photo Rahi Rezvani)

Kean, Jacopo, Veronica e Ippolito Etro

f over the course of the last decades some analysts have called into question the capability of family-controlled companies to survive the complexities of globalisation, examining the fashion system one is forced to think again. Not only are many companies still headed by the founder or by his heirs, they are also able to garner incredible success, but the actual traditional family structure itself has been shown to be an exceptional business instrument, particularly appreciated by both clients and the world of finance. This is shown by brands such as Missoni, Armani, Ermenegildo Zegna, Salvatore Ferragamo, Brunello Cucinelli and Versace, family players of the first order in their sector and capable of exploding any commonly held belief about the matter. What are the strong points which continue to make this type of governance so efficient and profitable? Firstly, the visceral care of the company, a real and integral part of the family which founded it. It is not surprising that the owners are disposed to make important sacrifices to be able to guarantee the best for their ‘child’. This behaviour, although fundamentally guided by personal interests, facilitates far-reaching entrepreneurial decisions. As, for example, does close attention to financial aspects and long term growth, whereas businesses in the orbit of large holdings ever more often aim for short term results (strictly linked to their wages) and push the company to frequent and massive debt. The latter is a choice that is a long way from that held by those who intend to responsibly leave a consolidated and time-coherent business to the family, thanks to a strong link with tradition, employees and the territory of origin. A coherence favoured also by the frequent use of family members as company icons, giving life not only to solid names but also difficult to imitate and perfectly positioned in the minds of consumers. These are important plusses for Made in Italy, considering that in Italian fashion four out of five businesses (with turnover of more than 20 million euro) are under family control and also record more consistent invoiced growth than that due to different governance, with less debt and greater number of hirings (Osservatorio AUB data). Because of this, over the next years it will be fundamental to maintain their competitivity high, pushing aside problems created by generational passage. How to do this? Investing heavily in internal coordination, more difficult to establish the more numerous the family at the head becomes. Respecting tradition, without turning away innovation. Counting on the exuberance of youth, tempered with the respect of the company’s founding values. Lastly giving the heirs the managerial competencies necessary to face a globalized market. These are important challenges for Italian companies such as Rubelli, Etro, Bisazza and Albini Group, whose leadership has passed from generation to generation for a long time and with great success. Confirming that betting on the family is, not only good social practice, but may also constitute an efficient mode of conducting one’s business, preferring long term results, brand coherence and management continuity. Aspects which are appreciated, not only by clients, but also by international investors evermore irritated the continuous and often imprudent managerial changes which globalisation is sadly accustomising us to.

The Cucinelli family: Carolina, Camilla, Federica and Brunello

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Tessuti di Sondrio – A Division of Marzotto Lab S.r.l. +39 0342 533248 - tessutidisondrio.it

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Trend

AUGUST 2017

FASHION E CINEMA

WEARABLE TECHNOLOGIES FOR AN

UNKNOWN FUTURE BY ENRICO MARIA ALBAMONTE

Michael Fassbender in Alien: Covenant (Photo Courtesy of 20th Century Fox)

Ryan Gosling in Blade Runner 2049 (Photo Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)

Scarlett Johansson in Ghost in the Shell (Photo Courtesy of Universal Pictures)

Ryan Reynolds in Life. (Photo Courtesy of Sony Pictures)

T

he age-old question “Where do we come from?”, more practical and scientific than existential, continues to beleaguer us. Science fiction, often with mysterious, macabre or shocking undertones throws up evermore worrying questions which urge answers. Like that to the question: “How will we dress on spaceships or on a mission to Mars?” From cinema to fashion, there has been a succession of recalls and affinities, seeking to propose plausible solutions to digital civilizations and to provide wearable technologies, able to protect us from lunar storms and any other extraterrestrial incidents we could be exposed to. Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence wear very glamourous clothes on the completely forgotten spaceship, almost at the limits of the basic catwalk wardrobe (the costume designer could have been a designer for Calvin Klein), in Passengers, distributed by Warner Bros. Activewear and the planning of future-leaning clothes take ideas from the workshops of the future (following laws of ideas worked on and developed in an updated imagined space age) new experimentation and bizarre clothing based on technologies projected into the future. With monsters and incurable sickness from hyperspace, another film explores the new frontiers of wearable technology and experimentation into shape and fabrics: this is LIFE distributed by Warner Bros. Here, costume design is less fashionable and more pragmatic and the looks are presented in flameproof fabrics, with a plethora of attached machines and lifesaving gadgets. And what about Alien:Covenant, directed by Ridley Scott, the last episode of the most famous science fiction horror ever? At the beginning of 1979, as Lieutenant Ellen Ripley appeared on screen for the first time in the first Alien film, the vest T-shirt for women had a boom moment, indicating how sportswear and the extraterrestrial look are evermore related. Distributed by 20th Century Fox, the sixth episode of the series shows Michael Fassbender as an android wrapped in a sheath which looks like a wetsuit. A sensual sheath, however, almost like a second skin, the one worn by Scarlett Johansson in various scenes from Ghost in The Shell, distributed by Universal Pictures International, where the actress transforms herself into a futuristic manga heroine in 3D. Meanwhile, we await Blade Runner 2049, the epic sequel to the 80’s film, produced here by Ridley Scott, distributed by Warner Bros. and starring an everlasting Harrison Ford and the cool American actor Ryan Gosling. Let’s wait for this new blockbuster to be able to decide which look to choose for a not too distant future.

