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WORKING HORSE serving the performance horse industry for 20 years

M A G A Z I N E

Winter 2017 | Stallion Issue

Mares with More | The Old Vaughn Mare........................................................16 Judge Cash | 1978-2017.......................................................................................31 Keep Your Horse in Good Health with Continuous Supplementation...........32 The Working Lines | High Rolling Roany & the rest of the story...................40 New Born Foals...................................................................................................54 Helmet Tough......................................................................................................66 How 2 Rodeo.......................................................................................................76 On the Road with SeeYa.....................................................................................87

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Hot Products....103 | Real Estate Coral...88 | Ad Index...106 Staff

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Mike Gerbaz | Managing Partner [mikegerbaz@gmail.com | 970.948.5523 Adele Lind-Nichols | Print/Internet Sales & Webmaster [adele@workinghorsemagazine.com | 970.302.6184 Jane Klingson | Print Sales [janeklingson@yahoo.com | 515.571.2832 Competitor News | Production and Graphic Art [competitornews@yahoo.com | 541.938.0608

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Working Horse Magazine has been serving the performance horse industry since 1997. Main Office | 355 Watson Divided Road, Snowmass, CO 81654. For questions regarding subscriptions and distribution call 970.948.5523. The views and/or opinions in articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect those of Working horse Magazine and are the responsibility of the author or advertiser. Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue 7


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Mares With More | The Old Vaughn Mare

By Larry Thornton ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... t seems the more we learn about horse genetics, the more we see the importance of the mare in our breeding programs. Many breeders over the years have professed the theory that the mare’s influence on the foal is over the 50% we would normally think of as her influence on the foal. Some say she is 70% responsible for the foal. Some say the influence is 80%. The great breeder Hank Wiescamp once told me the mare is 100% responsible for the foal if it is a bad one. A few breeders have taken the importance of the mare a step further by inbreeding to a special mare. They believe by inbreeding to a great mare they concentrate the influence of that mare. This is the goal of inbreeding and linebreeding but they believe in the importance of the mare in reaching that goal. This breeding theory is called “Inbreeding to Superior Females.” The Old Vaughn Mare our Mares with More topic in this issue will certainly give us a great example of this breeding theory. The Old Vaughn Mare was registered in the American Quarter Horse Association in February 1944. She was an aged mare when she received her papers as she was reportedly foaled in 1918. She was owned at the time by M. L. McGehee & Sons of Wayside, Texas. Dewitt McGehee signed the registration application. The pedigree application noted that she was a brown mare that stood 14.1 hands and weighed about 1050 pounds. Those papers tell us that she had a large white star on her forehead and a small snip on her nose. She had one white sock on her left hind leg and a small white ring on the inside at the top of her right hoof. Bob Hooper inspected the Old Vaughn Mare when she was registered with AQHA. He put the following note on her registration application, “Wonderful old mare, Excellent quality even at 26 years of age.” This note certainly indicates the quality this mare displayed even as an aged mare. Bits and pieces about the Old Vaughn Mare have appeared in various places over

the years. One of the major contributions came when Melton McGehee responded to Andrea Mattson’s HOOF-NOTE column that appeared in the October 1992 issue of THE QUARTER HORSE JOURNAL. Andrea’s HOOF-NOTE ad provided the industry with information about some of the great foundation horses in the quarter horse. Andrea gathered this information in her pedigree research and conversations with some of the old-time horseman. This HOOF-NOTE profiled Bartender, a son of the Old Vaughn Mare. Melton’s initial phone conversation with Andrea was followed up with him sending some great pictures and information about not only the Old Vaughn Mare but several of her foals. This information included material and a picture of the good sire Sergeant, a full brother to Billy McCue, who was the sire of Charley McCue, the first son of the Old Vaughn Mare. This stallion was prominent in the McGehee breeding program. They also owned Bartender. One of the first things the McGehee notes told about the Old Vaughn Mare was that she was a race mare. His note read this way, “The Old Vaughn Mare was stolen when she was one year old-- They made a great roping mare out of her-She was so fast –They decided to race her, and she was never outrun. I talked to two old time jockeys that rode her. They both told me she was never outrun.” One of those jockeys was George Hampton. Hampton would become a trainer for McGehee. McGehee told Andrea that Hampton was 75 years old when he started training for the McGehee’s. McGehee noted on the back of the picture of Bartender under the name “Old Vaughn Mare” that “some called her Brown Betty.” A story that appeared in the August 1960 issue of THE RANCHMAN, verifies through the McGehee’s that the Old Vaughn mare was not only undefeated as a race horse, but that she spent over half her life on the racetrack. The title of the article was “Late and Great “Old Vaughn” Mare Appears In The Pedigrees Of Many of To-

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day’s Top Sires Of Racing, Show Horses.” The story confirms that the Old Vaughn Mare entered the broodmare band at the age of 15 with her first foal coming in 1933. This article confirms that the Old Vaughn Mare was a mare that showed a lot of quality. She appeared in a horse show in July 1943 at Tulia, Texas where she won the aged mare class. Her son Billy Barnes won the stud foal class and those two teamed to win the mare and foal class. Not bad for a twenty-five-year-old mare. The pedigree of the Old Vaughn Mare is limited. Her sire was a horse we call today the “John Ellard Quarter Horse.” The pedigree of this stallion is unknown. A note on the Registration Applications for Old Vaughn Mare tells us that the John Ellard Quarter Horse was a “Quarter Horse raised by John Ellard of Plainview, Texas and sold to Tom Ivey of Hereford, Texas.” The dam of the Old Vaughn Mare was a Tom Ivey Mare. Her sire is listed as Ivey Roan, who is described as a “Red Roan Quarter Horse owned by Tom Ivey. The second dam of the Old Vaughn Mare was another mare known as a Tom Ivey Mare. Paul Mattson in his great book THE REAL AMERICAN QUARTER HORSE, shows that the Tom Ivey Mare (dam of the Old Vaughn Mare) was called Daisy. Her sire the Ivey Roan was called Rail. The first registered foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare was Charley McCue. This 1933 stallion was sired by Billy McCue by Jack McCue by Peter McCue. Charley McCue helps us with the Old Vaughn Mare ownership record. The breeder of Charley McCue was Jim Vaughn; thus, we know where the name Vaughn comes into the picture. Jim Vaughn was from Plainview, Texas. Charley McCue was the sire of five AQHA ROM racehorses. They were Baby Dumplin, Punjab, Lamberts Teddy McCue, Lucky McCue and Denny McCue. His daughters were race producers as well. His daughter Patsy Lee was the dam of the AAA stakes winner Bar Three by Three


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Bars. Charley McCue will play a role later in our look at the Old Vaughn Mare.

ma Futurity in 1947 was Leota W but there may have been another Oklahoma Futurity.

pattern of 6 X 5 X 6 X 6 X 5 X 4 to the Old Vaughn Mare through these horses.

The next foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare was Miss Chubby. Miss Chubby was sired by Chubby who was sired by Midnight by Badger by Peter McCue. She was bred by S. B. Barnes of Tulia, Texas. This tells us that Barnes owned the Old Vaughn Mare for several years. My edition of the AQHA Stud Book lists the owner of Miss Chubby as Charles A. Goad of Fairfax, Oklahoma. Miss Chubby was foaled in 1937.

Oswald was sired by Johnny Barnes and he was the sire of Peter John the 1963 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Horse. Johnny Barnes takes us back to the Old Vaughn Mare. Johnny Barnes was sired by Charley McCue the son of the Old Vaughn Mare. This makes Oswald inbred to the Old Vaughn Mare with a 3 X 2 breeding pattern. The dam of Johnny Barnes was Mollie by John Wilkins by Peter McCue. An added note John Wilkins was the sire of Joe Hancock.

Miss Chubby ended up in the hands of Lester Williams of Fairfax, Oklahoma. Williams married the former Mrs. Roy Goad. As the story goes, Mary Goad got Miss Chubby in the divorce settlement. The rest is history as Lester and Mary Williams teamed to be the breeders of three AQHA Supreme Champions and the breeder of the dam of one other Supreme Champion. The Supreme Champions are Goodbye Sam, Leo Maudie and Joe Fax. The fourth AQHA Supreme Champion with ties to Williams was Fairbars. This son of Three Bars was out of Lady Fairfax, a daughter of Miss Chubby. Lady Fairfax was bred by Mary Williams.

The first registered foal out of Miss Chubby was Oswald. He was bred by Roy Goad of Fairfax, Oklahoma. Oswald was an ROM racehorse. He started his official race career in 1947 and ended it in 1950. He had one win, two seconds and a third in five official starts. His true success was as a match race horse and that record is unknown. Some reports show that he won an Oklahoma Futurity in 1947. But the first winner of the AQHA recognized Oklaho-

Oswald would later be owned by Bob Shelhamer of Billings, Montana and this would become the Oswald influence on the Cowhorse Confluence or the bringing together the blood of Oswald (Awesome Pete) and High Rolling Roany. The key characters in this side of the cross came from the Oswald horses Oswald Pete and Judy Oswald. Awesome Pete has a breeding

Miss Chubby again shows the inbreeding strength of the Old Vaughn Mare line. Miss Chubby was the dam of Maudie Williams and Lady Fairfax. These two mares were raced with Maudie Williams earning

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Mares With More continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... her ROM and setting a new track record at Pawhuska, Oklahoma with a time of :12.4 at 220 yards. Lady Fairfax was an ROM stakes placed runner with a second in the 1951 Oklahoma Futurity and a third in the 1952 Oklahoma QH Exhibitor’s Association Derby. The Supreme Champion Goodbye Sam has a breeding pattern of 3 X 3 to Miss Chubby. The sire of Goodbye Sam was Fairfax Joe, who was out of Lady Fairfax, who was out of Miss Chubby. The dam of Goodbye Sam was Maudie Leo, who was out of Maudie Williams, who was out of Miss Chubby. The Supreme Champion Joe Fax was a ¾ brother to Goodbye Sam. He had a breeding pattern of 3 X 2 to Miss Chubby. His sire was Fairfax Joe and his dam was Maudie Williams. The title of AQHA Supreme Champion denotes the quarter horse’s versatility as this championship requires a horse to be AAA rated on the track (above a speed index of 90), a good halter horse and a good show horse in more than one event. Goodbye Sam earned his AAA rating on the track and then earned his performance ROM and his AQHA Championship in 1969. He secured the Supreme Championship in 1970 the same year he earned his Superior in halter with 53 points. Then in 1975 he added a Superior in cutting with 52 AQHA points. Along the way he earned 36.5 western pleasure points. Goodbye Sam was one of the few Supreme Champions to earn performance points in cutting. He would sire some pretty good cutters with Jody Fairfax, winner of $87,998 earning the NCHA Platinum Award; Sam Superstar winner of $24,216 and the 1975 NCHA Open Futurity Reserve Championship and Bye Bye Streaker winner of $35,388. Goodbye Sam was out of Maudie Leo by Leo and out of Miss Chubby. Maudie Leo was a full sister to the Williams’ bred Supreme Champion Leo Maudie. Leo Maudie earned his performance points in Western Pleasure (15), Calf roping (12), Heading (1) and Hunter Under Saddle (1).

