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MASTER THE CONCEPTS OF INSTITUTIONAL INNOVATION; IDENTIFY AND RESOLVE CHALLENGES, SELECT IDEAS, PROTOTYPE AND TEST. UNLEASH THE INNOVATION CHAMPION IN YOU.


FACILITATING INNOVATION


Copyright @ 2017 by ES Consulting, Everything Brilliant, & Leadership Strategy. All rights reserved. Published by ES Consulting, Everything Brilliant, & Leadership Strategy. Springfield Gardens, NY Published simultaneously in Saudi Arabia No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning without the express written consent of ES Consulting, Talk Freely, & Leadership Strategy. For more information, please contact Mr. Bassam AlKharashi, b.alkharashi@esconsulting.com.sa ISBN 978-0-9997443-0-7 pbk ISBN 978-0-9997443-1-4 ebk Printed in the United States of America


MASTER THE CONCEPTS OF INSTITUTIONAL INNOVATION; IDENTIFY AND RESOLVE CHALLENGES, SELECT IDEAS, PROTOTYPE AND TEST. UNLEASH THE INNOVATION CHAMPION IN YOU.

FACILITATING INNOVATION Written By Bassam Alkharashi, Michael Allen, Patrick Roupin and Michael Wilkinson


TABLE OF UNDERSTANDS THE ROLE OF FACILITATOR

GUIDING THE TEAM IN FIGURING OUT THE CHALLENGE

HARVEST PEOPLE’S CREATIVE THINKING

SUPPORTS THE TEAM’S CONCEPTUAL THINKING

PROVIDES THE TEAM THE APPROPRIATE TOOLS FOR CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


CONTENTS A. INTRODUCTION B. CHALLENGE

8 56

C. IDEATE

102

D. CONVERGE

164

E. PROTOTYPE AND TEST

180

22 TOOLCARDS APPENDIX

218 264


A INTRODUCTION


INITIATION TO BUSINESS INNOVATION


WHY SHOULD I READ THIS BOOK? By reading this book, the insights, ideas, tools and guides, you will discover a lot, including but not limited to; • A clear view of the key steps in the Innovation Process • Guidelines for Prototyping Ideas and evaluating their quality • Techniques for facilitating a team through the Innovation Process • Understanding which Ideation Technique to use in any given situation

11


GETTING STARTED LAND OF INNOVATION


13


WHAT IS INNOVATION? INVENTION IMAGINATION

CREATIVITY

Change that creates new dimension of performance.

The practical translation of ideas into new or improved products, services, processes, systems or social interactions.

Peter F. Drucker

The University of Melbourne

BLUE SKY THINKING

EUREKA! WHAT IS INNOVATION?

The successful exploitation of new ideas. UK DTI

It’s the process of identifying NEEDS.

Innovation is converting ideas to numbers. Information Week

Stimulating creativity to find and assess

IDEAS.

Testing and implementing the best ideas to deliver VALUE.


“

INNOVATION OUTLOOK

DREAM BIG, START SMALL, ACT NOW

Robin Sharma

INNOVATION HORIZON

DEFINING THE OBJECTIVES OF INNOVATION FACILITATION

How might we collaborate with the information centers to eliminate the need for regional data collection ?

INFO CENTERS

How to optimize the data collection from regional center?

REACTIVE

NOW

NEAR FUTURE PROACTIVE

This guide has been developed to help professionals create and support innovation challenges. It combines several processes that are complementary, parallel or optional. For each section, you will find the conditions to adapt to a specific process. Alternatively, we invite you to refer to the Process Timeline.

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THE BUSINESS CASE FOR INNOVATION You and your organization has been innovating – you may not have called it innovation, but if you go back to the definition of innovation (the successful implementation of ideas) you’ve been doing that.

DERIVING BENEFITS FROM ENGAGEMENT:

TWO BROAD APPROACHES

• Asking how to improve the day to day life of employees

Innovation is the process of translating ideas into solutions through using a method we usually refer to as the Innovation Process.

• Demonstrating that you trust them to come up with valuable ideas • Engaging them in turning the innovation strategy into reality • Recognizing and rewarding them when they show initiative and do something new and different

REASONS TO INNOVATE: • Competitive environment evolving more rapidly • Shareholders expect increasing returns • Constant needs to control and reduce costs • Ambition to serve new markets • Customer expectations ever more demanding • Employee’s engagement more complex • To engage with customers and suppliers • Desire to create a culture of innovation

We have already defined the definition of innovation as the process of ideas into solutions and agreed that, to a greater or lesser extent you have been doing this already, but the questions are whether you are doing it well and fast enough – and if you are a commercial organization, whether your competitors are doing it better and faster than you; or if you are a public organization, whether you are doing it well and fast enough to be delivering value for the money invested from the public purse. Innovation has never been as essential. In the last decade we have seen whole industries disrupted predominantly by the digital revolution. Organizations that failed to adapt have been put out of business and no industry is safe; In the future, it will seem as quaint that we used to take our vehicles to a garage to be serviced once or twice a year as it is that men used to run in front of cars waving red flags. Maintenance at all, it will likely be similar robots that assembled your vehicle that do the maintenance. Advances in home automation and remote healthcare will likely make the idea that we send our elderly relatives to old


people’s homes to have cared for sound absurd.

17

That’s the business care for innovation, but you need to understand and build the business case for innovation in your organization. There are two broad approaches you (and most organizations) can take; 1) The benefits gained from engaging people – mostly your employees, but also your customers. You shouldn’t discount the value you get from ideas, but any $ benefit from ideas is a welcome by-product. First and foremost, you are looking to derive benefit of engagement from: • asking how and improving the day to day life of employees by, for instance by removing waste and duplication of the work they do; • demonstrating that you trust them to come up with valuable ideas; • engaging them in turning the strategy into reality; • recognizing and rewarding them when they show initiative and do something new and different. 2) Or the benefits from transformation and innovation – new products, services or business models Which should you focus on? Probably both.

THE QUESTIONS ARE WHETHER YOU ARE DOING IT WELL AND FAST ENOUGH


INNOVATION EXCELLENCE

Strategy

Like a tree, innovation should grow evenly with the contribution of each part of the organization.

Leadership Marketing Technology Policy

Collaboration Networking

Foresight

Customer Experience

Innovation Excellence

Service Design

Communication


THE BUSINESS CASE FOR INNOVATION INNOVATION MATURITY MODEL 01 INITIATION

02

FOCUS

Initial decision to innovate has been made first steps being taken.

Practice and fine tuning are needed to improve inconsistent success.

03 STRUCTURED

Clear expectations are established. Success is consistent.

04 PROFICIENT

Change is internalized, owned and mastered by people.

05 INNOVATIVE

People are proactively collaborating to innovate.

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WHERE TO LOOK FOR INSPIRATION FOR THE NEW IDEAS

GO WHERE SMART PEOPLE GO

GO WHERE IDEAS THRIVE

BE INQUISITIVE

ALLOW YOURSELF TO BE INSPIRED


WRITE ALL YOUR IDEAS DOWN AS THEY OCCUR TO YOU

CREATIVITY & INNOVATION They are not the same; • Creativity is the act of imagining something new • Innovation is the act of implementing something new • You can be creative, but if you don’t implement something, you’re not innovating

MAINTAIN YOUR CREATIVITY BOOK

21


12 BRICKS EXERCISE THIS IS A GREAT INNOVATION GAME TO GET CREATIVITY STARTED. YOU JUST NEED TO HAVE 12 LEGO ™ BRICKS - ANY COMBINATION AND LET’S SEE WHAT YOU CAN MAKE

Split the group into three. Ask the first group to make a small box, just big enough for a small pill. The second group ask them to make something that might be useful for your desk, then give some examples such as a phone stand, or business card stand, perhaps a coaster for your coffee cup or something to hold the phone charger cable. The last group tell them to let their imagination run wild - they can make anything. Give them 5 minutes and see what happens. Typically the person that you asked to make a box starts first and ends first, but they always make a box. The second group generally also make something useful, and sometimes something other than what you suggested.The last group generally start last and if they finish, they’ve made a ‘robot’ or something useful for the desk. The point of the game is 1. Everyone makes something, we are all creative 2. Paradoxily, the people that we gave specific requirements to tend to be more creative and the people for whom we gave no boundaries to what-so-ever find it significantly harder


EXAMPLES

23


INNOVATION TRENDS

PERSPECTIVE AND FORESIGHT

SOCIAL INNOVATION

Using the crowd to source and select ideas.

Foreseeing best business practices from around the World helps organizations build their unique values.

CO-CREATION

Creating strategic alliances with business partners to develop common projects.

RADICAL INNOVATION

There is a stong desire to change by the whole organization.

MARKETING TECHNOLOGY

COMPLEX ECOSYSTEM DESIGN

Complex ecosystem design helps in managing organization from an holistic perspective providing tools that map stakeholders in a more participative fashion.

Mass media does not work! Marketing technology addresses specific user groups within a specific situation with highly interactive content.


BUSINESS PROCESS INNOVATION

Innovating how business processes work.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Crowd-sourcing is utilized by many organizations to co-create solutions with specific communities.

OUT-IN INNOVATION

Bringing the outside-in to speed up customers response by anticipating needs.

CULTURE CHANGE

Creating a culture where innovation thrives

INFORMATION VISUALISATION

In the world of “Right to information” information visualization become critical.

DATA INNOVATION

Data is everywhere and can be used to create new value.

25


THE FACILITATOR ROLE FACILITATOR ARCHITECTURE

Session Roles/Facilitator • Guide • Motivator • Bridge builder • Clairvoyant • Peacemaker • Taskmaster • Praiser • Active listener

Roles/Other Roles • Session Sponsor • Project Manager • Methodologist • Recorder • Documenter • Timekeeper • Participant • Observer

SERVICES

TOOLS


27

ARCHITECTURE

• Assess organization’s requirements in terms of innovation excellence • Design organization’s Innovation Architecture • Support organizations creating a culture of innovation • Develop management tools that encourage innovation

SERVICES

• Support client, projects with international best practices in: • Innovation Strategy

TOOLS

• Support the organization with tools that fosters innovation capability:

• Service Design

• An online platformt to help the organization to share challenges and ideas

• Design Thinking

• Business Innovation Toolbox

• Social Innovation

• A set of tools designed in house to support the organization in developing innovation excellence

• Innovation Management

Innovation is… STRATEGY. CULTURE. PROCESS.


CREATING ENGAGEMENT A FEW THINGS YOU MUST DO…

Work on the innovation team’s identity

Promote through pictures and videos

Ailgn the innovation objectives with HR and management

Have an Innovation day!


29

Compete for international awards

Align your innovation strategy with your branding goals

Dedicate spaces for innovation activities and promotion

Crowdsource from innovation platforms and social media


THE INNOVATION PROCESS


THE INNOVATION PROCESS AND WHERE THIS GUIDE FITS The diagram that follows provides a picture of the Innovation Facilitation Process within the organizational framework we call “Innovation Architecture�. The facilitator guide addresses the Central part of the diagram which is described as: Challenge, Ideate, Converge, Prototype and Test. We can see that the process works best when it is supported by an organization that has awareness and the capability for innovation. This is not the case for every organization, but this should not prevent you from executing the process. This diagram shows the logical way of developing an Innovation Architecture from the center to the end passing through the Architect, Innovate and Implementation stages. That is the ideal way to develop an innovation strategy. However, we know that many organizations need to see some result from innovation efforts before accepting innovation as an institutional value. Therefore, this guide for innovation facilitation is designed to provide an organization quick results from an innovation challenge to prove the importance of innovation and pave the way to institutional innovation.

31


MANAGING INNOVATION WHO ARE YOUR STAKEHOLDERS?

Contribution

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

Contribution

ORGANIZATION

STAKEHOLDERS EXPECTATIONS • Different stakeholders value different things. • Stakeholders expectations provide a source of innovation.

INNOVATION SOURCES Complaints/Requests/Suggestions Size Volume Contribution

STAKEHOLDERS VOICE CAN HELP TO: • Identify and Prioritize Needs • Identify Innovation Challenges

EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

• Co–create Solutions • Uncover System F ailures


DEFINE THE INNOVATION STRATEGY BUILDING YOUR INNOVATION STRATEGY • We define the strategy using a tool called the Strategic Innovation Canvas.

• It defines what you are going to do and how you are going to measure it to make sure it happens.

• It describes your Innovation Strategy on one piece of paper, in a language that everyone can understand.

• If you prefer, the canvas can be a working document and you convert it into a Word document.

STRATEGIC INNOVATION CANVAS (EXAMPLE) EXTERNAL

INTERNAL Capabilities & Training

Create innovative thinking.

Strategic Alignment

Your innovation wed strategy is revie . rly te ar qu

Measuring our internal innovation capability

Key Activities

Mission

Customer / Partner co-creation

are Our customers r associated to ou s. ge en chall

engLaunch 16 chall es this year!

Key Resources and Governance

Everyone has an . innovation agenda

60% of our n staff have take Innovation Facilitation.

Industry and Academic foresight

Our mission is to inspire innovation and creativity in everything we do

Competitive foresight

es We have initiativ and with university think-tank.

Key Partners & Benchmarking

aWe have an innov e tion zone to shar . ts igh ins

Measuring our external innovation positioning

We speak at 3 national conference and 1 international.

We collaborate with govt. entities to evaluate ourselves.

Examples

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DESIGN THE INNOVATION ARCHITECTURE

STRATEGIC INNOVATION CANVAS

INNOVATION GOVERNANCE

Who moderates which Zone & Challenge?

How do we prioritize challenges & Zones?

What are the innovation benefits?

Are we implementing innovation processes?

INNOVATION PROCESS

INNOVATION MEASURES


INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

35

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

INTER N A L

EXTERNAL


DEVELOP INNOVATION LEADERS INNOVATION CULTURE

INNOVATION OFFICE

An Innovative Culture is one that:

Reasons:

• Inspires, encourages and recognizes creativity

• Facilitate Innovation activities

• Welcomes (and expects) the sharing of ideas

• Accelerate growth

• Encourages experimentation

• Improve efficiency and effectiveness of our work

• Relentlessly drives the implementation of the best ideas

• Enhance consistency of execution

• Demands these attributes from the top to the bottom of the organization

• Provide structure for innovation • Manage innovation tools, centers, & architecture

MAKE INNOVATION VISIBLE…

Feedback

Co-creation

Forum

Innovation Awards

Concept show

Live testing


INNOVATION OFFICE

37

MANAGE INNOVATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Develop Innovation Strategy

Create Innovation Architecture

Develop Innovation Roadmap

Develop Innovation Communication Plan

INNOVATE

SUPPORT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Maintain Ideas Bank

Support Innovation Projects

Challenge

Prototype & Test

Develop Innovation Capability

Moderate Challenges & Zones

Ideate

Coordinate Implementation

Enhance Innovation Maturity

Measure Innovation Benefits

Converge

Rollout New Idea

SUPPORT THE INNOVATION OFFICE Administer Office Methods and Tools

Administer Office Roles

Administer Office Services Portfolio


INNOVATION LEVEL 3 Exploration into new markets

Create new markets

2 Existing markets we do not serve

Adjacent growth Exploration into new capabilities

1 Markets we currently serve

Improvements, extensions & cost reductions

New products & services

Capabilities we currently exploit

Existing capabilities we do not exploit

Horizon 1 Seen by employees Organic improvements Implemented in weeks

Horizon 2 Engage employees Customer insights Market research Months to deliver

Create new capabilities

Horizon 3 Greater resources Insights from employees and customers Part of an open innovation Innovations are also more likely to be disruptive


EXECUTE INNOVATION THE FACILITATE INNOVATION MODEL

THE SUB-PROCESSES

The diagram that follows, “Outcomes of Each Phase,” presents the 4 phases, we are going to cover with Facilitate Innovation. The first phase, Challenge, is optional if the challenge has already been identified by the organization. However, it can be worthwhile to go through the phase to assess if the challenge definition is complete before moving on to Ideate.

This diagram provides the specific steps for each of the four phases. While this facilitator’s guide focuses on the “facilitation” of each phase, it also provides the theoretical framework for each phase. We invite the facilitator to execute personal research on the subject.

OUTCOMES OF EACH PHASES

THE SUB-PROCESSES

CHALLENGE

PLAN THE INNOVATION PROJECT

UNDERSTAND STAKEHOLDERS

FRAME THE CHALLENGE

COMMUNICATE THE CHALLENGE

IDEATE

SELECT IDEATION TOOL

IDEATE

PROFILE IDEAS

UPDATE CONVERGE PHASE PLAN

CONVERGE

SEGMENT IDEAS

ELIMINATE IDEAS

SELECT IDEAS

GROUP IDEAS

UPDATE PROTOTYPE & TEST PHASE PLAN

PROTOTYPE AND TEST

SELECT DESIGN CONCEPT

CREATE A PROTOTYPE

TEST THE PROTOTYPE

DEVELOP BUSINESS CASE

DEVELOP IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

UPDATE IDEATE PHASE PLAN

• Agreement on a challenge statement which describes the opportunity to exploit or problem to solve • Innovation Challenge Profile

• Ideas that meet the challenge

• A shorter list of ideas that are moved to the next phase

• A Prototype Model • Business Case • Implementation Plan

OBTAIN APPROVAL TO IMPLEMENT

39


CHALLENGE PROCESS

SENIOR MANAGEMENT DECISION TO UNDERTAKE AN INNOVATION CHALLENGE

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES

Where to start? INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

PLAN THE INNOVATION PROJECT

UNDERSTAND STAKEHOLDERS

E X T E R N A L

CHALLENGE

INTERNAL

FRAME THE CHALLENGE

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

COMMUNICATE THE CHALLENGE

IDEATE

UPDATE IDEATE PHASE PLAN

SELECT IDEATION TOOL

INITIAL CHALLENGE


Constructing Challenges Several sources can be used to create challenges… INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

41

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

E X T E R N A L

INTERNAL

Innovation Diagnostic Canvas

Interview Records Customers

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

IMDb Com.

Press

Reviewers

Community

Buyers Affiliated customers

Collaborators / vendors

Twitter community

INITIAL CHALLENGE

Challenge Stakeholders

Sister company

EBay IMDb

CEO’s priority Virgin Megastore

Management

Marketing dept.

Challenge Abstraction

Our department’s high exposure

Nintendo World

Stakeholders Map

Sony Entertainment


IDEATE PROCESS Ideas

CHALLENGE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES

Knowledge and experience

UPDATE IDEATE PHASE PLAN

PLAN THE INNOVATION PROJECT

Ideas

IDEATE

SELECT IDEATION TOOL

IDEATE

CONVERGE

PROFILE IDEAS

UPDATE CONVERGE PHASE PLAN

Ideas happen when we create connections between our knowledge and experiences. The more connections we can make, the more ideas we have. It’s as simple as that!


Ideation Techniques Idea Bridge

Subtract

To create novel idea

To create disruptive ideas

43

Idea Hacks

Reverse Innovation

To fix the existing

To improve the existing

+

-


CONVERGE PROCESS

IDEATE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT UPDATE CONVERGE PHASE PLAN

SEGMENT IDEAS

CONVERGE

ELIMINATE IDEAS

SELECT IDEAS

GROUP IDEAS

PROTOTYPE

UPDATE PROTOTYPE & TEST PHASE PLAN

SELECT DESIGN CONCEPT

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES

From Ideas to Solutions


Low Impact Low Impact

High Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Impact

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Substantial Ideas

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

PEOPLE

High Impact

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

TECHNOLOGY

Incremental Ideas

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

INFRASTRUCTURE

IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS Idea Assessment Canvas

Fundamental Ideas

High Impact

Low Impact Low Impact Low Impact

High Impact High Impact High Impact

Low Impact Low Impact Low Impact

High Impact High Impact High Impact

Low Impact

45


PROTOTYPE AND TEST PROCESS

CONVERGE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT UPDATE PROTOTYPE & TEST PHASE PLAN

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES

What is a Prototype?

What to Prototype, when and how? What are the type of Prototypes and their characteristics? What’s the right attitude to effective Prototype?

SELECT DESIGN CONCEPT

(exploring vs. rendering)

PROTOTYPE & TEST

CREATE A PROTOTYPE

TEST THE PROTOTYPE

Aesthetic

Aesthetic/Ergonomic

Ergonomic

Principle

DEVELOP BUSINESS CASE

IMPLEMENT

DEVELOP IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

OBTAIN APPROVAL TO IMPLEMENT


Prototyping tools

47 Software 2D/3D

Hardware

What is testing?

How to conduct a test? When? For what?

Photo/Video

Drawing

3D Printing

Prototyping/Testing Matrix PROTOTYPING MATRIX PRIMARY SERVICE

The types of test tools and techniques.

SPACE

SYSTEM

PRODUCT

SERVICE Experience Prototype

Service Image

Experience Prototype

Service Image

Story Board

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Story Board

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Story Board

Mockup

System Map Construction Iteration

SYSTEM Conceptual model

Service Image

Story Board

Experience Prototype

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Mockup

System Map

System Map

SECONDARY

Construction Iteration

Service Image

SPACE Mockup

System Map

Story Board

System Map

Experience Prototype

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Service Image

PRODUCT Service Image

Conceptual model

Story Board

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Mockup Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Mockup


FACILITATOR GUIDE FOR INNOVATION


IDENTIFY INNOVATION OPPORTUNITIES, PRIORITIZE, SELECT AND BUILD AN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR A TARGETED OPPORTUNITY.

49


HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE This guide offers a linear process and sub-process that are parallel or optional.

Training section

Schemes and pictures

DEFINING THE OBJECTIVES OF INNOVATION FACILITATION This guide has been developed to help professionals create and support innovation challenges. It combines several processes that are complementary, parallel or optional with respect to the case it applies. For each section, you will find the conditions to adapt to a specific process. Alternatively, we invite you to refer to the Process Timeline.

What facilitator do, what he must care about, what he need to prepare, control, etŃ


What facilitator say to guide the team and gain engagement Tips and time keeping Page number and chapter color

51

TERMS AND DEFINITION Innovation is often used as a catchall term referring to the process of translating ideas into solutions through using a method we usually refer to as the innovation process. Challenge is the issue that has been identified by an organization to be solved. Alternatively, a challenge can refer to an opportunity to create added benefits without focusing on a problem. Ideate is simply the act of generating ideas. Converge is the process of taking a wide range of ideas and eliminating or combining those ideas towards a compelling design. Test and Prototype is the process of implementing in an initial form, the design and solutions proposed in a smaller form to assess success prior to full implementation.


“IRONICALLY, IN THIS CHANGING WORLD, PLAYING IT SAFE IS ONE OF THE RISKIEST THINGS YOU CAN DO.” REID HOFFMAN


B 53

CHALLENGE


INNOVATION CHALLENGES CHALLENGE PROCESS SENIOR MANAGEMENT DECISION TO UNDERTAKE AN INNOVATION CHALLENGE

PLAN THE INNOVATION PROJECT

GHALLENGE

UNDERSTAND STAKEHOLDERS

FRAME THE CHALLENGE

COMMUNICATE THE CHALLENGE

UPDATE IDEATE PHASE PLAN

IDEATE

INNOVATION PROCESS

SELECT IDEATION TOOL

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES


WHAT IS INNOVATION CHALLENGE? Challenge example

Objective: Gaining support for an innovation project. Challenge: “How might we secure time for our innovation activity”? Objective: Novel ideas to improve customer service. Challenge: “How might improve our customers experience, get them talking about our service to their friends at a dinner party”? Why Challenge?

The Challenge mode is critical to the innovation process because it explicitly expresses the challenges you are striving to address through your efforts. In order to be truly generative, you must first craft a specific and compelling challenge question to use as a solutiongeneration springboard. What makes a successful Challenge?