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AUGUST 2017

WITHUSSHOWROOM

WITH/US. Via Visconti di Modrone 30 - Milano

Worldwide Global / Business Communication / Development Strategies Two independent professionals join forces to offer global strategic advice to brands that have reached the maturity and subsequent necessity to go to the next level. A consultancy based team that has the aim of assisting your brand in its immediate future evolution through a customised 360° project that is specifically created with and for each client. Creation and subsequent implementation.

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Trend

AUGUST 2017

S/S 2018

PRIVATE BANKER BY FRANCESCA MANUZZI LUIGI BIANCHI MANTOVA

SEVENTY

Details DANDYISM

BERWICH THE BRIDGE

FEDON

SIVIGLIA

HEVÒ

RED-SOX APPEAL

LARDINI

PALTÒ

SEALUP

The most requested professional figure in the financial sector. The investment expert gives financial consultancy to high net worth clients. Dressed punctiliously in a tailored suit, he manages wealthy portfolios and, even in the midst of an economic crisis, he is one of the profiles very much in requested by banks, because he is an important driver for bringing new clients to the credit institutions and to growing administrated mass.

STETSON

PAOLONI

TAGLIATORE CLARKS

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AUGUST 2017

S/S 2018

YUCCIE A.K.A. YOUNG URBAN CREATIVES BY FRANCESCA MANUZZI HANRO

Details ARTSY

HAMAKI-HO

CAMPOMAGGI

K-WAY

BRETELLE & BRACES

TATRAS

PT 05 PANTALONI TORINO

ROY ROGER’S

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COLMAR ORIGINALS

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Goodbye Millennials, time to make room for the Yuccie. The young urban creatives are the new tribal generation which has stepped over its hipster cousins. Not happy with a traditional job, on Instagram they prefer accounts sharing pets, food and technology. They are sons and daughters of the hedonistic culture fruit of the recession therefore utilitarian by culture but they don’t bow to artist-like sacrifices because they work hard and assert their ideas.

DORIA 1905

AMERICAN VINTAGE

MOON BOOT ENTRE AMIS FASHION ILLUSTRATED


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AUGUST 2017

RESORT 2018

SPRING TOP 6 BY ANNA PAOLA STRONA

Guccify Yourself

Gucci’s cruise collection takes its inspiration from ancient cultures, from the Greek and Roman up to the Renaissance. A decidedly visionary line sees models decorated with gold laurel leaf coronets, in a kaleidoscopic mix of antiquity and rock ‘n’ roll details. Alessandro Michele, at the helm of the Florentine brand, turns everything on its head again, re-interpreting it in an unusual and contemporary way. It could be called Guccification, a chaotic and creative style, which prefers precious fabrics, like silk and fur, combined with denim, jersey and PVC. Pijamas worn with long jackets, used denim embellished with embroidered florals, right up to slogan prints and logos. Accessories have always had a key role at Gucci, Beatles boots, long boots and slippers trimmed with fur, velvet bags with chains and maxi handbags in crocodile and imposing jewels, even for men.

Graffiti Style

Versus Versace’s style takes inspiration from the street, creating a play on contrasts both for silhouette and fabric and colour combinations. Hip Hop and graffiti culture is seen on logo’ed sweatshirts, in fact Versus features several times on T-shirts and jackets whilst prints display the fluorescent colours of the ‘80’s. Shapes are inspired by activewear and play with the idea of uniform, contrasting with masculine suits and more slim fitting silhouette. The accessories have essential lines in contrast with strong colours, bags and rucksacks, made in technical fabric, are capacious, berets have logos and sneakers and moccasins have contrasting soles.

Silver Age

Paul Surridge has only just arrived at the head of the Roberto Cavalli lines and his main task will be the relaunching of the Just Cavalli brand. This collection takes up the brand’s DNA in a significant way, the baroque details, the animal prints and floral motifs all exalt its glam-rock spirit. Total black is enriched with luminous and metallic details, even for men, whilst fabrics are both enveloping and sinuous. This is a versatile collection, distinguished by its slim silhouette, slim fit trousers and slim waisted jackets, contrasting with soft sportswear cut bomber jackets. Details are incredibly important: embroidery, studs and zips make each piece unique and unusual.

New Basic

For Bottega Veneta, Tomas Maier presents a collection which is distinguished by saturated colours and elaborate details. Proportions are decisive, whilst fabrics, consistencies and colours are combined in a discrete high impact way. Fabrics such as nappa leather and calf suede are declined in neutral tones allied to brights. Materials, which when sewn together create textures which are at once extremely soft and versatile, together with more sumptuous materials such as cashmere. The majority of the collection pieces are made up in cotton drill and poplin, triacetate crêpe and jersey, and have a fluid and airy aspect, thanks to the excellence of the tailored cut. Great research and attention form the basis for accessories, from two-tone document folders to the many toned brick rucksack and super capacious sacks. Footwear is all in white calf and the chosen styles are moccasins and sneakers.