Book lists his owner as S. B. Barnes. Chester B was an ROM sire of such noted horses as Texas Ruby.

Chester B was the sire of Chester Brown. This stallion in turn was the sire of Bama Rosita. Bama Rosita was the dam of I’m A Rosita. I’m A Rosita is the dam of the AQHA Reserve World Champion Halter Horse and successful halter sire Coosa. The fourth foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare was Bartender. This 1940 stallion was sired by Chubby’s son Manitobian. His breeder was S. B. Barnes and he was owned by several people during his life including the M. L. McGehee and Sons. The McGehee’s bought Bartender after they bought his dam. Bartender is considered the most widely known foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare. The AQHA shows that he has a speed index of 55 which translates into a C rating on the track, but no official starts are listed. He was a get-of-sire winner in 1960 with one win in two shows. Bartender sired 218 registered foals with 71 performers with two racing ROM and one stakes placed runner. The stakes place runner was Martini Girl. She had 62 starts with eight wins, ten seconds and eight thirds earning $5,465. She was second or third in six stakes races including a second in the Buttons And Bow Stakes in 1952. Her record shows that she set a track record at LaMesa Park going 350 yards in :18.400. She earned three AQHA halter points. Little Vicky was the other racing ROM. The sire record of Bartender shows that he sired 48 performance point earners that earned 25 ROM, five AQHA Champions, seven Superior Award winners and three AQHA High Point Award winners. His AQHA Champions were Tender Boy, Dee Gee, Gatita Lady, Texas Fizz and Lucky Bar. Tender Boy was bred by M. L. McGehee and owned by Sunny Jim Orr. Orr made this son of Bartender an AQHA Champion with 25 halter points and 65 performance points. They teamed up to be the 1961 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Calf Roping Horse and 1961 AQHA High Point Working Cow Horse.

The third foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare was Chester B, a full brother to Miss Tender Boy would sire only 33 registered Chubby. This horse was foaled in 1938 and foals with 11 of them making the QHA perbred by S. B. Barnes and my AQHA Stud 18 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue

formance arena. This resulted in 10-point earners with six taking home an ROM. His foals earned 752.5 points with three AQHA Champions, six Superior Awards and quite a few AQHA high point awards.

Tender’s Sioux was a 1960 daughter of Tender Boy. She earned 221 AQHA Points earning an AQHA Championship with Superior awards in tie-down roping and reining. She was the 1964 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Horse, the 1965 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Mare, the 1965 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Mare and the 1966 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Mare. Tender Sioux was a full sister to Tender’s Tonka and Tender Taos. They were all out of Baby Belinda by Pondie Joe. Tender Taos earned 224 AQHA points earning an AQHA Championship, a Superiors in halter tie-down roping and reining. This gelding was the 1966 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Horse and the 1965 AQHA High Point Junior Steer Roping Horse. Tender’s Tonka earned 75 AQHA points. He was the 1966 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Horse and the 1961 AQHA High Point Junior Steer Roping Horse. Tender’s Two and Tender’s Choctaw were full brother and sister sired by Tender Boy and out of Zuni by Draper’s Sun Up. Tender’s Choctaw earned 106 AQHA points earning a Superior Steer Roping and an AQHA Reserve World Championship in heeling in 1977. Tender’s Two earned 83 halter and performance points. She was an AQHA Champion and the 1967 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Mare. Dee Gee by Bartender was owned by Wanda Harper Bush. This great mare became an AQHA Champion with 164 performance points and 62 halter points. She was Superior in halter and reining. She was the 1955 AQHA High Point Reining Horse and the 1955 AQHA High Point Halter Horse. Dee Gee carried Wanda Harper Bush to the 1952 Girl’s Rodeo Association (GRA) All Around World Championship and the GRA World Championship in barrel racing and calf roping. They would repeat as the GRA World Champion Barrel Racers the next year. Dee Gee would retire from the arena to produce nine foals with seven performers. They include the ROM performers Little


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Dee Gee, Dee Gee’s King, Eternal Dee Gee and Dee’s Image. She would have two race starters with Sunshine Echols earning a racing ROM.

performers with five AQHA Champions. His AQHA Champions were King Lucky Bar, Lottie Bar, Lucky Bar Lass, Lucky Bar Madam and Miss Lucky Bar.

Dee Gee’s King would sire 22 performers with five ROM in the arena and one Superior award winner. The Superior Award winner in reining was Dollie Star King. She earned 72 AQHA performance points. He also sired Mr Chess the 1976 AQHA Youth World Champion in Working Cow Horse. His daughters produced 25-point earners including Crockers Queen an AQHA Superior halter horse; Peppy San Eddie a 1975 AQHA Reserve World Champion Junior Cutting Horse and Docs Phoebe an AQHA Superior cutting horse.

The last two AQHA Champions sired by Bartender were Gatita Lady and Texas Fizz. Gatita Lady earned 46 halter and 12 performance points while Texas Fizz earned 28 halter and 14.5 performance points. Some of the other performers by Bartender would include Allen’s Star a Superior barrel racing horse that was the 1969 and 1970 AQHA High Point Pole Bending Mare, Kay’s Bar Maid, Lee’s Pride, Rum Saffire and Tequilla Hombre all AQHA Superior cutting horses.

Eternal Dee Gee The Eternal Sun daughter of Dee Gee was the dam of Okie’s Teddy Bear. This son of Okie Leo was the 1974 AQHA High Point Junior Tie-Down Roping Horse and the 1976 AQHA High Point Tie-Down Roping Stallion. He earned 128 AQHA performance points and a Superior in Tie-Down Roping. Lucky Bar by Bartender was an AQHA Champion and Superior Halter Horse. He earned 51 halter points and 17 performance points. He was an NCHA money winner. Lucky Bar sired 10 AQHA ROM

Sand Bowl a 1945 son of Bartender is an interesting horse. He was ROM in the AQHA with five halter and nine performance points. His performance points came in cutting (4) and reining (5). The AQHA sire records shows that he sired one foal that was registered in the AQHA. That foal was Trinket Bennett who was bred by Milt Bennett. This mare was the 1955 NCHA Open World Champion and the 1955 and 1956 AQHA High Point Cutting Horse. She was superior in cutting with 138 AQHA performance points. Trinket Bennett was known in the NCHA as Snooky.

Billy Barnes was foaled in 1943 and his sire was Sergeant by Billy McCue. Billy Barnes was bred and owned by M. L. McGehee and Sons. The last foal out of the Old Vaughn Mare was Duck Hunter McCue by Reed McCue. This 1944 son was gelded. He was bred by McGehee Brothers of Wayside, Texas.

The true test of a great mare comes through her ability to maintain her influence on the breed. We have seen through Miss Chubby that this line has come down through the breed through inbreeding to this great mare. Here are a couple more examples of how inbreeding to this mare has influenced the quarter horse. Our examples are Senor George and Christmas Four. Senor George was the 1961 NCHA Open World Champion Cutting Horse. He earned $61,253 in cutting putting him in the NCHA Hall of Fame. He was the 1968 NCHA Open Reserve World Champion. His AQHA record shows that he was an AQHA Champion with 25 halter points and 483 performance points. He was Superior in cutting and the 1968 AQHA High Point Cutting Horse. His sire record shows that he had 40 AQHA point earners with 790 points and 19 performance ROM. He sired one AQHA Champion and 5 Superior performance horses.

.......................................................................................................................................................................................... Bartender was a well known sire and a big part of the Old Vaughn mare’s influence.

The Old Vaughn Mare was reportedly born in 1918 and registered in 1944 at the age of 26. This Charley McCue wasn’t as well was an honor for a mare this old to get a number. known as Bartender but he was an integral part of the linebreeding to the Old Vaughn Mare.

Photos courtesy of Andrea Mattson Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue 19


Mares With More continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sire of Senor George was Claude by Preacher G a son of Bartender. Preacher G was an ROM show horse with four halter and one performance point. He was out of Josephine by Ross Green. The dam of Senor George was Miss Bartender by Bartender. This gives Senor George a breeding pattern of 3 X 2 to Bartender.

One of the all-time great producing mares is Laney Doc. This great mare was foaled in 1982. She is a proven cutting horse with $270,495 in earnings. She was the 1986 NCHA Derby Reserve Champion and the 1987 Gold & Silver Reserve Champion. Laney Doc entered the broodmare band to produce foals that have earned over $1.2 million. Her leading money earner is Cat Ichi the 2004 NCHA Open Derby Champion with earnings of $303,271. Cat Ichi is the sire of cutting horses that have earned over $4.8 million. His leading money winner is Ichis My Choice the 2016 NCHA Horse of the Year with earnings of $339,437. Laney Doc is out of the mare Christmas Four. Christmas Four was the 1965 NCHA Open Futurity Reserve Champion. She won $26,611 and 138 AQHA cutting points to be a Superior performer. She was an NCHA

Youth Reserve World Champion.

The blood of the Old Vaughn Mare in Laney Doc comes from Christmas Four. Christmas Four was sired by Christmas Star. Christmas Star was an AQHA point earner in performance and an NCHA money earner. This stallion was the sire of only 20 registered foals. These 20 foals include only four performers and all four were AQHA point earners. The other threepoint earners were Christmas Five, Teques Christmas and Jimmy’s Baldy. Christmas Star was sired by Baldy B. Baldy B was sired by Chester B. Chester B was sired by Chubby. The dam of Chester B was the Old Vaughn Mare. The dam of Baldy B was Trixie B by Charley McCue. Charley McCue was sired by Billy McCue and he was out of the Old Vaughn Mare. This gives Baldy B two crosses to the Old Vaughn Mare. The dam of Christmas Star was Miss Christmas by Claude. Claude was sired by Preacher G by Bartender who was out of the Old Vaughn Mare. This gives us a third cross to the Old Vaughn Mare. Miss Miller 4 was the dam of Christmas Four. Miss Miller 4 was sired by Ike Rude.