A Clear Challenge

Organizational Context

55


CHALLENGE PROFILE This tool is used when we already have a general understanding of the challenge. We want to understand the challenge environment or a potential new challenge that derives from the initial challenge. CHALLENGE PROFILE CHALLENGE

SPONSOR

CHALLENGE

START DATE

STOP DATE

TARGET AUDIENCE

CALL TO ACTION

HORIZON WE WANT

INNOVATION FOR: TO FIX THE ISSUE

CONSTRAINT

REWARD RECOGNITION

INSPIRING INNOVATION MODEL

NOW

THE FUTURE

CREATE CHANGE

FAR FUTURE

CREATE RADICAL ISSUES


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> CHALLENGE PROFILE

HIGHLIGHTS The Potential Challenge •The Potential Challenge usually starts with the statement: How might we…? •The challenge statement will ideally be a single sentence that combines all the aspects we want the challenge to cover. •The challenge can include constraints like “without additional employment” •Keep concepts and wording simple.

The Sponsor • It is important to have someone who is willing to support the challenge within the organization. • The Sponsor must have enough power to enforce the decision and run the challenge within the organization. • The Sponsor must be in a position to represent all stakeholders taking part in the challenge.

The Horizon • Knowing your Horizon and what you want to do will help you in understanding the scope of change you can expect around this challenge. • Getting clarity of the Horizon determines the most appropriate ideation technique.

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CHALLENGE

• • • • • • •

Inspires your team Provides a reference for evaluating competing ideas Empowers your team to make decisions independently Fuels brainstorms by suggesting “how might we” question Captures the hearts and minds of people you meet Is something you revisit and reformulate as you learn by doing Guides your innovation efforts

CHALLENGE Challenge

START & STOP DATE Start and End date are important to ensure there is no loss of motivation among collaborators. Date can be changed once the challenge has been defined.

Sponsor Start date

CALL TO ACTION

Target Audience

What are the things that need to be done to support this challenge? Example: • Initiate a workshop • Create an awareness video • Launch an online idea challenge resolution • Initiate a process of collaboration

Call to Action

• etc.

Horizon

CONSTRAINT What are the limits of this project? • Budget • Policy limitation • Department involved • Geography • Timeframe

• Etc.

INSPIRING MODELS (OPTIONAL) Inspiring Innovation Model can be a great source to ideate, however, people may take these examples as expectation and just duplicate.

We want

Innovation for: To fix the issue

Constraint

Reward or Recognition Inspiring

Now

C


SPONSOR Sponsor must feel responsible for the challenge. Sponsor must have the authority to enforce the challenge resolution. If the sponsor is too busy, he/she must be in a position to delegate the challenge execution. A clear Challenge

PROFILE

TARGET AUDIENCE The potential project stakeholders. These includes: • Managers • Users

• Vendors • Customers • Opinion leaders • Etc.

Stop date

Organizational Context

Once again, these get to define as you go through the Challenge Phase.

The future

Create change

Far future Create radical change

HORIZON & WANT Horizon refers to the level of projection in the future to generate concepts. We have 3 horizons: • Now (the near future) • Future • Far Future We may want to: • Fix the issue • Create a change • Create a radical change

REWARD OR RECOGNITION (OPTIONAL) Reward or Recognition must be offered with respect to people’s interest in the organization. Engagement is better than rewards. Example:

• IPad, weekend holiday, gift voucher, cash, etc.

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3 INNOVATION HORIZONS Horizon 1 • Seen by employees • Organic improvements • Implemented in weeks

Create new markets

Horizon 2 • • • •

Can still engage employees Customer and strategic insights Market research and competitive analysis Months to deliver

Existing markets we do not serve

Adjacent growth

Horizon 3 • Greater resources, patience and strategic direction • Insights from employees and customers is valid • Part of an Open Innovation strategy that also includes customers, analysts, R&D • Innovations are also more likely to be disruptive

1 Markets we currently serve

Improvements, extensions & cost reductions

Capabilities we currently exploit


3

Where to start?

Exploration into new markets

2

Scenario 1 We have people from different parts of the

Scenario 2 We have people from the same part of the

organization that is likely to have different challenges.

organization that has a common issue.

Exploration into new capabilities I know my challenge

I am clear with the scope of my challenge

61

To do

IDEATE

New products & services

Challenge Abstraction

>

Innovation Diagnosis Canvas

Existing capabilities we do not exploit

Create new capabilities

Challenge Abstraction


INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS This tool can be used to identify different challenges from various stakeholders. It is particularly useful when an organization wants to start to innovate without having a specific challenge in mind.

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS CHALLENGE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

We have many challenges

INTERNAL

E X T E R N A L


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

HIGHLIGHTS Our Organization Our existing perception of what our company does We do.. We excel at.. We are unique because.. Our company mission is.. We have a clear understanding of our priorities… We earn our money by.. Our team looks like.. Our business is changing because.. Our business is being disrupted by.. Our Position in our Marketplace The way we operate in the Marketplace We describe our market as.. We position ourselves against our competitors by.. Our value add is.. The opportunities in the marketplace are.. The risks in the marketplace are.. Our potential for growth is..

Our Culture The way we operate together We identify ourselves as… Our colleagues would describe our organization in broadly the same way… We celebrate success by.. We build strong teams by.. Our working environment is...

Our Capabilities What do we do, what are our unique competencies? We’re great at.. We have a tradition of.. We are known for.. We are proud of.. We have experience in..

Our Partners and Community What our Partners and Community expect of us We see our role in our community as.. We understand who are our most important partners… We know what our partners expect of us.. The role we should take in our community is.. We see trends that will inform our strategy as..

Our Clients How our Clients see us? What do we do, what are our unique competencies? We understand what our clients want from us by... We understand what our clients think of us by… Our clients love us because.. Our clients are frustrated when we.. Our clients would like us to..

Color coding Participants will start by filling up the canvas with green, yellow and red sticky notes. • Green for what we celebrate well. Where we are successful. • Yellow for these things that are not always successful in the organization. • Red for what we do not do, or fail to do.

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IDENTIFYING CHALLENGES INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS Fill the Innovation Diagnostic Canvas with Orange, Green, & Red sticky note.

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

We celebrate success well

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Some departments find it easier to success than others

We find it difficult to celebrate success

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INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

Now that your canvas is filled with Orange, Green, & Red sticky note. try to identify challenges.

How might we…?

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

65 Note: Focus on the red sticky notes that are the major issues faced by the organization.

INTERNAL

E X T E R N A L


CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION Creating a well defined challenge will help you to communicate with stakeholders. Harvest best ideas from collaborators and discard unwanted deviation from the scope. For each challenge identified designs a Challenge Profile. The suggested Challenge Profile will help to determine challenge components.

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION Measurement

CHALLENGE

With positive discrimination policies?

Materials We have one challenge

Mother Nature

Potential New Challenge

Machine/Equipment INITIAL CHALLENGE

Man power

With appropriated infrastructures?

Methods

With blind friendly devices?

With non discriminative HR policies?

With process that eliminates physical movement?


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

HIGHLIGHTS

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

INITIAL CHALLENGE

Canvas How to read this canvas? • At the center is the initial challenge. • At the circumference are the variables that may affect the initial challenge. • In between, are the potential new challenges. A potential new challenge integrate the basic of the initial challenge and the specificities of selected variables.

Identify Variables How to proceed? • First, we need to discover the variables. These are important factors that may change the challenge scope. • Once we have define the variables, we can go on with the writing of potential new challenges. Discovering the variables can be a long process you can conduct using tools like stakeholder interview, observation, qualitative and quantitative analysis.

Interview We suggest that you run rounds of interviews with challenge stakeholders to understand the underlying factors that could affect the challenge scope. Reframe your challenge question if needed proposing different alternatives. This will help you to validate that the assumed challenge is really at the origin of dysfunction, alternatively, you would have a potential new challenge to propose.

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Influencing Factors 2. Sustainability Potential new challenge

We partner with CSR and present innovation as a solution for sustainability issues.

1. Marketing Opportunity Employee give some time to contribute innovation projects.

3. Priority Potential new challenge

Potential new challenge

We convince the CEO to recognize innovation as a top priority.

Gaining support for an Innovation Project

5. Business Model Innovation We present a new business model on which innovation.

4. Crowdsourcing Potential new challenge

Potential new challenge

Employee give some time to contribute innovation projects.


How might we gain support by presenting Potential new innovation as challenge a sustainability opportunity?

1. Marketing Opportunity Employee give some time to contribute innovation projects.

5. Business Model Innovation We present a new business model on which innovation.

How might we gain support Potential new Potential new by presenting challenge innovation as a challenge marketing opportunity?

How might we gain support Potential new Potential new by harvesting challenge everyone’s mind? challenge

2. Sustainability We partner with CSR and present innovation as a solution for sustainability issues.

How might we gain support by Potential new Potential new convincing the challenge challenge CEO?

3. Priority We convince the CEO to recognize innovation as a top priority.

Gaining support for an Innovation Project

How might we gain support by Potential new Potential new responsibilities challenge within our new challenge Business model?

4. Crowdsourcing Employee give some time to contribute innovation projects.

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CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION Factors Map - Listing

CEO

Long-term Plan

Managers

Brand Sustainability

Marketing

Collaborators Com. Authority

Policies

Gaining support for an Innovation Project

Integrative Social Responsibility

Website

Competitive Trends

Strategy Win-Win Model Objectives

Shared Model

Technologies KPI SAP Existing


Factors Map - Linking

CEO

Long-term Plan

Managers

Brand Sustainability

Marketing

Collaborators Com. Authority

Policies

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Gaining support for an Innovation Project

Integrative Social Responsibility

Website

Competitive Trends

Strategy Win-Win Model Objectives

Shared Model

Technologies KPI SAP Existing


CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION CEO

Factors Map - Grouping

Long-term Plan

Managers

Brand Sustainability

Marketing

Collaborators Com. Authority

Policies

Gaining support for an Innovation Project

Integrative Social Responsibility

Website

Competitive Trends

Strategy Win-Win Model Objectives

Shared Model

Technologies KPI SAP Existing


CEO

Factors Map - Labeling

Long-term Plan

Managers

Brand Sustainability

Marketing

Collaborators Com. Authority

73 Gaining support for an Innovation Project

Policies

Integrative Social Responsibility

Website

Competitive Trends

Strategy Win-Win Model Objectives Shared Model

Technologies KPI SAP Existing


Utilizing Influencing Factors IMDb Com.

Press

Reviewers

IMDb Com.

Press

Reviewers

Buyers

Buyers Affiliated Customers

Affiliated Customers

Twitter Community

Twitter Community EBay®

Challenge Stakeholders

Sister Company

EBay®

Challenge Stakeholders

IMDb Sister Company

CEO’s Priority

IMDb

CEO’s Priority Virgin Megastore Our Department’s High Exposure

Marketing Department

Virgin Megastore

Marketing Department

Sony Entertainment®

Nintendo® World

Our Department’s High Exposure

Stakeholder Group - Listing

Stakeholder Group - Linking Customers

Customers

IMDb Com.

Press

Reviewers

Community

IMDb Com.

Affiliated Customers

Challenge Stakeholders

EBay®

Challenge Stakeholders

IMDb Sister Company

EBay® IMDb

CEO’s Priority Virgin Megastore

Management

Stakeholder Group - Labeling

Collaborators / Vendors

Twitter Community

CEO’s Priority

Marketing Department

Buyers Affiliated Customers

Collaborators / Vendors

Twitter Community

Press

Reviewers

Community

Buyers

Sister Company

Sony Entertainment®

Nintendo® World

Our Department’s High Exposure

Nintendo® World

Virgin Megastore

Management

Sony Entertainment®

Marketing Department

Our Department’s High Exposure

Stakeholder Group - Representative

Nintendo® World

Sony Entertainment®


Interview Screener Criteria would be different from a stakeholder representative to another. What is important is the selection approach.

CUSTOMER

Sex?

Continue/Drop

User or not?

City?

Example: •

We run the screener by phone.

We are looking for a non-customer female aged of 30 to 35, living in large cities.

We have a list mobile phone number only.

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Continue/Drop

Continue/Drop

Age?

Interview


Interview Questionnaire

Stakeholder’s Interview

• Mind Mapping is used to create an Interview Questionnaire.

Interviewer, Interviewee & Facilitator

• Some people would find comfortable to use the Interviewee

mind mapping as an interview protocol. This is absolutely fine.

Interviewer Conduct the interview

Mind Mapping Detail

Important Topic

Respond to the interview

Detail

Influential Factors

Important Topic

Detail

Detail

Recorder

Interview Questionnaire Selective Topics

All Topics Topic 01 Topic 01 Topic 01

Topic 01

Take notes, video, picture and record the interview.


CHALLENGE CHECKLIST WRITING CHALLENGE PROFILE Challenge

our shop from "How might we create a new business by removing the existing model?

Following this example. Pick any of the challenges you identified with the Innovation Diagnostic Canvas and elaborate. Information can be fictional.

Barbara Brite, Director Finance & Marketing Stop date 12 November 2014 Start date 12 June 2014

Sponsor

Target Audience

nt of Operation

Department of Finance & Marketing, Departme

Call to Action

by eliminating our Investigate all possibilities of business creation natives that would alter Find l. shop from the existing business mode . respond it customer's experience Horizon

Innovation for:

We want

✓

To fix the issue

The future

Now

Create change

✓

Far future Create radical change

Constraint

- Not to open a new shop - Maximize th utilization of existing ressources - Maximum $120000 investment Reward or Recognition Inspiring

- Marks & Spencers collect point - Decathlon Click & Collect - www.mywash.in - www.laundrapp.com

Contribution Awards at the corporate day! (3 ipad)

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GETTING STARTED WITH INNOVATION CHALLENGES When to Use the Subtraction Tool

This tool aims to introduce the concept of Innovation Challenges, why they are important, what a good challenge looks like and how to construct them. There are three tools; capturing challenges in a workshop with a range of people from different parts of the organization and capturing challenges from people in an interview that are from the same part of the organization, then framing those challenges into something that people can engage with (see diagram below). Challenge setting workshop with people from different parts of the organization that are likely to have different Challenges

Getting Started

Constructing

with Challenges

Challenges

Challenge setting interview with people from the same part of the organization that are likely to have different Challenges


79 Opening words Good morning, it is a pleasure to be with you. We are meeting to understand how innovation can assist you and your teams’ objectives. Innovation thrives when we are focusing on the right things – solving the right problems for our customers, finding novel solutions to seemingly intractable issues and exploiting the best opportunities. We call these Challenges. It’s a very common for the organizations to start some innovation full of enthusiasm and backing from the senior people but after a few months that activity ‘fizzles-out’ with little or nothing to show for it. The #1 reason for this is a lack of strategic direction – they quite literally went looking for some great ideas with the expectation that those ideas will create their own momentum and the organization will eventually benefit.

This is a high-risk approach. Innovation is nothing if it isn’t strategic. It needs to be directed and informed by the strategy – what you want to be, now and in 5, 10, 20 years and beyond. We need to define these challenges, prioritize, measure and resource them. The purpose of this session is to find those problems and opportunities that will provoke ideas, but first we are going to spend some time talking through what challenges are, what good challenges look like and how we go about defining them and who we need to involve. The key is your honesty and unreserved input. If we want the unobvious ideas, we need to seek out the un-obvious challenges.


What Makes a Successful Challenge? The following are typical elements that are used to construct a challenge. The first 4 are mandatory. The more elements we can include the better the challenge.

THE CHALLENGE HOW THE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE REWARDED OR RECOGNIZED A VERY CLEAR CALL TO ACTION (CTA) THE TYPES OF IDEAS WE WANT (AND DON’T WANT) A SPONSOR (SOME PEOPLE THAT YOU WANT TO ENGAGE WHO BELIEVE AND HAS THE POWER AND BUDGET TO IMPLEMENT THE BEST IDEAS) START AND STOP DATE FOR PEOPLE TO ENGAGE WITH THE CHALLENGE (THE OPTIMUM DURATION IS 2 WEEKS)

TIME SCALES, MILESTONES AND RESOURCES

THE FIRST IDEAS TO SEED THE CHALLENGE

EVALUATION PROCESS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA


Note: This step is the most difficult

Some Samples of Good Challenges

Objective: Gain support for an Innovation Project CTA: "How can we secure time for our innovation activity?"

Probable Issues - Topics, Concerns, Potential Pitfalls Disagreements on what is really the challenge. If there isn’t a clear insight into what the real challenge is – what the sponsor’s opportunity or problem is, they probably won’t invest the time/resources/money into the next steps and the ideas probably won’t get implemented which will likely impact the experience of the people that engaged in the challenge. (In other words, if you ask for ideas but don’t do anything with them, those who gave the ideas will be understandably disappointed.) Disagreement around the phrasing of the Challenge. Ensure we have a diverse group of people engaged in the process. Avoiding wasting time on word smithing if that means we lose sight of the objective of the Challenge.

Objective: Implement novel ideas to improve customer service CTA: "What could we do for our customers that would get them talking about our service to their friends at a dinner party?" Objective: Improve efficiency of our employees CTA: "What do you do during your working day that wastes time or doesn't add value?" Objective: Implement novel ideas for new products CTA: "What are the problems our customers are experiencing that we and our competitors are not addressing?" Objective: Implement novel ideas for a new service CTA: "What might a Uber-type model for our industry look like?"

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Describe the 3 Innovation Horizons in Order to Seek Clarification on Their Priorities

Create new markets, target new needs

Core (Horizon 1) describes the ideas that improve or optimize existing products and services in existing markets and clients. You can implement dozens if not hundreds of core ideas. Your employees will find it easier to see these ideas, because, they are quite literally infront of them – on their immediate horizon. Adjacent (Horizon 2) describes the ideas that help you expand from your existing business with incremental products and services and enter adjacent markets. These ideas are, of course, harder to find and riskier and as such, most organizations can manage a handful of these projects at any one time. But these ideas are potentially more valuable. Your employees can contribute these ideas, but you need to involve customer-facing and market-facing employees, as well as customers, to find these types of ideas.

WHERE TO PLAY

A useful approach that has stood the test of time is called the “3 Innovation Horizons.” It essentially describes the three types of innovation.

ADJACENT

Expand from existing business

Enter adjacent markets

CORE

Serve existing markets/clients

Optimize existing products

Existing products/assets

Incremental products/assets

HOW TO WIN


TRANSFORMATIONAL

Develop breakthroughs markets don’t yet exist

Transformational (Horizon 3) describes the ideas that will help breakthrough into markets that don’t yet exist with products and services that also don’t exist and probably the customers for those products and services don’t yet know that they need them. Clearly, there are some massive wins in this area, but the cost and risk in these innovation projects are high. The Horizon analogy is important. When someone goes to work in, for instance, a call center, their horizon will likely be Horizon 1 - their workstation, their computer screen and phone, their performance targets and metrics and whatever their manager has asked them to do on that day. We can expect them to be able to offer ideas about their horizon, but can’t expect them to contribute to Horizon 2 or 3 – they might have the ideas, but we can’t expect it. The Horizon concept is important for two reasons: We need to ask our sponsors which horizon they want to focus their attention on and purposefully construct challenges that match the horizon. It informs us which communities we need to engage.

Invent new products/assets

Checkpoint and Ask for Feedback The final step in this section is… From this step you will either move on to p. 85 or p. 93. Move to p. 85 if you are running a workshop with lots of people that represent a department or division (in which case they are likely to have different challenges). Move to p. 93 if you are running an interview with one or more people from the same department or division and will therefore likely have the same challenges.

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SETTING UP WORKSHOP WITH MULTIPLE MEMBERS

Intro 15 mins Session 1, 75 mins (60 mins plus a 15 min break) Session 2, 65 mins (50 mins plus a 15 min break) Session 3, 60 mins Wrap-up 25 mins Total 4 hours

When to Use This Tool

Prepare for the Workshop

Use this tool if you are running a workshop with multiple people representing multiple areas of the business (i.e., a management team). Use this tool after you have set the scene with section B1.

This workshop requires people to work in groups of 4 or 5. Ideally, they will not be direct colleagues. The more diverse the group, the better.

When NOT to Use This Tool To run an interview with one or a handful of people that are likely to have the same issues/opportunities to innovate. Jump to section p. 93.

The workshop takes a minimum of 4 hours so they need to book half a day. This is a hard work, so refreshments are required. The workshop uses a tool called the Innovation Diagnostic Canvas. These need to be printed at A0 size. Each group needs a pack of sticky notes of four colors; red (generally pink), amber (orange), green and yellow sticky notes and pens.


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Set-up the Room for the Session

This workshop takes a minimum of 4 hours, the majority of time will be spent with the participants standing while working on an A0 size poster/ canvas that can be mounted on the walls.

We do this well

We could improve

Seats are required since as 4-5 hours is a long time for some people to be standing. There has to be ample space for groups to stand around the posters/canvases when they are working. There is a simple code that people need to remember for this exercise, so it makes sense to use a flip chart to confirm the code so they can glance up at any time for a reminder.

We need some innovate idea here

Introduce the session, thank the participants for their attendance, confirm the time available and explain the objective.

Innovation works best when we are solving problems – whether they are known problems, or identifying previously unknown problems.

Objective: Identify where an innovation is NEEDED in order to solve a problem or exploit an opportunity.


Setting the Scene

Use Getting Started with Innovation Challenges to set the scene and introduce the main concepts for this interview before you move on.

Explain the Process to Get Started

Introduce the session, thank the participants for their attendance, confirm the time available and explain the objective. Innovation works best when we are solving problems - whether they are known problems, or identifying previously unknown problems. Objective: Identify where innovation is NEEDED in order to solve a problem or exploit an opportunity

Let's get started. You can see a number of canvases on the walls around the room. Please stand next to one of the canvases with a group of no more than 5 of your colleagues. If you find yourself standing with a colleague from the same team or department, please swap with someone else and move to another canvas.

I have asked that you work with colleagues that you don’t normally work with, which of course it means that you might disagree. That’s fine, if one of you sees a red whilst the other sees a green, this is normal because of course you see things from a different perspective. When we get to the last stage of the workshop, we will deal with the reds and yellows rather than greens.

You can see that the canvas has 7 boxes and each box has a series of provocations/statements.

You will doubtless come across the instance, where one of you will want to respond to a question with a red or amber and one of your team will want to say “yeh, but, project xyz is going to solve that and we are going to start that project soon. That might be the case but of course, it might not, so keep the sticky note up there, let’s not demote priorities because of things that might happen in the future.

As a group, discuss each statement and use the sticky notes to comment on how the statement applies to your organization. For example, “Our Culture” prompts a discussion about how you “celebrate and reward success”. Use the green amber, red (pink) sticky notes and stick them in the Culture box on the canvas. For example:

We will take up to an hour on the first three questions. (If there is more than one group) Can I ask that group 1 starts with box 1, group 2 starts with box 2 and group 3 starts with box 3. You might notice that the top 3 boxes refer to internal categories and the bottom 3 refer to external categories. We will do the external one later.

We celebrate success well

Some Departments find it easier to celebrate success than others

We find it difficult to celebrate success

Remember, this isn’t a test of your loyalty. The aim isn’t to paint the canvas green. We are actually looking for reds and ambers because we are more likely to find opportunities to innovate in things we could or should do better than things we do well.

We have 20 minutes or so per box then we will move on to the next box. Stay together in your group and use the same canvas for the complete workshop. This isn’t intended to be an endurance event, so if you wish to sit down and work through some of the questions rather than stay standing up, please do so, but, please come back and stick to notes in the box as you complete them so I and the other groups can measure your progress.


The top six boxes are generally easier because they can ask the group to talk about their organization - internal factors namely: Take a 15 to 20 minutes depending on time after the first hour (by which time the first three boxes should be complete).