Welcome to The Jungle

Philipp Plein showed at his home, in the hills behind Cannes, at the aptly named La Jungle du Roi. For this resort collection Plein is inspired by the jungle environment, even though the street-style spirit, the brand’s DNA, is always present. This influence has many facets, it can be a romantic or mysterious place, but it is also dangerous at the same time. Cult clothes like hooded sweatshirts and biker jackets are re-imagined, using denim and leather, embellished with designs, embroideries and couture rips. The resort also has a small capsule, designed by the famous street artist Alec Monopoly. Alec X Plein is made up of sweatshirts, jackets and customized tracksuits with prints or handpainting with the artist’s tag.

Seven Nation Army

Innovation and quality are the key words to best describe Tomas Maier’s resort collection. A basic colour palette ranging from neutral tones to blue, also offers a military green. The collection is made up of versatile pieces which constitute the perfect, alwaystravelling, globetrotting wardrobe. Patterns used for jackets, shirts and trousers are an unusual camouflage: a re-worked and stylized pattern which interrupts the monochromatic line up of the looks. It is a carefree way of dressing, made of easily mixed together pieces. The cotton cargo trousers are combined with knitwear, or the leather bomber jacket, whilst outerwear in technical fabrics become transformable thanks to double face workings.

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WHI W O N D E R F U L H O U S E S I TA LY

Wonderful Houses Italy selects and presents to the Italian and international market the most beautiful properties in Italy. Please contact us about the research of your dream homes www.wonder fulhousesitaly.com info@wonder fulhousesitaly.com | T. +39 0283311211

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Discover Italy’s Wonders

Wonderful Houses Italy presents Luxury Rentals and Exlusive Properties for Sale

Brianza

Toscana

Chianti

Lago di Como

Milano

Salento

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Discover Italy through our luxury rentals. We selected the most exclusive estates around Italy for your dream vacation in the privacy of a home. All the luxury and comfort in some of the most extraordinary locations in Italy, enjoy a sunset over Capri, a glass of wine while admiring the beautiful Chianti countryside, or a boat ride on Lake Como that brings you to your villa pied dans l’eau. WHI can also organize your special event in one of our unique properties with a selected staff that can help you make your dream come through, from the Alps to the smallest island of the Mediterranean. www.wonderfulhousesitaly.com info@wonderfulhousesitaly.com | T. +39 0283311211

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Focus

AUGUST 2017

SCOUTING

LABELS TO WATCH BY ANNA PAOLA STRONA

Mr. Blackout

Two companies, founded in Puglia and in Spain, a trip to the most difficult areas of the world and now the launch of a new project in fashion. Mr. Blackout is the brand of T-shirts which bear the names of difficult areas in the world and tell the stories of personal blackouts. Its creator, Nicola Russi, is a 28 year old young entrepreneur who has worked in the retail sector, taking care of marketing and communication for an international leather goods company and then moving back to Foggia, his birthplace, where he started up a company in the olive oil export industry. With this chapter over, he left for Barcelona where he opened a restaurant in the heart of the city. Nicola wanted to tell us about his business experiences: starting from Southern Italy up to the Spanish city, which have seen him as a protagonist in different sectors, because it is these experiences which have brought him to create Mr. Blackout. The line has five styles, all Made in Italy by factories with a strong work ethic, all the while maintaining accessible costs. The prints consist of images and illustrations of skulls, which represent difficult areas of the world such as Nyanga (Cape Town), Kamagasaki (Okasa), Tepito (Mexivco City), Brixton (London) and Forcella (Naples). The skull becomes thereby a representation of difficulty but also the beginning of a rebirth after one’s own blackout.

Bad Deal

Francesca Rainoldi presents Alea

Francesca Rainoldi was born in Rome in 1994. Her training began in London, where she attended a course in illustration, photography and design at The School of Central Saint Martins. At nineteen she decided to return to Rome and begin a course as fashion editor at the Istituto Europeo di Design. Not long afterwards, she founded her brand Francesca Rainoldi, her idea being to give shape to a bag which could change according to the needs of the wearer, this is the concept behind Alea. Francesca, always paying a great deal of attention to detail and to Made in Italy, produces her collection in Florence, choosing fabrics of the highest quality. Her desire is to give form to a genderless and indispensable object in the world of fashion accessories. And so Alea transforms itself from rucksack to shoulder bag. An object which adapts to any moment of the day and which is able to change appearance from sporty to elegant based on the wearer’s outfit. Even the name is a challenge: [à-le-a] is a Latin word which immediately brings the game of dice to mind, a polyhedric object which has many of the characteristics of the bag designed by Francesca Rainoldi, such as its form and the many ways of using it.