Ike Rude was a good sire of such ROM horses as Chocolate Ike, Ike Rock, Nickie Clegg and Rude Chester. Ike Rock was an AQHA Champion.

Ike Rude was a paternal half-brother to Claude, the sire of Miss Christmas. Preacher G was the sire of both Claude and Ike Rude. Preacher G was sired by Bartender. This gives Christmas Four a linebreeding pattern of 4 X 5 X 6 X 5 to the Old Vaughn Mare. From a beginning with the Old Vaughn Mare down to Laney Doc we have seen that this great mare family has shown a lot of success in the annals of the quarter horse. And we must see that the Old Vaughn Mare certainly reinforces the breeding theory of “Inbreeding o Superior Females” to produce good foals.

..................................................................... About the Author | Larry Thornton is a Pedigree Analyst and freelance writer for Working Horse magazine, Speedhorse and Quarter Horse News. Thorton started his writing career in 1984 with his first article being printed in the Speed Horse Magazine. He was also an Agriculture Instructor for 37 years.

............................................................................................................................................................................................ This is a wonderful picture of Sunny Jim Orr and Tender Boy. It was used as the cover of the HOOF AND HORNS magazine.

Laney Doc has formed her own branch of the Old Vaughn Mare mare line.

Tender Boy

Photo courtesy of Sunny Jim Orr A Darol Dickenson photo courtesy of Sunny Jim Orr 20 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue

Photo courtesy of EE Ranch LLC


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Judge Cash |1987 - 2017

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By Sharee LaRue ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... ne of the top AQHA sires of our time is now running among other greats in greener pastures. Judge Cash, simply known as “Judge,” left us with an amazing bloodstock this September. The 30-year-old grey stallion [Dash For Cash x Mary Mito] was laid to rest at his Cross Country Ranch home in La Line, Oregon, with his owner and companion, Scottie Johnson by his side. So how do you honor a legend in writing? The word “Legend” is used to describe someone as being “remarkable enough to be famous, or does something extremely well,” according to Webster’s Dictionary. So, what defines “extremely well?” Does earning over $115,000 running on the track, holding a speed index of 110, and competing in the All-American Futurity do it? Maybe. How about producing barrel racing progeny with combined earnings of over $1.3 million? How about progeny that have collected over $1 million on the track? How about giving your offspring the mind, conformation, athleticism, paired with pure grit, to repeatedly set, and break, records in several disciplines? There isn’t a stallion on the planet that can compete with him for trainability and heart as his offspring represent him at the NFR in more than just barrels. Every end of the Thomas & Mac Center [steer wrestling, team roping, pick up horses] you look at, there is a Judge Cash. Enough said. “Extremely well” has just been defined. He not only sired past NFR barrel racing qualifiers like Judge Buy Cash, ridden by Brenda Mays, and Quick Judge, ridden by Amy Dale, ten-year-old KG Justiceweexpected [Issy] will grace the barrel pattern at this year’s PRCA Finals. Being currently ranked sixth in the World, earning $111,758 so far for the season, Issy will be ridden by Kathy Grimes. Cash Mia If U Can, ridden by Jordan Bailey, will represent Judge at the Jr NFR this year as many cheer them on from the stands and homes across the nation.

Johnson and Judge | photo by Robin L Corey 30 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue

For those that knew Judge, the titles, the earnings, the fame, and the praise, do not fill the void left behind. There will never be another. There will, however, be “the next,” and “the future of his bloodline.” As we watch the legacy he has left the industry, we will remember….... The Judge.


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Keep Your Horse in Good Health with Continuous Supplementation

By Kelsey J. Nonella |Ph.D. |P.A.S. |Equine Nutritionist @ Horse Guard, Inc. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... hen compared to other nutrients required for horses, vitamins and minerals are needed in quite small amounts. However, they are absolutely essential for normal bodily functions. These crucial classes of nutrients need to be consumed on a daily basis in order to ensure your horse’s best health. The essential macro-minerals are calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, chloride, potassium, and sulfur. The essential trace minerals are iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, iodine, and cobalt. Differentiation between the two classes of minerals is determined by the amount necessary to the horse. Macro-minerals are typically measured in percentage of diet or grams per kilogram, while trace minerals are typically measured in parts per million of the diet or milligrams per kilogram. No matter which vitamin or mineral we are discussing, it is crucial that it be fed within the recommended range for optimal health. Certain vitamins and minerals are consistently deficient in feedstuffs and need to be provided by a supplement in order to ensure your horse’s requirements are being met. One mineral in particular that is normally lacking in feedstuffs is zinc. Zinc deficiency is probably one of the most widespread and most overlooked deficiencies of horses in the United States. Normal diets only supply three-fifths of the minimum recommendation of the National Research Council. Zinc serves as an antioxidant and is critical for skin and hoof health, carbohydrate metabolism, and thyroid production. Without supplementation, your horse may experience weak, brittle hooves and have a difficult time putting on or holding weight. Providing supplementation will help ensure that your horse isn’t one of the many horses across the United States that isn’t provided enough zinc from their common feedstuffs. Other vitamins and minerals can vary greatly in feedstuffs. Weather conditions and soils in certain areas of the United States can greatly impact the levels of certain vitamins and minerals. The Northwest, for example, is extremely selenium deficient. If you are not providing your horse with selenium supplementation while living in or feeding forage from this area, he is almost definitely selenium deficient. Removing supplementation from your horse for only one month will most likely make him subclinical-

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ly deficient, and after 4 months of no supplementation on Northwest forages, he will have substantially lower selenium levels. Research has found that horses not supplemented for 4 months will in fact be so deficient that supplementation with 3 mg of organic selenium will not increase their blood levels to adequate levels after 4 months. It is predicted that supplementation would need to be provided for 6 to 8 months before blood levels would be back to adequate ranges. While many horse owners only supplement while practicing and competing on their horses, research provides that it is essential for your horse’s health to continuously supplement. Storing hay also greatly impacts the nutritional value. While the nutritional content of hay’s protein and minerals will stay pretty stable, vitamins are much more volatile. The volatility of vitamins allows for dramatic decreases during harvest and storage. For example, vitamin C is high in green grass; however, when cut and baled, it can lose up to 50% in the first 24 hours of curing. Vitamin E is also abundant is green grass; again, however, the vitamin E content continuously decreases once baled. Research has shown that hay stored for 6 months loses 80% of its vitamin E due to oxidation, rendering it useless to your horse. The loss of volatile vitamins makes it crucial that your horse is receiving a supplement in order to keep meeting its nutritional requirements throughout the year. While subclinical deficiencies aren’t visible to the naked eye, they can wreak havoc on your horse. These deficiencies can not only cause your horse to lose his competitive edge but also to be more susceptible to disease and infection and can have long-term effects that shorten his competitive life, as well as his total life span. Supplementing your horse with a great vitamin–mineral supplement designed for horses in your area will address these possible deficiencies. Do the best thing for your horse by keeping vitamin and mineral levels adequate in your horse throughout the year. In turn, your horse will be able to give his best to you.

................................................................................................... About the Author | Kelsey J. Nonella, Ph.D. is an equine nutritionist who was riding horses before she could walk. Her love for horses drives her to help educate people on their horses’ needs in order to have happy, healthy horses.


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The Working Lines | High Rolling Roany & the rest of the story

By Larry Thornton ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... hen the “Working Lines” covered the stallion Awesome Pete in the August/September 2016 issue of THE WORKING HORSE, we left behind part of the story. The part we left behind was a closer look at the stallion High Rolling Roany, the other half of what has become known as “The Cowhorse Confluence” or the bringing together the blood of High Rolling Roany and the stallion Oswald found in pedigree Awesome Pete. High Rolling Roany was a stallion that seems to have come out of nowhere to be the foundation sire for Bub Nunn and his wife Nona of Miles City, Montana. Bub explained how he came to own High Rolling Roany in an interview I had with him, “Jayne Harris of Gillette, Wyoming was having a quarter horse sale. They were mostly Hancock’s and I was wanting to get more Hancock into my horses. So, I went down to the sale. She was selling mostly baby colts with a few mare and colt pairs.” He continued, “I bought what I thought would be the best stud prospects. I bought one colt with its mother and I bought two singles and one of the singles was this big ole colt, High Rolling Roany.” “Roany caught your eye right away. He was in a pen of stud colts and he would stand alone all the time. He was a little bigger than the rest of the colts and he would stay off in the corner by himself. I had already bought two others and so when he came in the ring, I bought him thinking that out of the three I might get a stud of some kind.” Bub continued with what happened next, “When I sold my ranch, I had to sell most of my stock, but I kept my mares and this big yearling. We had moved here to Miles City. A fella over at Harden was going to calve some 800 first calf heifers and I helped him. I had just started riding the big colt. So I took him with me and I rode him at least every other day and I could see he was really picking things up.” “Then I bred him to my mares. When I got that first crop of colts, I knew I had something pretty good. They all looked alike and they all acted like Roany,” noted Bub talking about the kind of colt his new stud was siring.

