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CONTENTS WorkingHorseMagazine.com | Fall 2019

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12 The Working Lines

Okie Leo and Third Amigo | Part II

18 Monty Bruce A three day clinic

22 Forco

Foundation for the Total Health of your Horse the

On the cover

28 Mares with More

Honey Thelah Okie Leo

brought to you by

Spurr’s Big Fix

and her influence on

photo by Oregon photographer Lindsey Wyllie

38 Spurr’s Big Fix

the Products you have been waiting for

LindseyWyllie.com

42 Hot Products

Read Spurr’s Big Fix story page 38

CUTTING EDGE PRODUCTS

43 Real Estate Corral FIND YOUR NEXT HORSE PROPERTY

Staff

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Mike Gerbaz | Managing Partner & Sales mikegerbaz@gmail.com | 970.948.5523 Jane Klingson | Sales janeklingson@yahoo.com | 515.571.2832

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Carolyn Olson | Sales olsonquarterhorses@yahoo.com | 503.397.1217

..................................................................................................................................................................................................... Competitor News | Production | Graphic Art | Webmaster competitornews@yahoo.com | 541.938.0608 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Working Horse Magazine has been serving the performance horse industry since 1997. Main Office | 355 Watson Divide Road, Snowmass, CO 81654. For questions regarding subscriptions and distribution call 970.948.5523. The views and/or opinions in articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect those of Working Horse Magazine and are the responsibility of the author or advertiser.

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The Working Lines | Okie Leo and Third Amigo | Part II

T

By Larry Thornton ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ he influence of Okie Leo on the life of Dick and Helen Robey was apparent when we reviewed this great stallion and his role in the development of their career in the horse business in the last “Working Lines.” We also saw how Okie Leo was an influence on Orren Mixer and his family as an exceptional show horse with young Jon Mixer in the saddle. The impact Okie Leo had on Orren Mixer is even more significant when you remember all the great horses this famous artist came in contact with, and how he would tell you Okie Leo was his favorite. So this time we will see the role of Okie Leo in the life of M. O. “Bud” Breeding and then take a look at the Okie Leo sire record. M. O. “Bud” Breeding was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in 2002. His credential for induction into the Hall of Fame came through the show and breeding segments of the industry. He served on the AQHA Show and Contest Committee for 20 years. During that time he revised the AQHA Champion rule in 1968 and he drafted the format for the AQHA World Show that premiered in 1974. He wrote the constitution and bylaws for the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association and the Oklahoma Amateur Quarter Horse Association. While he was doing that, he bred and/or owned 100 AQHA point earners and seven AQHA Champions. The interesting part of the story is how Bud Breeding got into the horses and his road to the AQHA Hall of Fame. I interviewed Bud in 2008 and here is what he had to say, “To the best of my recollection it was 1961 and my first wife and I at that time lived in a nice two-bedroom house out in Northwest Oklahoma City. With a backyard about the size of a two car garage.” “Well I came home one day from work and she said, ‘I bet you can’t guess what I did today.” Bud replied, “No I’m sure I can’t. What did you do today?” “She said, ‘I bought three horses today.’ You what? ‘Yes, I bought three horses.’ I said, Where are they, out in the backyard and that was a joke as the backyard wasn’t big enough to have three bodies back there much less three horses.” He then explained, “She had taken the dog to the vet that morning and Lee Holden who was one of the veterinarians had gotten into a discussion with her or talking to her and said something about the fact that he had three horses he wanted to sell.” He continued, “I don’t know what the conversation was because I wasn’t there. But that lead to her asking how much and he told her, and she told him alright I’ll buy them.” Then she told Bud, “My only problem is I don’t have a place to keep them. Well here is what we have: three horses, a mare with her weanling and yearling filly and no place to keep them.” He told her, “Since they were both sired by the same horse, I suspect that the fella that has that stallion would be agreeable to board them. And that turned out to be Dick Robey, the owner of Okie Leo.” “So she took a trip out to Open R Ranch on Waterloo Road and that was back when it was a two-lane dirt road. Dick and Helen were agreeable to having the horses out there at their place and that is how it all got started.”

10 Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall

“That was Britton Flicker” continued Bud about what they got in the deal, “The yearling filly was Okie Leo Star and the weanling filly was Okie Leo Sue.” This is how the three amigos Bud Breeding, Dick Roby and Orren Mixer would become lifelong friends and Okie Leo was their common bond. Bud related the following story about his friendship with Orren Mixer, “An interesting sideline to that story is that Britton Flicker had one little wisp of white on her forehead and one little bit of white on her left rear coronary band. Okie Leo Star had no white on her except a star on her forehead. Hence the name. The weanling filly had zero no white hair on her whole body. Both sired by Okie Leo. After a little time goes by, I tell my mother, whose name was Tilly, I am going to breed that filly back to Okie Leo and if she has a third filly in a row, I am going to name it after you.” “Well mother knew the markings on the mare and the two fillies, and she said no you may not. The only way you can name a filly after me is if it has a blaze and four white stockings. I said ok if that is the way you want it that is the way it will be. So we bred her to Okie, and she produced a filly with a blaze and four white stockings. It was amazing. We named that filly Okie Tilleo.” He then added, “My good friend Orren Mixer knew the story behind my conversation with my mother and painted a head portrait of Okie Tilleo in his usual grandiose fashion and gave to me as a gift. It is one of my treasured possessions and it hangs in my office today.” He continued, “I was a city boy and I think I knew which end to feed but I’m not too sure about that. I grew up riding a stick horse around the yard playing cowboy and Indian and Sharon teases me as she had a horse background and she rode horses while playing cowboy and Indian. I got involved with Dick and Helen in their operation helping them in making some of their improvements.” “I have always been a person who feels one must give back something as you can’t be just a taker you have to give something back. That necessitated my involvement with the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Exhibitor’s Association and that is now the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association. My involvement with them goes back to 60’s.” He talked about one of the horses he owned, “I bought Harlan from Bob Roby, Dick’s brother. I had him about 3 years and then sold him to the Harlan Syndicate of Bob Robey, Huddy Hudspeth, Carl Mills and Jim Nance.” Harlan is now in the AQHA Hall of Fame. One of the performers bred by Bud was Red Okie Bars. This gelding earned 108 AQHA points in the youth and open. He earned points in western pleasure, reining, trail, hunt seat, western riding, pole bending and working cow horse. He was sired by Robin III and out of Okie Jody by Okie Leo and her dam was Harla Bradley by Harlan. The next step in our story brings a fourth person into the mix. Bud explained, “Bob Loomis made a pass through Oklahoma one year and Bob always thought highly of Okie Leo as he was a noted reining horse in his own right. He saw Britton Princess and want-


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ....... ed her, and I sold her to him for $300.00. He took her and ended up placing second in the NRHA Reining Futurity.” The success of Okie Leo as a sire was noticeable from the beginning, but it is Bob Loomis that gave this beginning a shot in the arm. Loomis was a young trainer just starting out and living in Lincoln, Nebraska. He would find his way to Oklahoma and the breeding programs of Dick Robey and Bud Breeding. He would ride three Okie Leo foals that would make their mark in the reining arena and help establish him as a reining horse trainer. The first was Okie’s Bamboo. This mare was described by Loomis in his book, REINING, THE ART OF PERFORMANCE IN HORSES as “the first outstanding horse he showed.” He credits Bobby Bassinger with training the horse. She was purchased by a friend of Loomis’ and he then showed her as a three and four-year-old. Okie’s Bamboo would earn an AQHA ROM in both the youth and open divisions. She was a winner of the 14 to 18 Youth Reining at the All American Quarter Horse Congress. Loomis described what he found in Okie’s Bamboo, “Everything was effortless for her. She was trained in a little, soft cotton rope hackamore that was nothing more than a rag. She was so soft in the nose a regular hackamore was too rough and abrasive to her.” Loomis pointed out that “many of the things she did and the things I felt in her were things I strived for in the horses I rode after her.” Okie’s Bamboo was out of the mare Cando’s Lady. This mare was sired by Can Do by Rondo Oklahoma by Walt’s Red Buck. The dam of Cando’s Lady was Sweetheart, a mare that has no known pedigree. Keep this pedigree in mind as we continue our look at Okie Leo and a mare named Honey Thelah in our Mares with More for this issue. The success of Okie’s Bamboo for Loomis sent him to Oklahoma and some more Okie Leo foals. The next Champion in Loomis’ life was Monika. This mare was described by Loomis in his book as “the first great horse I trained myself.” He described this mare as “a goosy, flighty mare.” He told that it took a lot of trail riding to put this mare’s mind in order to make her a reining horse. Monika would go into the 1968 NRHA Futurity and come out with a top ten finish. She was also a winner at all the major stock shows, and she won the Nebraska Futurity. When Bob turned her over to Joyce Loomis Kernek, she went into barrels and poles to earn AQHA points. Joyce would use Monika as her rodeo mount as well. She earned 57 AQHA performance points in reining, poles and barrels. She made the AQHA top ten in the 1970 High Point Reining race. She earned her ROM in reining in 1970. Monika was out of Ready Monika. This mare was sired by Ready Money W. Miss Carver was the dam of Ready Monika. Her sire was Ready Money W. This makes Ready Monika 1 X 2 inbred to Ready Money W. Ready Money W was sired by Red Star Joe by Little Jodie. Little Jodie was out of Dixie Beach the dam of Harlan. The dam of Ready Money W was Money by Bert P-227. Bert P-227 was out of Lady Coolidge. Lady Coolidge was a full sister to Dixie Beach, the dam of Little Jodie and Harlan. It has to be noted here that Ready Money W was sired by Red Star Joe, who was out of Lady Starlette by Oklahoma Star P-6. Because of the double breeding to Ready Money W, this gives Ready Monika a 4 X 4 breeding pattern to Oklahoma Star P-6. The next outstanding reiner for Loomis was Britton Princess. Loomis described her as a prettier mare than Monika but that she was also “lazy.” He rode this mare to the NRHA Futurity Co-Reserve Championship in 1972. Loomis later teamed his Okie Leo daughters and they made a great team with Monika, the senior horse and Britton Princess the junior horse. They count among their wins a dual championships at