An ideal of fashion which comes closer to an artistic movement than it does to a simple fashion brand. Zoow24 and Marina Rubini founded Bad Deal defining it as “an aesthetic incident between metropolitan tunnel and a rose garden”. A line which mixes street art, underground culture and sportswear, to create collections with a metropolitan soul, thanks to prints and chromatic contrasts. Bad Deal took part in the final of the 9th edition of Who is on Next? Uomo 2017, the scouting project organized by Fondazione Pitti Immagine Discovery and promoted in collaboration with Altaroma and L’Uomo Vogue. Bad Deal spring summer 2018 is inspired by a confrontation with the immobility of city monuments and the fleeting train, which passes through without stopping at the platform. The unexpected upturns established rules, giving life to original and hyper-contemporary clothes, with minimalist lines, reworked in a new way using cuts and layers, rips and sutures, classic materials, alongside technical fabrics such as nylon and gabardine, cotton and vinyl or denim and sponge.

AirDP Style

AirDP Style is a concept brand brought about by the four versatile minds of Lele Danzi, Paola Froldi, Antonio Cavazzini and Alessandro Del Piero. Its characteristics are lightness, dynamism, lucidity and imagination. The goal is that of creating a contemporary and highly distinctive total look. Having won over the eyewear market AirDP by AirEyeWear, this year saw the launch of the sneakers collection AirDP by iShu+ and of outerwear and accessories AirDP by Goose Tech. A new business strategy, based on the creation of partnerships with companies which can translate their philosophy into product. AirDP came back to Pitti Uomo this year, with an eyewear collection inspired by a nomadic lifestyle, by the need to feel at home everywhere, and dialogues with the needs of a new generation constantly on the move. A good example of this is the style CAVA by AirEyeWear, cava like the sparkling white Spanish wine, cava (in Italian the word means quarry) like the quarry which generates material. It has the solidity of a geometric design and a visual and material lightness thanks to the use of a special polyetherimide, Ultem. The frames are obtained thanks to injections into a mould and not by cutting a length, which allows for greater reduction in weight and thickness, the highperformance lenses are photochromatic.

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AUGUST 2017

SCOUTING

Overhead

Stefano Minesso grew up in the province of Venice and was interested in the ancient art of hat creation, studying the maufacturing and modelling techniques in artisanal Italian workshops. In 2015 he presented Overhead. The brand thinks about a new generation of headwear, designing a new and continuous evolution of the baseball cap. This is an alternative vision of headwear, one where manufacture and branding are studied and developed with awareness. Overhead puts research and experimentation into materials and advances in confection technology side by side, evolving and changing the intrinsic sportswear image of the baseball cap. Autumn Winter 2017 presents two visor shapes in felt, designed considering new proportions and created in two different silhouettes. The materials selected include boiled wool, stubbly tweed, Prince of Wales check, bouclé fabrics, eco fur and felt of shaved and long hair haired lapin in different shades. The collection is a homage to London in the 90’s, a place of great eclecticism and innovation in arts, music and fashion.

Interview with Andrea Lazzari, creator of Plùs Que Ma Vìe Who is behind the brand Plùs Que Ma Vìe? My name is Andrea Lazzari and I am the creator of the brand Plùs Que Ma Vìe. I am from Padova, I was born in 1991. I consider myself to be an eclectic and creative person, but I am also a little bit of an entrepreneur. I studied at the Istituto Marangoni in Milan and, in 2013, I reached an important stage by winning the award for best fashion designer. From that moment on I understood what my path was going to be. Where does the name PQMV come from and what are the brand’s goals? PQMV comes from 21st century underground culture, with strong influences from the 80’s and the 90’s. The name means, more than my life. The goal of the brand is to create a new tribe of people, a new target, able to renew the classical male stereotype, changing shapes and cut and aspiring to a new elegance, without setting any limits on expression. I want to transmit a message of renewal, without abandoning formal elegance, but mixing up classics and streetwear. Tell us about your creative journey. All of my collections come about from a finished piece, I like studying the silhouette and the fit to then completely rethink them and thus define the collection. I analyse trends of the moment and those from past seasons, then I focus on a macro theme and start sketching. What fabrics do you prefer for your collections and where do you have your line made? Everything is completely Made in Italy, in the Veneto region to be precise. Even the choice of fabrics is in national territory! I always use, cotton, silk and wool and then I like to mix these with technical research fabrics which make the mix without ever seeming heavy.

La Siesta

Everything started on a summer afternoon, with sea breeze on the skin and the sound of waves reaching the ear. The Spanish West Coast, a unique place full of antique culture, where lifestyle and traditions are part of its inhabitants’ DNA. La Siesta was born here, thought up by Jorge Navarro Pertusa, a member of the Gioseppo family which for over 25 years has been dedicated to the footwear industry. For the first time at Pitti Immagine Uomo, the brand will present its second collection. La Siesta’s aim is to maintain the essence of traditional espadrillas, made from natural jute and the best raw materials such as leather, cotton and cool Italian fabrics, adding a vulcanized rubber sole which makes them more hardwearing. The designer Jorge Navarro has this idea of La Siesta, a perfect combination of comfort, style and luxury with a Made in Spain label.