1. Our Organization

2. Our Culture

It’s likely that they will need some help to start with. Allow them to look at what the other groups are doing if they wish. The first box might take

3. Our Capabilities

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It should end up looking like this: INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

20-25 minutes as they are figuring out how the canvas works. The second and third boxes happen much quicker.

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

It is tempting to allow the participants to continue talking beyond the first hour that was planned for the first three boxes, however, the value comes in the third hour so if they exhaust themselves or compress the time available for the last session we don’t get the benefit we were looking for. Stop the conversation at the first hour and take a break. Gradually the canvas starts to get filled with colored sticky notes. Some people will find it difficult to stand and work for long periods of time so they can take the work to a desk but encourage them to stand up to put the stick notes on the canvas in order that the other members of the workshop can see progress.

I N T E R N A L

E X T E R N A L


Gradually, the canvas starts to get filled with colored post-it notes. This is more of the same but this time, we are looking at the external factors namely: Our position in the marketplace Our partners and community How our clients see us The external section of the canvas is sometimes harder for people that are not involved with customers or partners.

Continue with the second half of the canvas, the External view of their innovation capabilities

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Before we start again, are there any questions or feedbacks?

Take a break after an hour for 15 to 20 minutes depending on time

Well done so far. We are then going to start working on the bottom half of the canvas, the external view. Checkpoint and ask for feedbacks and questions in order to refocus our minds. Remind them of the objective, to identify known and unknown needs that will drive their innovation efforts. Then, we need to do more of same.

I N T E R N A L

E X T E R N A L


Identifying Needs

CEO if no other Senior person who can't be a sponsor.

How are we all doing? We've done the hard part and you've all done really well, congratulations. Before we start again, any questions or feedbacks?

Communities and Groups to be engaged means, if we are going to broadcast this Challenge to a specific groups or groups, who should it be? That might mean "staff ", all "customer-facing customers", all "customerfacing staff and customers", "partners" or it could be more specific such as "customers who only order less than once a month from us", or "just our design partner community"

This is when we will fill in box 7 with the yellow stickynotes. Your group can start anywhere, revisit the red and yellow sticky notes which have a statement of need and write a challenge on a yellow sticky note. Let me explain what I mean by a challenge. It is a call to action to a discrete group of people to seek the ideas to solve a problem or exploit an opportunity. The objective of this exercise is to capture needs, not ideas. It's very easy to slip into idea mode. Resist the temptation.

The session should take an hour to allow us a time to wrap-up. The group need to identify the following for each red and yellow sticky note; • Objective / Call to Action • Sponsor • The Communities or Groups that should be engaged

Again, it's very easy to slip into idea mode. That's fantastic because it shows that you are getting excited about the opportunities, but it isn't helpful for this exercise so please resist the attempt. INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

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INNOVATION CHALLENGE

You need to write on the yellow sticky notes the following;

Help people by going to a random canvas and choose a random pink sticky note and convert it to them. Here is an example:

• The Objective/Call to Action • Sponsor

We find difficult to celebrate success

• The Communities or Groups that should be engaged The Sponsor is vital because people are more likely to engage when the most senior person is supporting the Challenge. Beware however, it's too easy to list the CEO as the sponsor for every challenge. They can't do all the Challenges, so think about this and only choose the

I N T E R N A L

E X T E R N A L

What meaningful but low-cost ways can we celebrate success? Sponsor. HR Dir. To involve. All senior Managers


Wrapping-Up We need to bring this to a close. You’ve done brilliantly. Thank you for your participation. Is there any feedback or questions? In a moment, I am going to ask someone from each group to briefly introduce the Challenges that their group found, but first, let me explain what happens next. I am going to photograph the canvases in case in the process of moving them the sticky notes fall across. We will then consolidate them into a report and spreadsheet where we can clump the challenges together by the Sponsor and Community. There then has to be some work to prioritize the challenges, in order to decide which to do first�. So, just before we finish, can I please ask one member from each group to talk to the other groups through the challenges identified on their canvas.

Thank the group again for their participation


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CREATING CHALLENGES FROM THESE INSIGHTS

To understand how to craft these insights into challenges, jump to p. 95.

>>


CHALLENGE SETTING INTERVIEW

Seek clarification on their priorities (Horizons)

The workshop needs 1 hour

Now that they understand the three types (horizons) of innovation, the sponsor needs to identify their priorities between: Horizon 1: Core – Improving and optimizing what they already do. Horizon 2: Adjacent – Implementing ideas that will take them into new markets with new products and services. Horizon 3: Transformational – Creating a new value that doesn’t currently exist.

Before you start, set the scene Use Getting Started (p. 79) with Innovation Challenges to set the scene and introduce the main concepts for this interview. Move on to p. 83 only after Getting Started

When to Use This Tool

Use this tool to run an interview with one or a handful of people that are likely to have the same issues/ opportunities to innovate.

When NOT to Use This Tool

Jump to section p. 85 for a facilitators guide for running a workshop with a number of people who are likely to have different challenges (i.e., a management team).

They might answer, ‘all’ which is fine, but a Challenge serves one Horizon and one only so if they want to do all three, there will be at least 3 Challenges.


Defining the Objectives Listen and probe with questions about the objective of the innovation activity – what they want to achieve. They might have a project or an idea in mind that they want to talk about, which again is fine IF the objective is to get just one challenge but equally, it be that one objective will provide more than one challenge, for example: A low cost airline wants to provide a service that helps their customers book an airport taxi. Once someone has made a flight booking they know their customer’s home address, their departure airport, times and dates of travel, so they can provide a quote for a taxi service. This will provoke a number of horizon 2 challenges such as ‘How can we best offer this proposition to our customers?’, ‘What are some of the customer experience issues when booking an airport taxi service that we can address with this proposition?’ It will also provoke some horizon 1 challenges such as ‘How can we manage a database of taxi firms that can support this proposition?’

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CONSTRUCTING CHALLENGES

When to Use This Tool The workshop needs 1 hour

Use this tool when you have followed on p. 79. Getting Started with Challenges and Challenge setting Workshop with multiple members or Challenge setting interview, meaning that you have some potential challenges and need to construct them fully.

Prepare for the Interview The only item to bring to the interview is the detailed agenda.

Recap the Potential Challenges Captured in Challenge setting Workshop with multiple members or Challenge setting interview and seek an opinion on the priorities Agree Who to Engage Listen and probe with questions about who the sponsor needs to engage to get the ideas.


When the Sponsors want Horizon 2 ideas, they need to consider how they can involve customers and partners as well as their employees.

When the Sponsors want Horizon 3 ideas, they need to look outside their organization and engage their supply chain and perhaps the academic community. If you are looking for Horizon 1 ideas, it’s likely that you will seek to engage the ‘do-ers’ but consider (try and persuade the sponsor) that the more diversity you can bring into the ideation phase, the more diverse and novel the ideas are likely to be. In other words, if you are trying to find ideas to improve the accounts payable process, seek involvement from the salespeople, account management and credit control not just the accounts payable team. Diversity also comes from the types as well as the role of the people to engage. Including the senior people to the detriment of the do-ers is a mistake, as is excluding the ‘difficult’ team members – the people that have ‘been there and got the t-shirt’. Ask the sponsor, ‘Who could harm this challenge? Who, if excluded, could influence others negatively? Who do you need to support and engage in this challenge?’

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The Call to Action (CTA)

with the sponsor.

Review sample CTAs and identify key qualities (some of these are great, and other deliberately ‘muddled’) ask for feedback on how they could be improved in the context of the challenge in mind: "Innovate with us" "Join us and shape the future" "Help us be the future" "We need your ideas" Listen and probe with questions about the call to action (CTA). Where possible, use numbers to quantify the objective you have set. For example, "x% of our surveyed customers said", "We spend $ on this and we think we can impact that by x% meaning we can free up funds for z." Help the people by capturing the first few ideas. Not only does this help frame the kind of ideas you want, you can start the creative process because ideas trigger ideas which trigger ideas. Make it clear what you want them to do – "Post your idea online", "Send an email to", "Come to an event" – so discuss this

Discuss how you might reward or recognize participation. Discuss with the sponsor "What's in it for the participants?" You may need to give a reason for your audience to engage - will it help them do their jobs better, save time, remove wasted time? Use phrases like "Help us", "Get involved", "You could have the answer" or "Make your voice heard." Discuss with the sponsor what is going to happen to the ideas when the campaign ends. When will the ideas be sorted and the ones that they will move forward chosen? If possible, use a visual medium – a video with the sponsor delivering the CTA on the camera works well because it shows the potential participants that the sponsor is serious. Regardless of whether this is possible, try and communicate the objective using visual stimulus – photos, videos etc. – to inspire the people you wish to engage. Understand that too many, offering ideas is difficult and seen as risky – “What if my idea is silly? What if they’ve already thought of this idea? What if they steal my idea?” So reassure that no idea is a stupid idea.


There is an important difference between recognizing and rewarding participation. Rewarding people with money isn’t necessarily a good idea. If you are able to incentivize people with some kind of reward, incentivize the first 10 or 20 ideas – the more ideas you have, the easier it is. Don’t be afraid to remind people regularly. Most idea campaigns follow the standard ‘hockey stick’ curve meaning 50% of the ideas can come in the last 20% of the time.

> > >

Attracting people’s attention to share ideas isn’t something you can generally do continuously. Two weeks is generally long enough, but equally, it can be done in 2 days or even 2 hours if need be. Choose a time where there aren’t any other distractions or competing priorities. If you are going to run a multiple challenges for the same objective, run them concurrently rather than at the same time.

Timing and Launching the Idea Campaign Discuss the timing of the campaign. Encourage the sponsor to think about when they need the ideas to be implemented then work backwards. Discuss launching the challenge with an event. Remember, ideas trigger ideas which trigger ideas, so it generally gets easier the more ideas you get. The best launch events are ones where you can take people out of ‘business as usual’ so change the scene and go somewhere where ideas come easily (the boardroom – particularly if it’s seen as a place where only the senior people go is NOT a great place). Fuel the launch meeting with sugar and caffeine.

Produce the Final Challenge Summary for Sign-Off Thank the participants for their time. Take away one or more of the potential challenges with an action to write-up for approval before going live.

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“REMEMBER, ALL TRULLY GREAT INNOVATIONS STARTED LIFE SOUNDING UTTERLY RIDICULOUS”


C 99

IDEATE


IDEATE PROCESS

CHALLENGE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT UPDATE IDEATE PHASE PLAN

PLAN THE INNOVATION PROJECT

IDEATE

SELECT IDEATION TOOL

IDEATE

PROFILE IDEAS

CONVERGE

INNOVATION PROCESS

UPDATE CONVERGE PHASE PLAN

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES


“FELIX, HERE’S AN IDEA. HOW ABOUT WE GET YOU TO THE EDGE OF SPACE AND YOU JUMP. WHAT DO YOU THINK”?

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CONSTRUCTING YOUR IDEA IDEAS Knowledge and experience

Ideas

INVERTED PYRAMID WRITING

DEMYSTIFY METADATA

WRITE YOUR BIG IDEA FIRST

OSM, UCD, UX, OS, PD, CNO, DTP, BPO, ORL, STP, IE, FTP, AI, PS, ETC.

Then the explanation of your idea Then go for the details that are good to know

MUST READ Then the explanation of your idea Ideas happen when we create connections between our knowledge and experiences. The more connections we can make, the more ideas we have. It’s as simple as that!

Good to know

How many of those do you understand? Encourage collaboration and outreach by demystifying your professional knowledge.


4 BASIC OF GOOD WRITING 1. CLARITY

4. VISUAL ARRANGEMENT Forum’s visual arrangement is limited; however, we can still play with: • Bulletin CAPITAL

Put yourselves in the shoes of your readers. Your reader is likely to be an angry panther hunting information do not waste his time.

Bold Color Font

Using 2 of these visual effect is wise. Using more than 3 would drastically reduce the user’s understanding.

Underline

2. HONESTY

Break your text only if it helps in understanding. Do not hesitate to use bullet points when appropriate.

1 BIG IDEA Be honest and genuine, and people will support you. Give credit and acknowledge sources to those who deserve it.

3. BREVITY

YOUR IDEA.

Avoid “Too long; I did not read. BIG ideas can get diluted with a load of details and justification. Allow your readers to make their own judgement.

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1 BIG IDEA

1 BIG IDEA

and 2 streams of development

and bullet points


THE DRAWING CHALLENGE

REDUCE ANXIETY

CREATIVE ATTITUDE

Can you be descriptive?

Creative sessions can lead to: •

Anxiety of not being understood

Not being creative enough

Being too different

Facilitator must set rules of Understanding to enable participants to express themselves.

True creative does not stick to their idea. They practice detachment.


IDEATION ENVIRONMENT High raising sealing Playful lightning Nomadic furniture Diverse and inspiring items

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ANALYSING THE CHALLENGE PROFILE Challenge

"How might we create a new business by removing our shop from the existing model? Sponsor

Barbara Brite, Director Finance & Marketing

Start date

Stop date 12

12 June 2014

November 2014

Target Audience

Department of Finance & Marketing, Department of Operation

Call to Action

Investigate all possibilities of business creation by eliminating our shop from the existing business model. Find alternatives that would respond it customer's experience. Horizon

Innovation for:

We want

✓

To fix the issue

Now

The future

Create change

✓

Far future Create radical change

Constraint

- Not to open a new shop - Maximize th utilization of existing resources - Maximum $120000 investment Reward or Recognition Inspiring

- Marks & Spencers collect point - Decathlon Click & Collect - www.mywash.in - www.laundrapp.com

Contribution Awards at the corporate day! (3 ipad)

Refer to your Challenge Profile to identify which ideation technique would work the best for it.


4 IDEATION TECHNIQUES Idea Bridge

Subtract

Idea Hacks

Reverse Innovation

To create novel idea

To create disruptive ideas

To fix the existing

To improve the existing

+

Idea Bridge Finding ideas to quickly fix something that is broken Re-thinking something that already exists to change or reposition it Creating something brand new

Subtract

Idea Hacks

-

Reverse Innovation

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GET TING STARTED WITH IDEATION

Ideate is the verb to create ideas. The first thing we need to do is to discard the perception that we might have that great idea are purely luck or serendipity – that they can’t be forced; the Eureka moment either happens or it doesn’t. That surge of energy we get when an idea hits you seemingly like a bolt out of the blue can certainly feel like it’s a fabulous accident. But it isn’t. Ideas happen when we make a connection between knowledge, ideas, insights and experiences that we all walk around within our brains. We hear or see something new which makes a new connection and an idea is born.

So we can make more ideas by making more connections. It really is as simple as this. We have covered challenges in the previous section which are ways to create opportunities for ideas, and this section describes 5 tools to provoke ideas. In most cases, they are designed to find disruptive or radical ideas – ideas that you probably won’t get using normal brainstorming exercises.


CHOOSING WHICH IDEATION TOOL TO USE The ideate section of this guide offers 5 ‘tools’. Use this table to decide which tool to use at which time and with what type of participants.

Ideation tool name

When NOT to use it

Who to use it with

Idea Bridge

When you want novel, but workable ideas. It’s a unique tool in that it focusses as much time on the constraints as the ideas.

This is not an ideal tool if you want to make fixes or tweaks to existing products or services.

This tool works well with a diverse range of people, but specifically, the introverts – people who don’t necessarily perform well in brainstorming exercises.

Subtraction

When you need divergent, disruptive ideas about an existing product (whether that’s to disrupt one of your products, or to seek ideas to disrupt a competitor’s product).

It isn’t a tool to use to make incremental improvements to something that already exists OR to solve a pressing problem.

Anyone can use this tool. It needs willing and generous participants because it may produce lots of ideas that might seem impractical.

Reverse Innovation

Idea Hacks

When to use it

Process improvement, fixing problems.

It isn’t the tool to use to invent or build something new.

When you need divergent, disruptive ideas about an existing product (whether that’s to disrupt one of your products, or to seek ideas to disrupt a competitor’s product).

It isn’t the tool to use to find ideas for fixes or tweaks to an existing product or process.

People who are not used to formal meetings or brainstorming sessions. Groups that are hard to engage in creative thinking or might be reticent to re-thinking a process.

Anyone can use this tool.

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UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS To most people, offering ideas is seen as a risky proposition. We all recognize that feeling when we share an idea with someone – an idea we are really passionate about, but we can immediately see from the look on the other person’s face that they aren’t getting it, they simply can’t share your enthusiasm for the idea because they just don’t understand it. It’s a horrible feeling. It makes us feel vulnerable and we are mostly conditioned not to make ourselves vulnerable in our work lives. An easy way to guard against this feeling is not to share ideas – and certainly not the ‘risky’ or ‘out-there’ ideas. It’s much easier to discuss/criticize other people’s ideas. That way, you’re being seen to participate and get involved, but you are not contributing.

We have to therefore remove the barriers and protect the people that we want to engage in ideation. We can do that by setting ground-rules of course, but if someone is determined not to share any novel ideas in case they look stupid, we can’t make them. What we can do, which is the bulk of the tools in this section, is to minimize the barriers to the process by disrupting how we get the ideas.


IDEATION GROUND RULES FOR THE FACILITATOR

!

Each of the ideation tools has a section for ground rules for the participants because some of the tools will have different rules. Here are the ground rules for ideation facilitators. Create and sustain energy. Facilitating Ideation Workshops are the best job in the world. The energy you get from the participants can be palpable…but you can kick-start that with your energy and enthusiasm. Hold your nerve. It can be a nerve-wracking time. At the start of the workshops, you won’t know what you’ll get and a little part of you will worry that you won’t get anything novel and exciting. All you can do is be confident and pass that confidence on to the participants. Protect the ideators. Sharing ideas can make us feel vulnerable – what if it’s stupid or unworkable? What if they know about the idea? If we meet (or allow the other participants to meet) an idea of derision or confusion it can kill the ideation process. It’s your job to protect the ideators by setting and enforcing the ground rule that is common across all of the ideation tools that no idea is a bad idea – indeed, all truly great ideas started sounding utterly ridiculous so the more ridiculous the better!

Continually offer affirmation. Good ideation facilitators continually give positive encouragement and affirmation both physically and verbally. Lots of smiles, positive adjectives (“love it, great idea, brilliant”). Facilitate, don’t ideate. It’s very easy to slip into ideation mode and start to offer ideas. Resist this temptation. It isn’t your job to come up with the ideas. When you’re offering ideas, you are no longer facilitating. If you have an idea that you feel is valuable, frame it as a question or prompt for someone else. Don’t confuse energy with ideas. You’re likely to have some extroverts in your workshop who love to be heard and verbalize their ideas. You’re equally likely to have some introverts who are less interested in speaking up. This means that they aren’t ideating as it does that the extroverts are coming up with brilliant ideas simply because they are being loud. It isn’t a contest! In many cases, you will ask people to write their ideas down to ensure that you are giving space to both the extroverts and the introverts. Before you finish, always ask your ideators to choose their first and second favorite ideas. Ideas are useless (arguably worse than useless) if you can’t act them (this is the next step, Converge). We can help this process by asking the participants in the ideation workshop, before they leave, to choose the first and second favorite ideas. Of course in some cases, people will choose both of their ideas so you can ask them to give one of their votes to someone else’s idea. This is tremendously helpful to the sponsor who generally has to choose which ideas to progress further.

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IDEA BRIDGE Among the 4 ideation methods proposed in this toolkit Idea Bridge is the most suitable to generate radically new ideas. Something that may change your business model or reach new markets. It is not a suitable method for quick fixes.

IDEA BRIDGE

IDEATE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Silence Q&A

Everyone participates

CONSTRAINTS

IDEAS


IDEATE >> TOOL >> IDEA BRIDGE

HIGHLIGHTS IDEA BRIDGE

Ground Rules INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Q&A

IDEAS

CONSTRAINTS

“There are two special ground rules for this workshop. The purpose of the ground rules is to make sure we are all operating under the same assumptions. Let’s step through each one quickly.” “This exercise is done in silence. We won’t verbalize our ideas or questions, including non-verbal communication even if you feel you are giving positive feedback on someone else’s idea.” “Also, everyone participates. Everyone has something – insights, knowledge and ideas of value. Therefore, everyone has an obligation to participate.”

When to Use the Idea Bridge Tool

This exercise is done in silence, so it is an ideal exercise for groups that might be dominated by extroverts to the detriment of the less assertive introverts. Use it when you are looking for novel ideas and solutions. The starting point therefore, is a problem to solve or opportunity to exploit – there has to be a very clear goal and constraints (which are the foundation for each side of the bridge).

When Not to Use the Idea Bridge Tool

When you want improvement ideas - % gains on an existing process rather than divergent ideas. When you want a very specific outcome rather than a wide range of potentially disruptive ideas.

“Can we adopt these ground rules – give me a head nod. Anyone opposed?”

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IDEA BRIDGE MODEL IDEA BRIDGE The Idea Bridge is an ideation tool used to create a novel idea. In this ideation technique, you re-think something that already exists and changes or reposition it. Among the four ideation techniques, the Idea Bridge is the only tool that lets you create something that is a brand new – something that may change your business model or reach new markets. Preparation • You will need yellow, pink, orange and green sticky-notes. • Enough markers for the number of delegates to write on the sticky notes.

Where track go to? Q&A

Process • Start by placing the Goal/Objective in the right corner. • Place the Constraints in the left corner. • You may already have some ideas you place them just above the goal. • You have questions about the constraints. Place them just above them. Delegates may answers these questions. But always in silence and by writing. • Finally, you can bridge ideas to constraints and questions. The whole canvas would create a rich content where you will see patterns to innovate by removing limits. Take time to analyze the whole thing and understand rich concepts.

Are track still there?

Is there hills in the tunnel?

CONSTRAINTS

New train not an option 12 KM, 4 stations

Lighted platform


THE IDEA BRIDGE CONSISTS OF FIVE KEY PARTS: Ideas

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

The thoughts or suggestions based on knowledge and experiences as to a possible course of action in solving the innovation challenge

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

Bridges

These are the links that connect the ideas and constraints.

Innovation Challenge

IDEAS

The main problem, question or task that needs to be addressed and solved.

Non hills in the tunnel!

To the velodrome Cycle Way Travelator Walk away

Q&A

The questions are formulated based on the constraints you listed, and the answers are you and your colleagues’ reply or feedback to the questions.

Constraints

These are the possible limitations, hindrances or restrictions you encounter while solving the innovation challenge.

The Idea Bridge tool is not a suitable method for quick fixes

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PREPARING THE IDEA BRIDGE WORKSHOP

CHALLENGE The challenge is the problem that needs to be solved, the hypothesis that needs to be tested or the opportunity that needs to be tried out.

CONSTRAINTS The constraints are the limits, guidelines or requirements.


Setting Up the Room Agenda and detailed agenda

Lots of stikcy notes, need yellow, pink(red), orange (amber) and green

Large flat wall or whiteboard

Enough markers for the number of delegates to write on the sticky notes

Up to 16 participants or more than 16 participants

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Tables

Chairs – arranged in U-shape if 16 or less; pods if more than 16


Examples of Challenge and Constraints Challenge 1:

Constraints 1

Constraints 4

Recreating a subway network with electrified trains is NOT an option).

The mold may be harmful to the touch.

12 miles of an underground tunnel stretching across 4 stations.

It grows in the tank, but stops growing when taken out of the tanks.

Operational escalators between the surface and stations.

It is a unlimited resource.

Electricity and lighting on the platforms.

Challenge 2:

We make surgical stockings for healthcare applications and want to diversify into the growing sports market.

Electricity in the tunnels, but no lighting.

There must be a social and health benefit for the citizens from the idea.

A novel idea that can be completed in <2 years

We are seeking novel ideas to transform a disused underground/subway line in a city into a novel public transportation route that is environmentally friendly.

Constraints 2

Challenge 3:

We make stockings from standard fabrics and are not planning on investing in new fabric technology.