This picture shows the power of Okie Leo as a performer! Photo Courtesy Helen Robey

Bud’s treasured picture of Okie Tilleo by his friend Orren Mixer Photo Courtesy Bud and Sharon Breeding

Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall 11


The Working Lines continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... the 1973 Houston Livestock Show with Britton Princess winning the junior reining and Monika winning the senior reining. This was a time when you could find as many as 60 horses in a reining class at these major stock shows. Loomis sold Britton Princess to Bobby Soucie and she went on to be the Nebraska High Point All Around Youth Champion in the state for four years. She earned points in such events as reining, pole bending, barrels and trail earning 32 open performance points and 43 youth performance points. She went to the AQHA Youth World Show in 1974 in Barrel racing finishing sixth and the AQHA Open World Show in 1974 in reining finishing third. Britton Princess was out of Britton Flicker, the mare that got Bud Breeding into the Quarter Horses. Britton Flicker was sired by Prince Hank by Hank H by King P-234. This would give Britton Princess a breeding pattern of 3 X 4 to King P-234. Britton Star was the dam of Britton Flicker. Britton Star was sired by Oklahoma Chicaro by Chicaro Bill. The dam of Oklahoma Chicaro was Star Bird by Oklahoma Star P-6. Star Bird was the second dam of War Leo and Rondo Leo. War Leo was the great son of Leo’s Question that sired such noted horses as War Bond Leo. Rondo Leo was a full brother to War Leo. Rondo Leo was most noted as the sire of Mr Gun Smoke. The dam of Britton Star was Star Rollins by Red Star by Oklahoma Star P-6. This makes Britton Star 3 X 3 linebred to Oklahoma Star P-6. The Okie Leo/Britton Flicker cross would produce nine AQHA point earners. This includes Okie Leo Star, the yearling filly that Bud originally bought to get into the quarter horse business. She earned nine halter and two performance points. Okie Tilleo the filly named after Bud’s mother earned 23 halter points and 2.5 performance points. The Loomis breeding program would utilize daughters of Okie Leo including Miss Okie Leokie. This mare was the dam of seven performers with six point earners with five of these point earner sired by Loomis’ great stallion Topsail Cody. These performers included Miss Leokie Sails with 104 AQHA performance point with a Superior in amateur reining. When Okie Leo died in 1979, he had sired 531 foals with 189 performers with 167 point earners that earned 4,565.5 points. Okie Leo sired 91% point earners from performers in the open; 88% point earners from performers in the amateur and 89% point earners from performers in the youth. They earned 78 Register of Merit Awards, 4 AQHA Championships, 11 Superior Awards, 1 Versatility Award, 9 World Championships, 3 Reserve World Championships and 2 High Point Awards. The last foals sired by Okie Leo came in 1979 just five years after the first AQHA World Show in 1974. He was well represented in the late 1970’s and the 1980’s with his five world and reserve world champions earning fourteen World and Reserve World titles and two Superhorse Awards. Okie Leo sired 43 Top Ten finishers in the Open World Show and 7 in the Amateur World Show and 11 in the Youth World Show. Let’s take a closer look at a few of these great performers. Kim’s Pica Pride was a chestnut stallion and a two time AQHA World Champion as the 1984 AQHA World Champion Senior Working Cow Horse and the 1977 AQHA World Champion Junior Calf Roping Horse. He has also placed five more times in

12 Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall

the top ten at the AQHA World Show. He was top ten in Senior Reining in 1984; Senior Reining in 1981; Senior Working Cow Horse in 1981; Junior Calf Reining in 1977 and Junior Heeling in 1977. He was the AQHA High Point Stallion in 1981 in working cow horse. He was an AQHA Top Ten finisher in the High Point Award for 1984 in working cow horse and 1981 in working cow horse. He was Superior in reining with an ROM in the open. He earned 94 AQHA points in cutting, calf roping, reining, working cow horse, heeling and western riding. Kim’s Pica Pride is a full brother to Kim’s Okie Leo. Kim’s Okie Leo is the sire of Okies Leo Rose, the 1992 AQHA Reserve World Champion Senior Reining Horse. The dam of Kim’s Pica Pride and Kim’s Okie Leo was Kim’s Pica. This mare was sired by Kim by Sonny Kimble. Sonny Kimble was sired by Zantanon and out of Queen by Valentino. Queen in turn was out of Jabalina, the dam of King P-234. This would make Sonny Kimble, a 3/4 brother to King P-234, the broodmare sire of Okie Leo giving the pedigree a collateral linebreeding pattern. The Okie Leo Super Horses were the full brothers Leonard Milligan and Smoke Um Okie. Leonard Milligan was the 1980 AQHA World Show Super Horse. He earned the 1980 AQHA World Championship in Senior Heeling; a 1980 AQHA World Championship in Calf Roping; a third in the 1980 Senior Heeling; a fourth in the Senior Working Cow Horse on his way to earning the Super Horse Award. He was also the 1980 AQHA High Point Calf Roping Stallion. He earned 124 AQHA performance points and two halter points. Leonard Milligan earned the 1978 AQHA World Championship in Working Cow Horse. This title went along with his top ten finishes in the 1979 World Show in Senior Working Cow Horse and Senior Reining. Leonard Milligan was an all-around performer that sired versatility in his foals. He is the sire of Movin Milligan, a 1982 bay gelding that has earned $48,765 in the NCHA with a Certificate of Ability and an ROM with 16 AQHA cutting points; Snipleo was the 1999 AQHA Youth World Champion on Tie-Down Roping earning 27 AQHA performance points; Leos Sen Bar was the 2001 AQHA/PRCA Horse of the Year in Tie-Down Roping with a performance ROM with 30 points and Misterios Milligan an AQHA World Show qualifier in team Penning with 90.5 points and his ROM and Whiskey Gold Star a two time PHBA World Champion with 90 PHBA performance points. Leonard Milligan is the broodmare sire of Lectric Playboy, the 1997 NCHA Open World Champion Cutting Stallion. This great grandson of Okie Leo won $142,263 and was a multiple aged event finalist and champion. He counts among his aged event titles the 1996 PCCHA Derby 5 & 6 Year Old Open. The dam of Lectric Playboy was Lectro Milligan, winner of $36,474 as a finalist in events like the 1987 Gold And Silver 4 Year Old Open and the 1987 Bonanza Cutting 4 Year Old Open. Smoke Um Okie was a bay gelding that won his first World title in 1985 as the World Champion Senior Reining Horse. He came back in 1986 to be the Reserve World Champion Working Cow Horse; the World Champion Senior Calf Roping Horse; Reserve World Champion Senior Heading Horse and World Champion Senior Heeling Horse to take the Super Horse title.


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... This great gelding has 7 more World Championship top ten finishes in the Open World and the Amateur World from 1983 to 1985. Smoke Um Okie earned 100 AQHA Heeling points; 67 heading points, 48 reining points, 27 calf roping points, 10 working cow horse points and 4 western riding points. The dam of these two Okie Leo show horses was the mare Farafield Star. This mare was sired by Star Money by Oklahoma Star Jr. by Oklahoma Star P-6. The dam of Star Money was Money. You will recall that Money was the dam of Ready Money W, the sire and maternal grandsire of Ready Monika, the dam of Monika. As we stated earlier, Money was sired by Bert P-227. She was out of Sue. Sue was a daughter of Cotton Eyed Joe by Little Joe, the sire of Zantanon, the sire of King P-234. The dam of Farafield Star was Saleeta Ward by Star McCue. Star McCue was sired by Starway by Oklahoma Star P-6. This makes Farafield Star 3 X 4 linebred to Oklahoma Star P-6. This tells us that Leonard Milligan, Smoke Um Okie, Britton Princess and Monika all carry a similar breeding pattern. It is a pattern of Leo and King P-234 crossed on a double bred Oklahoma Star P-6 mare. Okie Leo sired nine AQHA Superior Award winners and one versatility award winner. Up Front Okie was Superior Working Cow Horse and the AQHA Versatility Award winner. He earned 191 AQHA performance points in events like reining, working cow horse, cutting, trail, western riding, heeling and barrel racing. He was Superior in working cow horse that was awarded the AQHA Versatility Award in 1992. He was the 1983 AQHA Reserve World Champion Working Cow Horse. The other AQHA Superior Award winners include Bobbie Oakie Superior in Cutting; Okies Stardust Superior Barrel Racing; Okie Leo Rose Superior in Tie-Down Roping; Billy Bob Baby Superior in Youth Barrel Racing; Haskell Okie Superior in Barrel Racing; Okie’s Teddy Bear Superior in Tie-Down Roping; Kim’s Pica Pride Superior in Reining and Smoke Um Okie Superior in Heading and Heeling. Okie Leo had one High Point winner with two titles, but he also sired the winners of seven AQHA High Point stallion and gelding title winners. Okie Flyer the 1970 and 1974 AQHA Youth High Point Barrel Racing Horse. This gelding won a total of 438.5 AQHA performance points. He earned his open AQHA Championship and was Superior in Youth Barrel Racing. He was shown in Youth by five different youth exhibitors. He earned points in reining, barrel racing, pole bending, showmanship and stake racing. The other High Point winners in the stallion and gelding divisions include Okleo Skeet the 1973 AQHA High Point Pole Bending Stallion; Okie’s Teddy Bear the 1974 AQHA High Point Junior Tie-Down Roping Horses; the 1974 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Stallion and the 1976 AQHA High Point Roping Stallion; Leonard Milligan the 1980 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Stallion and Up Front Okie the 1982 AQHA High Point Working Cow Horse Gelding and the 1984 AQHA High Point Working Cow Horse Gelding. The Okie Leo daughters have produced 368 performers with 242 point earners that have earned 5,200.5 points earning 114 Register of Merit Awards, 4 AQHA Championships, 19 Superior Awards, 3 World Championships, 5 Reserve World Championships and 1 High Point Award winner. A statistic we will add to the Okie Leo maternal grandsire record is AQHA World Show earnings and the AQHA Alliance Partnership earnings. Okie Leo has maternal grandsire earnings in the AQHA World Show of $19,344.13, National Cutting Horse Association of $752,906.33, National Reining Horse Association of $202,049.54, National Snaffle Bit Association $127.50 and the National Reined Cow Horse Association $58,635 for total earnings of $1,033,821.