You showed on the runway for the first time at Pitti Uomo, can you summarize the fashion in the spring summer 2018 collection? Downhill Luxury Acid Team, this is the collection’s name, it redefines shapes and volumes stolen from bikers’ sports clothing, adapting it to the trend of the moment in a mix between activewear, with high tech fabrics and more formal clothing.

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Focus

AUGUST 2017

EXHIBITION

THE FLEETING MUSEUM BY FRANCESCA MANUZZI

Coat Comme des Garçons, spring summer 2015, Collection Palais Galliera

Gräs haute couture spring summer 1960. Wedding dress for Dorothy McGowan in: Who are you Polly Maggoo? by William Klein (1966), Collection Palais Galliera

Portrait of Olivier Saillard (photo Akastudio Collective)

I

n the rooms of the Galleria del Costume e della Moda in Palazzo Pitti. Inestimably precious garments, which have made the history of costume or which have never been under the glare of lights and forgotten or reclaimed furniture become the background for the ideal museum, curated by Olivier Saillard, director of the Palais Galliera in Paris. These are the somatic traits of The Ephemeral Museum of Fashion, on show until 22nd October 2017, produced by Fondazione Pitti Immagine Discovery, in collaboration with the Gallerie degli Uffizi and the museum of the Ville Lumière. Clothes never before seen out of the archives and others displayed for the last time, before being returned to the shadow of their boxes, because considered too fragile to live on under the eyes of all, enter into the eighteen rooms of the palazzo. Two hundred items of dresses and accessories, dating from the mid 1800’s until the present day, come to life thanks to the outstanding conservation work, carried out by the restorers of the Galleria del Costume and of Palais Galliera. These garments, created by the most important dressmakers and the most prestigious ateliers in the world: Florence, Rome, Milan, Paris, New York: Sartoria Worth, Mariano Fortuny Venezia, Sartoria Rosa Genoni, Sartoria Emilio Federico Schubert, Roberto Capucci, Sartoria Madeleine Vionnet, Irene Galitzine Roma, Elsa Schiaparelli, Jole Veneziani, Biki, Maison romana d’alta moda Carosa, Nina Ricci, Gianfranco Ferré and Christian Lacroix, are spread throughout the rooms, resting on mannequins in wood and wax, or abandoned onto velvet furniture. A revolutionary editing and a never before seen selection, as Saillard himself tells us: “It is with the joy of discovery, with the curiosity of giving life back to a garment, with the will to reveal others, that we have made this selection. We had the idea of creating the Ephemeral Museum of Fashion as a sort of challenge. A new display solution, more poetic than what we would usually be able to do, and that I could do through my job in Paris, also due to the size of the surroundings and the possibility of using the palace’s furnishings. We brought together chairs, mannequins and frames, which in their historical, stylistic, temporal and functional diversity, are able to fill the space, creating dialogues between themselves and, above all, with the garments and accessories on display. It is therefore no longer just a garment hanging up or inside a glass case, rather it is in a continuous spatial relationship with this, with objects which we could define backstage. And in this relationship the leading actor is the visitor”.

Maison Martin Margiela, haute couture collection Artisanal autumn winter 2005 (photo Katerina Jebb)

The Ephemeral Museum of Fashion, mood inspiration

The Ephemeral Museum of Fashion

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FASHION ILLUSTRATED


The Look

Michael Fassbender in Song To Song (Photo Courtesy of Lucky Red)

FA SHI ON

ACC ESS ORI ES

Different Class

Fancy Patterns

Style between vintage and contemporary, between sportswear and luxury, in a unique location setting, Raw in Milan.

Prints inspired by nature, present in the most sophisticated English tapestries, make the background for accessories with romantic or extremely contemporary patterns.

PAGE

36

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different CLASS STYLE_ GIULIANO

DEIDDA MEDRI MODEL_ PATRICK CARROLL @ I LOVE GROOMING_ DANIELA GALEAZZI @ FACE TO FACE AGENCY PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT_ FRANCESCO GIUNTA LOCATION_ RAW, C.SO MAGENTA 10, MILANO PHOTOGRAPHY_ CESARE

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NYLON JACKET WITH GOOSE FEATHER PADDING, TATRAS KNITTED WOOL V-NECK WITH EMBROIDERY, ANTONIO MARRAS PRINTED POPLIN SHIRT, DOLCE&GABBANA PRINTED DENIM PANTS, MOSCHINO VELVET TRAINERS, STEVE’S


WOOL BOMBER JACKET, HEVÒ KNITTED WOOL CREW-NECK, MSGM WOOL TROUSERS, BERWICH STUDDED CALFSKIN SHOES, N°21 COTTON SOCKS, BORGHI UOMO


TWO-BUTTON SINGLE-BREASTED SUIT WITH FLAT-FRONT TROUSERS AND COTTON PIQUET POLO SHIRT, ALL BY

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STUDDED MINK AND SOFT LEATHER JACKET, VLADIMIRO DENIM SHIRT, LEE KNITTED CASHMERE TURTLENECK, ETRO CORDUROY FLAT-FRONT PANTS, ENTRE AMIS