He continued, “I didn’t stand him to the public. I let a few friends breed to him, but when his colts started getting around he just got popular.” One of the first things we want to do is delve into the sire record and see how many performers the stallion has sired. Guess What! High Rolling Roany is a stallion in demand with no official AQHA performers. So, what caused the demand for High Rolling Roany colts? The answer to that question is good ranch using horses that have also made frequent successful appearances in the rodeo arena. Both areas that the AQHA doesn’t keep records on. So where did these quality ranch horses come from? A look at the pedigree of High Rolling Roany will give us some answers to that question. The sire of High Rolling Roany was Roan Prairie. Roan Prairie was a 1965 roan stallion bred by Jake Kittle of Arizona. The AQHA lists two owners for Roan Prairie. They are the Diamond Ring Ranch of Casper, Wyoming and Roy Cleveland of Brule, Nebraska. Bub professed that he really didn’t know much about Roan Prairie. Just what the fella said at the Harris sale when he bought High Rolling Roany. This is what the man said, “That’s the only stud ever saved out of Roan Prairie. I picked up Cheyenne on Roan Prairie and he was the best pickup horse I ever rode.” Bub added, “High Rolling Roany was the only stud colt that we could find by Roan Prairie. The old boy that raised him ran down those bloodlines and never could find another stud by Roan Prairie.” He added, “I guess they were more valuable as geldings.” Roy Cleveland was the last owner of Roan Prairie. He told me how he came to own the horse, “I bought Roan Prairie from Van Irwin of Casper, Wyoming. He owned the Diamond Ring Ranch. I had seen Van’s kids rope on him when he was younger. At that time, I didn’t really realize what he was. Oh, I’d heard about him and seen some geldings by him, so I looked him up in the Stud Book:’ He continued about why Roan Prairie was available, “Van was in the process of changing his program and I actually bought

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him through Lee Martinez, the ranch manager. Roan Prairie was owned by the Diamond Ring Ranch and Lee was in charge of selling the horses.” “I hadn’t seen Roan Prairie for a number of years, so I went to look at him. I went in January and it came a blizzard. Lee lived on the Shamrock Ranch, which was North of Casper and Roan Prairie was at Powderville. They had the geldings and mares at the Shamrock Ranch. I saw about 30 head of geldings by him, and just about every one of them was a good one. But I wasn’t real impressed with their mares.” “Well it had stormed, and it was bad enough that I couldn’t get over to see him. So, I stayed overnight with Lee. In the night I woke up thinking about him. That is when I made up my mind that if he’d sire saddle horses that looked like them, out of those kind of mares, I was just going to buy him. I never went to see him. I paid Lee and made a deal to have Lee deliver him.” “Roan Prairie was 18 years old when we got him. We had him until he died. We got four colt crops out of him.” Roy reaffirmed that he thought High Rolling Roany was the only stud colt ever kept that was sired by Roan Prairie. The sire of Roan Prairie was Cibecue Roan. Cibecue Roan proves to be a key player in Cleveland buying Roan Prairie. He talked about Cibecue Roan this way, “We were raising ranch horses and rope horses. Good calf roping and team roping horses. I had always been a big fan of the Driftwood horses and some of the Hancock horses, and I really liked Cibecue Roan.” Cibecue Roan was sired by Red Man by Joe Hancock and out of Miss Linwood by Driftwood. Thus, we see that Roan Prairie was the combination of the two great performance siring stallions Joe Hancock and Driftwood. Roy added, “The first time I saw Cibecue Roan I was working for a man named Oliver Manning. Manning had made a deal to buy Cibecue Roan over the phone with Jake Kittle. We went to Grand Rock to get him and Jake decided not to sell. Well he had another horse there that was a brother named Redwood Man. He bought him. I liked that horse, his disposition and he bred good colts. He didn’t have the eye appeal


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Cibecue Roan had though.” Cibecue Roan was the 1965 AQHA High Point Steer Roping Stallion. He was the 1966 AQHA fourth place High Point Steer Roping Horse. He earned 55.5 AQHA performance points in reining (24), cow horse (12), heading (8), heeling (5), tie-down roping (6) and western pleasure (.5). Cibecue Roan sired 133 foals with 15 performers. He sired five ROM show horses that earned eight Superior Awards. His leading point earner was El Campanero. This bay gelding earned 730 AQHA points. He was Superior in open western riding, open western pleasure, youth showmanship, youth western riding, youth western pleasure and youth western horsemanship. This gelding was the 1975 AQHA Youth High Point Working Cow Horse and the AQHA Youth World Champion Western Riding Horse. Red Ding was another Superior performer with his awards coming in youth western pleasure and open western pleasure. Red Man was a AA race horse. He had a speed rating of AA on the old letter system and that was probably the highest rating at the time he raced. This is equivalent of a speed index in the 80s for today’s racehorses. He was a track record holder. He was ROM

in the arena by earning two roping points. Red Man was a successful sire. He counts among his foals the great stallion Blue Valentine and Worryman. Blue Valentine being the foundation sire of his own line of Joe Hancock horses. Worryman was the sire of Bankette, the dam of the Champion Quarter Running Horse Rebel Cause. Red Man was sired by Joe Hancock and out of a mare we know today as a Burnett Roan mare. Miss Linwood was the dam of Cibecue Roan. This daughter of Driftwood was out of Queen Ann by King P-234. Queen Ann was one of several own daughters of King P-234 to be brought to California by Perry Cotton and Channing and Katie Peake of Rancho Jabali. Channing and Katie Peake owned Driftwood and for several years formed a partnership with Perry Cotton. The dam of Roan Prairie was Tom’s Rosewood, a daughter of Texas Tom F. Texas Tom F was an ROM show horse that had two performance points and one halter point. Texas Tom F was a son of Joe Tom. Joe Tom was a paternal half-brother to Red Man as they were both sired by Joe Hancock. Joe Tom was bred on Tom L. Burnett’s Triangle Ranch. Joe Tom spent several years as a herd sire for the Burnett Ranch

GUMBO GIN CAKE b ro 15.3 2006 QUARTER HORSE

LJH HIGHROLLIN TEXAN 2017 QUARTER HORSE

JENNY LYNNE GIN 2009 QUARTER HORSE

of Guthrie, Texas. The dam of Texas Tom F was Miss Tommy 58. This mare was a daughter of Tom (Scooter) the foundation sire of the modern era of Burnett Ranch horses. Tom (Scooter) was sired by Midnight by Badger by Peter McCue. The dam of Tom’s Rosewood was O See O by Driftwood. The DRIFTWOOD BREEDERS NEWS­ LETTER of July 1, 1996 in a piece called “The Jake Kittle Story,” indicates that O See O was a “two-time grand champion reining mare in California.” O See O was also described by Kittle in this material as “having the best head” he had ever seen on a mare. One of the other mares that Kittle bought during this time was Miss Linwood, the dam of Cibecue Roan. The Kittle breeding program was founded on the Driftwood mares like O See O and Miss Linwood. With the addition of O See O to the pedigree of Roan Prairie we have another Joe Hancock cross on Driftwood. This makes Roan Prairie double bred to the Joe Hancock/Driftwood cross. Cibecue Roan was sired by Red Man by Joe Hancock and out of Miss Linwood by Driftwood. Tom’s Rosewood was sired by Texas Tom F by Joe Tom by Joe Hancock and out of O See

HIGH ROLLING ROANY b ro 1985 QUARTER HORSE #2348377 VALENTINE ROSEBUD blk 1987 QUARTER HORSE

GUMBO ROANY bl ro 1992 QUARTER HORSE AQHA # 3083820

MR PETE OSWALD b 1987 JUNIORS GBLAZE QUARTER HORSE 1993 AQHA#2594828 GIN BLAZE QUARTER HORSE sor 1969 QUARTER HORSE AQHA-0611395 MR PETE OSWALD b 1987 AWESOME PETE QUARTER HORSE b 15.2 1996 AQHA#2594828 GIN BLAZE QUARTER HORSE sor 1969 QUARTER HORSE AQHA-0611395 ROANYS TOMCAT rd ro 15.3 1990 ROANYS EASY CAT QUARTER HORSE 1999 2909916 CHANTILLY SAGUNTO QUARTER HORSE sor 1991 orking orse agazine QUARTER HORSE 3060042

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ROAN PRAIRIE ro 1965 VANZI RENO BAR rd ro 1977 OLE RICHARD sor 1979 ROSEBUD FOUR b 1980 OSWALDS PETE b 1968 OH MISS SADIE blk 1976 OSWALD br 1945 GIN CAKE b 1958 OSWALDS PETE b 1968 OH MISS SADIE blk 1976 OSWALD br 1945 GIN CAKE b 1958 HIGH ROLLING ROANY b ro 1985 JAX RED CAT sor ~ SAGUNTO sor 1979 tallion ssue JENNY SABRE sor

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The Working Lines continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... O by Driftwood. This makes Roan Prairie 3 X 4 to Joe Hancock and 3 X 3 to Driftwood. An Author’s Note: One of the legends in quarter horse history has to do with Driftwood. Driftwood is listed as sired by Miller Boy by the Hobart Horse. Some believe that the Hobart Horse was John Wilkins or a son of John Wilkins. John Wilkins was the sire of Joe Hancock. A man named Hobart was a manager on the JA Ranch when John Wilkins was there. This is interesting as Joe Hancock and Driftwood have crossed very well together. Vanzi Reno Bar was the dam of High Rolling Roany. She was bred by Vernon H. Hall of Harrold, South Dakota. Her last owner was Roy Cleveland of Brule, Nebraska. She was the dam of six registered foals with none of them being AQHA performers. High Rolling Roany had one full brother in Vanzis Reno. He was born in 1986. Roy Cleveland recalled how he got Vanzi Reno Bar, “I bought her from Vernon Hall. He lived north of Pierre, South Dakota. My mission was to buy a full sister to a paint horse I was interested in. He was wanting to get out of the mare business. So, to get the paint mare, I had to take Vanzi Reno Bar. She wasn’t even halter broke. She had never had anything done with her when I got her.” He added, “Hall was an old bush track race horse man. He mainly ran in the Dakotas. Like match races run on the reservation. She was a roan and bred pretty good. I brought her home and turned her out with old Roany.”