Bud and Dick building fence on the Open R Ranch!!! Photo Courtesy Helen Robey

Britton Flicker the mare that got Bud Breeding into the Quarter Horse business.

Photo Courtesy Bud and Sharon Breeding

Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall 13


The Working Lines continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... The Okie Leo maternal champions and reserve champions include the following: Dog Patch Doc, the 1986 AQHA World Champion Senor Reining Horse, 1984 NRHA Open Futurity Co-Reserve Champion; No Fat Chics, the 2003 NRCHA World Champion Limited Open Bridle Horse, the 2002 AQHA Reserve World Champion Senior Working Cow Horse; Okies Hotrod Girl, the 2005 Youth World Champion Pole Bending Horse; Earlina Dry, the 1982 NCHA Non-Pro Derby Champion; Red Okie Bars the 1975 AQHA Youth World Champion Reining Horse; Jarvice Redwin, the 1983 AQHA Reserve World Champion Junior Reining Horse Sporty Saint, the 1976 AQHA Reserve World Champion Western Riding Horse; Legislator, the 1987 AQHA Reserve World Champion Senior Working Cow Horse and Olenas Oakie Gal, the 1989 AQHA Amateur Reserve World Champion Heading Horse. Okie Leo was the maternal grandsire of horses that earned 19 AQHA Superior Awards. They include Tugboat Cody, in reining; Zancaster, in tie-down roping and heading; Winokie Win in steer roping, Okies Jac Pine in reining; Miss Leokie Sail in amateur reining; No Fat Chics in reining; Miss Okie Chen Step in halter; Red Oakie Bars in youth western horsemanship and western pleasure; Howie Oakie Leo in barrel racing; Teddy Bear Rose in tie-down roping; SR Leo Quixote in team penning; Pretty Springtime in hunter under saddle; Wranglers Okie Leo in amateur reining; Merry Martini in halter; Passim In Lace youth

showmanship and Topsail Jim in amateur reining. Okie Leo was a commercial stallion and not a part of a major breeding program that used linebreeding to take advantage of his ability as a sire. Okie Dokie Dunnit is a mare that is influenced by linebreeding to Okie Leo. She earned $22,262.72 as the1997 NRHA Limited Non-Pro Derby Reserve Champion 1998 NRHA Limited Non-Pro Intermediate Reserve Champion. Her produce record shows that she is the dam of eight NRHA money earners with earnings of $179,400.75 for average earnings of $22,425.09. Her foals include AR Oakies Last Stand winner of $62,694 as the 2013 NRHA Non-Pro Derby Reserve Champion; Dun It By Starlight winner of $33,068 as the 2005 NRHA Non-Pro Derby Co-Reserve Champion; Mega Jax, winner of $39,464.94 finalist in the 2004 NRHA Non-Pro Futurity (4th) and Okie Lil Dokie, winner of $32,140.15 as a 2000 NRHA Non-Pro Futurity Finalist and a 2001 NRHA Non-Pro Derby Finalist. Okie Dokie Dunnit has an interesting relationship to Okie Leo. Her broodmare sire is Diamond B Okie by Okie Leo. Her dam is Lancet Pawnee by Lancet by Okie Leo. This means that Okie Leo appears in her sire’s pedigree as the grandsire and he appears in third generation as the maternal great grandsire. This tells us that she has a 2 X 3 breeding pattern and is linebred to Okie Leo. .........................................................................................................

Continued on page 51 JOE REED II

JOE RE

ch 1936

ch 1921

LEO

QUARTER HORSE

NELLE

sor 14.2 1940

#0000985

sor 1931

QUARTER HORSE

LITTLE FANNY

JOE RE

#0001335

b 1937

ch 1921

OKIE LEO

QUARTER HORSE

FANNY

sor 1956

#0001572

b 1914

QUARTER HORSE

KING

ZANTA

#0062301

b 14.3 1932

ch 1917

SORREL SUE

QUARTER HORSE

JABAL

sor 1944

#0000234

br 1920

QUARTER HORSE

TOMMY KING MARE

#0003932

BRITTON PRINCESS

QUARTER HORSE

sor 1969

U0080824

QUARTER HORSE

HANK H

KING

#0655847

ch 1942

b 14.3 1932

PRINCE HANK

QUARTER HORSE

QUEEN

sor 1951

#0002154

ch 1936

QUARTER HORSE

PRINCESS ANN BRADLEY

DISTUR

#0035725

sor 1939

ch 1926

BRITTON FLICKER

QUARTER HORSE

MARE

sor 1957

#0031231

QUARTER HORSE

OKLAHOMA CHICARO

CHICA

AQHA# 0085681

sor 1943

b 1930

14 Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall

BRITTON STAR

QUARTER HORSE

STAR B

sor 1951

#0035708

b 1935

QUARTER HORSE

STAR ROLLINS

RED ST

#0067821

sor 1946

sor 1945

QUARTER HORSE

ALLRE

#0016574


.......................................................................................................................................................................................................

EY

O

Okie Leo not only had the power but the disposition to go with it. He is often portrayed in pictures without a bridle and as this picture shows with a visitor to the ranch. Photo Courtesy Helen Robey

Leonard Milligan one of two AQHA Super Horses sired by Okie Leo!

Photo Courtesy Author’s Files

The pedigree of Britton Princess shows the linebreeding to King P-234 as well as the nick between Leo and Oklahoma Star P-6. JOE REED ch 1921

NELLENE sor 1931

JOE REED ch 1921

FANNY ASHWELL b 1914

ZANTANON ch 1917

JABALINA br 1920

KING b 14.3 1932

QUEEN H ch 1936

DISTURB ch 1926

MARE BY GREYWAGGONER CHICARO BILL b 1930

STAR BIRD b 1935

RED STAR* sor 1945

ALLRED MARE

JOE BLAIR DELLA MOORE FLEETING TIME LITTLE RED NELL JOE BLAIR DELLA MOORE ASHWELL FANNIE RICHARDSON LITTLE JOE JEANETTE 2 STRAIT HORSE BAY MARE

b 1911

ZANTANON JABALINA DAN 1 NAIL QUARTER MARE UPSET THOUGHTLESS BEAUTY GREY WAGGONER

ch 1917

CHICARO VERNA GRACE OKLAHOMA STAR MOORES FLEET NOWATA STAR OKLAHOMA STAR MARE

b 16.3 1923

1915 ch 1923 sor b 1911 1915 b 1907 sor 1910 br 1905

dun b

br 1920 sor 1920

ch 1917 ch 1918 gr 1940

b 1926 b 14.2 1915 gr 1931 br 1940

Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall 15


16 Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall


Friday | 650 weanlings that are mostly colored & performance bred. Largest colt sale in the World! .................................................................... 2006 daughter of Peeka Pep-Peptoboonsmal x a Docs Hickory daughter. Cutting earnings over $12,000. .................................................................... 16 yr stallion who is a son of Smart Chic Olena x a Haidas Little Pep daughter. .................................................................... In foal to Double Loaded Gun, Earned over $74,000 and a son of Gunner. •14 yr palomino mare by son of Hollywood Dun It out of Doc O Lena. •8 yr palomino mare by son of Wimpys Little Step out of Boomernic bred mare. •14 yr palomino mare | daughter of Mr Boomerjac out of daughter of Topsail Cody. •8 yr sorrel mare by Shini Like Hail out of daughter of Hollywood Dun It.

In foal to Little Smart Spook, a dark palomino son of Smart Spook out of Hollywood Dunit mare. •15 yr sorrel mare out of Haidas Little Pep & Smart Little Lena. •12 yr old bay mare out of Reminic & Major Tylor Moore. •3 yr old mare out of Docs Hickory & Colonel Freckles. •11 yr old mare out of Dual Pep who is out of daughter of Peppy San Badger. •3 yr old red roan mare out of Peptoboonsmal & Freckles Playboy. .................................................................... 5 mares | High Rolling Roanie, Drift Chip and War Concho bred | bred to blue roan stud of Cibecut Ike, out of a Rolling Roany, Joe Country bred mare. Stud also sells. .................................................................... Several partial dispersions of mares. Large selection of broke geldings. Lots of high bred mares and broke saddle horses. Large selection of yearlings and 2 yr old studs, mostly colored. + Several listings of broke ponies.

Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall 17


Three Days with Monty Bruce

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By Debra Martin ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..... hen it comes to horses and increasing your performance skills, sometimes swimming in the deep end of the pool is just what you and your horse might need. I had the opportunity to participate in the Monty Bruce Performance Horse - Extreme Cow Horse Camp (MBECC) and came away feeling like I was just exposed to a whole new planet.