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PRINTED SILK BOW TIE, KINLOCH SANDERSON WALLPAPER, B&B

DISTRIBUZIONE


PRINTED LEATHER IPAD MINI HOLDER, LOUIS VUITTON MORRIS V COLLECTION WALLPAPER, MORRIS & CO


PRINTED BACKPACK WITH LEATHER DETAILS, PAUL SMITH ART OF THE GARDEN COLLECTION WALLPAPER, SANDERSON


COTTON AND LEATHER BASEBALL HAT, VALENTINO GARAVANI GREENWOOD COLLECTION WALLPAPER, THIBAUT


PRINTED SILK TIE, BIGI TOILE COLLECTION WALLPAPER, SANDERSON


LUREX AND LEATHER TRAINERS, GUCCI ARCHIVE WALLPAPER III COLLECTION WALLPAPER, MORRIS & CO

ALL THE WALLPAPERS PICTURED ARE DISTRIBUTED BY B&B DISTRIBUZIONE S.R.L.


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Highlights 2

AUGUST 2017

LIFESTYLE

NET FOR MAUNA KEA

Volcanic eruptions and palm fronds paint the return of Net, with a special partnership with Mauna Kea at Pitti Immagine Uomo 92, after its debut in January. The brand is among the leading names in bicycle saddle production, with three beehive layers (cap, padding and cover in thermoplastic material), which thanks to E.V.A. in the padding allows for a better cushioning, whereas the layers of net guarantee incomparable comfort as well as maximum breathability. The saddles, which are 100% recyclable, become interchangeable and customizable collectors’ items. A fetish object for men and women, with street or heritage inspirations, or exotic or precious like gold. The collaboration with Mauna Kea, which takes its name from the famous Hawaiian volcano, gives life to saddles bearing the brand’s graphics.

YSL

Yves Saint Laurent has two museums, one in Paris and the other in Marrakech, with a coordinated image studied expressly by the Wolkoff & Arnodin agency. “Yves Saint Laurent and I discovered Marrakech in 1966 and we never abandoned it again, to the extent that we bought a house to be able to go back whenever we wanted to,” explained Pierre Bergé, president of the Foundation and longtime companion to the designer. “This city had an enormous influence on his work and in particular for the discovery of colour. It doesn’t need pointing out that Paris is where it all began.” The two spaces dedicated to 40 years of Yves Saint Laurent’s creativity will open on the 3rd of October in the City of Light and in the 19th in Morocco revealing the iconic designer, who passed away in 2002, and the history of the name which today belongs to the Kering group. The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech, designed by Studio Ko, will be a cultural centre, and will be sited in rue Yves Saint Laurent, a few steps from the Jardin Majorelle, and will take up four thousand square metres. The Parisian museum on the other hand, measuring four hundred and fifty square metres, will be at number 5 avenue Marceau, headquarters for the maison for over thirty years and which, since then, has housed the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent.

TENAX

The name Tenax is in everyone’s head. The first extra strong hold styling gel in fashion in the 80’s for the slicked back styling of the 20’s or of punk. In 1982 Diana Est, an Italian new wave singer with a comet-like career recorded her 45rpm with the same name and not long afterwards the Tenax in Florence opened its doors, one of the clubs which were a symbol of tech-house music in Italy. Today, those five letters return to their legal owner with a new line of products from Ludovico Martelli. The pack is retro, reminding one of past luxury and the range covers hair pomade, brillantine, gel and mint shampoo.

FASHION ILLUSTRATED

RAW

The English term raw encapsulates the quintessence of the concept of two Milanese cabinets de curiosités. A passion for interior design, combined with research into the atmosphere of times gone by, is the recipe proposed in the windows of Raw. The two boutiques, although different in display, have in common a declared taste for objects and expressive atmospheres. The first, in via Palermo 1, is the window for Raw in Brera district, a cosy and scenographic place, where there are contaminations with design. New for 2017 is the opening of the new store in corso Magenta 10, which recapitulates and relaunches, not only an important episode of research and a precise taste, but also consolidates the Raw format to interpret a real lifestyle. It is a wunderkammer, where the display changes cyclically. This gathering of objects from France, Belgium, Holland and England, intentionally not restored and combined with a selection of items of contemporary manufacture, gives life to a voyage between sensations, atmosphere and history. This could all seem like idiosyncratic bric-à-brac, but the form is typically that of an inventory of the world which takes possession of rarities and lines them up on its shelves, seeming to suggest taxonomy. The recipe foresees the combination of highly selected and researched brands, leaning towards the production of refined French style ceramics, unusual trays and paperweights in decoupage, sophisticated perfume sprays for the house up to a rich selection of finishes for interiors: wallpapers and colours for murals, lighting and kitchen furniture, cements and resins, paddings and textiles. The proposal is completed with a corner dedicated to flowers, present in every space in the shop. The goal remains that of never losing sight of the true nature of the Raw philosophy, that is to say glancing at the past not in a melancholy way, but in a new way in which an old square of parquet becomes the top for a coffee table, the pillar head for a staircase or the base of a lamp. Unusual interior displays where vintage is placed in a provocative way and is reinterpreted in contemporary key and embodies an identity made of subtleties and suggestions.