We want to sell these new products through new channels. We do not see our current channels of medical supply distributors as a valid channel.

30% of the shops of our town’s highstreet is empty. It impacts on the look of the town which is deterring visitors. We are looking for novel ideas that will improve the look of those shops and therefore the overall look of the high street.

Challenge 4: A by-product of our manufacturing process is an organic material (a mold) that grows in the waste tanks. How can we repurpose this mold?

Constraints 3 •

We do not own the empty shops so we cannot repurpose them.

We are permitted to put some boards or covers on the shop fronts.

The ideas must be: •

Vandal-proof

Able to last for at least 12 months

Able to adhere to health and safety laws


Checklist of Materials Session objective (the problem to solve, hypothesis to test or opportunity to fix on behalf of you Sponsor) The constraints that frame the innovation activity (from your Sponsor)

Checkpoint: Review, Preview, Big View

It is important for the facilitator to quickly review what has been done to date, briefly describe what the group is about to do, and explain how the previewed agenda item suits the overall objective of the session. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an easy yet effective way of using checkpoints in a session: "We have just completed..."

Ground rules for participating in the Ideation workshop

"In our next step, we will be using an ideation tool that we call the Idea Bridge to identify potential innovations."

If you are going to use the windows for the bridge exercise, you will need specific pens

"This is important because the Idea Bridge disrupts the normal way of brainstorming which will allow us to identify different types of ideas and potential innovations for."

Clipboard with sign in sheet (if appropriate) Name cards, with team indicators (if appropriate) Team identifiers for table groupings (if appropriate) Session evaluation forms (if appropriate) Workshop provocations (if appropriate)

You can include opening words (inform, excite and empower) before doing a checkpoint. You can make the session longer by extending the ideation period.

"If you have not been exposed to this technique before, you will likely find that it's certainly unusual because we do this in silence. Only the facilitator speaks." "There are two reasons for performing this workshop in silence: First, it removes many of the barriers to creativity that some of us might feel such as looking foolish or not being able to get our voices heard. The other benefit is, it removes our ability to meet every idea with a question or a problem. We all do this - even subconsciously." â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you love brainstorming sessions and love to share your ideas and get your voice heard, this workshop might require some self-control. However, if you normally hate idea brainstorming sessions and see yourself as more of a solution than an idea person, I hope you'll enjoy this approach."

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What to Say The table set up is done, the materials are ready, the rules are set and you have already introduced the Idea Bridge tool to the participants. So, what’s next? Let’s play the Idea Bridge game.

1 “Ask questions before proceeding to the next step then visually check and respond to any questions.” 2 “When we do the workshop properly, we will do it

in silence, but this exercise is to make sure we are happy with the approach, so please feel free to ask questions.”

3 “To start off, we are going to anchor our bridge. On the right side, we are going to start with the objective which is to find ideas to transform a disused underground/subway line in a city into a novel and environmentally friendly public transportation route and I am going to use the yellow sticky notes.”

Escalators to and from stations ARE operational Lighting on the platforms but NOT in the tunnels Using subway trains is NOT an option.”

12 miles 4 stations

Power in tunnels

New train NOT an option

Escalator up and down

IDEA BRIDGE INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Novel public transportation in disused subway 4 “We then anchor the left side of the bridge with what we call the constraints. What we mean by Constraints are requirements, facts that can’t be challenged or limits. We write the constraints on pink sticky notes. In this example the constraints are: 12 miles of underground tunnel stretching across 4 stations

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

IDEAS

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

New train not an option 12 KM, 4 stations

Lighted platform

Lighted platfom


5 “We call it an Idea Bridge because we are go-

ing to bridge the gap between these two anchors using our creativity, insight and knowledge.”

6 “Is everyone with me so far? Any questions before I move on?” 7 “The easiest place to start is on the right side,

so I am going to take a pen and the green stickynotes and write some ideas - one per sticky-note and place it next to the objective. So we might for instance, suggest converting the train tunnels into a walk way or street so I will write that on a green sticky note and place it next to the Challenge. Another idea might be to create a cycleway or perhaps even a travelator or moving walkaway. So, again, I will add these ideas to green sticky notes and stick them next to the Challenge.”

8 “So, I would like you to think about

ways we might achieve this objective. Think about the space and how it might be reused, think about some of the things that could be done, see the space being used in ways that it is not being used today. What are some of those ideas? Come and grab a pen and a green sticky note and add it.” (it isn’t necessary that anyone does this).

12 miles 4 stations

Power in tunnels

REMINDER

New train NOT an option

Novel public transportation in disused subway

We need the objective on the right side, and constraints on the left side. Why? We need to leverage the concept that the right brain is for creativity and the left brain is for analytical thinking. We need a large space - a large whiteboard, a window and a glass writing pen, or the good old-fashioned brown paper.

IDEA BRIDGE INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Use the following color coding for the sticky notes:

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

IDEAS

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

New train not an option 12 KM, 4 stations

Lighted platform

Objective and Resources

Questions and/ or Observations

Constraints

Ideas

Ask questions before proceeding to the next step then visually check and respond to any questions.

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9 “Great, now some of you aren’t looking at the green sticky notes anymore. You’re looking on the left side of the bridge aren’t you? You’re analyzing the constraints, and probably have questions about them. You’re using the left side of your brain the analytical side of your brain. If you were one of the people that engaged, you were likely using the right side of your brain, the side that helps us creative.” 10 “So, let’s do the same for the left side of the bridge, but this

time, we will use the orange/amber sticky notes for the questions and write, again, one per sticky note. So, for example, is the track level or are there hills (which you don’t notice in a train, but would if you were cycling), can we use tracks - are they still there, or where do the tracks go - do they stay within the city, or do they go outside the city towards where people live?”

New train NOT an option

Escalator up and down

12 miles 4 stations

11 One of the reasons why we do this exercise in silence, is to avoid these questions being roadblocks to creativity. So, for instance, someone put an amber sticky note asking ‘are there hills in the tunnel? If there are not any hills, add a new amber sticky note saying ‘there are no hills in the tunnel’. If we don’t know, rather than allowing ourselves to dwell on the unknown, we will move on by replacing that one amber sticky note into two, one saying ‘There are hills in the tunnel’ and another amber sticky note saying ‘There are no hills in the tunnel’. This will allow us to continue.” NO Hills in the tunnel

Power in Tunnels

New train NOT an option

Escalator up and down

12 miles 4 stations

Power in Tunnels

Lighted platform

Hills in the tunnel

Are the tracks still here?

Where does track go to?

12 “If the track is flat, then we could, for instance, flood the

Lighted platform

Hills in the tunnel

Are the tracks still here

Where does track go to?

IDEA BRIDGE

tunnels and create a canal. Wouldn’t that be a novel idea? Let’s add that in green and we will connect the two with a line.” IDEA BRIDGE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

IDEAS

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

New train not an option 12 KM, 4 stations

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

Lighted platform

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

IDEAS


13 “When we connect a constraint to an idea, we get to draw a line

between the two which also visually looks like the span of the bridge.”

14 “Is everyone still with me? Any questions before I move on.” 15 “Let’s carry on. When I suggested the idea of an underground canal – the right-brainers, the creative ones may have thought of Venice and torch-lit tunnels, or a water ride at an amusement park – it’s a really visually evocative idea. The left-brainers, the analytical ones probably immediately asked themselves, ‘How do we move the boats, where do we get the power from?’ So let’s put that up in amber.” Underground canal

Hills in the tunnel NO Hills in the tunnel

Are the tracks still here

Electrify tunnel to power a boat

NO Hills in the tunnel

Where does track go to?

16 “Is everyone still with me? Can you see how we are building this bridge? We are aiming to build a picture that looks something like this. I hope you can see the bridge taking shape?”

IDEA BRIDGE INNOVATION CHALLENGE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

How might we create a novel public transportation in disused subway?

CONSTRAINTS

Electric boats

17 “We are going to move on to the objective of the workshop next, but before we do that, are there any questions?”

Where does track go to?

IDEA BRIDGE

Q&A

Are the tracks still here?

Underground canal

IDEAS

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

IDEAS

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Process

Always emphasize the concept that the left brain is for analytical skills and the right brain is for creativity. A large space is a must.

2

1

Step 1 - Set the Scene and Anchor the Bridge What to do: • Remind the people of the ground rules – Silence then Participation. • Write the objective on yellow sticky notes on the right hand side. • Place the written objective at the upper right hand corner of the available space. • Then at the far left, write the constraints on pink sticky notes.

Step 2 - Get Started

What to do:

• • •

Make a mental note of participants who take the back seat and seem to be less confident. Make sure they engage later in the exercise. Take photos as the bridge gets built. The amber sticky notes are questions, so if you can answer the questions, or if the sponsor is there and they can answer them, do so immediately by writing on a sticky note.

What to say:

"Next, everyone takes some sticky notes and a pen and get started from whichever side you wish. Remember, there's no discussion, no filtering, no feedback, everything and anything goes at this stage. If you see someone put up something that you consider ridiculous, can you think of something even more ridiculous? Remember, all truly brilliant ideas started sounding utterly ridiculous." "Again, start from whichever side you feel most comfortable. Some people are more comfortable working with the constraints on the left hand side than the ideas on the right. It's up to you." "If you start from the right, you're probably looking to list ideas, so use one green sticky note per idea." "If you start from the left - the constraints, then use the amber or orange sticky notes."


3

4

Step 3 - Checkpoint and Introduce the Next Phase What to do: • Sooner or later the momentum will slow down. Don’t force it. Ask the participants to sit back down and tell them that there is a suspension of the no talking rule but not a suspension of the rule that we are not going to judge – verbally or non-verbally other people’s contributions. • Look for feedback and if required, restart the workshop or, if the consensus is that the bridge is complete, congratulate the participants and prepare them for the next phase. • Reiterate the objective. What to say:

“The last step is the fun one which is when we are going to start to identify some of the most promising ideas that we can see up here. Let’s just recap our sponsor’s objective which is...” "If you start from the left - the constraints, then use the amber or orange sticky notes." “How are we all feeling? Do we still have some work to do on our bridge?”

Step 4 - Draw Conclusion

What to say:

“The last thing we are going to do is to get some indication of whether we can prioritize these ideas in any way, so I am going to ask everyone to choose their 1st and 2nd favorite idea.” “Grab two yellow stick notes each, and write 1st and 2nd - fill the whole post-it, so it’s really obvious. Once you have done that and just as I am finishing up think carefully about which ones to vote for.” “Which ideas should you choose? How about the ideas that will most likely achieve our objective have the highest likelihood of success given the constraints, and makes best use of our resources?” “Of course, you can vote the your own ideas - we won’t know, but neither will anyone else - none of these ideas has a name on and you didn’t verbalize them, so please, give your votes to the ideas that meet the objective, it isn’t a competition.” “Before we do this, I want to thank you again for your participation and creativity. The bridge will be photographed and passed on to the sponsor, (insert name of the sponsor) and I will recommend that they feedback as soon as possible their thanks and which ideas they are going to implement or consider for implementation. When you are ready, then, as you leave, put your 1st and 2nd favorite sticky-notes next to the ideas that you think the sponsor should consider implementing if you are collecting formal feedback, as they to take a feedback form or tell them how their feedback will be asked for.”

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SUBTRACT Subtract is particularly useful to simplify processes and eliminate costs. An opportunity to offer something different by simplification. This Ideation Technique is suitable to redesign something that already exists and need to be refreshed.

SUBTRACT INNOVATION CHALLENGE

IDEATE

The workshop needs 1,5 hour

FUTURE

EXISTING

TO BE ELIMINATED


IDEATE >> TOOL >> SUBTRACT

HIGHLIGHTS When to Use the Subtraction Tool

Use this tool to find a radical or a disruptive ideas for new products or business models. It works by taking an existing customer journey, process or even business model, mapping it out step by step and then subtracting one component at a time and asking, “If we subtracted this element, how would we stay in business and serve our customers?” There are numerous examples of disruptive business models, products or services where subtraction has been used. Dell made it big by manufacturing and selling computers whilst SUBTRACTING the retailer. Millions of people everyday book a taxi cab through Uber but unlike other taxi cab firms, Uber SUBTRACTED has the need to own any vehicles or employ any drivers. Amazon SUBTRACTED the need for physical stores. Unlike all other car manufacturers, Telsa has SUBTRACTED the dealer network and provide a retail experience not dissimilar to buying an Apple Computer. The kid’s ‘balance bike’ or ‘stroller’ makes learning to ride a bike easier by SUBTRACTING the pedals. While many restaurant chains labor over their menus in order to provide the maximum choice, chains like Nandos SUBTRACTED choice and specialized in just one menu item – chicken.

When NOT to Use the Subtraction Tool

It isn’t a tool to use to make incremental improvements to something that already exists or if you need ideas that you can implement now. As its purpose is to find divergent ideas it’s likely to require a Converge tool to select which ideas to progress.

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Suggest these Ground Rules and seek assent as you write them up on a flipchart


SUBTRACT MODEL SUBTRACT INNOVATION CHALLENGE

FUTURE

EXISTING

TO BE ELIMINATED

Idea

Idea

Idea


Rules • Everyone has something of value, therefore everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

Preparation • For this exercise you will need to prepare the user journey with its key instances. • You need to know what you may like to eliminate across the journey.

Process • Start by mapping the user’s journey horizontally in the middle of the board, leave plenty of space above. • Analyze which functions you could eliminate. Where they intervene in the process. Put a note on these function below the process. Use different colors for different functions. • Write down ideas to eliminate functions above the existing process. • Soon, you will discover a new user journey on which unnecessary functionalities or tasks have been eliminated. You may end up with several user journeys on which user’s journey functionalities have been eliminated. It is your role to assess which scenario respond the best to the user experience you are looking for.

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PREPARING THE SUBTRACTION WORKSHOP The starting point for the workshop is a ‘straw man’ customer journey, process or business model that you want ideas about. It’s a straw man because the first step of the process is to get the group to map out the journey so that the whole group understands it the same way. Then you need to decide which component to subtract (it would take too long to go through all of the components and people’s energy might run out just as you subtract the most interesting one).

Setting Up the Room

The best way then to choose which elements to subtract is to ask, “Which of these elements are you most concerned about losing – which would impact the organization most?” The easiest answer that someone might give is “our customers”, so you might need to probe a little further and ask, “how hard is it to find customers, are your customers unique in some way, would it be more damaging that, for instance, losing your ability to make your products to the same standard, or the ability to purchase your raw materials?” This workshop session lasts an hour, so you need 3 or 4 elements. Therefore, choosing the most important ones is really important.

Items to Have in Room Tables, chairs arranged in a U-shape, if 16 or less, pods if more than 16. At least 2 flip charts and multi-colored markers (more if the number of delegates requires the room to be split into pods).


Checklist of Materials Agenda and detailed agenda Session objective from sponsor (if possible the sponsor should introduce the objective) and ‘straw man’ customer journey Ground rules for participating in an ideation workshop Opening statement Clip board with sign-in sheet (if appropriate) Name cards, with team indicators (if appropriate) Pens and notepads for the participants to capture ideas

Checkpoint: Review, Preview, Big View "We have just completed." "In our next step, we will be using an ideation tool that we call Subtraction to identify potential innovations." During opening, move around, go deep within the "U” establish eye contact, look for early signs of dysfunction.

"This is important because the Subtraction disrupts the normal way of brainstorming which will allow us to identify different types of ideas and potential innovations for..."

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What to Say "We are going to use an ideation tool called Subtraction. If you have not been exposed to this technique before this might start off sounding mad, however, there's some method to the madness." "It works by taking a customer journey or process and then asking, 'If we subtract one element how would we still deliver our product or service?'" "We are going to start with an example both to explain how it works and to warm up our 'idea muscles.'" "We need to imagine that we are now in the restaurant business. We serve hearty family meals and our target customers are families and groups of friends and co-workers. Let's quickly get down the customer journey starting with a customer opening the door and ending with leaving the restaurant happy and satisfied with their meal. We need the 'resource' which could be who does it or what's used) and the activity so I will start with 'the Restaurant Manager' welcomes the guest and shows them to the table and gives out menus, (then write it up on the board for all to see). Who wants to go next, what's the next thing that happens? Who is the resource and what is the activity?" (Capture the events in order - see the broad process you need to the right) "So we are going to subtract one of these components. Let's start with the simplest one, and one that we are all familiar with because not all restaurants have restaurant managers that greet us and show us to a table. So, we have subtracted that resource.

How do we manage that? How does the process change? What ideas do we need?" (You would expect people to say that the guests simply choose their own table and call the waiter when they are ready to order.) "Great, you are getting the idea. Let's put the restaurant manager greeting back in the process but subtract the waiter role. Again, you may have been to a restaurant like this so it shouldn't be revolutionary, we're just flexing our idea muscles here to help us when we get to the challenge for the workshop." (You would expect people to say that the customers go to a serving counter and give their order and take a number, then return to the counter to collect their food when they hear their number shouted from the kitchen OR the customers go to a buffet table that has the food and people help themselves.) "This is a good stuff. Before we move on, has anyone heard of the 'pay as you please' restaurant model? It's an example where they have subtracted the price list and you literally pay what you feel like paying based on the service and quality of the food." “We will do another one really quickly, let’s subtract the menu. How could that work? What ideas can we offer to still provide a great experience for our target market, BUT without a menu or indeed any idea of what food to offer on a day to day basis? You don’t need to capture these ideas, you are only doing this to break down any barriers and get people talking and ideating.


Do this activity only if you have time within the open 20 minutes for the introduction and warm-up exercise.

“This is great, let’s quickly do one more that will stretch us a little more. Let’s subtract the cook, in fact, let’s subtract our ability to cook anything, we can prepare cold food, but we can’t cook or prepare anything that requires skill. We still want to provide a great customer experience for our target market though. What ideas can generate, even without a pretty important resource.” (This is the fun one in this example. Expect some more radical ideas.) “Great stuff. Well done everyone. You’ve clearly all got the idea of how this tool works, and our idea muscles are nicely warmed up. Before we move on to the challenge that we came here for, are there any questions or observations?”

We are looking for a process that looks broadly like this: Resource: Restaurant manager welcomes the guest and shows them to a table and gives out menus Resource: Menus and prices Waiter: Introduces themselves, take a drinks order Waiter: Return with drinks and takes meal order Food: Is available Cook: Make meals Waiter: Bring meals and checks on drinks Waiter or Restaurant Manager: Ask for feedback during meal Waiter: Take empty plates and return with menu with desert Waiter: Take desert order Food: Is available Cook: Make desert Waiter: Bring desert Waiter: Clear plates and give bill Waiter: Take money and thank the guests.

Record the first few ideas in order to give affirmation that they are doing the right thing, but quickly stop recording because: • We don’t need these ideas. • This will be hard for some people and they might prefer to sit and listen rather than participate so you need to scan the room and encourage those people to speak up. • When you are recording the ideas, some people will slow down and wait for you to finish writing the last idea before they give you the next idea. As well as illustrating the technique, the aim of this warm up is to make people feel that the ideas are flowing freely and that it’s easier than they thought, so be enthusiastic and be positive and encourage body language.

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Process Step – Getting Agreement on The Journey, Activities and Resources "Now that we are all clear on how subtraction works, our next step is to capture the journey or process that we are here to investigate. This is important because we all need to have the same picture of the journey if we are going to work together. Just as we did before, we need the resource and activity." "Who wants to start?" (Then write the insights on a board or flipchart.) Keep going until the team has the complete journey.

"Before we move on, is everyone happy with this?" (Nod your head or raise your hand and visually look at the group to ensure you have verbal or non-verbal consensus from everyone.)

Be prepared with the order that people put, the steps may need to change. If possible, write these on large sticky notes so they can be moved. You may want to have someone record the journey so that you can focus on facilitating the group. This part is very important. If you do have someone to record, instruct the recorder both about the format (Noun: Verb Object) and about the importance of using the participants’ words and not using his/her own words. Make sure you get all of the resources as well as activities. Watch for the people that look confused and focus on them. This is a disruptive exercise – and deliberately so, so some people won’t want to participate because it doesn’t seem to make sense or puts them out of their comfort zone. Reassure them that they will see why we are doing this in the next 20 minutes. There is a point at, which the group will think that they have finished the exercise. You need to be very aware of this and before then, mentally decide they have finished, ask them to look closely at the order and, if need be, do some reordering. If there is a requirement to document the workshop, take a photo of the complete journey at this stage.

135 Bring this phase to a close after 10 minutes


Subtract Elements "Now that we have captured the process journey, our next is to discuss possible elements to subtract. This is important because it will give us possible ideas that can lead to disruption and innovation for the process." "For this step we want a discussion because innovation is a collaborative exercise. But we are all going to make a note of the ideas on our own notepads. The reason for this is that when someone is writing up the ideas on a flip chart we often slow down and watch them writing before we verbalize our idea in order to make sure it gets written down. This just slows things down, so please do share your ideas, but write them down on your own notepad. In the last 10 minutes of this workshop we will consolidate the best ideas".

When appropriate, change the resource

"Let's start by subtracting (then choose one resource - one that you feel will be easy to start with). What ideas could help us achieve our objective without (the resource or activity)?" "This is a good stuff, let's change the resource that we are going to subtract, now let's subtract..."

The normal approach here is to capture the ideas as they are being brainstormed. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend this because: You need to focus on facilitating rather than recording. When the ideas are being captured on a whiteboard or flip chart people often slow down and wait for the idea to be written up before they call out for the next idea which slows things down The introverts hate shouting out their ideas and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to inhibit them Sooner or later the ideas will seem much harder to come by. Stop and choose another resource to subtract. This part of the exercise lasts for 60 minutes (50 minutes if you want to take a short break before you start the consolidation process).


Checkpoint and Introduce the Next Phase

"This has been great, well done everyone. We have been identifying the ideas using the Subtraction process. And we have to stop this now because we are running close to our scheduled time to end the workshop. Before I introduce the next phase, are there any feedbacks or questions?" "The next task is to identify some of the key ideas that we captured. While the sponsor will receive the entire output from this session, we will want to highlight the most important ideas for further consideration." "Would someone please volunteer to take the pen and capture them?" Asking one of the delegates to capture the best ideas gives you the ability to focus on facilitating to the group

Consolidating the Ideas

"Let's start with (and choose a resource that you subtracted). There were some great ideas discussed. What stood out? We won't have time to list all these ideas, so please just mention the ones that really stood out for you as having the potential benefit or worth further consideration. Who wants to start?" Then facilitate a discussion about the ideas (e.g., â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is it that makes these ideas stand out?) then move to the next resource. Many of the delegates will feel as though the workshop has ended, so you need to energize them to finish the work by being demonstrably energized.

We have 15 minutes for this session so depending on the number of resources that you subtracted plan the timing accordingly. Use one flip chart sheet or section of whiteboard per subtracted resource.

Ending the Workshop Thank the participants for their time and energy and inform them the stand out ideas per subtracted resource will be shared with the sponsor. Photograph the flip chart with the stand out ideas. Generally, the ideas are put into a spreadsheet for the sponsor as well as the photos.

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IDEA HACKS This Ideation Technique is consist of replacing function or benefits by other. It creates a rich solutions by combining things that are apparently not related. Idea Hacks is particularly suitable to repair, fix things that are broken or does not work well.

IDEA HACKS

IDEATE

SUBJECT

CATEGORIES

ATTRIBUTES

IDEAS

INNOVATION CHALLENGE


IDEATE >> TOOL >> IDEA HACKS

HIGHLIGHTS

Ground Rules

“There are two special ground rules for this session.” “Are there other ground rules we would like to consider? a. Everyone has something (insights, knowledge, and ideas) of value, therefore everyone has an obligation to speak and share b. Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb (don’t judge or mock other people’s ideas) “Can we adopt these additional ground rules - give me a head nod. Anyone opposed?”