This is how Roy Cleveland remembered High Rolling Roany, “When that colt was born, he was really big. He just stayed that way. Everybody talked about him.” He continued about how High Rolling Roany was special from the beginning, “I was living north of Gillette, Wyoming at that time and the pasture they were in was on one of the main roads. There was a lot of traffic on that road and people would call and ask about the colt, or they would drive in and want to know about that colt.” Roy recalled the day Bub bought High Rolling Roany this way, “Bub Nunn came to the sale in an old International pickup with a stock rack on it. He bought him and loaded him in the pickup. That colt stood tall enough, as a six or seven-month-old colt, that his head was over the top of the cab of the pickup.” The sire of Vanzi Reno Bar was High Reno Bar. High Reno Bar has no AQHA show record. His sire was Sea Bar. Sea Bar was sired by Lightning Bar by Three Bars. Whisper W was the dam of Sea Bar. She was sired by Joe Reed II. The dam of High Reno Bar was Boyd Flick 2. This mare is a full sister to Stan and Mary Kay Steyskal’s great blue hen mare Boyd Flick. Boyd Flick and Boyd Flick 2 were sired by John Red by Red Man by Joe Hancock and out of Palo Gal by Sandy McCue. John Red was out of Just Sissy, a thoroughbred mare by Just David. John Red was the first horse in South Dakota to run AAA time on the track. High Reno Bar was a full brother in blood to Flick Bar, the

AAA/AQHA Champion sired by Sea Bar and out of Boyd Flick. Van Bar Chic is the dam of Vanzi Reno Bar. This mare was sired by Vanzi Bar by Clabber Bar by Three Bars. Clabber Bar was a AAA rated race horse. The dam of Vanzi Bar was Vansarita by Vandy and out of Garrett’s Miss Pawhuska by Leo, an AQHA Hall of Fame inductee. Vanzi Bar was a AAA/AQHA Champion with 24 halter points. Frei’s Bar Chic was the dam of Van Bar Chic. This mare was sired by Bar Bea. This horse was sired by the AAA/AQHA Champion Casbar. Casbar was sired by Three Bars and out of Little Egypt by Texas Dandy. High Rolling Roany spent several years developing his skills as a good working ranch horse and as a steer roping horse. Then an injury ended that career. Here is how Bub told what happened, “He was turned out and a fella turned a mare, a mule and a saddle horse out next to him. Roany was one that would paw the wire and he pawed the wire. He nearly cut his front foot off. I didn’t find him for 10 days. I got him to the vet, but we couldn’t get it to heal. It was infected, and we couldn’t get it to heal. The vet said that if we kept that infection below the knee, he might last quite a while.” Bub continued, “We cut back on using him. Then a neighbor wanted to use him. He was a good fella and he wintered his stock real well. He said, ‘Why don’t I winter him? Because he is closer to my place and I’ll put a couple of mares with him in the spring.”

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Bud and Nona Nunn with their picture of High Rolling Roany

Lynne Taylor on Roanys Tomcat

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Photos courtesy of John Moore

High Rolling Roany one of the foundation sires for The Cowhorse Confluence


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... “So, we did it that way. Well spring came, and he came out of his house one day and the ole horse was laying down. He hollered at him and he got up. Turned around about twice ran into the side of the barn and died. The infection had gotten him.” The blood of High Rolling Roany found its way into a number of ranch breeding programs. They include the Hetletved Quarter Horses; Leachman’s Hairpin Cavvy Quarter Horses; Beecher Ranch; Quentin Taylor and of course The Cowhorse Confluence of Lynne Taylor and John Moore. These breeders have seen this line of horses do their duty as ranch and rodeo horses, and they like what they have seen. So, they have implemented this line into their breeding programs finding that success can breed success. THE COWHORSE CONFLUENCE Lynne Taylor was a well-known Montana horseman that was a long-time manager of the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Refuge. He was a rodeo hand competing in the saddle bronc, bull riding and team roping. He was also a noted rodeo pickup man. Taylor bought Roanys Tomcat by High Rolling Roany from Bub Nunn. Taylor would buy three Nunn bred weanling colts and Roanys Tomcat turned out to be the best of the three. He was the one used in the Taylor breeding program. Roanys Tomcat was out of Jax Red Cat by Apple Jax by Two Eyed Jack. When Taylor retired from the Pryor

Mountain Wild Horse Refuge, he started day working for local ranchers and one of them was Bob Shelhamer. This introduced Taylor to the Oswald horses and as they say the rest is history. Taylor would buy Awesome Pete in 1999 to cross on his Roanys Tomcat mares. The Taylor plan was to bring the High Rolling Roany blood together with the Oswald bred horses of Bob Shelhamer. The breeding program would come together with the help of rancher, author and historian John Moore. The Taylor plan sadly came to an end when Lynne Taylor would unexpectedly die of an aneurysm. The Taylor family decided to sell the horses. This brings Leroy Hauerland an AQHA Heritage Breeder from Sealy, Texas into the picture. Hauerland would bring Awesome Pete to Texas and is continuing his version of The Cowhorse Confluence. CONTINUING THE CONFLUENCE We will let Leroy refresh us on how he came to bring The Cowhorse Confluence to Texas, “I have always admired the Peter McCue horses. I grew up with them. I grew up around an old man that had racehorses named Owen Lay. I was born in 1946 and in the late 50’s I was a jockey for Mr. Lay and he raised Painted Joe the paint horse that outran horses like Clabber.” “I had always been interested in the Peter McCue horses and I learned most of the good ropers wanted the Peter McCue blood. We were as poor as church mice and we had

to ride what we could afford. But the good ones were Peter McCue horses and through men like Mr. Lay and Jess Koy I learned the value of good bloodlines.” He continued, “My son Brad is a pretty big guy and he was wanting a bigger horse. I had a good line of Doc Bar bred horses, but he wanted something with a little more size and bone. We had the cow, but we didn’t have the size. The 15 to 15.3 hands 1200 to 1300-pound horse is what he wanted. Our horses were in the 1100-pound range. So, we went to looking for something bigger.” Leroy tells how he learned about what he calls the Montana horses, “About 20 years ago I took a horse to Billings, Montana to the Bill and Jann Parker sale and to make a long story short I got to meet Bill and Jann and a fella named Bub Nunn. Bub Nunn had High Rolling Roany by Roan Prairie who goes back to Joe Hancock. I talked to others like Ray Beecher and John Moore and I learned about these Montana horses and their Peter McCue blood.” “John Moore was key in getting me the history of these horse especially the Shelhamer horses. I studied the pedigrees of these horses and they are linebred to Peter McCue as far as you can go. I realized Shelhamer knew what he was doing with Oswald as they have a significant look to them. That look came out in Awesome Pete a blood bay with black mane and tail. He was what I would call the old blood bay, he was really dappled dark black bay with the black feet black mane and tail. He had a big

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Rock River Gun is one of the three cutting bred stallions that Leroy is outcrossing his Cowhorse Confluence mares on and he is very happy with the first foals from these stallions.

This is Duane Gilbert on Sunday Creek Pete This is LJH Highrollin Texan at two days by Awesome Pete and out of a daughter of of age. Leroy is quick to note, “Look at Roanys Tomcat at the 2005 National Western the bond and muscle on this colt.” Stock Show in Denver doing pickup duties.

Photo courtesy of W John Moore orking Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue 43


The Working Lines continued

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black foot and feet hard as a rock.” “I never got to meet Lynne Taylor, but I learned that he was not only a bronc rider, but a pickup man and he did a lot of team roping. I found out that Lynne had bought Awesome Pete or “Bob” as he called him. Lynne had worked for Mr. Shelhamer as a day rider. I never had the privilege of meeting Mr. Shelhamer, either.” “So, Lynne had Roanys Tomcat and Awesome Pete and he had acquired some Poco Pine mares and was crossing then on those two stallions. He ended up with some really nice mares. He started crossing the mares out of Roanys Tom Cat on Awesome Pete and it seems he found a magic cross.” When Leroy found out that Awesome Pete would be sold, he and Brad went to Montana. They would buy Awesome Pete as well as some Roany Tomcat Mares and one of the Poco Pine bred mares in 2008. Awesome Pete went to Texas and he started the Texas branch of the Cowhorse Confluence. He has been bred to the Roany’s Tomcat mares supplying mares for the program. One of those mares was Poco Pine Kitty. She was bred by Lynne Taylor. Her sire was Roany’s Tomcat. The dam of Poco Pine Kitty was Roan A Pine by Bar Lee Pine. Bar Lee Pine was sired by Bar P Pine by Poco Pine. The dam of Bar Lee Pine was Zippo’s Annie by Zippo Pat Bars. Zippo’s Annie was out of Annie Lee Pine by Poco Pine. This gives Bar Lee Pine a breeding pattern of 2 X 3 to Poco Pine. The next step came in 2011 when Leroy bought Gumbo Gin Cake a 2006 bay roan stallion from Ray Beecher and the Beecher Ranch of Miles City, Montana. The sire of Gumbo Gin Cake was Gumbo Roany by High Rolling Roany. The dam of Gumbo Roany was Valentine Rosebud by Old Richard by The Ole Man. The dam of Valentine Rosebud is Rosebud Four by Super Cowboy. The dam of Gumbo Gin Cake is Juniors Gblaze a full sister to Awesome Pete. The sire of Juniors Gblaze is Mr Pete Oswald a son of Oswald’s Pete by Oswald. The dam of Mr Pete Oswald is Oh Miss Sadie by Oswald’s Pete by Oswald. The dam of Oh Miss Oswald is Judy Oswald by Oswald. Nestor’s Gin is the dam of Judy Oswald. The dam of Juniors Gblaze is Gin Blaze by Oswald. She was out of Gin Cake by Johnny Cake and she was out of Nestor’s Gin by Nestor. This gives Junior Gblaze and Awesome Pete a Ibreeding pattern of 3 X 4 X 4 X Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion ssue 2 to Oswald. It also gives this full brother and

sister a breeding pattern of 4 X 3 to Nestor’s Gin. Nestor’s Gin was sired by Nestor and she was out of Savage Gin by Tommy Waggoner. Oswald was sired by Johnny Barnes by Charlie McCue X Billy McCue. Billy McCue was sired by Jack McCue and out of the Old Vaughn Mare. The dam of Oswald was Miss Chubby by Chubby. The dam of Miss Chubby is the Old Vaughn Mare. The Old Vaughn Mare was sired by the Joe Ellard Horse and her dam was a mare by the Ivey Roan Mare. This gives Oswald a breeding pattern of 3 X 2 to the Old Vaughn Mare. Leroy has brought The Cowhorse Confluence to Texas. Despite the loss of Awesome Pete in 2016, he has put together a nucleus of mares and colts by this great stallion that will allow the program to progress with Gumbo Gin Cake a key ingredient in the program. When he discusses his breeding program, you sense the success he is seeing through the colts hitting the ground. He will describe his cowhorse confluence horses with great pride in that they are maintaining the good size and correct conformation these bloodlines are noted for. One colt is LJH Highrollin Texan (name pending with the AQHA) a 2017 red roan colt that has caught his special attention for his size and muscling as a colt. This colt is sired by Gumbo Gin Cake and out of Jenny Lynne Gin by Awesome Pete and she is out of Roanys Easy Cat by Roanys Tom Cat. Check out his pedigree that accompanies this article. Leroy has also added a new element into his breeding program. He is an avid cutter who owns the cutting bred stallions Atta Cat by Highbrow Cat, Playboy Boonsmal by Peptoboonsmal and Rock River Gun by Playgun. He is using these stallions as an outcross for his Cowhorse Confluence mares from Awesome Pete and Gumbo Gin Cake cross and he likes what he is seeing. When Leroy Hauerland was a kid he learned the value of a good Peter McCue bred horse, the kind of horse he couldn’t afford but all the good ropers were riding. The industry has seen over the years that the Peter McCue line of horses have been a part of roping segment of the industry and they are represented by the stallions Joe Hancock, Jack McCue and Badger all found in the Cowhorse Confluence. Leroy has brought home the bloodlines he dreamed of as a kid and at the same time he is perpetuating this great line of horses for others to enjoy and appreciate through the cowhorse confluence.