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Highlights 2

AUGUST 2017

LIFESTYLE

INTERVIEW WITH JONNY PIERCE

Interview with Daniele Parlanti

BY GIULIANO DEIDDA

BY DANIELA CURSI It takes around six months to prepare a riding boot for sale. Although the label Parlanti can vaunt 30 years of experience, the process remains the same as ever, from design to production of the prototype, from testing to modifications. That which remains unaltered - and is unalterable- is the passion for raw materials and the perfectionist mentality of those who take care of each phase of production. An approach which begins with a dialogue with the rider and materializes in an unstoppable creativity. Daniele Parlanti talks about this in this interview. When did this passion start? It is not possible to date it. I was just a small boy, when I spent afternoons after school in the factory with my father who at the time produced couture and fashion shoes. I accompanied him to tanning factories in Tuscany, in Santa Croce on the Arno river. I was a nightmare for the tanners because I loved the smell of the leathers and I touched everything. And today I am their nightmare as an adult and businessman. I open all the new batches, I check them, I study them. Nothing escapes me. Then 30 years ago the Parlanti label was founded. It is my mother Aurelia’s surname. And it is the inheritance from my father who has always made his work constant research into the best leathers. Because leather is not all the same.

The release of Abysmal Thoughts, the fourth album from the New York band The Drums is a chance to ask the frontman of the group some questions.

Talking of leathers. Have you used many different types? Calfskin first and foremost, but also shark, crocodile, ray, eel, ostrich, lizard, bison and various snakes. Let’s talk about your one-of-a-kind formula. I perfected it 15 years ago. Starting with the choice of raw materials – because it is not true that a calfskin is always the same, it depends on the climate conditions the animal has lived in and its nutrition – I chose the highest quality both for the outside and for the lining and I worked with the chemists at the tanning factories to ensure softness and strength. When you produce a riding boot you have to take into consideration the context in which it will be used, sweat from the horse, sand, rain and so on. For this reason, I have studied a production method which for over 15 years has ensured long lasting comfort. Our sport has changed in appearance and we must be ready to stand alongside. You only have to think that once there were 15 competitions a year and now there are 5 a week. A rider who competes on 5 or 6 horses every weekend must wear comfortable and practical boots. The boots must not be a weight or represent a problem, on the contrary they must ease our athletes’ task.

Beginning in 2005, when Elkland, your earlier band, debuted with the single Apart. At the time, I asked myself how such youngsters could get such an incredible 80’s sound. Tell us about this. It was a long time ago. We were just kids who wanted to make it in the musical scene then. Since I was a boy, when I lived with my parents in the country, I composed music in my room, using an analogic synthesizer, from my dad’s collection. To re-work them I used a really simple software. I was just experimenting. At the time, I realized I was gay and I felt alone so I spent the nights online in chat to meet other people like me. One night, one of these people asked me to play the music I had composed and was really enthusiastic. He was a manager and wanted to meet me in New York. The result was that, six months later, I had a band and a recording contract. If I played you the original recordings of Elkland songs you wouldn’t recognise them, they were much rougher and in fact, analogical. What can I say? Certain atmospheres from the 80’s fascinated me. I love Altered Images, Morrissey, Kate Bush and the Sugarcubes with Björk, for example.

You said that not all leathers are the same, but they depend on the calf’s quality of life. Can you give an example to clearly illustrate this? A calf which comes from Pakistan or Bangladesh or North Africa, lives in dry conditions where there is a shortage of water, it does not graze much and is exposed to flies which leave holes in the skin, these translate into imperfections which must be covered up with chemicals and special workings. This does not happen in Belgium, Holland or France where the grazing is plentiful as is water. Of course, the latter cost more but the quality is high.

Lets come bak to the present. Abysmal Thoughts has the freshness and energy of a debut album. What has changed compared with the preceding album? I am trying to be completely myself. I don’t want to be influenced by the outside anymore, so I don’t listen to other people’s music and that is a sacrifice. It is the first time that I have been solo, so I have complete control, right up to the artwork on the cover. It is nice to hear that it could be a debut album because I was breathing total creative freedom.

How does the process work? Once the design is ready with many memos, I deliver it to the pattern maker to work on the style and then on the prototype. Then, if the first version convinces me, this is followed by three or four months of tests. I consign the new boots to a trusted horse rider who tries them out. Then I personally go to check how the boots react to the job and to gather the rider’s precious testimony. Once everything is put together and the suitable modifications have been made, they become new styles for sale.

The album has explicit sexual references. How important is it to face these arguments today? When we started, things were different. Only bands like Le Tigre and Hercules and Love Affair were trasparent about homosexuality. Apart from that, I didn’t feel safe in facing up to the argument. I remember avoiding answering direct questions several times during interviews. It’s different now. I consider it to be fundamental to be open and give messages. Composing each one of the album’s songs was like therapy for me. I learned so much about myself. It is an introspective album one where I ask myself questions. I think it is fundamental for an artist to be honest and give himself completely. The fact that we have today a president like Donald Trump makes all of this even more important. I feel as though I am an activist and I have the duty to connect with others. If we were all open and honest and if we all listened to one another I am convinced that the world would evolve.