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When to Use the Idea Hacks Tool A hack is when you take something that already exists and hack (or change) elements to create a new value, utility or customer/user experience.

Rules • Everyone has something of value, therefore, everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

The starting point therefore, is something that already exists that you want ideas for or different versions or variations of. You can use idea hacking to find ideas for something new, but you’ll likely need to start with a competitive product.

Preparation

Use the tool when you welcome a wide range of potentially disruptive ideas.

Process

When Not to Use the Idea Hacks Tool When you want an improvement ideas - % gains on an existing process rather than divergent ideas. When you want a very specific outcome rather than a wide range of potentially disruptive ideas.

• Prepare some topics to address this exercise: • Example: Components, utility, materials or format, sales model, customer, value proposition, user experience, business model, etc.

• Start by writing down the name of the subject you would like to explore. • This subject has sub-categories you may like to explore as well. Write them in a separate sticky notes. • Under each category, write down the respective attributes for each category. • Once you are done with this analysis, start replacing attributes with new attributes that have not been explored before. • You may try to create a new categories as well. • Finally, analyze the whole thing and understand new concepts of the offering.


PREPARING IDEA HACKS WORKSHOP The starting point for the workshop is a product or service that the sponsor wants to Hack. It is essential that you prepare some topics to direct the exercise. Read through the warm up exercise and you will see that the ideation exercise is directed by suggesting elements to hack such as: • Components (Can one or more component be removed or substituted?) • Utility (Can we change what it does?) • Materials or format (How is it delivered? What materials are used?) • The sales model (How is it sold? Is it sold directly to the end-user or through a supply chain? Is it sold as a product or a service? How and when do people pay for it?) • The customer (Who is the target customer? Remember the customer and the user/consumer may be different.) • The value proposition (Where’s the value? Why do people buy it?) • The user experience (How is it used? What purpose does it offer? How does it make people feel? Why do they buy and consume it? How does it differentiate itself from other similar products?) • The business model

Note. Many of these cross-over and many of these won’t apply to all products – for example the value proposition for a Mars Bar is widely different from the value proposition for an insurance product.

SETTING-UP THE ROOM Checklist of Materials (Items to Bring) Agenda and detailed agenda Session objective Ground rules for participating in the ideation workshop Pens and notepads for the participants to capture ideas Opening statement Clipboard with sign in sheet Name cards, with team indicators (if appropriate) Team identifiers for table groupings (if appropriate) Session evaluation forms (if appropriate) Workshop provocations (if appropriate, the things we are trying to Hack) (Optional) a bag of mini size Mars Bars for the warm-up exercise Items to Have in Room • Tables, chairs arranged in U-shape if 16 or less, pods if more than 16 • 3 flip charts, multi-colored markers, tape • Sign in table, work table for placing other materials


Checkpoint: Review, Preview, Big View “We have just completed…”

“In our next step, we will be using an ideation tool that we call Innovation Hacking to identify a potential innovations.” “This is important because the innovation hacking disrupts the normal way of brainstorming which will allow us to identify different types of ideas and potential innovations for …” You can make the session longer by extending the ideation period. During opening, move around, go deep within the “U,” establish eye contact, look for early signs of dysfunction.

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In this example we are going to start with some easy hacks and move on to harder ones that include the following

Re-ordering the components

Warm-up by Playing an Idea Hack Game

“If you have not been exposed to the Idea Hack technique before, don’t worry, we’re not going to break into anyone’s bank account. A ‘hack’ is simply when we take something and change it - hack it.” “Let’s take for example, a Mars bar, we all know what that is. It’s a nougat base, with a caramel top all wrapped in chocolate. The simplest hack is to RE-ORDER those three components, let’s get started and stretch our idea muscles who want to offer some ideas?” (Then ask for two or three ideas, i.e., Chocolate base, with nougat on top, wrapped in caramel.)

Substituting one or more components

“Great, next, what if we hack one or more component, what about CHANGING the nougat base, who wants to offer an idea as a substitute base?” (Get four or five ideas before you move on, then four or five substitutes for the chocolate.)

The utility (what it does)

“You can see that already we could capture hundreds of ideas. Let’s switch from the components to the UTILITY, which means what it does - it’s a high-calorie chocolate snack. So let’s hack the utility (meaning what it does)? There’s a simple hack from high-calorie to... low-calorie, but how far can we go with changing the utility? (then look for 5 or 6 ideas, i.e., a highcalorie drink, a meal replacement drink, a diet drink, a gel).”

“What if we hacked the CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE? It’s a snack, it’s tasty and gives us energy. What ideas can we come up with to provide a different customer experience?” “What about the BUSINESS MODEL? Mars bars are generally sold to distributors who sell them to retailers who sell them to us. Could we hack the business model and sell it directly? What would it need to be that would allow us to, say, sell a subscription and deliver them weekly to customers?” “I think we’ve gone far enough for you all to have understood the basic concept of idea hacking, it’s a really fun way of generating ideas really quickly.” As well as illustrating the technique, the aim of this warmup is to make people feel that their ideas are flowing freely and that it’s easier than they thought, so be enthusiastic and be positive and encourage body language. • The warm should only take 10 minutes • The warm-up exercise is over The customer experience (why do people buy it, what does it do for them, how does it make them feel, how does it differentiate from other chocolate bars?) The business model (how it’s sold, what quantities, but also how it gets from the factory to the consumer – is it direct, or through multiple hands?)


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The normal approach here is to capture the ideas as they are being brainstormed. We don’t recommend this because: •

You need to focus on facilitating rather than recording.

When the ideas are being captured on a whiteboard or flip-chart people it can slow down the speed at which the ideas can be written up.

Process Step - Let’s Start Hacking

“Now that we understand Hacking, our next task is to discuss possible elements to hack. This is important because it will give us some ideas that can lead to disruption and innovation for the process.” “For this step, we want a discussion because innovation is a collaborative exercise. But we are all going to make a note of the ideas on our own notepads. The reason for this is that when someone is writing up the ideas on a flip chart we tend to slow down to wait for the person writing in order to make sure our idea gets written down. In the last 10 minutes of this workshop we will consolidate the best ideas but we don’t want to slow down the ideation process.” When appropriate, change the element Sooner or later the ideas will seem much harder to come by. Stop and choose another element. Some common hacking elements:

This part of the exercise lasts for 60 minutes (50 if you want to take a short break before you start the consolidation process).

Component: reorder, change

Utility

Customer experience

Business model

“This is good stuff, let’s change the element that we are going to hack, now let’s hack.”

Checkpoint and Introduce the Next Phase Ask the participants to stop talking for a short time so you can introduce the next phase.

“This has been great, well done everyone. We have to stop this now because we are running close to our scheduled time to end the workshop. Before I introduce the next phase, is there any feedback or question?” “The next task is to identify some of the key ideas that we captured. While the sponsor will receive the entire output from this session, we will want to highlight the most important ideas for further consideration.” “Would someone please volunteer to take the pen and capture them?” Check whether they felt they had enough time. We ask one of the delegates to take the pen and capture the ideas in order that you can concentrate on facilitating the group.


Process Step - Drawing Conclusions (Choose a group to start)

“Can one of you talk the rest of the group through your journey by talking about the main ideas. Start by reading out the ORIGINAL IDEA, then the REVERSE IDEA, then the SOLUTION IDEAS that you have to implement that REVERSE IDEA.” (look for a group that is happy to kick things off.) “Remember, the last thing we are going to do is to ask everyone to choose a 1st and 2nd favorite SOLUTION IDEA so here is your chance to get your SOLUTION IDEA noticed.” Thank that group and ask for feedback from the other groups. Perhaps a round of applause, then move on to the other groups.

“This is great. Now that we have reviewed the top SOLUTION IDEAS from each group, the last thing we need to do is to put some kind of priority on these SOLUTION IDEAS. We have to assume that we can, quickly, do only a handful of these ideas so I am going to ask you to choose a first and second favorite idea.” Have the clock to track time. Each time a strategy is lobbied, place a check mark next to it.

“Before we do this, however, each person will have the option of taking (30 seconds) to indicate any SOLUTION IDEAS for which he or she would like to request support. This is the time to lobby the rest of the team to vote for the SOLUTION IDEAS you personally believe should be given highest priority. When you lobby you should indicate which SOLUTION IDEAS you support and why. “Of course, you can lobby for your own idea, or your group’s ideas, but it would be good to feel as though you will vote for someone else’s. What’s most important, isn’t what’s the most interesting or novel idea, it’s the ideas that will make the biggest impact on the objective of the workshop which was to find the most impactful ideas to (then insert the objective of the workshop).”

“Who would like to go first?” “Now that lobbying is complete, let’s make the final determination of our priority SOLUTION IDEAS. Look over the list. You have been given six dots (20-25% of the total number). Three dots are (BLUE), three are (ORANGE). Place the blue dots on the SOLUTION IDEAS you believe are the most important. The BLUE dots count three points each, while the orange dots each count one point. You can only place one dot on a SOLUTION IDEA.” “You will have 5 minutes to review the SOLUTION IDEAS and place your dots on the ones that you feel are the best. Any questions? Let’s get started.” Make sure the SOLUTION IDEA sheets are clearly visible. Following the tally, the SOLUTION IDEAS would be ranked by number of votes received.

“Based on this, it appears that our priority SOLUTION IDEAS are the following...” With six dots, look for a jump somewhere between the 4th and 8th highest vote getters to determine where to cut off the priority SOLUTION IDEAS. Quickly check the ideas with votes and make sure you can read the idea. If there is any doubt, then ask someone from that group to clarify.

Ending the Workshop Thank the participants for their time and energy and inform them that the stand out ideas that were captured will be shared with the sponsor. With six dots, look for a jump somewhere between the 4th and 8th highest vote getters to determine where to cut off the priority SOLUTION IDEAS. Quickly check the ideas with votes and make sure you can read the idea. If there is any doubt, then ask someone from that group to clarify.

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REVERSE INNOVATION This exercise requires participants to think the worst experience they could offer to their customers which seems to be contradictory to the principle of innovation. However, it offers interesting insights to make things really different and contextually integrated.

REVERSE INNOVATION IDEATE

The workshop needs 1,5 hour

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

REVERSE SCENARIO

DO WELL

DO BETTER

NOT GOOD


IDEATE >> TOOL >> REVERSE INNOVATION

HIGHLIGHTS When to Use the Reverse Innovation Tool This tool works well because it ‘disrupts’ the normal brainstorming approach, so rather than asking for instance, “ideas to improve the client onboarding process”, we reverse it and ask, “if we were trying to offer the worst possible experience for a new client – if we wanted to win a new client, but make them want to leave us immediately before they buy anything from us, what could we do?” If you have an audience therefore that isn’t used for formal meetings or brainstorming exercises or are a particularly hard group to get to participate, this is a good choice of ideation tool because it is significantly easier for people to engage this way because we’re asking for insights and observations (and the odd joke comment) rather than explicitly asking for ideas, so there are no wrong answers. This tool works well for processes but assumes there is already a process in place. It isn’t the tool to use to invent or build something new.

REVERSE INNOVATION INNOVATION CHALLENGE

REVERSE SCENARIO

DO WELL

DO BETTER

NOT GOOD

Rules • Everyone has something of value, therefore everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

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Preparation • It is essential to know what you want to improve from user experience perspective. • Example: To improve the user experience of your restaurant, you will reverse the user experience of the customer. But if you want to improve your business process you may reverse the user experience of the restaurant manager.

Process • Start by writing down a fictional chronological scenario with the worst experience you could offer to your customers or manager. Use one sticky note for each key instance of your scenario. Place them in line from left to right on top of the board. • Now that you have the worst user journey. • Add a colored sticky note under each key instance with the following assessment. Not true: means you are good – GREEN Somehow true: means you are average – ORANGE True: means you are not good – RED • Focus on the red notes that indicate clear areas of improvement. Generate ideas for improvement.


PREPARING FOR THE WORKSHOP The starting point for the workshop is clearly identified problem to solve or opportunity to exploit. For the first stage of this Ideation Tool, we reverse the problem or opportunity. Some examples follow: "We are seeking ideas to improve the client on-boarding process"

"If we wanted to win a new client, but make them want to leave us immediately before they buy anything from us, what could we do?"

"We want to reduce customer complaints about shipping errors"

"How could we maximize the number of complaints through shipping?"

"We want to improve the customer experience through our purchase to pay process"

"How can we reduce non-value added time in our sales administration process"

"What ways can we speed-up the induction and training time for new starters"

"How can we provide the worst possible customer experience through our purchase to pay process?"

"How can we string-out the sales administration process by extending the non-value added activities?"

"What ways can we ensure that we delay the time it takes for new starters to make an impact?"


Setting-Up the Room Checklist of Materials Agenda and detailed agenda Session objective from sponsor (if possible the sponsor should introduce the objective) Ground rules for participating in an ideation workshop Opening statement Clip board with sign in sheet Name cards, with team indicators if appropriate Sticky notes, yellow, red (normally pink), amber/ orange and green Pens Workshop provocations (If you are, for instance trying to solve a problem, can you bring examples of the problem or examples of the result of the problem?)

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Items to Have in Room •

This exercise needs a large wall or windows that the participants can stick sticky notes to.

Tables, chairs arranged in U-shape if 16 or less, pods if more than 16 (assuming this configuration also offers enough room for groups to work at a wall)

2 flip charts, multi-colored markers


Checkpoint: Review, Preview, Big View

Ground Rules

"We have just completed..."

There are two special ground rules for this session.

"In our next step, we will be using an ideation tool that we call Reverse Innovation to identify potential innovations."

Everyone has something (insights, knowledge and ideas) of value, therefore everyone has an obligation to speak and share.

"This is important because Reverse Innovation disrupts the normal way of brainstorming which will allow us to identify different types of ideas and potential innovations for..."

Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb (don't judge or mock other people's ideas)

"With Reverse Innovation, the starting point is the following question."

"Can we adopt these additional ground rules - give me a head nod. Anyone opposed?"

(Then reveal or write-up on the flipchart the ‘reversed’ objective.)

If you have not been exposed to this technique before I know this will sound mad. However, there's some method in this (apparent) madness. I am going to ask you to start to identify all the ideas you have to meet this objective. We will then, one by one reverse each one and we expect to find ideas that we wouldn't normally have found. The 25 min sessions include a check-in time to review the last session and introduce the next session

During the opening, move around, go deep within the ‘U”, establish eye contact, look for early signs of dysfunction.

"Are there other ground rules we would like to consider?"

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VAC ATIONS FOR ALL STUFF

CANDIES FOR CLIENTS

HUG JACK EVERY MORNING

Process step - Getting Ideas/Insights "The first thing to do is to create some smaller groups, ideally 6 people each." The grouping is determined by the number of spaces on walls for the exercise. You can also use whiteboards or windows – anywhere you can stick sticky notes. "Then quickly nominate someone that will take charge of the pen and sticky notes - the only requirement for this role is neat hand-writing. This person is not leading the group, just the pen." The next stage uses color coded sticky notes so you can use any color other than red/pink, amber/yellow or green notes. "To start, someone will suggest an idea to meet our reversed objective, then the person with the post-it notes will write it down on a yellow post-it note and stick it to the wall. We will go until we run out of ideas and then move on the next reversed item."

This invariably starts with people calling out joke responses. This is fine. Not only do they create momentum and break down barriers, often people will be more truthful because they can say it as a joke. “I’m going to lead this for this first one or two ideas then leave you to it, So in your groups, someone suggest an idea to meet this objective, get it written down and stuck on the wall. Remember, there are no stupid ideas”. Watch for groups or people that look confused and focus on them. This is a disruptive exercise – and deliberately so, so some people won’t want to participate because it doesn’t seem to make sense and puts them out of their comfort zone. Reassure them they will see why we are doing this in the next 20 minutes. If you need to document the workshop, take photos to show how the session progressed. Some people will not be comfortable standing. The group or individuals can sit down as long as someone is positioning the sticky notes on the wall.


X20 OUR SALARY

There is a point at which the group needs to take stock and reorder the sticky notes into the ‘journey’ so there is some kind of chronology. This is key to the exercise to encourage the groups to take stock and do this when the ideas / insights start to dry up. Ask for confirmation from the groups that they have the whole journey mapped out. “Great, let’s get the next idea written down and while that is happening, the group needs to figure out whether that happens before or after the first idea - so do we stick it to the left or right of the first one?” If you are working with more than one group, then invariably they will finish at different times. This is fine. (address all the groups) “Can everyone see how this works? The key thing is, (emphasize) Don’t filter the ideas at this stage, just get them on the wall. It really doesn’t matter how ridiculous the idea sounds. Remember, if we wanted to build a set of muscles we’d exercise them and stretch them, think of it this way that we are exercising our idea muscles, so have fun, get the ideas down.”

PART Y EVERY FRIDAY

OFFICE IN MOUNTAINS

(Announce to the groups that seem to be slowing down or all the groups.) You will be introducing the next phase with an example, so choose a wall and one or two ideas and rehearse the next step. “The order that the sticky notes are on the wall is important, so take a step back and make sure you are happy with the order. If some things happen concurrently, then stack them up on top of each other.” This phase takes 20 minutes, so give the groups a time to get the ideas and insights down. If you feel their energy is dropping, remind them to take stock and stand back and think about how the sticky notes are positioned on the wall – we need some kind of process or journey. We will of course be discarding some of the ideas, but the journey is important.

Bring this phase to a close after 20 minutes.

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Checkpoint and Introduce The Next Phase Ask the participants to sit back down and stop talking for a short time. Ask for feedback or questions about the task. “It looks as though you’ve all got some great ideas up there, and it sounded like you had fun and I love the energy”! “This was just the first step of 3. By reversing the objective, we hope we’ve been able to find some innovative, novel ideas and insights to meet our sponsor’s objective to...” “Did you get through the whole journey?” Seek verbal and non-verbal confirmation by walking into the U shape desks.

They will have been standing up for most of the session, which for some people is a long time so, invite them to take a seat for this check-in session. Check whether they felt they had enough time and feel they got the whole ‘journey’ complete. If there is more than one group and only one of them didn’t complete their process/journey, that’s fine. We will be consolidating the ideas. If you are working with one group, then you will need to give them more time to complete the process/journey.


“Now, we get to the hard work. The next step is to reverse each step. For this, we need three more packs of sticky notes. We’re going to use the traffic light system, so green, amber is orange and red which is this pink color sticky notes, so if you can grab the packs please.” This next step needs some introduction so it is important that the people are alert so seek visual confirmation. “Right, before we restart. I am going to illustrate this with this journey. Can everyone see this?” (Visually check that everyone can see you.) “We’ll start at the beginning (then read out the idea) and then we need to agree on what the reverse of the idea is. So this first idea says (for example) ‘Allow the salespeople to sell things or combinations of things that don’t exist.’” Then, the reverse will simply be, ‘DON’T allow salespeople to sell things or combinations of things that don’t exist’. Now, if that is the way things happen today (i.e., the salespeople are not allowed to sell things or combinations of things that don’t exist), write it on a Green sticky note. If it sometimes happens, but not always, write the reversed statement on an orange/amber sticky note. If it often happens, then write it on a Red/Pink sticky note and place the sticky note directly below the original idea – even better, just overlap it so that there is no doubt that they are connected.”

“The color coding is important here, and sometimes it can take a couple of minutes to get used to it. The key is to agree the reverse idea/statement first, then ask ‘do we do this”, then if it is:

Do as many examples as you need to make sure people understand

• Yes, it’s good, use Green • Sometimes, but not always, use Amber/Orange • No, this doesn’t happen, use Red/Pink

155

Seek confirmation that the groups and participants understand what’s required. Walk into the U shape to look for visual clues of understanding/confusion. “I’ll be coming around, so unless there are any other questions, let’s go. Even reverse the joke comments as well as the serious ones if they are Red/Amber.”

Bring this phase to a close after 20 minutes


Process step - Reversing the Ideas/Insights

Possible Issues

“Regroup in the same groups as with your ‘journey’.”

The color coding of the sticky note is very important here so make sure people are doing it correctly.

“You can nominate a different person to take charge of the pen and sticky notes or stick with the same person, it doesn’t matter.” “We have 20 minutes to do this part of the exercise. Just to reiterate, the aim of this phase is to find the steps in the journey that we can innovate and we’ll be looking at the reds and ambers. If an idea, when reversed, is without doubt green, you actually don’t even need to write the reversed statement on the Green sticky note.” “As you got through you should come across a ‘ah-ha’ moment when you think of a new and novel idea. That’s fantastic that’s what we are here for, however, make a note of that for yourself and keep going. It’s really easy - and unhelpful, to let the first idea that pops into your head distract you and your group. The aim of the last 20 minutes of the exercise is to discuss ideas, so keep going.” Then they just need to get started at the beginning of the journey and keep going until there is a Red, Amber or Green post-it next to each idea/insight.

Yes, it’s good, use Green Sometimes, but not always, use Amber/Orange No, this doesn’t happen, use Red/Pink It does take some time for some people to figure this out so be patient. People do need to be neat and tidy at this stage, so make sure the reversed sticky note sits directly below or even better overlapped to the original idea. Reaffirm that on the next stage, is to look at the Ambers and Red/Pink sticky notes so they need more details than the Green (in-fact we don’t even need a reversed statement on the Green sticky notes.) This step generally happens quickly. If you need to write-up the workshop, take photos to show how the session progressed. If you are working with more than one group, then invariably they will finish at different times. This is fine. You will be introducing the next phase with an example, so choose a wall and one or two ideas and rehearse the next step.


Checkpoint and Introduce the Next Phase Ask the participants to sit back down and stop talking for a short time. Ask for feedback or questions about the task. “Right, well done everyone, this is great stuff. We’ve got lots of red and amber sticky notes, which is what we wanted. The next step is the fun step which is to start to turn these into ideas that we can implement to meet our sponsor’s objective (then reiterate the objective.)” “This is the last step. I am going to ask you to get back with your previous group. As before, you can ask someone else to take the pen or stick with the same person.” “You need a different color sticky note pad, but you can use the original color as long as you are neat and tidy and attach it to and below the red or amber sticky note - essentially so you have three sticky notes stacked up on one another - the original idea at the top, the reversed idea on the red or amber sticky note directly below and the actions to bring this idea to life at the bottom.” “I’m going to illustrate what to do now by going to another wall. Can everyone see this?” (Visually check that everyone can see you, then read out one of the ideas.) They will have been standing up for well over an hour, which for some people is a long time so invite them to take a comfort break and then take a seat for this check-in session.

The very last step of this workshop is to ask all participants to choose a 1st and 2nd favorite idea by sticking a sticky note below the idea. It’s important therefore that each idea is on a separate sticky note.

“So the ORIGINAL idea was to ‘allow the salespeople to sell things or combinations of things that don’t exist’, then the REVERSED idea was simply ‘DON’T’ allow salespeople to sell things or combinations of things that don’t exist’ and this is on an amber/orange sticky note which tells me that this sometimes happens. So, we are looking for SOLUTION ideas now to stop this happening. Now, which group owns this journey? What SOLUTION ideas could we offer to make sure this doesn’t happen? It’s amber rather than red, so what are the circumstances when this does happen and how can this be stopped? Just call out some ideas on this one.” (Listen for the ideas, affirm them positively with yes, great, excellent.) “Write each one down on a sticky note. Use a separate sticky note for each idea. When you feel there is enough, move on. Is everyone happy with this?” (Seek visual confirmation before you move on. Do another one if you think it is necessary.) “We started the last exercise from the beginning of the journey, but this isn’t necessary. If you feel strongly that you want to focus on one part of the journey, start there, but focus on the Reds then the Ambers. The more creative we can put into this part of the exercise the better, so if you feel you can solve some problems, let’s make sure we solve the most important ones first.” Seek confirmation that the groups and participants understand what’s required. Walk into the U shape to look for visual clues of understanding/confusion.