This camp is limited to 12 riders who have had some experience in the show pen in cow horse, reining, cattle work or versatility events and as such, each person attending had skills and challenges to work on over the course of three long days. How long were the days you ask? Most everyone was up by 6:30AM getting ready for the day and most riders were doing their final unsaddling for the day after 10:00PM. The calm, kind and yet energized intensity with which all participants studied each aspect of the instruction for every rider was like a gel that held everyone together. No one wanted to miss a single word that Mr. Bruce offered each person to correct an issue, or offer an idea for improvement. I’ve had experiences at other clinics where there always seems to be “that” person who seems to dominate the attention of the clinician and then they just disappear as all the other riders are working on their challenges. There was NONE of that. Every single person was trying to learn and absorb and ponder each thing Mr. Bruce was offering to each rider. Even those of us who didn’t have a horse that spins very well, we could see Monty working with a rider, who in my eyes, was already spinning at lightning speed. Yet he was able to see the horse had his head tipped with the wrong ear pointing skyward. When I heard this I thought to myself “what in the heck is he talking about the ear for?” I could see that the horse was looking in the direction of the spin which is what we want. I didn’t realize until Monty stepped off his horse, took the horse’s head in his hands and gently showed the rider (and all of us) that the horse pivots his head in a twist that puts the wrong ear up. Monty then tipped the horse’s head the correct direction so the correct ear was a little higher than the other. It was like a light-bulb moment for all of us. Monty had the rider use two hands to ask the horse to correct which ear was pointing up as the spin happened, and in just a little while the horse held the correct tip and what was already a fast spin became a blur. Someone asked me what my expectation was before I attended the MBECC. I said that I wanted to improve my ability to read and handle cattle. Those of us in the mid-west, where there is limited access to doing real “ranch work,” struggle. The access to fresh cattle is very expensive and without a safe facility and the people on the ground to manage them, it is very challenging to find quality cattle time. Some of us that have tried cow-horse classes often only have access to cattle when we are in the pen with a judge scoring us on the ride. It is true; there is a lot of dry work a person can do to improve the ability of how your horse moves and the controls you have, but nothing really gets you and your horse ready like working live cattle. At the MBECC, being able to spend three full days under expert instruction, with specialized assistants working behind the scenes to handle the cattle, and

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....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ... with excellent riders and horses who all had something to work on, was a rare treat. Did I improve my ability to read and handle cattle? Yes, but there was so much more that I learned. Monty focused the learning on what it should feel like if we were working in front of a judge. The “final exams” happened daily in the cutting pen, in the reining patterns and cattle work in boxing, fencing and circling. All of us were able to listen to the feedback from a judge’s perspective and were required to score a ride. This all took place while Monty offered training ideas of what to improve upon for next time for each participant. This was a deep dive and intense learning experience in a very supportive and friendly atmosphere. I also could write an entire book on the amazing gourmet dining that was supplied for three full days by Mrs. Amanda Bruce. Each meal, made from scratch, with careful planning and seasoning of yummy cast-iron cooked vegetables, melt-in-yourmouth meats, salads, breads, pies, short-cake, egg-bakes, cinnamon rolls and muffins and the to-die-for fish tacos, with about 20 toppings all made

from scratch. Even with saddle time 10+ hours a day which worked up a heck of an appetite, it was a struggle to convince my tummy to fit into my skinny jeans on the last day of the clinic! I traveled home with a tired horse, my body sore, my head full of thoughts and ideas for improvement, and most important, the confidence to feel like I too might someday be able to ride like some of the other people who became my friends at the clinic. I don’t really want to share this information with the world at large because I don’t want the MBECC to become so popular that I can’t get a spot in it next time. Biography information: Monty Bruce is a Western Performance Horse trainer and clinician that specializes in the Reined Cow Horse. Monty is a multi-time Futurity and Derby champion with winnings in excess of $300,000 in Reined Cow Horse, Reining, Ranch Riding and Cutting. Monty, his assistants, and students have won several World and Reserve titles and numerous Top Ten finishes. Monty is also a certified National Reined Cow Horse Association 2A judge. Monty’s knowledge, clear explanation of training, and positive and patient approach to teaching has made him a popular clinician nationally and internationally. Monty’s desire is that his clients and students not only accomplish their goals, but that they maintain a long lasting relationship with their horse.

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By Marcia Akes | Forco.com

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WHY FORCO FEED SUPPLEMENT? he digestive system is at the heart of most major problems in a horse such as colic, diarrhea, compaction, founder, poor doers, poor appetite and weight loss. FORCO Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier is a source of nutrients. This source feeds and nurtures the entire scope of bacterial and microbial populations in the full spectrum of the digestive system. The FORCO formula helps to bring a horse’s digestive system to full performance. Hay, grain, vitamins, and mineral supplements can now be broken down into a form that can be absorbed into the blood stream of the horse, thus, providing maximum nutrition to every microscopic cell in the horse. FORCO formula assists in producing maximum digestion for maximum nutrition! FORCO PRODUCTS FORCO Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier For Horses Two important aspects of total health care for horses. •Feeding the horse a complete and balanced ration including proper amounts of hay, grain, water, vitamins and minerals. •Providing a proper and adequate source of nutrients which will feed, nurture and assist in maintaining normal and proper levels of beneficial digestive bacteria for a fully efficient operating digestive system. This is where FORCO assists you in the overall health of your horse! FORCO Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier is a product that addresses the problem of providing proper bacterial populations and fermentation in the horse’s digestive tract. FORCO uses highly effective yeast cultures and digestive enzymes in making FORCO Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier. FORCO uses a formula that began in research over 25 years ago. This formula combines different cultures and enzymes causing a synergistic effect which makes the fermentative quality greater than if each ingredient is used individually. FORCO Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier is a one-of-akind-product. It is one of the few pure and all-natural products on the market. It is dependable, stable, and safe. It does not contain live microbial or live-cell yeast, due to their perishability and inconsistent performance. It has no carriers or fillers and there are no supplemental vitamins, minerals or proteins. The FORCO formula contains only pure fermentation products de-

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signed to promote normal microorganism and bacteria population in the digestive tract of the horse. Most horse owners are very concerned with what and how they feed their horses, but this is only one side of the equation. To maintain optimum health and nutrition in the horse, the horseman not only has to feed balanced rations but also must maintain a balanced micro flora in the digestive tract. What is a balanced micro flora? It is a bacterial population in the horse’s gastro-intestinal (GI) tract, which is not over inhabited by pathogenic bacteria (organisms having a detrimental effect on the animal). There are many different species of bacteria that normally occupy the GI tract of the healthy horse. Only a few of these are dominant and the rest are present in small numbers; the dominant species are the beneficial bacteria. A number of factors can cause an imbalance between the beneficial bacteria and pathogenic bacteria. These factors are stress, ingestion of toxins, abrupt feed changes, feeding of antibiotics, etc. The beneficial bacteria are suppressed and the pathogens take over. This over-population by the pathogens causes inflammation and erosion of the gut wall allowing the bacteria to enter the horse’s circulatory system. Microbiologists also believe that the killing off of certain bacteria within the gut that normally stimulate animal resistance and immunity to disease can decrease the horse’s resistance to chronic infection. Also, there is a direct relationship between stress and digestive upsets. In other words, stress can kill bacteria; decreased bacterial populations can lead to digestive upset Happy FORCO Customers We continue to receive feedback describing just how important, beneficial and result-driven our feed products are with equine and bull digestive situations. Our products do make a difference in the health of your horses, bulls and even smaller animals! “My name is Renee Rowles, and my horse Dudes a Royal Star is an extremely hard keeper. I have had a super hard time putting weight on him and keeping it on. I have tried and endless amount of supplements and feeds to build him up and nothing really made me satisfied.


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I was introduced to Forco and wasn’t going to be impressed until I saw the results. After 3 weeks on Forco I saw a huge difference already! My horse Dude had filled out in the places I was aiming for and started to pack on more muscle. He has now been on Forco for a few months now and I’m still extremely pleased with the results that I have been searching for for so long, and it’s super easy to feed! Thanks Forco!” - Renee Rowles

FORCO is a family business owned by David & Lynette Frank. FORCO initially started in the hay business making a product that would help prevent mold and heating in higher moisture baled hay. Interestingly the name FORCO is derived from the initial hay product of forage (FOR) conditioner (CO). The hay product was a bit different than what the FORCO® Feed Supplement Digestive Fortifier is today though the concept is the same to improve feed.

“On behalf of the Colorado Horse Rescue, I would like to At the same time David and Lynette were producing the express our sincere gratitude to David Frank, President of Forco FORCO hay product LLC, for introducing us to Forco Feed Supplement. Some of they owned and operatthe horses we receive are perfectly healthy, a large portion are ed a racehorse training severely debilitated upon arrival. stable for ThoroughWe conducted a study tracing weights of 5 different horses on bred and Quarter Horse a weekly basis for two racehorses. In 1984 months. All the horses they started researching had gained weight and and studying the use of had improved body the ingredients in the conditions. Using this hay product for use in fabulous product has a digestive supplement allowed us to mainfor horses. tain optimum health An in-house product was later develand nutrition for all oped from this research and used on the of our horses. Results horses in the training center. The changes AFTER can be noticed almost and results in the racehorses were remarkimmediately. Our able! In 1986 FORCO Feed Supplement 10 yr old pregnant mare | 1 month exactly on FORCO! horses gain weight was introduced into the horse market. quickly and develop shiny healthy coats. “Our FORCO products are often the product of last resort. During our first year with Forco we have only had one in- Usually they have tried everything else and all of a sudden their stance of colic. This is an incredible statistic, considering we horse gets better after using FORCO. A lot of horse owners don’t have an average of forty horses on our farm, some with extreme understand that nutrition comes in two parts. The first part is medical conditions. Our sincere gratitude goes out to Forco and what you feed in the trough. The second part is all about gut Forco Feed Supplement.” health. We stay away from using vitamins, minerals, or amino -Rachel Tanguy, Executive Director of Colorado Horse acids. We suggest everyone keep feeding their horse their norRescue mal rations, but add in FORCO. It doesn’t throw anything out of Feed Supplement Family balance and almost always leads to a healthier horse. You feed FORCO LLC is located on the eastern plains of Colorado near your horse. We’ll feed his digestive system.” – Dave, Founder the town of Flagler where it first got its start 37 years ago in 1982.