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New Born Foals

By Outback Stallion Station ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... everal things need to be con- equate transfer of antibodies include failure of colostrum sidered routine care, when production (i.e. due to fescue toxicity), inability or lack foaling out mares. It is important of desire by the foal to nurse, prematurity, dysmaturity, to recognize and observe new foals foal rejection by the mare and failure to absorb antibodto make sure that they are thriving and ies that are ingested. nursing within a few hours of birth. Newborn foals enter the world without antibody protection. Foals Early testing for antibody levels in a neonatal foal can are entirely dependent on antibodies absorbed following identify potential cases of FPT and allow for early iningestion of mare’s colostrum in the first few hours of life tervention and medical management. It is recommended for protection against infectious diseases. Mares produce that a blood sample be collected from a newborn foal colostrum only during the last 1 to 2 weeks of gestation approximately 12 hours after birth to evaluate circulatas antibodies are actively transported from their blood ing IgG levels prior to ‘closure’ of the gastrointestinal and concentrated in the mammary gland. After nursing tract to antibody absorption. If IgG levels are < 400 mg/ the colostrum, specialized cells that line the small intes- dl at 12 hours, oral supplementation with frozen-thawed tine of the newborn foal absorb the antibodies and trans- colostrum or a commercial colostrum substitute should fer them into the foal’s blood. Absorption of antibodies be performed. Foals with complete FPT (IgG < 200 mg/ by these specialized cells is greatest during the first 6-8 dl) may require intravenous plasma transfusion as well hours after birth and stops by 24-36 hours of age. to raise serum IgG levels sufficiently to protect against potential infectious diseases. Failure of passive transfer (FPT) of antibodies occurs in 10-20 % of newborn foals. A foal greater than 24 hours If IgG levels are 400-800 mg/dl, the need for interof age is considered to have failure of passive transfer vention and therapy is dependent on potential pathogen if circulating antibody (also called immunoglobulin or exposure and/or the medical condition of the foal. Foals IgG) levels are less than 400 mg/dl. The term ‘complete’ with partial failure of passive transfer at risk of developfailure of passive transfer is often used if levels are < 200 ing infections may benefit from IgG supplementation. In mg/dl. This implies that a newborn foal did not receive contrast, foals with partial FPT born into a clean enviany colostral antibodies from her dam. A level of 400 to ronment with low pathogen exposure potential and good 800 mg/dl is considered partial failure of passive transfer and a blood IgG concentration greater than 800 mg/dl is preventive management practices may not need supplemental IgG. Antibody levels of > 800 mg/dl at 12 hours considered adequate. of age indicate that adequate passive transfer of immunoglobulins occurred and no additional testing or interIgG Level Interpretation vention is necessary under most management conditions. < 200 mg/dl Complete failure of passive transfer < 400 mg/dl 400-800 mg/dl > 800 mg/dl

Failure of passive transfer Partial failure of passive transfer Adequate passive transfer of colostral antibodies

The most common causes of FPT are poor quality colostrum and premature lactation. Mares that drip or run milk for several hours prior to giving birth are losing colostrum that is vital to the survival of the foal. In that situation, it is recommended that colostrum be stripped or milked out of the mare and saved for the foal. The colostrum should be strained through a gauze filter into a labeled plastic bottle and either refrigerated or frozen if foaling does not appear to be near. Other causes of inad54 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue

Testing a foal at 24 hours of age or more will determine the final extent of passive antibody absorption. It is critical to understand that no significant amount of antibodies is absorbed if oral supplementation is provided after 24 hours of age. Foals greater than 24 hours of age identified with FPT require intravenous administration of plasma or a commercial equine IgG preparation to successfully increase blood antibody levels. Although plasma transfusions are commonly performed in foals for disease prevention and medical therapy, oral administration of colostrum early in the first day of life is unquestionably easier and safer to perform.

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....................................................................................................................................................................................................... A variety of screening tests have been developed over the years for evaluation of IgG levels in foals. The single radial immunodiffusion (RID) test is considered the most accurate test for quantitative measurement of antibody levels in foals. Unfortunately, results of the RID test are generally not available for 24 hours or more making it impractical for routine use on a breeding farm or at a veterinary clinic when rapid results are required for therapeutic intervention. Stallside diagnostic tests have been used to estimate IgG levels in foals. These tests typically estimate serum IgG within a range of values and as such are considered to be semi-quantitative tests. The ARS Foal-IgG Test is a new turbidimetric immunoassay used for quantitative measurement of blood IgG levels in foals. In a recent research trial, the ARS Foal IgG Test was evaluated against the reference standard single radial immunodiffusion (RID) test for estimating IgG levels in foal blood. Values generated by the ARS test were highly correlated to data produced by the RID in a dilution study. The test had a low coefficient of variation (i.e. results were very repeatable) and test results were similar using plasma or serum. The test was determined to be very accurate in identifying foals with failure of passive transfer (< 400 mg/dl). The test was easy to use and produced results within 10 minutes, making it adaptable to clinical situations where intervention decisions are time dependent.

Early testing of a newborn foal can detect potential cases of failure of passive transfer in time for oral supplementation with frozen colostrum to be effective. A timely diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention will often circumvent a life-threatening medical crisis in a young foal. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... About the Author | Outback Stallion Station & Embryo Transfer Center is located in Caldwell, Idaho and offers full service On-Site Foaling Services including 24-hour monitoring, large foaling stalls, and a veterinarian on call for each foaling. We closely monitor every mare and foal to make sure your foal has received the antibodies necessary to thrive. If you have any questions or would like to more information on IgG testing or foaling please contact our office at (208) 454-5557.

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Helmet Tough

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By Nicole Aichele ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... he western discipline and rodeo events are among the last equestrian sports holding out from wearing helmets while riding. Actually, we aren’t just holding out, we are freaking out. Stomping our boots, standing our ground, and shaking our fists at the mention of helmet safety in our sport. In a recent survey conducted by Helmet Tough, a common reason that people don’t wear a helmet is because they “aren’t part of the western heritage.” Like many of these folks, I am proud to be part of the western tradition and the thought of this rare lifestyle fading away saddens me. I am sure that I’m not alone in thinking that if the world were a bit more cowboy and a lot less Wall Street, we’d be much better off. How is it then that people who share such similar beliefs differ so greatly in their opinions when it comes to wearing helmets or cowboy hats? Where lies the disconnect? My name is Nicole Aichele aka “Helmet Girl,” and I am the owner and founder of Helmet Tough – a movement created 4 years ago to eliminate the stigma associated with wearing a helmet in western disciplines. I have grown up in the equine industry, primarily competing in barrel racing. In 2010, my mare Biankus French Girl “Blondie” and I broke the World Record on a WPRA Standard Pattern with a 16.643 (since has been broken). I have been a WPRA Card Holder for 4 years and rodeoed full time for two of those years. Lastly and perhaps most relevant, I made the switch from a cowboy hat to a helmet in 2009. My journey to “Helmet Girl” can be summed up pretty quickly. I was sitting in the back of my Sports Medicine class in High School and found myself convicted when faced with the reality of head injuries and my choice to refuse a helmet. I began to try and justify my choice but what I found was that there was no legitimate reason not to wear a helmet and my decision was based on excuses that had no depth. The next barrel race I attended, my helmet was strapped on and has been ever since. That decision has blossomed into more than I had ever imagined or intended and eventually led to the development of Helmet Tough when I was confronted with the stark fact that most riders in the western industry believe that they should wear a helmet, but ultimately succumbed to the same excuses that I had faced years ago, turning away from what they knew to be right. Things like: “I want to wear a helmet, but I am afraid of what other people will think of me” and “I know I should wear a helmet, but they just aren’t part of the western culture” all too often stand in the way of wearing a helmet. Are folks in the western industry really concerned with what other people think of them? Is opting for a helmet rather than a cowboy hat actually impacting the beloved cowboy culture for the worse? What does it mean to be a real cowboy, anyway? Who were the men who created the western heritage that we hold so dearly and why do we still admire 66 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion them Issue today? What would they have done if faced with the helmet controversy?