157


Process Step - Ideating You (or someone) needs to write-up this workshop, so you need to be very active to make sure that the person that is writing is writing clearly and legibly otherwise however good their idea is, it can’t be implemented if no-one can read it.

“Right, let’s get started. Regroup in the same groups with your ‘journey’ of sticky notes.” “We have 20 minutes to do this part of the exercise. Just to reiterate, the aim of this phase is to find ideas that would turn Reds and Ambers into Greens.”

Checkpoint and Introduce the Last Phase Ask the participants to sit back down and stop talking for a short time. Ask for feedback or questions about the task.

You (or someone) needs to write-up this workshop, so you need to be very active to make sure that the person that is writing is writing clearly and legibly otherwise however good their idea is, it can’t be implemented if no-one can read it.

Process Step - Drawing Conclusions (Choose a group to start)

“Can one of you will talk to the rest of the group through your journey by talking about the main ideas. Start by reading out the ORIGINAL IDEA, then the REVERSE IDEA, then the SOLUTION IDEAS that you have to implement that REVERSE IDEA.” (look for a group that is happy to kick things off.) “Remember, the last thing we are going to do is to ask everyone to choose their 1st and 2nd favorite SOLUTION IDEA so here is your chance to get your SOLUTION IDEA noticed.” Thank that group and ask for feedback from the other groups. Perhaps a round of applause, then move on to the other groups.

“This is great. Now that we have reviewed the top SOLUTION IDEAS from each group, the last thing we need to do is to put some kind of priority on these SOLUTION IDEAS. We have to assume that we can, quickly, do only a handful of these ideas so I am going to ask you to choose a first and second favorite idea.”

“Before we do this, however, each person will have the option of taking (30 seconds) to indicate any SOLUTION IDEAS for which he or she would like to request support. This is the time to lobby the rest of the team to vote for the SOLUTION IDEAS you personally believe should be given highest priority. When you lobby, you should indicate which SOLUTION IDEAS you will support and why.” Have the clock to track time. Each time, a strategy is lobbied, place a check mark next to it.

“Of course, you can lobby for your own idea or your group’s ideas, but it would be good to feel as though you will vote for someone else’s. What’s most important, isn’t what’s the most interesting or novel idea, it’s the ideas that will make the biggest impact on the objective of the workshop which was to find the most impactful ideas to (then insert the objective of the workshop).” “Who would like to go first?” “Now that lobbying is complete, let’s make the final determination of our priority SOLUTION IDEAS. Look over the list. You have been given six dots (20-25% of the total number). Three dots are (BLUE), three are (ORANGE). Place the blue dots on the SOLUTION IDEAS you believe are the most important. The BLUE dots count three points each, while the orange dots each count one point. You can only place one dot on a SOLUTION IDEA.” “You will have 5 minutes to review the SOLUTION IDEAS and place your dots on the ones that you feel are the best. Any questions? Let’s get started.” “Based on this, it appears that our priority SOLUTION IDEAS are the following.”


159 Make sure the SOLUTION IDEA sheets are clearly visible. Following the tally, the SOLUTION IDEAS would be ranked by number of votes received. With six dots, look for a jump somewhere between the 4th and 8th highest vote getters to determine where to cut off the priority SOLUTION IDEAS. Quickly check the ideas with votes and make sure you can read the idea. If there is any doubt, then ask someone from that group to clarify.

Ending the Workshop “I want to thank you again for your participation and creativity. The content on the walls will be photographed and passed on to the sponsor, (insert name of the sponsor) and I will recommend that they feedback as soon as possible their thanks and which ideas they are going to implement or consider for implementation.” Photograph the ‘journeys’ to make sure you can document them properly. Make sure the photo is of high resolution enough that the words on the sticky-notes can be read.

Make a specific note to photograph the ideas with votes.

Generally the ideas are put into a spreadsheet for the sponsor as well as the photos.


FROM IDEAS TO SOLUTIONS


D CONVERGE

161


CONVERGE PROCESS

IDEATE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT UPDATE CONVERGE PHASE PLAN

SEGMENT IDEAS

CONVERGE

ELIMINATE IDEAS

SELECT IDEAS

GROUP IDEAS

UPDATE PROTOTYPE & TEST PHASE PLAN

PROTOTYPE

INNOVATION PROCESS

SELECT DESIGN CONCEPT

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES


CONTRIBUTION TO CHALLENGE RESOLUTION Solution tree â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for idea stage identification: Contribution 1 The idea is a part of a large group of idea solution.

Contribution 2 The idea is one of the important aspects of the challenge resolution. Contribution 3 The idea is fundamental to challenge resolution.

163


THE IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS The Idea Assessment Canvas

Checkpoint: Review, Preview, Big View

Contribution to Challenge Resolution

ASSESSMENT CANVAS

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Impact

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

PEOPLE TECHNOLOGY

To explain idea contribution with the metaphor of the tree. Facilitator may use a representation of the tree on top of the canvas and point elements of the tree while giving the explanation.

High Impact

High Impact

Business Categories

The Idea Assessment Canvas must be ready and fixed on the wall. Depending on the number of ideas they could be one or several Assessment Canvas.

Fundamental Ideas

High Feasibility

“I will proceed to give you the instructions on how to sort the ideas. Thereafter, you can join with your team and start working.”

Substantial Ideas

High Feasibility

Incremental Ideas

INFRASTRUCTURE

“We have collected so many ideas. Your next job is to sort them using the Idea IDEA Assessment Canvas you can see on the walls. This will allow us to build our plan for implementation.”

Low Impact


IDEA CATEGORIZATION Explanation

tree could look quite different.”

“The process of idea categorization is cyclical for each idea going through: Present the Idea, Determine the Business Category, Determine the Idea Contribution, Determine the Idea Impact and Feasibility until each ideas has been classified. Let’s get started.”

“Finally if I decide to remove the trunk; the tree would not exist anymore.”

Present the Idea “You will start by picking one idea from the brainstorming and reading it aloud to your team.” Determine the Business Category “Discuss with your team which business category this idea belongs to. Here are the 3 categories: • People • Technology • Infrastructure “If there is debate about the business category idea just pick one. Whatever you may have selected will get confirmed later in the process of development.” Determine Idea Stage “Now that we have determined the idea business category. We need to determine the Idea contribution. What is idea contribution?” “Well, for this exercise I would like for you to envision a tree. If I remove a leaf from the tree, the leaf being an idea, you may not notice the difference because the tree will still look like a tree and a leaf is not going to make the difference.” “If my idea is a branch and I decide to remove it. The picture of the

“We understand by this metaphor that Ideas support each other and are each part of a bigger picture. When we speak about an idea we want you to make the habit of understanding the context of this idea and where specific ideas fit in the big picture.” “Now practically this means that if an idea is a leaf it would be incremental, if it is the branch it would be substantial and if it is the trunk it would be fundamental. Incremental ideas are less important than the substantial idea and substantial ideas are less important than fundamental ideas. “This differentiation is quite important because instead of competing for ideas people start understanding that ideas can work together as a tree structure which is much productive.” “You will need to determine the contribution of each idea. Once again if you are not sure about the stage of the idea, just pick one. And once you have placed all the ideas. Revisit the specific business category row and shuffle the ideas among the stages as necessary until you reach something satisfactory.” “In fact, you may have categorized an idea as fundamental being fundamental but while reviewing you may understand that this particular idea is a child of another fundamental idea. Thus downgrade the idea to substantial or incremental.” “Note that some ideas may not have ‘parents’ and look disconnected from others. This should not prevent you from finding their contribution.”

165


The Impact/Feasibility assessment helps you to prioritize ideas based on their relevance to the challenge.

2

1

If you have less of ideas you could neglect these attributes. We give priority to ideas in the following sequence:

Impact is measured in terms of challenge resolution.

1. High Impact/High Feasibility 2. High Impact/Low feasibility

Feasibility is measured with respect to the organization overall capability in developing the solution.

4

3

3. High Feasibility/Low Impact 4. Low impact/Low feasibility

Determine Impact and Feasibility Point to elements of the chart while giving the explanation about Impact and Feasibility factors.

“Each row and column is an intersection in the content feasibility matrix. Each feasibility matrix has 2 axes: impact and feasibility.” “The X-axis is impact: If we implement the idea, what would be the impact on achieving our vision?” “The Y-axis is feasibility: How feasible is this idea? If we commit to investing in the idea, what is the likelihood that we would be successful?”

Use a more appropriate example if it would be more helpful.

“As an example, solving world hunger would have a high impact on improving world conditions, however, the likelihood of success would likely be low as we have been at it for decades.” “After selecting the right business category and the right idea stage select the place of your idea within the feasibility matrix. If you have too many ideas under the same category, contribution and impact/feasibility, you can superpose sticky notes on top of one another.”

Important Notes “Always remember that the ideas assessment canvas has 3 layers of information. The business category, the idea contribution and the impact and feasibility matrix.” “Whenever you move an idea from a place to another within the idea canvas these 3 factors can change. Thus, make sure you are moving the sticky note to the right place corresponding to your criteria of placement.” “For example; if you have placed an idea under High Feasibility and High Impact on the business category 1 and column stage 3, and your team decides to move the idea from stage 3 to stage 2 that should not affect the other 2 factors except if there is a real need for it too. Thus you will move the idea under the column stage 3 but keep the note under High Feasibility and High Impact within the business category 1.” “Does anyone has question or do not understood how the Idea Assessment canvas works?” “Now we are ready to start the idea categorization.”


Soon your canvas will start looking like this… IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

High Impact

Low Impact

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Impact

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Impact

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

INFRASTRUCTURE

Repeat steps 2 and 3 for Technology and Infrastructure.

TECHNOLOGY

Incremental, Substantial, Fundamental

3. At the cross section of row and column. Assess idea’s Impact and Feasibility.

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

PEOPLE

2. Start with People’s row by assessing idea’s contribution under the 3 columns.

High Impact

High Impact

People, Technology, Infrastructure.

Fundamental Ideas

High Feasibility

1. Divide ideas sticky notes into 3 bunches.

Substantial Ideas

High Feasibility

Incremental Ideas

High Feasibility

Place your idea sticky notes on the Idea Assessment Canvas. How to?

Low Feasibility

Activity

Low Impact

167


IDEA ELIMINATION Create a Go/No Go list “If you have lots of ideas in your chart. It may be wise to eliminate ideas at this stage. To proceed this task we need to create a Go/No Go list. A Go/No Go list is a screener on which we pass all the ideas individually and eliminate ideas that do not meet the criteria. To create a Go/No Go list we need to define criteria for which the idea is acceptable. The Go/No Go list is unconditional. If an idea does not pass any one of the criteria, it gets discarded. Thus, it is important you select your criteria carefully.” “I propose that you gather with your team and start writing down a list of Go/No Go criteria. Some of the criteria may be by default as per company policy, department practice, etc. but some others may be determined by your team as acceptable for idea selection.”

CRITERIA

Challenge specific

Institutional

A

GO/NO GO SOLUTIONS B C

D

“Thus, please do not hesitate to split your Go/No Go criteria into several categories. This could help you to make sure that you have explored the most important decision criteria.” “Bear in mind that Go/No Go criteria are not evaluative but discriminative. There are only two answers: Go or No Go. If any of the ideas have a No Go, the idea is discarded.” “Note that if your Go/No Go criteria are too discriminative, all ideas would be discarded and it would become difficult for you to go ahead with a working model. If some of your criteria in the Go/No Go list could be easily overcome, they may not be suitable as criteria. Thus, select your criteria carefully.”

Execute the Go/No Go “Now that your Go/No Go list is ready I suggest that you go through all the ideas and eliminate those which do not meet any of the Go/No Go criteria.” “To simplify your task you may start by eliminating all the ideas that are on the left down box of each feasibility matrix. Those ideas have low impact and low feasibility.”

The solution can be developed in 6 month

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

The prototype won’t cost more than 5000 $.

Yes

No

Yes

No

We have internal resources to develop it

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Participants would gather in team and design a Go/No Go list they could split into several categories.

We contribute more at least 2 of the 5 values of our organization

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

The Go/No Go can be listed using the present template sample:

“It is acceptable to revise the criteria if you feel that too many ideas get discarded. However, the same criteria should apply to every idea.”


Business Line

Contribution

Explain the Intelligent Sticky Note “During the next phase which is the ‘Idea Selection’, our sticky notes are going to be moved to a different chart. We do not want to lose the information related to business category, idea contribution and impact feasibility. Therefore, we need to report this information on each idea.” “As you might have noticed, we use special sticky notes for this workshop. They have 3 levels of information that would be very useful for you to retain from the Idea Assessment Canvas.” “The sticky notes contain 3 icons. The first one content 3 icon to report the business category. The second is the idea contribution tree on which you can indicate contribution. The third is the Impact/Feasibility Matrix.”

Impact/Feasibility Matrix

Record business lines, contribution and Impact/Feasibility for each sticky note: “On the box, indicate the business category of the idea with a tick mark. “On the tree tick mark the idea contribution. 1 being the three leaf (incremental), 2 the branch (substantial) and 3 the tree trunk (fundamental).” “Finally, tick mark the area your idea has been keeping within the Impact/Feasibility Matrix.

169


IDEA SELECTION Social media

Large paper chart can be used to stick the ideas in groups and collectively assess what works well together as a working model.

Example of idea group with labelling

Saving

B to B opportunity Real time transaction

Combine Findings Best deal

Group ideas in a way that make sense to you as a concept solution Represent ideas group as a working model. Solution ideas can be repeated from a concept to another, however, it is important you bring a strong design direction for each concept.

Example of solution design

Solution Design

“Now that there is agreement on the grouping of the ideas, your team will need to understand the relationship between the ideas within the groups and combine them in such a way that they form a working system. At this stage ideas will get combined, reinterpreted, overlapped and enriched. We invite individuals to elaborate on solutions on their own by creating a single page representation of the idea group they have selected. That means that each individual will select one group of ideas and design a graphic representation of this idea group in an A4 landscape white paper.”

“Now that we have selected your best ideas. Let see how we can make sense of all of this by creating groups of ideas.”

“As you elaborate on the combined solution you will surely see solution gaps between the ideas. Some may be left unsolved. However, you should attempt at this time to bring solutions to make the group of ideas a working system through which new ideas can be generated.”

“First of all, we need to place a large paper chart on your table (or on the wall) to create a group of ideas. Place the ideas by group of ideas and discuss with your team different working solution for these groups.”

“There is a single limitation to this exercise: Do not fall to the tendency of stepping away from the original concept or solution. You should remain true to the original intention and challenge definition.”

Create Group of Ideas


As group, select one of the group of ideas and materialize the ideas into solution design using LEGO®

Note: • You do not need to keep all the ideas. • You can add new ideas to your design. • You must respect the challenge: “How might we create new business without opening new store?”

Design with LEGO® “Let’s give some volume to our idea. We will use LEGO® to prototype solution design. There is a single guideline while prototyping with LEGO®. Always start with the big picture, then narrow down to details. You do not want to waste time perfecting the details if you are not sure about the concept itself. Always place ALL elements of the design on the table. For example, if I want to improve the customer experience at the bank teller counter I would make sure to have all the elements supposed to be present in that place.

Teller, customer, counter, cash, computer, cash counting machine, phone, separation window, pen, electronic payment terminal, queue machine, etc. etc. If all elements are on your table to start, you would not miss one.” It would happen that you won’t find the element readymade. This is absolutely fine. You can build it with LEGO® or draw it in a small piece of paper you place within your design.

171


Solution Assessment

Dependency Assessment

Group Idea Presentation

“As team’s present their idea solution, I would like you to take sticky notes and write down some dependencies you may find for their particular solution. Anything that you believe could be worth them exploring within their solution system. I invite one of the team members presenting to collect the sticky notes at the end of their presentation.”

“Now that we have the combined solutions design, the next steps is to have presentations from each group. The purpose of the group presentations is to create awareness about the different group of ideas you have and eventually collect feedback from your colleagues. The presentation will force you to structure the information around a working group of ideas. An idea group presentation should not take more than 1 minute. We want it to be short and right to the point.” “Let’s do it. You have 20 minutes to prepare your idea solution presentation.” “Now that you are ready, let’s start with the first team’s presentation. Each team will present its solution idea as a working system. We will take only one minute per group of ideas. There won’t be question/answers but instead, we will have an individual dependency assessment.” Each team can leave suggestion and recommendation on other team’s concepts.

Recap “Well let’s have a recap. We created 356 ideas initially. We have now 12 group of idea solution that has been presented. What do you feel about this? Do you see opportunities to answers our initial challenge? Do we need to step back and rework through the process.


Each concept should contain

The dependency note from other teams

The original IDEA sticky note

173


E PROTOTYPE AND TEST 175


INNOVATION PROCESS

PROTOTYPE & TEST PROCESS

CONVERGE

SENIOR MANAGEMENT UPDATE PROTOTYPE & TEST PHASE PLAN

SELECT DESIGN CONCEPT

PROTOTYPE & TEST

CREATE A PROTOTYPE

TEST THE PROTOTYPE

DEVELOP BUSINESS CASE

IMPLEMENT

DEVELOP IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

OBTAIN APPROVAL TO IMPLEMENT

CHALLENGE OWNER

INNOVATION TEAM

MANAGERS & EMPLOYEES


WHAT IS PROTOTYPING? Prototype comes when we are ready to develop a concept into a real solution. During that time, we still have a conceptual understanding of the solution but not the actual definition. Thus, we will keep trying different alternatives to develop the real solution.

AESTHETIC

AESTHETIC/ ERGONOMIC

It looks like a real car but It looks like a real car does not work. and works like a real car, However, it is not an industrial product.

ERGONOMIC

It works like a real keyboard but does not look like.

PRINCIPLE

It demonstrates a principle of ventilation beyond aesthetic and functionality.

Full Size Scale

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PROTOTYPING TOOLS SOFTWARE 2D/3D

2D • • • • •

Power Point Photoshop Illustrator PowerPoint Inkscape

2D INTERACTIVE • Flash • Axure

HARDWARE

3D

HARDWARE PROTOTYPE

• Google SketchUp

• Raw material

• 3D Max • Autostudio

• Re-use • Print

• Maya • Blender

• Paint


PHOTO / VIDEO

DRAWING

3D PRINTING

ANIMATION

TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUES

DIRECT

• • • • •

• Pencil • Pastel • Ink

• • • • •

Goanimate Crazytalk Iclone Powtoon Adobe After effects®

VIDEO • Window Movie Maker®

INTERLACED IMAGES • Flash®

PROFESSIONAL TOOLS • TRIA® • Chartpak®

Laser sintering Plaster powder, ink and binder Stereo lithography Polyjet Fuse deposition modeling

INDIRECT

• Copic®

• Wax printing & casting

TABLET

• Ceramic powder and binder

• Metal powder & binder

• Ipad® • Wacom®

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WHAT IS TESTING? A test makes the difference between what design may assume about the user and the user perception itself. A test aims at providing a true feedback about product, system, space and application.

Functional Prototype Testing:

Aesthetical Prototype Testing:

Research shows that 3 users testing cover most of the usability related issues.

Product and System Aesthetical preferences are faster to test. Sample would be at least 12.


Blind Test Is used to evaluate:

We call it blind Test because, the brand is not revealed to the tester.

Functional Prototype Is used to understand:

• Taste • Smell

• Mechanic • Process efficiency

• Touch

• Ergonomic

• Appearance

Wheelchair

One Way Mirror Test Lab

Eye Tracking Test Room

Is used to understand: • How users utilize products and systems? • How they interact with each other? • How they approach a new concepts? • Etc.

• Just like the one way testing room but with special glasses, the user wear while executing tasks online. • These glasses tell us on real time where the user it looking on the screen.

Test lab are usually equipped with camera, microphone, remote controllers, comfortable seating.

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STRATEGIC GOAL Now that we have groups of idea solution, we want to select the best group for implementation. We will use 2 tools for this exercise. The first tool will help us to assess how well each group of ideas fits the organization goals. The second tool will help us in assessing if a group of ideas is reasonably implementable. This is important because by combining both the findings, we will be able to determine which group is the most suitable for immediate implementation.

Goal Assessment First of all, you will need to determine the goals of your challenge. For this, you may look back to your Challenge Profile, interview or stakeholder map. Your goals may have changed since the beginning. This is normal since you understand the problem better than at the beginning and your priorities could have changed. To find the goals you may have a quit brainstorming with your team. Start by writing down goals individually on sticky notes and prioritize them. Compare each sticky note respecting individual categorization. Soon you will discover patterns in terms of prioritization. Decide how many goals you would like to have. We suggest between 3 to 8. Five being easy to handle and relatively focused. Goals could have different coefficient and that would be seen on the next tool. Thus, you can ne-

glect this aspect for now. At the last if you are not able to agree on specific goals, you may vote.” Once the diagram is ready with the goals you can start assessing solution design. For each solution design you overdraw the area corresponding to the key strength of that specific solution.

Let’s analyze this example with Solution design A. With respect to the goal “increase number of products we offer” the team gave 3 out of 5. For “increase income” they gave 3 as well. For “Reduce incorrect orders” they gave 4 for reducing the number of health violations they gave 5 and finally for Increase on-time delivery they gave 5. This type of representation allows us to compare a specific solution design with other. However, the coefficient of each goal is important and for this we will use the next tool which is Gain/Pain Assessment.”


Goal Assessment Tool Example of assessment for 3 solution design:

INCREASE INCOME

INCREASE NUMBER OF PRODUCTS WE OFFER

REDUCE INCORRECT ORDERS Design solution A Design solution B Design solution C

INCREASE ON-TIME DELIVERY You can use diagrams with multiples goals. We recommend between 3 to 8 goals. 5 being the easiest to handle.

REDUCE NUMBER OF HEALTH VIOLATIONS

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PAIN/GAIN ASSESSMENT GAIN ASSESSMENT Well, let’s start with the first tool which is for gain assessment. Gain assessment refers to the idea that our organizations is going to benefit from the group of ideas we are going to implement. For this, we need to compare our group of ideas with our organization’s goals to assess what would be the gain.”

organization’s priorities. Coefficients are mentioned in percentage. Once you have made any modifications to the weights, you are ready to assess the goals of your idea groups. Remember that you have already assessed the goals for each idea solution. Thus, the work here is just about combining these result for each group of ideas.

For each goal define a weight. By default, the weight is equally divided between the goals. This may be something you will want to modify according to your GAIN ASSESSMENT EXCEL TEMPLATE CHALLENGE: “HOW MIGHT WE...” Solution Design

SCORE: 1 LOW - 5 HIGH ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS

Solution Low Investment Design Code

Easy pick up and drop off laundry service

25% While explaining the tool have a large format of the document printed or project the Excel document on the screen to use as a demo. Excel tools for pain/gain analysis should be sent to the participants prior the workshop

Score

Reduce or not increase manpower

25%

Adj. Score

Score

Increase on-time delivery

15%

Adj. Score

Score

Increase number of Total products/service we offer.

25%

Adj. Score

Score

Order

10%

Adj. Score

Score

Ad). Score

Quick Cash!

A

2

0.5

3

0.8

4

0.6

3

0.8

2

0.2

2.8

5

Cazabella

B

2

0.5

3

0.8

3

0.5

4

1

1

0.1

2.8

5

Ecosphere

C

3

0.8

4

1

3

0.5

5

1.3

3

0.3

3.8

3

Piccadilly

D

5

1.3

5

1.3

4

0.6

3

0.8

2

0.2

4.1

2

H25

E

5

1.3

5

1.3

4

0.6

4

1

2

0.2

4.3

1

Koala!