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Mares With More | Honey Thelah and her influence on Okie Leo

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By Larry Thornton ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... hen we study a pedigree, we often find individuals that you wouldn’t expect to become the foundation of a family of horses, but they do. This is especially true of mares in the tail female line or that bottom line in the bracket pedigree. This is that bottom line that starts with a horse’s dam and then through her dam and so on down the line. This is the line that takes us to the taproot mare or the foundation mare in that tail female line. Many of these taproot mares come from humble beginnings and Honey Thelah is one of those mares. She becomes a Mare with More as a taproot mare contributing to the success of Okie Leo. We have been taking a close look at how Dick Robey bought Okie Leo setting this stallion up as the foundation of their Open R Ranch. We saw with the help of Don Wilcox how they made Okie Leo a legend in the arena. He became an AQHA Champion; Superior Reining Horse and a Register of Merit performer. He earned 20 halter points; 16 cutting points; 57 reining points and 15.5 western pleasure point for a total of 108.5 points. He was an NCHA Certificate of Ability winner with over $1,000 in earnings. Okie Leo won a Superior in reining by winning 50 of the 55 AQHA reining classes he entered. Then Okie Leo put Dick Robey on the road to success as a breeder as well as a horse trainer. It was those first foals by Okie

Leo that got it started and we saw how one of them was Bumble Bee Leo. Let’s let Robey revisit how Bumble Bee Leo got it started, “As soon as the first two-year-olds came out, we took this rascal Bumble Bee Leo to the shows. I literally saddled this horse only 14 times before we went to Tulsa and the old fair grounds and I sure enough eat those reining horses up. I didn’t have any idea of what I was doing. But people thought I was a sure enough horse trainer. Because every year we’d come a sailin’ with a new set of Okie Leo foals.” Bumble Bee Leo would go onto earn 46.5 performance points with points in cutting (36), reining (6), western pleasure (3), trail (1) and western riding (.5) to earn a performance ROM. He was an NCHA Certificate of Ability winner in cutting earning $7,612.36. He earned six AQHA halter points with two Grand Championships. Bumble Bee Leo is the sire of Becky Bee Leo the third dam of the $11 million reining horse sire Wimpys Little Step. Now Bumble Bee Leo introduces us to another side of this story. The dam of Bumble Bee Leo was Baby Sandy Ann. This mare was sired by Prince Hank and out of Honey Thelah. Honey Thelah came into the picture when Dick and Helen Robey got married. Helen explains, “My dad bought her as a two year old for me and I broke her. I really didn’t know anything about

The Oh Cay branch of the Honey Thelah mare line as been quite successful through her daughter Oh Cay Shorty.

OKIE LEO sor 1956 QUARTER HORSE #0062301

OH CAY sor 1974 QUARTER HORSE AQHA# 1068822

PRINCESS CAY sor 1958 QUARTER HORSE AQHA# 0116925

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LEO sor 14.2 1940 QUARTER HORSE #0001335

SORREL SUE sor 1944 QUARTER HORSE #0003932

PRINCE HANK sor 1951 QUARTER HORSE #0035725

HONEY THELAH buck 1950 QUARTER HORSE #0144459

JOE REED II ch 1936 QUARTER HORSE #0000985 LITTLE FANNY b 1937 QUARTER HORSE #0001572 KING b 14.3 1932 QUARTER HORSE #0000234 TOMMY KING MARE QUARTER HORSE U0080824 HANK H ch 1942 QUARTER HORSE #0002154 PRINCESS ANN BRADLEY sor 1939 QUARTER HORSE #0031231 CAN DO b 1941 QUARTER HORSE #0001302 BRADLEYS BLONDIE pal 1944 QUARTER HORSE U0148301

JOE R ch 1921 NELLE sor 193 JOE R ch 1921 FANNY b 1914 ZANTA ch 1917 JABAL br 1920

KING b 14.3 1 QUEEN ch 1936 DISTU ch 1926 MARE

ROND pal 193 STAR b 1935


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horses. She was a pretty good endurance horse. I must have ridden her 20 miles on the weekend here and there.” Helen continued, “She was a buckskin mare. She was by Cando, a Rondo Oklahoma horse. Cando was right here at Edmund. I think he produced some pretty good horses.” “When Dick and I got married we used Honey Thelah to ride and then we sold her to Clyde and Thelah Reeves. We registered her at that time. She was named after Thelah Reeves. She had to pass inspection before they would give her a number. She was appendix registered.” The Reeves made Honey Thelah a broodmare. She produced six foals. The first five foals were listed as bred by Jerry Reeves, the son of Clyde and Thelah Reeves. The five foals were Baby Sandy Ann, (1957); Princess Cay, (1958); Suzanna Lee, (1959); Three Stockings, (1962) and Sissy Walker (1963). Baby Sandy Ann, Princess Cay and Suzanna Lee were sired by Prince Hank. Three Stockings was sired by Harlan while Sissy Walker was sired by Okie Leo. Suzanna Lee was the dam of one ROM performer in Okie Leo Hank with 17 performance points. Bumble Bee Leo out of Baby Sandy Ann had two full sisters that were point earners. Okie’s Sandy Ann was a performance point earner and Graceful Okie earned three AQHA performance points. The last foal out of Honey Thelah was Okie Can Do. This buckskin gelding was sired by Okie Leo. He was foaled in 1964 and he earned one AQHA performance point. He is listed as bred by Mrs. Paul R. Nagle. Mrs. Nagle would become the owner Honey Thelah and several of her daughters including Princess Cay. Helen continued her story, “Mrs. Nagle had a day care center in Oklahoma City. She bought Honey Thaleh and I went to teach riding on her at the day care camp. I think she kept her until she was 32 before she died.” Helen continued, “Honey Thelah was the only one she had at her place. We kept the daughters here. We had several owners that we kept mares for. The Huggins’ mares were another line of horses that we kept here. This is the line of mares that Leonard Milligan the AQHA World Show Super Horse came from. We kept the mares and paid all the expenses and then we sold the colts.”

b 1911 1915 ch 1923 sor b 1911 1915 b 1907 sor 1910 br 1905

JOE REED ch 1921 NELLENE sor 1931 JOE REED ch 1921 FANNY ASHWELL b 1914 ZANTANON ch 1917 JABALINA br 1920

JOE BLAIR DELLA MOORE FLEETING TIME LITTLE RED NELL JOE BLAIR DELLA MOORE ASHWELL FANNIE RICHARDSON LITTLE JOE JEANETTE 2 STRAIT HORSE BAY MARE

KING b 14.3 1932 QUEEN H ch 1936 DISTURB ch 1926 MARE BY GREYWAGGONER

ZANTANON JABALINA DAN 1 NAIL QUARTER MARE UPSET THOUGHTLESS BEAUTY GREY WAGGONER

RONDO OKLAHOMA pal 1938 STAR b 1935

WALTS LITTLE BUCK LADY 13 HIGHWAYMAN YELLOW WOLF MARE

dun b

ch 1917 br 1920 sor 1920 ch 1917 ch 1918 gr 1940 pal 1935 sor 1934 br 1923

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Mares With More continued ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... The pedigree of Honey Thelah begins with her sire Can Do. Can Do was an “A” rated runner on the track. This was equivalent to a 75 speed index today. This was probably the second fastest track rating a horse could get at this time. He had only one official start giving him his ROM. He finished third in this race. Wilbur Stuchal was the last owner of Can Do. Stuchal knew a good race horse as he trained the legendary Jet Deck to his World Championship in 1963. The sire record for Can Do shows 14 racing ROM with one stakes winner and one stakes placed runner. His runners earned $49,420. The stakes horses were Kanzo, winner of the 1951 Nebraska Futurity and the 1952 Nebraska Derby and Little Do was the stakes placed runner in the 1954 Nebraska Futurity with a third. The arena performers by Can Do earned 18 AQHA halter and performance point with two ROM. The ROM are Miss Candy and Joker Do. The maternal grandsire record for Can Do shows that daughters produced 34 racing ROM with six stakes horses. They earned $140,207 on the track. His stakes horses include Race Bar, winner of the 1964 Nebraska Futurity; Miss Lady Bar, winner of the 1961 Nebraska Futurity and the 1962 Nebraska Derby; Hoddy Do, winner of the 1956 Nebraska Futurity and Leo Do, winner of the 1954 Nebraska QHA Championship. The daughters of Can Do produced six arena ROM with one Superior performer. The Superior performer was Holdup Arky with 105 AQHA points and a Superior in Western Pleasure. Cando was also the sire of Cando’s Lady and this mare shows her ability to cross with Okie Leo. She was the dam of Okie’s Bamboo by Okie Leo the first Okie Leo foal Bob Loomis showed. This horse earned an open ROM and a youth ROM earning 79 AQHA halter and performance points. Can Do was a son of Rondo Oklahoma. Rondo Oklahoma was sired by Walt’s Little Buck. Walt’s Little Buck was sired by Bud Bennett Horse, a son of Yellow Jacket. My AQHA Stud Book says that Walt’s Little Buck was sired by a horse named Planter. When you look at the pedigree of Walt’s Little Buck under his registration number #21016, he is sired by Bud Bennett. Rondo Oklahoma was out of a mare named Lady by Doby. The dam of Cando is a mare named Star. Star was a daughter of the Highwayman, a thoroughbred. Her dam was a daughter of Yellow Wolf. The dam of Honey Thelah is a mare we call Bradley’s Blonde. The pedigree of this mare is unknown. The blood of Rondo Oklahoma appears in some pretty famous quarter horses. He is the sire of Little Rondo A. Little Rondo A is the sire of Martin’s Sun Tan. Martin’s Sun Tan is the dam of Pat’s Dusty Star. Pat’s Dusty Star is the dam of the AQHA World Champion Two Year Old Halter Stallion Skipa Star. Rondo Oklahoma sired the mare Do Way. Do Way is the dam of Poco Coed. Poco Coed was an AQHA Champion and Superior Halter mare and daughter of Poco Pine. Poco Coed was the dam of Vickie Lee Pine, the first AQHA World Show Super Horse and Poco Coeds Te N Te, the great halter mare with 257 points and a Superior in halter. Poco Coeds Te N Te is the dam of the noted halter sire Temon.