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Those cowboys lived by principles that are rare today. Values so foreign to our world that people are mesmerized by the honorable life these slow-talkin’ simple folks lived. Folks who open doors, who say, “Yes ma’am” and “Yes sir,” who show respect to all while, still upholding their own beliefs. According to The National Day of the Cowboy, here is what the founders of our western heritage say it means to be a real cowboy: 1. Live each day with honesty and courage 2. Take pride in your work. Always do your best. 3. Stay curious. Study hard and learn all you can. 4. Do what has to be done and finish what you start. 5. Be tough, but fair. 6. When you make a promise, keep it. 7. Be clean in thought, word, deed and dress. 8. Practice tolerance and understanding of others. 9. Be willing to stand up for what’s right. 10. Be an excellent steward of the land and its animals. This is the cowboy way—and this is where the before mentioned disconnect lies. When looking at our heritage, we discover that it has nothing to do with the outside and everything to do with what is inside. In other words, being a cowboy isn’t as simple as wearing a hat and losing the western lifestyle isn’t as simple as wearing a helmet. When asked, “What made you choose to wear a helmet?” a young girl wrote, “My mom makes me. I hate it because people make fun of me at rodeos. They judge me because I’m wearing that. They don’t look at how well my horse and I are doing. That’s all they care about, it really hurts.”  While these harsh judgments are not in line with the heart of the Cowboy Code, our response to criticism is just as significant. While we are to practice tolerance and understanding of others (See #8), we also should be willing to stand for what is right regardless of the adversity we may face (See #9). It’s important to realize that just because we rodeo, work with horses, or love the western lifestyle, it doesn’t automatically mean that we measure up to the cowboys of our heritage. In order to do that, we must live by the values that they held themselves. It’s also important to realize how the familiar hat began in the first place. According to Wonderopolis, “Legend has it that Stetson’s invention of the cowboy hat started as a joke. During a hunting trip, Stetson amused fellow hunters by making a cloth from the fur of animals they captured. When Stetson finished making his fur felt, he made a very large

hat with it, which he wore for the remainder of the trip as a joke. He soon realized, though, how well the hat protected him from the rain and harsh sun.” The cowboy hat was not intended to represent the western lifestyle—it started as a joke and was kept because of the protection from the elements that the wide-brimmed hats offered the cowboys who rode all day and night. Let me be clear, my intention is not to discredit the cowboy hat--but the sad irony is that we now worry about rain ruining our hats when they were originally used as a tool to keep the rain off us. That’s what they were: a tool. Not an accessory meant to define the people who wear them. If protective head-gear like we have today was available back then, would cowboys have worn it? Who’s to say? But it’s certainly not out of the realm of possibility.  Part of Wild Bill Hickok’s code of conduct was “I will be brave, but never careless.” Even Roy Rogers shared a similar statement in his Rider’s Club Rules listing, “Be brave, but never take chances.” No doubt bravery was a trait of every one of those legends. Each of them made it clear, though, that being brave and being senseless are two separate things. The Lone Ranger’s creed states: “I believe in being prepared physically, mentally, and morally to fight when necessary for that which is right” and “...a man should make the most of what equipment he has.” Hopalong Cassidy’s creed states: “a strong, healthy body is a precious gift.” Stetson, Rogers, Autry--all made the most of the hide and leather that they had. Today, we are blessed to have protective headgear allowing us to better preserve our “precious gift.” But at the end of the day, is any of this really about helmets? The reality is that the controversy on helmets will come and go like everything else, and soon we will be faced with another dilemma that will bring each of us to a fork in the road where we will have to decide between doing what is right and doing what is easy. My hope and prayer is that when we are faced with each new challenge, we will choose to decipher between the flesh and the heart and come out walking in the way that is right.

................................................................................................. About the Author | Nicole Aichele is a professional barrel racer that has broken world records. She also works at the family business Don Johnson Trailer Sales, manages bible camps, and is the owner of Roots Horse Market, a company that focuses on restoring equine health to its roots through natural products.

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A Timey’s Rodeo Bible|fan disclaimer...a contestant that competes in timed events

By Sharee LaRue ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... would hope by now that you all know how to check your trucks and trailers to be “road ready.” I am also going to assume that your horse is in shape and so are you. So, what is left? A first-class strategy to success!

In the beginning of time, the Rodeo Gods created the mind-boggling entry system that creates much anxiety for many. One association to enter – not too bad. More than one – chaos starts to ensue. First of all – how do you determine when you want to be up? By the way, this is called a preference. How do you do that? Everyone has their own way and some just point and shoot and hope for the best. But do you follow the money? If you are prepared to win, then the only thing left to do is to FOLLOW THE $$$$. What you need • A note book and pencil, or your handy dandy smart phone • Results from last year • Draws from last year (This is where the note book comes in. This year you will write down the draw in your event so that next year you can see what perfs most of the money came from – this is VERY important to barrel racers). • A calendar • An atlas (or Google maps) • A calculator • A cup of coffee (according to BJ Taruscio, a long time PRCA Steer Wrestler and a member of the Columbia River Circuit.) Rodeo Entry 101 • Check the results from last year – what perfs did most of the money come from? • Team Ropers, Calf Ropers, Steer Wrestlers, Breakaway - Who has the stock and how do they react to a crowd, slack, being hauled. This is where your note book comes in. Write down all the above info for next year. • Barrel Racers - If you check the winning times from last year you will get an idea of what perf had the better ground. You can also tell if the winning times are slow for the size of the course. This will let you know that the ground is probably not the best. Do you really want to run there? This is when you want to call around and find someone that has ran there and find out why the times where slow. You also need to know if it is a side gate or

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a center gate. Is there an ally to run in and out of or is it a shut gate? Are the barrels on the wall or out in the middle of nowhere? How does your horse deal with the set up? If it is a set up that is not the best for your horse, how does the cost of fuel and fees weigh against the amount of money you might win? If you are willing to go there anyway – you should probably enter slack for less distractions or preference the first perf so that your horse has almost a week to get over the fact that you made it run in hell. • Now that you have followed the money, and studied the stock or the set up, it is time to get out the calculator and the atlas. ALWAYS FOLLOW THE MONEY! You really don’t want to back track and drive in big circles because this is a waste of time, money and most important – makes your horse tired. Try to plot your plan of travel based on following the money in the best way you can. • So now that you know when you want to be up – in a perfect world – you need to plot out the backup plan – your second preferences. If you can’t make it work with your 1st preference and your 2nd preference, then you need to enter “or out.” Not all associations let you do this – so check your rules. • The complicated part of this is “IF” you are entering more than one association. Which association is the most important for you to make finals or place in the year end standings? Whichever that one is – it will take priority over the others. Chart that association’s rodeos first and fill in with the other rodeos. • If you think you are almost done – YOU ARE NOT! Just because you have studied and have a plan of action does not mean that the plan will go that way or that you will always remember when to enter what rodeo. So……………….. • Write down the following in your note book in this order and check it EVERYDAY! •Name of rodeo •Entry number •The time and date the books open and close (make sure you pay attention to what time zone you are calling – you don’t want to miss entries because you didn’t account for a time difference) •1st preference, 2nd preference, and if you need an out •Buddies names and card numbers


....................................................................................................................................................................................................... •A line to write down your confirmation number •The time and date of call backs •The time and date of the perf you are up in •A line to write down your confirmation number •Stock contractor •Stock notes & #’s, color for easy i.d. •Set up •How did your horse react to the environment •Your time •Your placing •What perfs did most of the money get paid out of •Every detail of your run •Any notes that will help you enter up better next year • You now must REMEMBER TO ENTER ON TIME!

If you are chasing more than one association, you will need to check ALL your information for ALL the rodeos on the same weekend EVERY TIME you call back for a rodeo to make sure that you will not foul yourself on a rodeo that has an entry date and time AFTER call backs for another. You might have to re-figure preferences and outs based on call backs.

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How can you make some of this easier? Get out that handy dandy smart phone of yours and set alarms for when books open and next year it will be, if you keep your bible up to date, life will be a PARTY.

Rodeo Travel 101 • ALWAYS give yourself more time to get there than you need. You never know when there will be a problem, flat tire, a wreck that shuts down the highway or construction.

Figure in fuel stops, potty breaks and if on a long haul, the time it takes to unload your horse, offer water, walk it around for 15 minutes and load back up every 4 hours. • When you are done with your perf, unless you are too tired to drive, LOAD UP AND HEAD TO THE NEXT ONE! Don’t wait until the next day. You never know what tomorrow brings and if something does go wrong it gives you a bigger window to not miss your go. Most horses will also do better if they get to rest overnight in the environment they will be competing in. Last but not least YOU MUST TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR “BIBLE” by filling it out after each rodeo! Don’t assume that you will remember. Life will be soooooo much easier next year. You will rarely make more money flying by the seat of your pants, than you will by being 110% prepared.

A Roughy’s Rodeo Bible|fan disclaimer...a contestant that competes in rough stock events

By Sharee LaRue ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... would hope by now that you all know how to check your truck or cars to be “road ready.” I am also going to assume that you are in shape and have been to the practice pen. So, what is left? A first-class strategy to success! In the beginning of time, the Rodeo Gods created the mind-boggling entry system that creates much anxiety for many. One association to enter – not too bad. More than one – chaos starts building. First of all – how do you determine when you want to be up – by the way, this is called a preference. How do you do that? Everyone has their own way and some just point and shoot and hope for the best. But do you follow the money?

If you are prepared to win, then the only thing left to do is to FOLLOW THE $$$$.

What you need • A note book and pencil, or your handy dandy smart phone • Results from last year • Draws from last year (This is where the note book comes in. This year you will write down the draw in your event so that next year you can see what perfs most of the money came from.) • A calendar • An atlas (or Google maps) • A calculator Rodeo Entry 101 • Check the results from last year – what perfs did most of the money come from? This can be an indication of what

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A Roughy’s Rodeo Bible continued

....................................................................................................................................................................................................... perfs draw the bigger crowds. Typically speaking, stock buck better and you will ride better with an energetic crowd. • Who has the stock and how strong is the pen? This is where your note book comes in. Write down all the above info for next year. If there are a multiple strong stock at one rodeo over the other, you will want to be up there first when you are rested and at your best. • Now that you have followed the money and studied the stock, it is time to get out the calculator and the atlas. ALWAYS FOLLOW THE MONEY! You really don’t want to back track and drive in big circles because this is a waste of time, money and most important – it makes you tired. Try to plot your plan of travel based on following the money in the best way you can. • So now that you know when you want to be up – in a perfect world – you need to plot out the backup plan – your second preferences. If you can’t make it work with your 1st preference and your 2nd preference, then you need to enter “or out.” Not all associations let you do this – so check your rules. • The complicated part of this is “IF” you are entering more than one association. Which association is the most important for you to make finals or place in the year end standings? Whichever that one is – it will take priority over the others. Chart that association’s rodeos first and fill in with the other rodeos. • If you think you are almost done – YOU ARE NOT! Just because you have studied and have a plan of action does not mean that the plan will go that way or that you will remember when to enter what rodeo. So……………….. • Write down the following in your note book in this order and check it EVERYDAY! •Name of rodeo •Entry number •The time and date the books open and close (make sure you pay attention to what time zone you are calling – you don’t want to miss entries because you didn’t account for a time difference) •1st preference, 2nd preference and if you need an out •Buddies names and card numbers •A line to write down your confirmation number •The time and date of call backs •The time and date of the perf you are up in •A line to write down your confirmation number

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•Stock contractor •What your draw was, number and color •How did he buck (every detail!) •Your score •Your placing •Name of judges •What perfs did most of the money get paid out of •Any notes that will help you enter up better next year • You now must REMEMBER TO ENTER ON TIME! If you are chasing more than one association, you will need to check ALL your information for ALL the rodeos on the same weekend EVERY TIME you call back for a rodeo to make sure that you will not foul yourself on a rodeo that has an entry date and time AFTER call backs for another. You might have to re-figure preferences and outs based on call backs. How can you make some of this easier? Get out that handy dandy smart phone of yours and set alarms for when books open and next year it will be, if you keep your bible up to date, life will be a PARTY. Rodeo Travel 101 • ALWAYS give yourself more time to get there than you need. You never know when there will be a problem, flat tire, a wreck that shuts down the highway or construction. Figure in fuel stops and potty/food breaks. • When you are done with your perf, unless you are too tired to drive, LOAD UP AND HEAD TO THE NEXT ONE! Don’t wait until the next day. You never know what tomorrow brings and if something does go wrong it gives you a bigger window to not miss your go. Most people do better if they get to rest overnight in the environment they will be competing in than to drive like a bat out of hell and then try to be their best in only an amount of minutes. Last but not least • YOU MUST TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR “BIBLE” by filling it out after each rodeo! Don’t assume that you will remember. Life will be soooooo much easier next year. You will rarely make more money by flying by the seat of your pants, than you will by being 110% prepared.