F

3

0.8

4

1

4

0.6

3

0.8

2

0.2

3.3

4


PAIN ASSESSMENT The pain assessment tool works exactly like the preceding one. It has columns on which you need to define pain criteria. They may be common for each project that you do in your department or specially developed for this particular project. Also, the coefficient would need to be determined for each pain criteria you select. If your organization does not have defined criteria for project assessment. You may spend some time with your team to develop these criteria and decide the coefficient for each of them. For exercise purposes, you may use the standard template predefined.

In this work, you must always be critical of the findings. At any point, your team should be aware of what they are doing, why they are doing it and how they are doing it. This is important because innovation is a combination of science and art. In other words, things that you control and other that you do not. Theoretical tools are like milestones in the path of discovery. They help us in understanding the subject better but we cannot expect them to give us straightforward answers. As a general guideline you should never agree with a result that does not make sense to you. Try to understand why. However, you should be objective and accept the result you do not like.

PAIN ASSESSMENT EXCEL TEMPLATE CHALLENGE: â&#x20AC;&#x153;HOW MIGHT WE...â&#x20AC;? Solution Design

SCORE: 1 LOW - 5 HIGH ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS

Solution Design Code

Low Investment

Easy pick up and drop off laundry service

Reduce or not increase manpower

Increase on-time delivery

Increase number of Total products/service we offer.

25%

25%

15%

25%

10%

Score

Score

Score

Score

Score

Order

Quick Cash!

A

2

2

2

5

3

14

4

Cazabella

B

4

3

5

5

1

18

3

Ecosphere

C

5

4

5

3

5

22

2

Piccadilly

D

5

4

5

5

3

22

2

H25

E

5

5

5

3

5

23

1

Koala!

F

2

1

1

5

2

11

5

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GAIN/PAIN MATRIX Now that you have the gain and pain for each idea group, you are ready to report the results on the pain/ gain matrix that combines the two tables.

We have a second zone, blue, with an interesting group of ideas we should consider as the second priority. And finally, the third group of ideas, in the grey, that are either too difficult to implement or low impact. We may bank these ideas and reconsider them later as the business environment evolves. As of now, they are not worth being developed.

The group of ideas that are closer to the top right corner, or the green zone, are the most suitable ideas. They fit the organization culture, require less investment and have a high impact on the organization. We would typically develop this group of ideas as top priority.

LOW

E C

D

B

PAIN

Excel tools for pain/gain analysis should be sent to the participants prior the workshop

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT

A

F

HIGH

While explaining the tool have a large format of the document printed or project the Excel document on the screen to use as a demo.

LOW

GAIN

HIGH


PROCESS ASSESSMENT Now that we know which solution ideas is best to be developed, we may want to focus one or more on prototyping. Your team members need to decide which group of ideas they want to develop first considering the results of the pain gain matrix. They could be a certain level of uncertainty concerning whether to develop one or more groups of ideas. We invite you to discuss the opportunities within your team and decide how to go with it. It is absolutely fine to start prototyping several group of ideas and abandon the less substantial on the way. Make your decision now, you have 10 minutes. Now that we know which group(s) we want to develop we need to decide which process would be the most appropriate for each group. For this we use the Prototype Decision Matrix, a tool design to help you to know which process is the most suitable to develop your particular group of ideas. The Prototype Decision Matrix has the advantage of taking into consideration the fact that your final outcome may be a combination of service, system, space or product. For this you will discover 2 results that would take you to one of the 16 processes designed for this program. To proceed, follow my instructions. The matrix contains boxes which are labeled from 1 to 3 and spread across 4 zones: service, system, space and product.

The nature is ether a service, system, space or product. You may refer to the glossary if you want to understand better the difference between service, system, space, and product. You may also feel that this particular group of ideas could have a combination of two or more natures. In this case, you will still need to make a single choice based on what seems to be the most significant to you. Now that you have decided the nature of the idea, next you need to determine the second factor which is the stage of the idea. You already have the answers to this question since we already assessed the stage of each idea. That is from 1 to 3; one being incremental and three fundamental. Once you have placed all your ideas on the Prototype Decision Matrix with respect to the 2 criteria we have spoken about, you will be able to know which is the primary and secondary nature of your idea group. Total the points for each zone combining the result of each box. You now have a result for each of the 4 zones. The highest score is your primary process; the second highest score is your secondary process.

What you need to do is to place on this matrix each individual idea according to what you know about their nature and importance.

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When to use it

When there is a need to understand a situation through a specific story which is representative of most users of the system, product, space or service.

Who to use it with

SELECT THE RIGHT PROTOTYPE/TEST TOOL

Thanks to photography and ready to use graphic design elements, storyboard has become accessible to anyone with even a little creativity. Storyboard can be very low graphic quality as long as the story board helps in communicating good ideas. At the early stage of idea development storyboarding is accessible to anyone who has interest.

When there is a system with many touch points. This means that user experience is quite diverse and there is a need for understanding the situation from the various perspective that could not be generalize through a typical storyboard. This tools are usable by anyone at the basic level. However the level of execution would greatly depend on individuals and groups capability in stepping back and understanding the big picture of the idea they want to develop. Repeated experience can only increase the quality of understanding.

An Experience Prototype is mostly an interfaced system that we present in paper format or using a quick prototype that could be made using Illustrators, Adobe Flash, etc. It is used to quickly understand how a system or service could work. Catch potential userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first impression. This tool would be better used by a persona who has some basic understanding of user experience. However this is not mandatory, the Experience Prototype can be utilized simply to demonstrate a principle to the potential users or project stakeholders.


We use it to quickly understand the size and shape of product and space in the environment, especially when it comes to products and devices that do not have precedents. A simple and economic way to avoid lots of unnecessary rework later in the project. The tool can be used by anyone and does not require any specific skills.

It is used to stimulate peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visual capability around a system, product, space or service that does not exist. The tool needs to be executed by a professional designer who has an understanding of volume, aesthetic and functionality. However this should not prevent anyone from designing a Service Image template that best describes how the Service Image deliverable should be. Thus, you are not designing the final deliverable but something as close as possible.

This tool is used to understand what different team members have in mind about an agreed solution. Thus, putting the solution on paper makes the solution more shareable. This tool requires some ability to understand that a design could have different Conceptual Models and those models need to be studied to select the best option. This task requires patience and an interest in detail design. The solution could be product, service, system or space.

Helps in visualizing the final product, service, system or space. There are different types of mock-up quality. Usually quick mock-ups are used at the beginning to test different solutions. While a high-quality mock-up is used at the end to render the final solution. A high-quality mock-up is quite challenging to develop considering the variety of techniques involved. However low fidelity mock-ups are extremely easy to develop and very helpful in understanding system specific elements.

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SERVICE Could be: • Information website • Online shopping • Online governance • Reception • Personal assistance/care • Call center It is often characterized by a specific task provided from A to Z, following subsequent steps. (not always)

4 TYPES OF P

There are 4 types of prototypes. Your design solution

SPACE Could be: • House, building, office, mall, playground, park, stand, school, hospital, station, ATM, road, etc. Any landscaped environment for human activities. It may contain element of system, product and service.


SYSTEM Could be: • Hospital Information System • Hotel Management System • Social network • Crowdsourcing platform • Policy There are multiple entries and various ways of interacting with a system. By consequence stakeholders and tasks are multiples but interrelated.

PROTOTYPES

n maybe of a specific type or a combination of these.

PRODUCT Could be: • Toothbrush, mobile, coffee maker, car, airplane. Any manufactured or handcrafted good that usually comes in a package or container. Mostly the outcome of mass production.

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PROTOTYPE DECISION MATRIX PROTOTYPE DESICION MATRIX SYSTEM

SERVICE

For each concept place your idea notes on the canvas. Your higher score is the primary process your second highest score is the secondary process.

The Process Assessment Matrix needs to be fixed on the wall and walked through. Facilitator must present the result on the chart and justify the finding.

SPACE

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

3

3

2

1

1

2

3

3

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

PRODUCT


You can now jump to the appropriate prototype section corresponding to the process illustrated by the prototyping matrix.

PROTOTYPING MATRIX Reporting these 2 scores on the Prototyping Matrix gives you the most suitable process solution for your particular group of ideas. There are 16 processes. You will be selecting the one which is at the intersection between your primary and secondary need. For

example, your primary need is a system design process and your secondary need is a service design process. Going through the table and column, you will find out that the process corresponding to your needs is the process number 14.

The 16 processes presented in the grid work as a sequence. That means that you would be starting with the first tool, second and finish with the third one.

PROTOTYPING MATRIX PRIMARY SERVICE SERVICE

1

2

4 Service Image

Experience Prototype

System Map

Service Image

Story Board

PRODUCT

3

Experience Prototype

Construction Iteration

SYSTEM

SPACE

SYSTEM

Story Board

Service Image

Construction Iteration

5

Story Board

Construction Iteration

6 Experience Prototype

7

8 Conceptual model

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

SECONDARY

10

9

11

System Map

Experience Prototype

13

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

14

Mockup

15

Construction Iteration

Mockup

16

Service Image

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Mockup Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Service Image

Conceptual model

Story Board

Construction Iteration

12

Service Image

PRODUCT

Mockup

Mockup

System Map

Story Board

Construction Iteration

System Map

System Map

SPACE

Mockup

System Map

Service Image

Story Board

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Conceptual model

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INNOVATION STORYBOARD This tool is always used first to solve Service Design challenges. You have been advised to use it because your group of ideas comes to solve a problem related to specific user task within or outside the organization. For this tool, participants need to collect maximum information regarding the task to be facilitated and give recommendations for the final design. This tool is part of process 1, 3, 4, 5, 9 and 13 Walk participants through the storyboard sample.

DEPENDENCY You do not depend on other tools to start executing this tool. However after execution, the other tools may form part of the recommended process. You may acquire a better understanding of the problem and come back to your storyboard with a fresh eye. Thus, we highly recommend that you rework your storyboard after finishing the other process tools.

TOOL PRESENTATION

“The Storyboard is a graphical technique that helps in understanding user tasks across a specific process of execution.” “For example: Driving through a fast food chain would include a sequence of tasks to reach the desired outcome for the user.” “We could depict the experience as the user driving through the fast food lane, placing a order, paying and collecting the order, etc. This sequence is called a service as it responds to a specific user need which is constant, and starts from a point A and ends a point Z.”

“A Storyboard can be used for presenting the existing or the desired model. An existing Storyboard would look like a photographic reportage whereas a futuristic scenario is often made with tricks to look like a future model.” “With a little creativity, you will likely find simple solutions to make your scenario look real and to sell a future solution. For example if you want to show the user using a public interactive device to apply for Visa, an ATM machine could serve the purpose for the sake of scenario. Collage, drawing and image manipulation can be utilize to create a Storyboard.” “A Storyboard contains specific elements:” “A general title for the Storyboard that describes the most important aspect of the innovation. It is suggested that you find catchy words that would make your title unique and memorable.” “Illustrations are used to give substance to the story. Illustration are the key instances of user interaction with your design.”


Storyboard must include the most important user touchpoint. The main task must be covered by the storyboard. Try to make the story entertaining.

“Illustration title provides some context about the task performed within the story.”

design. These pieces of information create context and logic that help the audience to understand your design concept.”

“Depending on the audience, illustration details could be quite elaborate using the inverted pyramid theory we have seen during the Challenge phase.”

“Thirdly, be right to the point and capture the key information about your innovation solution.”

“Some Storyboards give space to contextual information related to the project. For example, the Storyboard might provide the list of business lines involved, organizational goals, etc.”

TOOL EXECUTION

“There is no convention for creating a Storyboard but some best practices.”

“There is a large variety of methods for creating a Storyboard. The best is the one you are comfortable with. This said you need to consider your audience as well. A cartoon type scenario works perfectly with children; it is usually well understood by adults, but it may not be suitable for organizations who want to cultivate seriousness. Also, you may consider the audience environment, technology awareness, and work culture.”

“First of all, nothing for free. That means that all elements of information present in the Storyboard must contribute to the understanding by either informing or contextualizing.” “Secondly, maintain consistency throughout the illustrations. Think about an actor’s dress code, building and architecture

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GRAPHIC DESIGN

PHOTO

“Any graphic design techniques to draw or overdraw personage, systems and environment as it will look like in the future. The base for such scenario is photography or existing graphic design manipulation.”

“The typical ‘Roman photo’ that pictures real people using the future system. Once again, image manipulation complement system prototype integration.”

TEMPLATE

VIDEO

“There are a variety of templates available on the internet to create Storyboard. You can see here a printed version of it. They are particularly useful for producing a quickly made prototype.”

“On the Internet once again, you can find a video version of Storyboarding. The web application proposes characters you can animate to create stories.” Whatever technique you may choose, we suggest that you start by using this thumbnail template to create you story overview.”


Collect a large number of key frame sticky notes

TESTING

Eliminate, combine and sequence key frame

Create a low fidelity stick drawing prototype

“The creation of a Storyboard is probably less interactive than using other tools simply because it require user centric design skills and creativity to put interactive systems into stories. The typical user would likely find it challenging to co-create a Storyboard. Thus, a Storyboard would come as the outcome of a long, co-creative process with the users using other techniques like Experience Prototype, or Construction Iteration. These techniques are more participative for the user to provide feedback on practical functionalities of the system. This does not means that you cannot present you storyboard to the user early. In fact, we encourage you to do it. Some users may find opportunities to redesign your story.”

Photography your scenario or use graphic templates

Give your scenario a compelling look and feel

Things you need: Pre-prototype; sticky notes. Define Prototype; Adobe Illustrator, Flash, Photoshop.

“Storyboarding is very much appropriate for group discussion. The facilitator would take the audience through the story and invite participants to have a discussion about the story. Thereafter alternative scenario alternatives or suggestions could be identified to improve the design.”

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INNOVATION SYSTEM MAP If your primary need has been defined as a system, System Map would be your first and principal tool for this project. In that case, we recommend that you use the System Map to develop, test and communicate your project until the end. This tool is part of process: 2, 6, 10, 14 & 7 If the System Map has been suggested as a third tool within the design process, it is because we believe that at this particular stage of your project development the System Map could be of help to communicate your project. (Process: 5, 9, 3)

DEPENDENCY If the System Map is the first tool of your design process. You won’t depend on any other tools and start working on it with the discussion insights you add to your team while selecting the idea group. (Process: 2, 6, 10, 14, 7) If the System Map is the third tool of your design process we invite you to source information from the other tool you develop your System Map. (Process: 5, 9, 3)

TOOL PRESENTATION

“Use the System Map typically when you need to accommodate a large number of interdependent tasks altogether. As an example a hospital information system requires a System Map because it is not only about booking a doctor appointment but also reporting the appointment to the billing department, informing the health insurance department, reporting doctors’ number of visits to the HR department, etc. System Map is typically done at a macro level; it provides a big picture of all the components that work together as a system. It also helps in understanding task interdependencies.”

“A System Map is used to map the current system in place or the future system. It can be a combination of both when a new system needs to integrate with an existing ecosystem.” “A System Map is not only about ‘visible’ components. For example if you use a System Map to understand issues related to unemployment, you may not find linkages between the social environment and employment performance. However it is quite evident that rich social interaction helps in finding a job. Thus you could use a System Map to understand direct factors such as education level or economic performance but also indirect factors such as opportunities to socialize, innovate, create, etc. A System Map demystifies processes and systems that, once represented, look much simpler.”


Systematize, Hierarchize, synthesize throughout the design process. Design is about economy, culture, governance and technology, social systems. Make sure you include all stakeholders information. Overdraw your design using computer graphic software

Create Pre-prototype of System Map

Test with stakeholders

Create a potential design using infographics

TOOL EXECUTION

“While executing the System Map, do not hesitate to take some time to understand the bigger picture of the ecosystem you are working on. This is the biggest challenge and value of this tool: to walk away from what we already know and to discover the larger picture of the environment we are working on. To do so, will help you to identify opportunities to create innovative solutions that are out of the box.” “Visualization is powerful. By representing graphically the ecosystem, you are helping stakeholders to understand the challenge from multiple angles. You help everyone to bring innovative solutions from their own perspectives.”

Re-test it with stakeholders

Define the final design

Things you need: Pre-prototype; Lego serious play, paper, markers and sticky notes. Define Prototype; Illustrator, Prezi, PowerPoint.

TESTING

“System Map design is an ongoing testing process. You learn and validate your System Map as you go. Therefore there is no need to have a formal testing protocol. Just understand that you learn by sharing with direct and indirect stakeholders. Your performance in designing an efficient System Map relies on your capability to continuously criticize your work and re-theorize influencing factors. Thus, you must keep re-designing your System Map by creating several versions of it. It may be preferable to use movable items such as sticky notes, printed icons, and flip charts. These elements allow people to interact with the System Map and try something else that could lead to radical innovation.”

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INNOVATION EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPE Experience Prototype comes as secondary tool in the process. It follows the Storyboard (process 1, 5 or 9) or the System Map.

This tool is part of process: 1, 2, 5 & 9 If the System Map has been suggested as a third tool within the design process, it is because we believe that at this particular stage of your project development the System Map could be of help to communicate your project. (Process: 5, 9, 3)

DEPENDENCY The Experience Prototype would utilize the findings of the previous tools Storyboard and/or System Map. An active group discussion could help in interpreting the outcomes of the previous tools into an Experience Prototype that responds to the needs of the users.

CHOICE REQUIRED In process 1 and 2 you have the choice to either uses the Experience Prototype or the Construction Iteration or both of them. That would depend on the nature of project you have and what best fits your requirement. We suggest that the group reviews the tools process slide and review the benefits of each tool before deciding.

TOOL EXECUTION

“Experience Prototype is used to test rich information content online and offline. Whenever there is a need for understanding information or making decisions or choices, the Experience Prototype is a relevant option.” “Examples of interfaced systems could be website and application, ATM, check-in, etc. Examples of noninterfaced systems are catalogs, signs and boards.”

TOOL PRESENTATION

“The variety of supports is quiet large and a theoretical explanation of system design does not always work. Experience Prototype helps in designing something which is close to reality and provides the contextual framework that helps users to understand the content and purpose of your design.”

The Experience Prototype

“To be tested an Experience Prototype should be fairly elaborated and run with a protocol.”

“Here we need to distinguish between Experience Prototype and Iterative Prototype.”

“Experience Prototype is used to understand interactive elements (software) such as screen, voice, written information, etc. It focuses on interactive elements and information cognition.” The Iterative Prototype “The Iterative Prototype focuses on the physical product (hardware). It may include screen and software elements but the objective is to determine the physical product and space occupancy.”

TESTING

“The previous tools used in your process are either the Soryboard or the System Map.” “The Storyboard contains the main tasks executed by the user while using the design. It is a perfect base to execute a test protocol. Simply write down the tasks to be executed by the user as it happens in your storyboard. Be clear about the context of the test and the goal of using the system. Do not be descriptive about the tasks to be completed to achieve the goal. Remember that in real life, the user will be alone to understand the design.”


Create interface screen using drawing material or 2D software Test the screens with users by asking what they understand from the system

Create pre-prototype

Test with user

Create define prototype

“Provide the context. Provide minimum information to the user about his/her relationship with the organization you represent. Simply describe what the design is about and what the goal is that this system is striving to achieve. Observe the user’s reaction and comments about the design. If the design is self-explanatory and the user is clear about what he/she can do with it without explanation, you win. If the user does not understand directly and looks for contextual information ask details about what he/she is looking for. That would help you to improve the design by bringing the required contextual information. Research demonstrates that 6 users bring 80% of the usability issues about a prototype. 3 users provide 60% of the issues. Therefore we suggest that you start testing early with a limited number of users as you have the opportunity to do so.’

Re-test with user

Define the final design

Things you need: Pre-prototype; paper pencils and stationaries. Define Prototype; PowerPoint, Adobe Illustrator, Axure, Keynotopia or Flash.

“Now you must ensure that your design addresses the needs of the end-users.” “Stakeholder interviews are important to capture information early about the business model, procedures and policies that may differ from end-users that actually use the system and face issues that are unknown to the organization. The tendency is high to listen to non-users to collect feedback about user requirements. This is due to lack of user-centric design understanding and the assumption that we know users and the way they interpret information. That belief is wrong and needs to be corrected at the root by including users in the development process.” “Like any other prototyping technique, you gain by testing your prototype early with users. Early feedback can influence your design drastically, avoiding later rework that could be expensive.”

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INNOVATION CONSTRUCTION ITERATION Construction Iteration come as secondary tool in many processes. It is a simple, low cost and low time investment with high return.

This tool is part of process: 1,2,3,6,7,8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 & 16

DEPENDENCY At this stage, participants probably know what kind of physical system is required to develop the design. However, you may not be sure about what it looks like as physical object. Construction Iteration helps in defining product and space volumes. From now, participants will use Construction Iteration as a cyclical process until the end of the design implementation.

CHOICE REQUIRED In process 1 and 2 you have the choice to either use the Experience Prototype or the Construction Iteration or both of them. That would depend on the nature of the project you have and what best fits your requirement. We suggest that the group review the tools process slide and review the benefits of each tool before deciding.

TOOL PRESENTATION

While explaining Construction Iteration the facilitator should demonstrate the principle using basic elements present in the room. For example: you could place chairs next to each other in a specific setting to simulate the basic seating arrangement for a metro vehicle. Explain that moving chairs from a place to another could create different experience for the user.

“Construction Iteration is a low cost, low investment tool that can be executed anytime during idea development.” “Basically, it is about stacking boxes and stuff all together to understand future products space congestion. It has nothing to do with a mock-up that aims at representing the future reality. The Construction Iteration is a kind of tentative mock up that aims at learning from experimentation.” “For example, you could design a new concept of a dental office and understand space congestion using old chairs adding to it recuperated pipes, screens and new artifacts as your design suggest. The whole setup would give a clear picture of the new design space occupancy. Doing this could help you to know

for example that a surgeon is not able to press the screen button because something blocked the way in between, that the remote control holder is not at the place most people would expect, etc. Such information cannot be found in paper or 3D modeling. They require experimentation around the iterative prototype. Construction Iteration is by definition not made to be final. They keep changing by adding and removing things as we understand the challenge better.” “For your reference; famous designer James Dyson failed 5127 Iterative Prototypes before inventing the first vacuum cleaner without bag.” “The most challenging part of this tool is not to execute but recognize its benefits. Often people believe that Construction Iteration is so obvious that it could not lead to any findings. They develop their design with this assumption until they fail usability testing involving high financial loss. Test early, fail early.” “Here, we need some differentiation. An Iterative Prototype is used to understand physical product development. It may include screen and software elements but the objective is to determine physical product and space occupancy. Interactive elements such as screen, voice, written information, etc. are usually treated separately with an Experience Prototype. Similarly the Experience Prototype could be made of drawing, paper cut, etc. that simulate the interaction. It focuses on interactive elements and neglects the physical support.” “Construction Iteration and Experience Prototype are complementary modeling processes between hardware and software.”


We try to understand space occupancy, position and measurement of things. Details and aesthetic does not matter. Work in the user environment. Include the user touch point.

Decide multiple prototype to validate multiple principles

Create prototypes

Reiterate, again, again and again

TOOL EXECUTION

“Construction Iteration calls on your imagination to understand product and systems within the space using basic elements like boxes, tap, rope, etc. With these elements, you start designing elements for the physical space. You use basic stationary tools to fix and detail the items.” “The execution of Construction Iteration looks pretty messy and unstructured that’s why people are often reluctant to use it. Results are not visible but cognitive. You get to understand the size and placement of your design elements.”