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We Wonder was a daughter of Rondo Oklahoma. She was out of Princess Ann Bradley. We Wonder was the dam of Bradley’s Hank an AA rated race horse. He earned his AQHA Championship with 25 halter points and 10.5 performance points in reining and western pleasure. Bradley’s Hank was a son of Harlan by Hank H. Bradley’s Hank was the sire of Brad Len, a Champion Quarter Running Gelding. Rey Hank 74 was a son of Bradley’s Hank. Rey Hank 74 in turn is the sire of Shesa Brick House. This horse has 606.5 AQHA performance points. Prince Hank came to be a part of our story through Dick and his brother Bob and their association with William “Bill” Bradley. Bob explained, “Bill Bradley was a real good friend of ours. Kind of like a second dad to me and Dick. He had this old mare, Princess Ann Bradley. She was by Disturb, a thoroughbred and we really didn’t know her dam. An old racehorse man that owned thoroughbred horses left Princess Ann Bradley at the mule barns in Oklahoma City. Before World War II there was a big mule market and in fact the barns are still there. I don’t know if Dick worked there or not but I worked there before I went into the Army. Well Bill Bradley bought Princess Ann Bradley for her board bill.” Bob continued, “Then when she got three registered colts, I believe Van Gundy from Colorado inspected her and she got her number. She was just an old thoroughbred looking mare, but she was one of those mares that had good colts.” Bob told how Hank H became involved in the story, “I was high on Hank H and we talked Bill into taking Princess Ann Bradley down there to be bred to Hank H. That is where we got Prince Hank. Bill tried to register him as Robert H and Prince Hank was second choice and they named him Prince Hank.” Hank H was sired by King P-234 and out of Queen H by Dan. “Bill and another fella ran old Robert. He was a big horse, but he was a real good-looking horse. He could sure run. I don’t think they ever made a recognized start on him. They just match raced him.” One story tells that Prince Hank (Robert H) was raced against a motorcycle. Both Bob and Dick know the story but neither saw the race itself. The AQHA shows that Prince Hank (Robert) had two official starts with one second. He also earned three AQHA Get of Sire points. “Finally Bill called me up and said that if you go to get Robert, I’ll give you half interest in him. So I went down and got Robert and started roping calves on him. In fact I pulled him a couple of years. Then I gave my half to Dick and Dick bought Bill’s half.” Bob talked about what kind of horse Prince Hank was, “He’d never had a stock saddle on him when I got him. I was just riding him, and I was running some calves on him and getting started roping on him. He would follow a calf like he’d followed a thousand. I just started roping on him. He was great in the box. He ran every calf the same way whether it was a fast calf or a slow calf. You couldn’t get him to run over a calf. He was the best big horse I ever rode because he really got in the ground. Oh Robert could sure get in the ground and in my estimation, he was a sure enough good horse.”


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Helen Robey echoed Bob’s thoughts on Prince Hank, “They couldn’t shake him up. He was a good big sound kind of horse. He was a little big for the time. We tried to show him a time or two, but he was too big for that time. They were still showing the little horses at that time. That was in about 1959. He was a nice horse and a good broodmare sire.” Prince Hank would sire 139 foals with 30 performers that earned 10 ROM, two AQHA Championships and three Superior Award winners. The leading point earner was Zanzie Hank who earned 286 points earning two of the Superiors one in youth and one in open western pleasure. Samona Sam was the other Superior in halter with 60 halter points and 34 performance points earning an AQHA Championship. The second AQHA Champion was Buffy Brown with 15 halter and 31 open points with four youth points. Marjo Sweetwater is another performer that earned six open points and 37 youth points. This gelding was an AQHA High Point Youth Heeling Horse. The broodmare sire record of Prince Hank shows that his daughters produced 19 racing ROM with two stakes winners and two stakes placed runners. His runners earned $109,253. The first stakes winner is Pal’s Hank Deck winner of the 1971 Cow Capital Clube Futurity. The second stakes winner was Clabb Bar Prize winner of the Bluestem Downs Championship. Both of these runners were out of Prince Hank’s daughter Peggy Hank. The Prince Hank sire record for his performers include horses that earned 1,479 AQHA points in halter and the arena. This includes 34 ROM with one AQHA Champion, three Superior Award winners and two High Point winners. The PHBA sire record for Prince Hank through his daughters shows 3,685 halter and performance points. His two AQHA High Point winners are Princess Cinna Bar, the 1983 AQHA High Point Junior Working Cow Horse and Poco Lick, the 1985 AQHA high Point Junior Working Cow Horse. Buzzer Bid earned 203 AQHA points earning a Superior in Trail. This gelding won two PHBA World Championship in performance while earning 1,462 PHBA halter and performance point. Bid Rigger earned 2007 PHBA halter and performance points as well as a PHBA World Championship. Yellow Hankie, Fancy Froggie and Britton Flicker are three of those daughters that show Prince Hank to be a good broodmare sire. Yellow Hankie counts among her foals Oklahoma Fuel. Oklahoma Fuel earned a speed index of 108 as a stakes placed runner earning a second in such races as the Speed Horse 220 Stakes. Oklahoma Fuel counts among his foals the great Yeller Fuel, a stakes winner of such races as the Midway Winter Futurity. Oklahoma Fuel is the sire of Oklahoma Top Hat or Scooter as he was called, was the PRCA/AQHA Horse of the Year in Heading from 1991 to 1993 and from 1997 to 1999. Oklahoma Fuel is the sire of Two Timen Fuel, a Superior Heading Horse with 109.5 AQHA points. Fancy Froggie is the dam of Mr Kane Raiser. This 1977 stallion is the broodmare sire of Invitation Only an NSBA Hall of Fame member. Bears Raisin Kane was an NSBA Bronze Award winner with $16,534 in western pleasure. Invitation Only is a leading western pleasure sire with foals like One Hot Krymsun, a 3 time AQHA World Champion and a 4 Time Congress Champion. His World Show wins came in the 2001 AQHA World Champion Two-Year-Old Snaffle Bit Futurity, 2002 AQHA World Champion Junior Western Pleasure and the 2005 AQHA World Champion Senior Western Pleasure. Britton Flicker was the dam of 10 AQHA point earners including Okie Leo’s Star, Okie Tilleo, Okie Cinco, Bill Hulsey, Okie Leah, Britton Okie, Britton Prince, Okie Native and Britton Princess, all by Okie Leo. Britton Princess was the leading point earner. Britton Princess was Reserve Champion of the 1972 NRHA Futurity. She won all of the major stock shows as well while being shown by Bob Loomis. She went on to be a top youth horse earning four Nebraska State Youth Championships.

Leolita Step the dam of Wimpys Little Step is a granddaughter of Becky Bee Leo by Bumble Bee Leo. Photo courtesy Tammye Hutton

Britton Princess was the first to showcase the Okie Leo/Prince Hank cross as the 1972 NRHA Futurity Reserve Champion. Photo courtesy Bob Loomis from the author’s files