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62

Destination

AUGUST 2017

TIME OUT

Liguria An Unforgettable Day

A special day, a fascinating and unique itinerary. By boat from Portofino or from Santa Margherita Ligure, destination: le Cinque Terre (The Five Lands). Riva Aquarama Special

Matteo Vernazza, owner of Motor Marine Tigullio & Ma.Mi. in Santa Margherita Ligure, illustrates one of the longpreferred itineraries by sea, a memorable experience, and one which is difficult to forget by those who enjoy it. Excursions by sea (and by land), in close contact with astonishing nature. “Leaving from Santa Margherita Ligure or from Portofino, hugging the coast and passing Zoagli, we arrive at Sestri Levante and Moneglia. Then on to Punta Mesco, where you can dive in the enchanting area of the Rocce Rosse (Red Rocks). Continuing through the Cinque Terre National Park, we come to Vernazza. A stop for lunch, perhaps at the Ristorante Belforte, and then a stroll in the lanes… Or a trip to see the Vigne Eroiche (The Heroic Vineyards), which got this name because they were created from steep terraces above a sheer drop to the sea. The French newspaper Le Figaro declared that these vineyards are amongst five of the most beautiful in the world. Starting off again by sea and if there is time continuing on to Portovenere, close to La Spezia. Portovenere is renowned for its beauty. The area has been included in the listing of World Heritage Sites. The church of San Pietro, which can be seen from the sea, is virtually a fortified castle and was erected around the year 1100. Extremely well-preserved, it is open for guided tours. Also, right in front of Portovenere is the island of Palmaria, where it is possible to have lunch after a rejuvenating swim (as an alternative to lunch in Vernazza). Our advice is to stop and eat at Locanda Lorena which has a garden and terrace before sailing back.” How long is it from Portofino to Vernazza? About an hour and a half. What type of boats are available? Of the boats available, I would suggest the motorboat Asterie 315, 10 metres long and full optional. It makes for a comfortable trip for 9 people plus the skipper. As an alternative, the Riva Aquarama Special, absolutely unique. It is suitable for 4 or 5 people plus the skipper. A vintage and elegant experience. Who makes up the majority of your clients, foreigners or Italians? Foreigners make up around 80% of our customers. Particularly Americans and Australians who are absolutely crazy about Portofino and the Cinque Terre. Credit is due to the group of the Cinque Terre, by exhibiting at tourism trade shows they have done a great job in promoting the area. Booking: Motor Marine & Ma.Mi. associate Santa Margherita Ligure (Ge) • Office SML : +39-0185-288408 • www.motormarine.com

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Destination 63

AUGUST 2017

TIME OUT

Zoagli

Ristorante Belforte Via G. Guidoni, 42 19018 Vernazza (SP) +39 0187812222 www.ristorantebelforte.it

Vernazza

Isola Palmaria

Moneglia

Locanda Lorena, Via Cavour, 4, 19025 Portovenere (SP), +39 0187792370 www.locandalorena.com Portovenere

Chiesa di San Pietro, Portovenere

Portofino

Asterie 315 Avatar

FASHION ILLUSTRATED


64

Fashion who Reads

AUGUST 2017

SPECIAL GUEST

IT IS NOT ONLY A

QUESTION OF FASHION BY JONNY PIERCE

T

Artwork by Nicola Gobbetto

he relationship between fashion and music has always been one of reciprocal influence and I believe it is still so today. When we started as The Drums in 2010, our style was somewhere between college and vintage preppy, we wore Teddy jackets. After a while, that style came more and more back into fashion, in part even thanks to our success. Maybe it is true that fashion today has more power than the past, but at the end of the day I don’t think it is so important. What interests me personally, is offering my world to my audience, that includes, as well as my music, also my way of dancing, my videos, my aesthetics and my look. I have always loved artists who involve you in this way, like Kate Bush for example, a performer capable of giving the whole deal in an excellent way. However, I don’t think that I am influenceable, as regards fashion, it is more important for me to find myself, even aesthetically. I follow what I know and what interests me. For example, I am very attracted to a certain type of sportswear, starting with motorbike trousers. And when I talk about a deep attraction, this includes the fetish and sexual aspects. In short, I am excited by sports clothing and athletic wear and I don’t see anything strange about that. Sexuality is important to me. I do have a piece in a completely different genre that I am very fond of, however. It is a Saint Laurent jacket in micro sequins made for me by Hedi Slimane for The Drums’ latest tour. I have only ever worn it on the stage because I am afraid of ruining it. Hedi Slimane was a great help at the beginning of our career. I remember our first meeting. We were doing a little soundcheck in Los Angeles and he came to take photos of us whilst we tried out. Then he came back for the show. Those images made us immediately known to the world of fashion and starting from there, made us popular. Hedi is a special person and we are still very good friends.

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