................................................................................................... About the Author | Sharee LaRue started her rodeo career at the young age of 12. Her rodeo career spanned more than 30 years. She owns a rodeo magazine, Your Competitor News, and is an equine marketing specialists that lives in Oregon with her husband and two boys.


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Frenchmans Boogie 2000 Palomino

(Frenchmans Guy-Boogie Smurf, Boogey Leo) World Champion/ Champion & Multiple Winning Sire of… PHBA World Champion GR BOOGIES GOLDRUSH By the All-Time Living Leading Sire of Barrel Horses FRENCHMANS GUY

Cokes Dry 2005 Black Branded King Ranch Stallion (Ritas Sweet Badger x Cokes Dry Peppy (Dry Doc) Money earner with AQHA points in heeling.

© Working Horse Magazine CK 2016

Very correct and has a great mind. Half of his babies are black so far. Stud Fee: $750

Socia Quarter Horses 421 Havard Dr. Lufkin, TX 75901 936-699-2614 936-675-3551 80 Working Horse Magazine 2017 Stallion Issue


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IOWA BREEDERS CUTTING FUTURITY 2018 NOMINATED STALLIONS 2017 Futurity 3 Yr. Old Open & 3 Yr. Old Non Pro Pay Out $6,955 Web Site: www.iacuttingfuturity.com Nominated Stallions, Stallion Service Auction, Mare Nominations, Futurities, Offspring For Sale, Contacts & Sponsors ______________________________________________ CD DYNA CEE Reid & Melanie Hockenson – Nichols CD Lights x CD Olena ARC Dyna Cee x ARC Matt O Lena 319-330-6862 HockensonQuarterHorses.com rhockenson@hotmail.com ______________________________________________ DANCING BOBBY SOCKS Donnie Stewart – Nora Springs Boonlight Dancer x Peptoboonsmal Cats Bobby Sox x High Brow Cat 217-242-4229 ______________________________________________ FUEGO DEL CORAZON Jim & Linda Randall – Osceola Peptoboonsmal x Peppy San Badger 641-342-7320 Jae Bar Pamela x Doc’s Jack Sprat cell 515-314-0281 J-Bar-R-Ranch.com jim-linda@j-bar-r-ranch.com ______________________________________________ GUITAR GUN Dave Eberline – Bristol Playgun x Freckles Playboy 641-775-3354 Dainty Lena x Smart Little Lena cell 319-415-1250 EberlineRanch.com daveeberline@hotmail.com ______________________________________________ HIGH CARD CAT Christy Braden – Colesburg High Rollin Cat x High Brow Cat Horstman Qtr. Horses Duhons Muleshoe Doc x Colonel Duhon 319-929-4687 HorstmanQuarterHorses.com glamourgrooms@gmail.com ______________________________________________ KROGS FIDDLE CAT Matt & Cassie Winters – Volga Can't Kick This Cat x High Brow Cat Matt 563-929-0046 Fiddlin Jill Pine x The Roan Fiddler Cassie 563-379-6435 SVRanch.net springvalleyranch35710@hotmail.com ______________________________________________ LITTLE DISCO TUCKER Jim & Brenda Kropf – Wall Lake Peppy San Badger x Mr San Peppy Disco Tucker x Doc Tom Tucker 712-664-2772 jkropf@netins.net cell 712-830-7875 ______________________________________________

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On the Road with SeeYa

By SeeYa [Bye Bye Biankus] ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... y name is SeeYa, a quarter horse mare, my human is Sharee, and we live in Oregon. Notice that I said, “My human.” Humans don’t own us, we own them. We own their time, their love, their care, their worries and we own a lot of their money. I have been writing my column since 2004 and my main focus is to train humans. I will take you with me on the rodeo trail as a barrel racer. You would not believe the adventures I have in store for you. What is even more interesting, is the things that happen when I am home. June 18, 2004 Last weekend I got to stay fairly close to home as I competed against about 100 others at a professional barrel. The good news is that I ran the fastest time of the day. The bad news is that I knocked over a barrel. In barrel racing, you get disqualified for knocking over a barrels. Who made that stupid rule anyway? I am pretty sure that it was one of those humans. Now that I think about it, did I hit it or did it hit me? Sharee says that they are metal objects without a brain. I say that they have a mind of their own and that one just jumped out in front of me. Sometimes that is just the way barrel racing goes. In this sport, like all others, sometimes lady luck flies with you and sometimes she flies to a whole different country. Sharee and I do have better news to share. We got a call that we thought we would never get. The American West 4-D people called and invited us to run in the Challenge of Champions, which is held in Reno, NV. The best of the best, only 50 in the nationare invited, compete and the fastest time takes home more than $5,000. They also pay down nine more places. When they called, Sharee thought that they were asking her to report on it. Oh ya, Sharee owns a newspaper. Anyway, it took awhile for it to sink in that they wanted us to compete in it.

After a lot of consideration, she told them that we would have to pass. “When you own a weekly newspaper, you can’t just take off for six days and leave everyone else holding the bag,” she told me. Maybe next year, if we are lucky to get another call, we can go. Until next time…I want to go to Reno and show them what I’m made of…SeeYa February 13, 2009 Oh, the day and the life at my house. There is never a dull moment. Either Sharee is in a panic, someone is in trouble, or life is bliss until one of the first two happen. With that being said, horse and pig 4-H are in full swing at my house. I think I will start with the pigs because they are easy to make fun of. 4-H pig weigh-in was this past Saturday so the pigs had to be loaded up and hauled to town. Nothing is more entertaining than two adults (Sharee, and her husband Shane) standing outside a pig pen scratching their heads. It went something like this: Shane – “What are we going to haul the pigs with?” Sharee – “The semi.” Shane – “Don’t you think that is over kill for just two little pigs?” Sharee – “Do you want to haul them in the front seat of the car?” Shane – After deciding that Sharee had a point he said, “How are we going to get them from the pen to the semi?” Sharee – “I will just pull the semi up to the pen and we can shoo them in the trailer.” Shane – “You can’t do that, it is so muddy the semi will get stuck.” Sharee – After deciding that Shane had a point she said, “I don’t know.” Like that is going to solve the problem. Shane – “Can we put a rope around their necks and lead them to the trailer?” Sharee – “No. Their necks are bigger than their heads and the lead rope will just fall off.” This is the point where someone needed a video camera. I am pretty sure I could have made money on these two by selling the footage to Hollywood for a reality

show. Two adults standing in the middle of a horse pasture in front of a pig pen surrounded by five horses and Gus, the goat, trying to come up with an idea while Patton (Sharee and Shane’s son) is jumping up and down saying, “Can I help,” over and over while Bowdie (Sharee and Shane’s other son) is telling all the horses “No pig, just cow!” Boy that was a long sentence. Sharee – “Ok, I will catch the pig by the hind legs. Shane, you grab the front legs. Patton, you make sure the horses don’t get out and then run and open the trailer door.” Now we have two adults that have a pig upside down holding onto its legs weaving in and out of horses while Gus is trying to get in their way so they can’t take his pig while they are yelling at Patton, “Open the gate, Shut the gate, Run faster, Open the trailer, Shut the trailer,” while the pigs where squealing at the top of their lungs. They didn’t do this just once, but twice. It was like a double feature. Needless to say, when Sharee got back WE decided on how to put the pigs away all by ourselves. I thought it would be a good idea to drive the semi into the pasture by the pig pen regardless of the mud. I then supervised Sharee as she made a tunnel from the trailer to the pig pen out of a big blue tarp. She held it down with rocks and I stood on a corner of it so the pigs couldn’t escape. At this point it’s best not to ask. Sharee then got in the trailer and shooed out the pigs into the tunnel and they ran into their pen. Gus was very happy. Until next time…maybe I could make some money selling the rights to my pig stories…SeeYa.

.................................................................. About the Author | Bye Bye Biankus, AKA SeeYa, is an AQHA mare by The Sovereign (Ettabo) x Mzpath Biankus (Biankus). She had a 10 year barrel racing career. She has published two books “On the Road with SeeYa,” volume I and II, along with being published in several newspapers and magazines. SeeYa went to heaven in July of 2017 at the age of 26.

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Bobby Norris 817-291-0759

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“Whether buying or selling, we’re your rural property specialist!” Marietta, Oklahoma Historical Equine Ranch. 1180+ acres includes 8000+SF registered historical house. Covered arena, 2-20 plus stall barns, round pen. Numerous grazing turnouts, plush grass, creek. 4BR guest house. Pool. Pete Rehm $7,900,000

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Whitesboro 1-Enjoy the country life with this comfortable 3 bedroom 2 bath home on 50 acres north of Whitesboro. Home features large open living kitchen area, granite counter tops. features pellet stove .Hickory hardwoods in living, kitchen and formal dining room. Tom Moore $495,000

Weatherford 5149 sq. ft. custom home on 35 acres. 2 Trinity Wells. Large 50x86 barn/shop with 2-18 Ft roll up doors. Large loft area. 20x60 Barn-shed with area on each side for stalls. Pete Rehm $949,000

Tom Moore Gabe Webster Tri Goldthwaite Larry Porter 817-597-8699 92 Working 817-204-3452 Horse Magazine817-266-5501 2017 Stallion903-821-1232 Issue

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Currently interviewing for rural agents

Lori Dugdale 817-296-8732

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