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Mares With More continued ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... She earned points in such events as reining, pole bending, barrels and trail earning 32 open performance points and 43 youth performance points. She went to the AQHA Youth World Show in 1974 in Barrel racing finishing sixth and the AQHA Open World Show in 1974 in reining finishing third. Here are some more Okie Leo/Prince Hank crosses that can be noted. They include Bobbie Okie, winner of 75 AQHA performance points and a Superior in cutting. A second foal from this cross is Sorrel Okie, winner of 17 AQHA points. These two foals are out of Bob’s Maiden by Prince Hank. Okie Chloe is an AQHA Champion sired by Okie Leo. This mare has 76.5 AQHA points in halter and performance. She is a full sister to Mustang Okie with 26 AQHA halter and performance points and Okie’s Skipper with a performance ROM with 29 AQHA halter and performance points. The dam of these three foals is Bobbie Cargill. Bobbie Cargill is also the dam of another AQHA Champion in Choctaw Rinski by Rinski. Rinski is a three quarter brother to Okie Leo that was sired by Croton Oil by Leo and out of Sorrel Sue. Her fourth performer is Junior Rinski sired by Rinski earned 22 AQHA halter and performance points. OKIE LEO X PRINCESS CAY Okie Leo and Princess Cay combined to produce 11 foals. All of the Princess Cay foals were sired by Okie Leo. This combination produced 5 performers in the AQHA. The first foal out of this cross was Prince Okie. This 1961 gelding has his ROM in the open with 13 points. This gelding was shown in the Youth division by Nancy Edwards. Nancy Edwards was one of the first to compete at the All American Quarter Horse Congress in the youth division. She showed in reining and barrels. The next performer was Cayo Leo. This horse earned four AQHA performance foals. Prince Okie and Cayo Leo were both bred by Jerry Reeves. One of the things that Dick Robey liked to do was name his foals after people he had known. The third performer out of this cross was Nancy Edwards, who was named after the young lady that went to the All American Quarter Horse Congress. Nancy Edwards (the horse) was started by Dick. This mare went on to earn 55 AQHA open performance points with two of them coming in working cow horse, one in barrel racing, 19 of them in Pole Bending and 33 of her points in reining. She was the eighth place AQHA High Point Pole Bending horse in 1972. Nancy Edwards was the first foal out of Princess Cay to be bred by Mrs. Nagle. The other foals out of Princess Cay and bred by Nagle include Okie Skyleo, Bill Van, Bob Loomis, He’s A Coke, Oh Cay, Cays Okie Dokie and Slant Hole. Okie Skyleo was the next performer after Nancy Edwards (the horse). This gelding earned 5 AQHA performance points. The last performer out of this cross was Oh Cay. This 1974 mare was an ROM show horse with 16 performance points. Oh Cay in turn is the dam of Oh Cay Oak, winner of $11,489.25 and SR Oh Cay Tari, winner of $3,280.00. Oh Cay San is the next mare in this line. She was an unshown daughter of Peppy San and Oh Cay. She is the dam of horses like Oh Cay Quixote, winner of $158,552; Oh Cay Shorty, winner of $68,788; Cay Oh Pep, winner of $59,979; MH Oh Cay With Moves, winner of $57,931; Shortys Oh Cay Girl, winner of $13,084.98; Quixotes Cowgirl, winner of $9,611; Keep It Short,

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$6,708; Shorty Lenas Son, $4,853; MH Ohcay Bodee, $4,136 and CD Comanche Cay, $604. Oh Cay Shorty not only earned $68,788 in the cutting arena, but she also earned 14. 5 AQHA performance points with an Amateur ROM in cutting. This mare is one of only three mares to produce three or more NCHA Futurity Champions. Her NCHA Futurity Champions are Oh Cay Felix, the 2006 NCHA Open Futurity Champion and the 2006 NCHA Amateur Futurity Champion; Oh Miss Caroline, winner of the 2011 NCHA Open Futurity and Oh Cay Do Over, the 2011 NCHA Non-Pro Futurity Reserve Champion. The produce record of Oh Cay Shorty shows that she is the dam of 18 NCHA money winners that have earned $1,327,104. This makes her the #15 All Time Leading Dam of NCHA Money winners. She is the #1 all-time leading dam of NCHA Futurity money winners. Her 11 NCHA Futurity foals have earned $588,265. Oh Cay Felix is the leading money winner out of Oh Cay Shorty. He won $468,498. His wins after the 2006 NCHA Futurity include the 2009 NCHA Super Stakes Classic Open Championship; the 2009 NCHA Classic/Challenge Limited Non-Pro Championship and the 2008 NCHA Super Stakes Classic Amateur Championship. Oh Cay Quixote earned his $158,522 by winning shows like the 1999 All American Quarter Horse Congress NCHA Open Cutting; Southern Open Derby and the All American Quarter Horse Congress Non-Pro Co-Championship. He has gone on to be sire of horses that have won $2,289,877. They include Quixote Jose, winner of $193,009; Oh Cay Liberty, winner of $171,206 and Oh Cay Shez Snazzy, winner of $95,750. Oh Kay Quixote is the broodmare sire of Cats Quixote Jack with winnings of $273,196 as the 2007 NCHA Non-Pro Derby Championship. Oh Cay N Short is the leading money winner sired by Oh Cay Quixote. He was the 2007 NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Champion and the 2014 World’s Greatest Horseman Champion. This gelding has NRCHA earnings of $206,557. Let’s look at the power of the Okie Leo/Princess Cay cross with the Oh Cay branch of the Honey Thelah family. Oh Cay was the dam of seven foals with her four daughters and their daughters producing 175 foals as of October 3, 2018. When we look at the AQHA One Generation Dam Report we see that 66 of these horses have become NCHA and/or NRCHA money with 38 of them earning over $10,000 with 16 of those earning over $50,000. The 16 include Oh Cay Felix, winner of $467,003; Oh Miss Caroline, winner of $281,727; Light N Lilly, winner of $280,216; Oh Cay Quixote, winner of $158,552; Smart Oh Cay, winner of $110,339; Oh Cay Do Over, winner of $107,674; Smart Hickory Merada, winner of $106,939; Oh Mis Peacock, winner of $104,607; Oh Cay Meriah, winner of $84,379; MH With Oh Cay Moves, winner of $75,459; Oh Miss Sidney, winner of $74,621; Miss CQR Oak, winner of $73,994; Oh Cay Starlight, winner of $72,719; Oh Cay Shorty, winner of $68,788; Cay Oh Pep, winner of $57,162 and SFR Magic Doll, winner of $51,907. Now as we look back on the Honey Thelah story we see how this mare that came from a modest beginning has played a key role in the early success of Okie Leo. A role that makes her one of our Mares with More.


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Prince Hank proved to be a great roping horse and then through his daughters he contributed to the Okie Leo sire record. Photo o Courtesy Helen Robey

Oh Cay Felix winning the 2006 NCHA Futurity. Photo from the author’s files

Conformation shot of Prince Hank.

Photo Courtesy Helen Robey

Can Do, the sire of Honey Thelah. Photo Courtesy Helen Robey

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S

Spurr’s Big Fix the Product you’ve been waiting for

By Marcia Akes | SpurrsBigFix.com ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... purr’s Big Fix 100% Natural Antiseptic is a mix of seven antiseptics that work together to help address several issues like rain rot, scratches, fungus problems, thrush, white line, wounds, etc.

Why Is It Called “Spurr’s”? The answer is that our beloved, beautiful little Shetland pony we all adore is named Spurr. We named the product after him because he is — well adorable!

Skin Care that Works! Spurr’s Big Fix is a conditioning Antiseptic Spray for Horse and Livestock Skin Care! It comes in a convenient, easy to use spray bottle with an adjustable spray tip. Rain Rot? Spurr’s Big Fix Antiseptic Spray is very effective for treating Rain Rot as shown in the progression pictures on our website. See what a difference after only two weeks of using the product. Itchy Skin? / Bug Bites? / Skin Allergies? Spurr’s Big Fix’s conditioning formula soothes inflamed skin quickly while the medication goes to work killing fungus and bacteria. You’ll notice a marked improvement in your horse’s skin condition after even the first application. Rely on Spurr’s Big Fix on a variety of skin fungus. Ideal for re-growing hair, mane and tails, too! Spray liberally over affected area daily and see new hair growth appear in days. Use weekly as a preventative maintenance. Wound Care That Really Works…Discourages Proud Flesh! Spurr’s Big Fix Antiseptic Spray is an extremely effective product for general wound care. Both antiseptic and soothing, this solution quickly penetrates the affected areas and goes to work. And, because it’s a convenient spray it reaches those

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deeper recess so hard reach with thicker ointments. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Our before and after WOUND CARE images, on our website, are not pretty; but they all have happy endings! After interviewing many of our users, none have reported proud flesh! Spurr’s has been very effective in treating scrapes and cuts. Visit our section under wound care. We have treated many minor cuts and scrapes; but do have pictures posted of a mare with a t-post injury, very serious. That particular mare was initially treated by a veterinarian. After the wound was cleaned, she was given a tetanus shot and then sprayed three times daily over the course of four weeks. The results are very compelling. Let Spurr’s Big Fix help you Maintain a Healthy Hoof! Spurr’s Big Fix “Hoof Fix” and Spurr’s Big Fix Antiseptic Spray are both excellent for Horse Hoof Care and maintenance. We all know the old saying “no hoof no horse” and our Spurr’s Big Fix Antiseptic Spray is no less than miraculous when it comes to conditioning dry, brittle or cracked hooves! Spurr’s will penetrate the hoof wall from every area where it’s applied, therefore killing the funguses that contribute to brittle hooves as well as many other hoof conditions. As a convenient spray, it’s easier to apply than other gooey hoof products, many containing drying pine tar as a main ingredient. Spurr’s Big Fix uses non-drying Tea Tree and other essential oils, along with glycerine to help moisturize the hoof. Farriers are some of Spurr’s greatest users! The application of Spurr’s 10-15 minutes prior to the farrier working the horse’s hoof, will create a much more pliable hoof. Highly effective on White Line Disease and a powerhouse on Thrush. Literally spray and watch as the black runs out of the crevices around the frog and drips off the hoof. And try “Hoof Fix” – it’s an awesome Hoof Conditioner! Spurr’s Big Fix is a product long time coming… Spurr’s Big Fix was developed and perfected by David and Kathy Kimbrough in the heart of Alabama horse country. In addition to both being lifelong horse enthusiasts and animal lovers, David is a highly respected, working farrier with over 38 years of experience. Being frustrated by the lack of positive results from the number of hoof products on the market, David and Kathy took it upon themselves to come up with a recipe that would meet, not only the needs of a horse’s hoof, but would also address many common skin and wound conditions, as well. After an ideal formula was scientifically developed under the supervision of a chemist, Spurr’s Big Fix underwent rigorous testing ensuring that it was both effective and safe. Today, Spurr’s Big Fix has been thoroughly tested, both in the field and in the lab. It has been endorsed by numerous horsemen and women. With a completed formula in hand. Bruce Conley, long-time friend of the Kimbroughs, entered the picture to assist with


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... production, packaging and marketing. Bruce’s invaluable production experience allowed the formula to be produced and marketed en masse. Bruce is not only a partner and a product evangelist; he also uses it daily on his small herd of miniature horses. What Makes Spurr’s Big Fix So Effective? Carefully designed by a leading chemist and in conjunction with horse care professionals, Spurr’s Big Fix has been successful in helping thousands of horses across the country. Testimonials Tested & proven effective time after time…

What Are the Main Ingredients in Spurr’s Big Fix? Tea Tree Oil, Menthol, Eucalyptus Oil, Iodine, Glycerin, Alcohol and other essential oils. Spurr’s Big Fix has a very pleasant aroma and was designed to be used as a spray- there is no need for the user to even come in contact with the solution if they want to avoid it. Spurr’s Big Fix is safe for the horse, as well as for the user. There is no need to worry if you do get any on you. Spurr’s will not stain or discolor. Owners love it because of its fresh, clean smell and non-staining formula, leaving their barn, hands and clothes free of damaging stain!

“I am thrilled about sharing the OUTSTANDING SUCCESS that I have found using Spurr’s Big Fix. The results that I have witnessed is nothing less than completely amazing!! My favorite horse Jazzy Girl came to the farm six years ago in the beginning stages of founder and has suffered with major hoof health issues from day one. My dad always said No Hoof, No Horse. Within three days of consistently using Spurr’s I began to see unbelievable improvement in the health of her frogs. Simply stated, Spurr’s is the Real Deal !! I won’t be without it.” Kathy Pinnell, The CARE Foundation – Comforting Abused Rescued Equines “Just simply, the BEST product on the market..I can say this because I used Spurr’s Big Fix on a colt with a horrific wound (stallion bite) to colt. The Spurr’s healed it like it was never a wound there! This colt’s pic is on the Spurr’s Big Fix site & on pamphlets. Thanks, to Spurr’s Big Fix & the fantastic people who produced this wonderful product! Patricia B McCullough - December 1, 2017 We have a colt that had some type of sore rash on his whole belly. Insects were eating at the skin leaving it raw and bleeding. We have applied Spurr’s Big Fix one time each day for 2 weeks his sensitive skin has returned to normal. We are so thankful for this great product! Jennifer - June 8, 2018

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854 Acres! Entire Ranch for sale!

Multiple homes 54+ Deeded Acres & 800 Leased! Comprised of three patented gold mine claims, State and BLM grazing leases. See the virtual tour link for the direct website to this beautiful property. ARMLS MLS # 5906101. Tucked away at end of an old stagecoach route, originally taking Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday and others over this ranch on their way to Prescott. Adjacent to 80,000 acres of National Forest.Located at the foot of the Bradshaw Mountains where the cottonwood tree lined Big Bug Creek cuts through this ranch to the west with 100 mile views. Friendly, colorful, registered Texas Longhorn cattle call this home. Easy 50 minute drive from Phoenix, gets you to this charming family ranch nestled in the high chaparral of central Arizona.Easy 50 minute drive from Phoenix. Also located on the ranch, newly remodeled 1800+- Manager’s home. Additional Guest house approx 900 sq ft also remodeled. Large new Workshop, 2 Hay Barns, 15 Stall barn with 12’ breezeway and tack room equipment storage. Plus a 8 stall show barn. Several arenas, turnouts with shades, working pens with squeeze chutes all on deeded part of ranch. Easy to move between pastures comprise the remainder of this Very Special Ranch with the best year around climate in Arizona. $2.7 M. Contact us for link to video.

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Susan Abare 928-713-7472 SAbare@AwardRealty.com

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The Working Lines continued from page 14 OKIE LEO AND A GOLD METAL Glenda’s Miss Okie was a 1974 daughter of Okie Leo. She earned $3,535.32 in the NRHA and five AQHA performance points. Glenda’s Miss Okie produced only one foal in Miss Okie Too, an NRHA money earner of $1,483.18 with four AQHA performance points. She is the dam of 13 AQHA registered foals with 13 money and/or point earners. This includes 10 Register of Merit winners from 12 shown in the AQHA. All of her foals are NRHA money earners that have earned $213,608 with an average of $16,431 per foal. Her foals include Okie Dun Did It, winner of $56,302 and 54 AQHA performance points. This horse was a Gold Medal winner in the 2002 Bayer/USET Festival of Champions winning team gold with Tim McQuay in the saddle. Her other foals include Faithfully Dun, winner of $33,944.64 as the 1997 NRHA Amateur Non-Pro Reserve Champion; Dun Its Deja Vu, winner of $25,615.86 as the 2006 Gordyville Breeders Cup Derby Non-Pro Co-Champion and the 2005 NCRHA Futurity Non Pro Reserve Champion and Dun Being An Okie, winner of 114 AQHA performance points in reining and heeling. Dun Its Déjà vu is the dam of horses that have won $192,116 including Gunners Dun It Again, the 2015 NRBC Intermediate Open Champion and Starbucks Finale the 2014 NRHA Non-Pro Futurity Reserve Champion. Glenda’s Miss Okie was out of the NRHA Hall Of Fame mare Glenda Echols. Dick Robey did sell Okie Leo in 1969 to Bruce R. Stultz and G. R. Foster. Then in 1970, he was transferred to Bruce R. Stultz. Okie Leo died a few years later, bringing an end to the life of this great stallion. But before we close on the story of Okie Leo and his three

amigos let’s look at one more story Dick told about Okie Leo, “We went down to a show in Gainesville, Texas and Matlock Rose lived there at that time. Don Wilcox and I went down there with Okie. J. T. Walters was the judge. It was a night show. We entered the reining. You know only a fool would go to Gainesville, Texas to show a horse against Matlock Rose and think he could win.” He continued, “But when you’ve got a horse like Okie Leo and no smarter than I was, I guess we just went down to test the air.” Robey further explained that B. F. Phillips Jr. attended the show. (Of course many of you will remember the late Mr. Phillips as the co-breeder of the legendary race stallion Dash For Cash. But prior to his success as a racehorse breeder and owner, Phillips was a major player in the arena. He was the 1965 and 1966 NCHA World Champion Non-Pro Cutting Horse Rider on his great mare Gin Echols and his gelding Goldwood, and this is only a minor representation of the great show horses owned and/ or bred by Phillips.) “B. F. Phillips Jr. was setting with all the kids that worked for the trainers that were showing horses. He told all those boys, ‘I’ll take one horse and give you boys the field and bet you $5.00, I can pick the winner,” reported Robey on the interesting happenings at this show. He continued, “They said, ‘Why would we do such a ridiculous thing as that, you’ll take Matlock,’ and he said, ‘No, I won’t take Matlock.’ So boy those kids lined up to take him up on his bet. But you know we beat’em. Phillips picked Okie Leo.” That is the story of Okie Leo. He would lineup against anybody and give them a run for their money and that is why his three Amigos loved him. He was their favorite horse.

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Award Realty 49 Bale Buddy 52 Bar T Heart 8 BIF 25 Bitter Root Horse Property 55 Bobby Norris 56 Breeders Spectacular 35 Clark Land Brokers 49 Colorado Horse Sale 4 Farmers and Ranchers 24 Forco 9 Golden Valley 53 Grandon Real Estate 46 Hermanson Kist 17 Hoof Cinch 52 Hunter QH 53 Huskerland Breeder 51 IBF 53 James Martinez 26 Jamison QH 5 JB Western Store 37 Judge Cash 21 Kalaloch+ 20 L&H Branding 53 Lauing QH 27 Long Horn Saddlery 53 54 Working Horse Magazine 2019 Fall

Lyons Elite 43 Mason & Morse Ranch Co 44 Mountain Valley Reality 48 O’Grady QH 50 Premier Equine 6 Revel 4n1 50 Spurr’s Big Fix 4 St Clair Performance Horses 3 Total Feeds 41 Twin Cities Horse Sales 40 Van Norman 34 Waukon Horse Sale 36 Weaver QH 16 Wetzels QH 53


The horse barn is a magnificent 46’ x 84’ structure featuring 10 total 10’ x 12’ stalls with turn outs, an office, a tack room, grain room, bathroom, and a horse wash space with hot water. Each stall has access to a thermal cycle frost free automatic waterer, of which there are 12 strategically located around the property and barn. The barn is connected to a 160’ x 320’ arena with a remote-control roping chute, a stock return, stripping chute, three sliding stock chutes, 2 holding pens on each end of the arena. All arena fencing is pipe with all posts set in concrete. Arena and runs are all sprinkled. There is a 32’ x 72’ hay barn at the north end of the arena. There is a total of 6 pastures in addition to the hay fields, 2 are not irrigated and have natural grass and cover and 2 are creek pens. All have a frost-free waterer. Also featured are two large grain bins for storage in bulk of alfalfa pellets and specialty colt pellets The ranch has excellent water rights for hay production with state of the art irrigation equipment including two pivot lines. The irrigations systems are gravity fed. The acreage has 5.5 miles of vinyl coated wire horse fencing. The main home is a western log home with 3,500 sf of finishes. There is a guest house, artist studio, gym with sauna, machine shop, car wash with pull through for trailer washing, all in addition to the horse barn and arena. Log home has high-end granite counters, stainless appliances, wood flooring, hot water radiant heating and rich interior finishes. Wrap around porch features mahogany decking. Property has over 10,000 ft of asphalt paving. Guest has country kitchen, breakfast bar, tiled bath, shuttered windows, balcony deck. This ranch is one of the most beautiful horse properties in the west with a setting where no other homes can be seen from the deck and yet it still has fantastic mountain range views of the Sapphire and Bitterroot Mountains. Only minutes to Stevensville and 45 minutes to Missoula International Airport.

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Profile for Michael Gerbaz

Working Horse Magazine | Fall 2019  

Working Horse Magazine | Fall 2019  

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