TESTING

Test throughout the process

Conclude a Conceptual Model of design

“Construction Iteration does not require a testing phase as such. The making of an Iterative Prototype is a test itself and since we keep learning from multiple prototypes we logically collect feedback from the appropriate stakeholders. For example: if you are looking to improve the technical capacity of a vacuum cleaner, there is no need to interview users. The improvement of your Iterative Prototype would ultimately take you to the technician and engineer. However, if you are working the command function of the same vacuum cleaner, end-user observation and interview matter a lot. They usually do not have the technical understanding There is no formal procedure to identity user requirement testing, it is all about the logic of experimentation and how far you are willing to push the experiment to improve technicality, function and beauty.”

Things you need: Iteration; will be made of cardboard boxes, tape, all kind of re-usable materials. They won’t be final prototype as such but a final Conceptual Model you may report with the specification on paper.

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INNOVATION SERVICE IMAGE It is one of the most popular design tools and aims at presenting the most important elements of a service, system, product or space.

DEPENDENCY Service Image comes after Experience Prototype or Construction Iteration. If these tools have been executed properly the group won’t find difficulties in capturing the most important features of their design to create the Service Image.

TOOL PRESENTATION

This tool comes as a 3rd step of the design process 1,2,3,5,6,7,9,10,11,13 and 14.

You may use the picture of the Mighty Mug showcasing different features.

Writing down features on a flip chart will help the group to share insights. Create a column for ranking and selecting the final features that would be presented as a service image.

“For any service, system product or space. They would be some features that unique. We speak about product or service differentiation. Service Image aims at creating a picture around these particular features. Most of the time Service Image is composed of a global view of the product, service, system or space. Then we highlight the specific features that are developed further with text and annotation.” “Let’s take the example of “The Mighty Mug.” It has several features like a vacuum base, insulated wall, a leak proof lead, etc. Advertising always stresses these particular features as a design concept it makes this product unique.” “Similarly we would like to show what is unique about your design but also show practically how things are happening around your product, service, system or space.”

TOOL EXECUTION

“Look at your design from all angles and list the features that could be highlighted with Service Images. Establish criteria for ranking your features. Think about what the project stakeholders are looking for.”

“Once you have established the list of features focus on the 5 best ones to develop the Service Image. There is no specific process for selecting a Service Image, it is a question of sense and harmony. You will gain by stressing features that belong to the same category. For example: technology, usability, automation, etc. For this, you might establish a guideline that matches your organization’s goals.” “If you are using the process 1,3,4,5,9,13, you will have presented on your Storyboard the most important features of your design that could be reutilized to create the Service Image. At the same time, since you want to benefit from your storyboard and Service Image you may want to avoid being repetitive with the features.”


Tell a graphic story about your product using graphic icons Integrate your system design in existing space using computer graphics

Decide what is your central service object

Create multiple service image prototype

Collect user’s feedback

TESTING

“There are various ways of testing Service Image.” “When Service Images are at the early stage of development they are usually in the form of sketches that are presented to potential users or project stakeholders. As the project gets refined and the Service Image becomes clearer and more professional, it can be tested with an exhibition, online survey, booklet, etc.” “Support would be adapted to the targeted audience. Some professional stakeholders are able to grasp complex visual systems. Some others need contextual information and a scenario.” “The only way to get it right is to test your Service Image early and keep testing it as you develop it. A good understanding of

Systematize and hierarchize information

Give it a compelling look and feel

your audience should help you to develop didactic material to present to them.” “Be sure to differentiate criticism from the content and presentation. In other words a great concept could be misunderstood because of bad presentation and a bad concept could be appreciated because of a good presentation. Thus, try to understand the customer review in a positive way by clearly identifying if the problem is related to the design itself or the way it is presented. Service Image along with Mock-Up are the two most accurate and mature ways to experience a product, service, system or space. Once you reach that level of execution, usually all the minor issues related to the design concept would have been overcome. And most of the issues pointed out by the users or stakeholders would be related to design promotion.”

Things you need: Pre-prototype; paper pencils and stationaries, Lego Serious Play. Define Prototype; Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, 3Ds MAX, SketchUp.

Good to remember: Include the most important touchpoint. Prioritize the function you wish to illustrate. Visual hierarchy applies. Develop your Service Image in the spirit of marketing. Provide annotation and contextual information in a systematic way.

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INNOVATION CONCEPTUAL MODEL Conceptual Model is used frequently in the domain of product and space design to understand the list of design possibilities. It usually comes early in the design process at step one.

This tool is part of the process: 4,8,11,12,13,15 & 16

Show the example of the DVD player to illustrate Conceptual Model.

DEPENDENCY This tool does not depend on the previous exercises. It will help you in designing a library of possibilities for your design concept.

TOOL PRESENTATION

“The Conceptual Model is particularly relevant to product design when team members have different views of a particular product or space design.” “Basically the Conceptual Model helps in putting on paper the different ideas people have in mind. If I ask you different types of pens you have seen utilized, you could probably mention five different types, not from an aesthetical perspective but functionally. You would probably tell me that one would have a cap to fix over the writing tip. The second would have a press button to bring the writing tip inward. The third would have a cap that you can screw or unscrew to bring the writing tip in and out, etc. We call these Conceptual Models regardless of the fact that the pen may be red, blue or yellow or that it looks modern or classic. What we are looking for is the generic functional model of the pen.”

TOOL EXECUTION

“Similarly we would like you to envision all possibilities about your design Conceptual Model. Each feature of your design could work differently. During this exercise what you need to do is to work on the various features of your design. Bring alternative models to select the best one. Note that the best Conceptual Model does not always fit the organization goals. Thus, you should select a Conceptual Model with respect to your organization goals.” “To proceed start identify alternatives to the present.”


Find 100 ways to design the same thing; Inspire yourself with visual trends Shape multiple aesthetical design that reflects determined lifestyle

Create a conceptual library through trends research

Explore formal aesthetic over the conceptual model

Validate your models from a marketing point of view

TESTING

“The Conceptual Model could be tested with end users particularly when it comes to aesthetical preferences. However the tool is more often considered as something which is executed internally to find the best technical solution rather than esthetical features. A large part of Conceptual Model preference is associated with semantic design. A science that studies how people interpret symbolically and meaning.” “Just to give an example: If your organization values and brand communication stress technological performance you may prefer design solutions that reflect the notion of high technology even for incremental features. But if your organization values and brand communication stress human interaction, you may prefer person-to-person communication in an environment that stimulates communication. All the

Test the models with users

Define the final aesthetic

communication support and the system would therefore emphasize the human feeling. Only designers are capable of understanding these aspects of design. Customer’s feedback has little interest in that domain.” “In other words: we all know that putting all the best ingredients together do not guaranty the best food. Similarly, if you ask people to select design attributes they would surely select the best attributes. But putting all the best design attributes together does not guaranty a good design.” “As a conclusion, end-user feedback from the Conceptual Model can be rich information. However it is you as the designer who must decide how much value you want to attribute to the feedback.”

Things you need: Depending the subject you may prefer cardboard, plastic, clay model, etc. If you are more comfortable with computer graphics you may like to use Illustrator for 2D and Sketch Up or 3D Max for 3D

Good to remember: Remember that “Conceptual Thinking” is the key to success it determine the success of your design. Enrich your conceptual thinking with lots of shopping.

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INNOVATION MOCK UP Mock-Up aims at developing a final physical object representing the future reality.

This tool come as 3rd and last step of the design processes 4,8,11,12,14,15 and 16.

DEPENDENCY This tool always precedes Construction Iteration. This means that participants already have a fair idea of the physical product specification and are ready to shape the final product or space. We assume that all system specifications are known and the way we interact with the physical product or space has been determined during the previous step. In other words, Mock-Up design is a matter of cosmetic.

TOOL PRESENTATION

“Let’s speak about the different categories of Mock-up:” ■“The aesthetical mock-up aims at demonstrating the aesthetic of a product. It may not be functional and may be of reduced scale.”

Walk through Mock-Up category pictures while explaining.

■“The functional mock-up aims at demonstrating the functional attribute of a product or space. It may not look like the final product but fulfill its functional properties. The functional mock-up needs to be a full size prototype.” ■“The full size mock-up is a mock-up that has the same size that the final product will have.” ■“The scale mock-up is smaller than the final product or space. If it aims at demonstrating the aesthetical property of the product or space it should never be greater than 25% of the full size product or space. The reason is that scale prototype greater than 25% tempted to give a distorted perception of the reality. In other words,any mock-up should be full size or scale lesser than 25%.”

TOOL EXECUTION

“The execution of your mock-up would greatly depend on the nature of your subject. Designers usually use material that is close to the final product material. However, material like plastics are complex to utilize. Thus we use polystyrene and wood-based materials to imitate plastic.” “It is difficult to generalize the concept of mock-ups considering the large range of product, space and service to be prototyped. The prototype industry is as large as the designing industry when it comes to manufacturing products. It is usually best to acquire knowledge from those who are particularly knowledgeable about a specific manufacturing process.” “As industry boundaries keep blurring it is going to be even more challenging to remain knowledgeable in a specific domain, thus we invite you to cultivate your curiosity towards prototype techniques.”


Develop subsequent prototypes adding levels of complexity and definition Test the prototype early with end users to collect feedback

Decide what type of prototype you need

Create multiple low fidelity prototype

Test user’s requirements

Design a high quality prototype

TESTING

“The Mock-Up is particularly adapted for testing.” “As we mentioned before, there are different types of Mock-Up. For an aesthetical purpose, the Mock-Up will be presented to the potential users without giving them the possibility of testing it simply because aesthetical mock-ups are usually fragile and not functional. They have the advantage of giving a realistic view of what the future product will look like.” “The functional Mock-Up provides the functionalities but without the aesthetical design. It has the advantage of being testable by the user.” “It is possible to complement various mock-ups like the aesthetical Mock-Up and the functional Mock-Up to gather feedback from potential users. Probably less expensive than realizing a prototype which combines both aesthetic and functional properties.”

Paint and customize if needed

Things you need: Cardboard prototype can be executed anywhere. Material like wood, plastic and metal require workshop facilities. CNC (Computer Numerical Control) like 3D printing, laser cutting, lathes require specific infrastructures.

Good to remember: Create different prototypes to validate different information. (function, aesthetic, principle, etc.) Make your mockup; full size or ≤ to ¼. Nothing in between. Try low fidelity prototype. Fail early and cheaply.

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22

TOOL CARDS


INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS This tool can be used to identify different challenges from various stakeholders. It is particularly useful when an organization wants to start to innovate without having a specific challenge in mind.

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

CHALLENGE INNOVATION CHALLENGE

We have many challenges

I N T ERN AL

EXTERN A L


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

HIGHLIGHTS Color Coding Participants will start by filling up the canvas with Green, Yellow and Red sticky notes. • Green is for what we celebrate well. Where we are successful. • Yellow for these things that are not always successful in the organization. • Red for what we do not do, or fail to do so.

Assessment

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS

As the canvas get filled with many notes, we start understanding the areas of the organization where things are lacking. It may be tempting to fill up the canvas with green notes. We are actually looking for red notes. Where the scope for improvement is much higher.

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Challenge Identification From the red notes particularly, we drive challenges at the center of the canvas. • Challenges can be a combination of several notes and colors. • Each challenges will be identified on a separate note.

INNOVATION DIAGNOSTIC CANVAS INTERNAL

E X T E R N A L

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

INTERNAL

E X T E R N A L

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CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION Creating a well-defined challenge will help you to communicate with stakeholders. Harvest best ideas from collaborators and discard unwanted deviation from the scope. For each challenges identified design a challenge profile. The suggested Challenge Profile will help to determine challenge components.

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION CHALLENGE

We have one challenge

INITIAL CHALLENGE


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

HIGHLIGHTS

CHALLENGE ABSTRACTION

Potential New Challenge Variables

INITIAL CHALLENGE

Canvas How to read this canvas? • At the center is the initial challenge. • At the circumference are the variables that may affect the initial challenge. • In between are the potential new challenges. A potential new challenge integrate the basic of the initial challenge and the specificities of selected variables.

Identify Variables How to proceed? • First, we need to discover the variables. These important factors that may change the challenge scope. • Once we have define variables. We can go on with the writing of potential new challenges. Discovering variables can be a long process you can conduct using tools like stakeholder interview, observation, qualitative and quantitative analysis.

Interview We suggest that you run rounds of interviews with challenge stakeholders to understand underlying factors that could affect the challenge scope. Reframe your challenge question if needed proposing different alternatives. This will help you to validate that the assumed challenge is really at the origin of dysfunction, alternatively you would have a potential new challenge to propose.

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CHALLENGE PROFILE This tool is used when we already have a general understanding of the challenge. We want to understand the challenge environment or a potential new challenge that derives from the initial challenge.

CHALLENGE PROFILE CHALLENGE

CHALLENGE

SPONSOR START DATE

STOP DATE

TARGET AUDIENCE

CALL TO ACTION

HORIZON WE WANT

INNOVATION FOR: TO FIX THE ISSUE

CONSTRAINT

REWARD RECOGNITION

INSPIRING INNOVATION MODEL

NOW

THE FUTURE

CREATE CHANGE

FAR FUTURE

CREATE RADICAL ISSUES


CHALLENGE >> TOOL >> CHALLENGE PROFILE

HIGHLIGHTS The Potential Challenge •The Potential Challenge usually starts with the statement: How might we…? •The statement would be in a single sentence that resumes all the aspect we want the challenge to cover. •The Challenge can include constraints like “without additional employment” •Keep concepts and wording simple.

The Sponsor • It is important to have someone who is willing to support the challenge within the organization. • The Sponsor must have enough power enforce decision and run the challenge within the organization. • The Sponsor must be in a position to represent all stakeholders taking part in the challenge.

Horizon • Knowing your Horizon and what you want to do, will help in understanding the scope of change you can expect around this Challenge. • Horizon and wants is something you should assess as a team. Both this information would be determined to select the appropriate ideation technique.

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IDEA BRIDGE Among the 4 ideation methods proposed in this toolkit, Idea Bridge is the most suitable to generate radically new ideas. Something that may change your business model or reach new markets. It is not a suitable method for quick fixes.

IDEA BRIDGE

IDEATE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Q&A

CONSTRAINTS

IDEAS


IDEATE >> TOOL >> IDEA BRIDGE

HIGHLIGHTS IDEA BRIDGE

Rules INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Q&A

IDEAS

• SILENCE. This exercise is done in silence. We won’t verbalize our ideas or questions INCLUDING non-verbal communication. • EVERYONE PARTICIPATES. Everyone has something (insights, knowledge and ideas) of value, therefore everyone has an obligation to participate.

Preparation CONSTRAINTS

• You will need yellow, pink, orange and green sticky notes. • Enough markers for the number of delegates to write on the sticky notes.

Process • Start by placing the Goal/Objective in the right corner. • Place the Constraints in the left corner. • You may already have some ideas you place just above the goal. • You have questions about the constraints. Place them just above them. Delegates may answer these questions. But always in silence and by writing. • Finally, you can bridge ideas to constraints and questions. The whole canvas would create a rich content where you will see patterns to innovate by removing limits. Take time to analyze the whole thing and understand rich concepts.

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SUBTRACT Subtract is particularly useful to simplify processes and eliminate costs. An opportunity to offer something different by simplification. This ideation technique is suitable to redesign something that already exists and need to be refreshed.

SUBTRACT INNOVATION CHALLENGE

IDEATE

FUTURE

EXISTING

TO BE ELIMINATED


IDEATE >> TOOL >> SUBTRACT

HIGHLIGHTS Rules

SUBTRACT INNOVATION CHALLENGE

FUTURE

EXISTING

Idea

Idea

Idea

• Everyone has something of value, therefore, everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

Preparation • For this exercise, you will need to prepare the user journey with its key instances. • You need to know what you may like to eliminate across the journey.

Process TO BE ELIMINATED

• Start by mapping the user’s journey horizontally in the middle of the board, leave plenty of space above. • Analyze which functions you could eliminate. Where they intervene in the process. Put a note of these function below the process. Use different colors for different functions. • Write down the ideas to eliminate functions above the existing process. • Soon you will discover a new user journey on which unnecessary functionalities or tasks have been eliminated. You may end up with several user journey on which user’s journeys functionalities have been eliminated. It is your role to assess which scenario respond the best to the user experience you are looking for.

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IDEA HACKS This ideation technique consists of replacing function or benefits by other. It create a rich solutions by combining things that are apparently not related. Idea Hacks is particularly suitable to repair and fix things that are broken or does not work well.

IDEA HACKS

IDEATE

SUBJECT

CATEGORIES

ATTRIBUTES

IDEAS

INNOVATION CHALLENGE


IDEATE >> TOOL >> IDEA HACKS

HIGHLIGHTS Rules • Everyone has something of value, therefore, everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

Preparation Prepare some topics to address with this exercise: Example: Components, Utility, Materials or Format, Sales Model, Customer, Value Proposition, User Experience, Business Model, etc.

Process • Start by writing down the name of the subject you would like to explore. • This subject has sub-categories you may like to explore as well. Write them in separate sticky notes. • Under each category, write down the respective attributes for each category. • Once you are done with this analysis, start replacing attributes with new attributes that have not been explored before. • You may try to create new categories as well. • Finally, analyze the whole thing and understand the new concepts of offering.

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REVERSE INNOVATION This exercise requires the participants to think the worst experience they could offer to their customers which seems to be contradictory to the principle of innovation. However, it offers interesting insights to make things really different and contextually integrated.

REVERSE INNOVATION IDEATE

INNOVATION CHALLENGE

REVERSE SCENARIO

DO WELL

DO BETTER

NOT GOOD


IDEATE >> TOOL >> REVERSE INNOVATION

HIGHLIGHTS

REVERSE INNOVATION INNOVATION CHALLENGE

REVERSE SCENARIO

DO WELL

DO BETTER

NOT GOOD

Rules • Everyone has something of value, therefore, everyone has an obligation to speak and share. Respect the speaker. • Remember, all the greatest ideas started sounding really dumb. • Avoid ‘bar discussion’ and take a stand.

Preparation • It is essential to know what you want to improve from user experience perspective. • Example: To improve the user experience of your restaurant you will reverse the user experience of the customer. But if you want to improve your business process you may reverse the user experience of the restaurant manager.

Process • Start by writing down a fictional chronological scenario with the worst experience you could offer to your customers or manager. Use one sticky note for each key instance of your scenario. Place them in line from left to right on top of the board. • Now that you have the worst user journey. • Add a colored sticky note under each key instance with the following assessment. Not true: means you are good – GREEN Somehow true: means you are average – ORANGE True: means you are not good – RED • Focus on the red notes that indicate clear areas of improvement. Generate ideas for improvement.

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IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS This canvas helps you to evaluate the ideas and prioritize solutions for responding to the challenge. It has 3 Business categories and 3 columns the idea contribution. At the intersection of business line and idea contribution you will find a classical Feasibility/Impact Matrix.

IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS Substantial Ideas

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Impact

High Impact

High Impact

High Impact

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

Low Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

High Feasibility

Low Impact

Low Feasibility

PEOPLE TECHNOLOGY

High Impact

High Feasibility

High Impact

High Impact

INFRASTRUCTURE

Fundamental Ideas

High Feasibility

Incremental Ideas

High Feasibility

CONVERGE

Low Impact


CONVERGE >> TOOL >> IDEA ASSESSMENT CANVAS

HIGHLIGHTS Business Categories • For each idea, you will need to select between 3 business lines. • Place your idea within the appropriate row. People, Technology or Infrastructure. • An idea could be split into several categories, in this case, pick the most prominent category for the particular idea. • This is not a final categorization as ideas will merge. You may not border about accountability at this stage.

Idea Contribution • Some ideas would have a fundamental impact towards challenge resolution others would be incremental. The 3 vertical columns help in sorting ideas’ contribution to the challenge. • Place fundamental ideas on the right. • Incremental ideas on the left, those you are not sure on the central column are substantial ideas.

Impact & Feasibility • Ideas are sorted with respect to Impact and Feasibility. • Move the idea towards High Impact if you believe that this idea would have a High Impact towards challenge resolution. • Move the idea towards High Feasibility if you believe that the idea is easily feasible. • Ideas that have Low Impact and Low Feasibility are likely to be discarded.

227


IDEA ELIMINATION If you have lots of ideas, the choice of development may become difficult. Idea Elimination helps to discard ideas that may looks genius but does not respond to basic organizational requirements. Go/No Go is a common practice for Idea Elimination.

CRITERIA CONVERGE

Challenge specific

Institutional

A

GO/NO GO SOLUTIONS B C

D

The solution can be developed in 6 month

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

The prototype wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost more than 5000 sr.

Yes

No

Yes

No

We have internal resources to develop it

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

We contribute more at least 2 of the 5 values of our organization

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes


CONVERGE >> TOOL >> IDEA ELIMINATION

HIGHLIGHTS Go/No Go Criteria • Create a Go/No Go list of criteria. • Split your list into 2 categories: • Institutional criteria would set the limits set by institutional policy and politic. E.g.: The idea reflects the corporate strategy. • Challenge specific criteria to respond to the constraints of the development team. E.g.: The idea can be developed within our department.

Non exception • Go/No Go aims at validating ideas without evaluation. The idea either passes or fails. • If an idea fails a single criterion, the idea is definitively discarded.

Change Criteria • If the criteria are too strict, too many ideas will get discarded. Reversely, if the criteria are too soft, very few ideas would be eliminated. • Consider revising your criteria if needed.

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INTELLIGENT STICKY NOTE If you have lots of ideas, the choice of development may become difficult. Idea Elimination helps to discard ideas that may look genius but does not respond to basic organizational requirements. Go/No Go is a common practice for Idea Elimination.

CONVERGE

Revise the attendence policy of board meetings to accomodate top executives' agenda


CONVERGE >> TOOL >> INTELLIGENT STICKY NOTE

HIGHLIGHTS Business Category In this box, you can tick mark the business category the idea belongs to. 1. People – management, strategy, policy. 2. Technology – IT, processes. 3. Infrastructure – Building, plan, installation. This information becomes useful at a later stage when you want to write a report about your business case. You will know what are the business categories associated with your idea concept.

Idea Contribution • Some ideas are fundamental to the challenge resolution, others maybe incremental. We have 3 categories of ideas; Fundamental, incremental and something in between for those we are not sure about. • While using Idea Assessment Canvas you will need to sort your ideas into those 3 categories. We encourage you to report this information on each sticky note using the “tree” label. • The truck is fundamental (or vital for the tree), the branches are substantial and the leaf is incremental.

Impact & Feasibility • Ideas are sorted with respect to Impact and Feasibility. •Move the idea towards High Impact if you believe that this idea would have a High Impact towards challenge resolution. •Move the idea towards High Feasibility if you believe that the idea is easily feasible. •Ideas that have Low Impact and Low Feasibility would be eliminated by default.

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CONCEPTUALIZATION This tool helps you to find the relationship between ideas, group them and create concept solutions. It is probably the most challenging task of the process where ideas get integrated into desirable working models. Concept solution must be seductive and unique.

Social media

CONVERGE

Saving

A B to B opportunity Real time transaction

B

C

Best deal

D


CONVERGE >> TOOL >> CONCEPTUALIZATION

HIGHLIGHTS Idea Groups • Group the ideas in a way that make sense to you without theorizing. Avoid classification as such as business categories, ownership, etc. We have done this before. • The game here is to orchestrate ideas all together to create a compelling model. Eventually, fill the gaps with new ideas. However, you must perverse yourself of deviating completely from the original ideas proposed.

Concept Design • Best concepts would come from awaken dreams for which you get motivated. They have little logic behind but just sound great to tell as a story. • For instance, if you identify several ideas that reflect the concept of “philanthropy” you may try to develop a concept solution around this attribute. Be radical in that sense to give a real identity to your concept. • Avoid combination as such as philanthropy, green, technologic, basic, digital, etc. These attributes maybe part of your concept, but they are not the essence of it. While designing a solution concept, we look for uniqueness.

Dependency Assessment • After presenting your concept to the group looking for feedback, understand what the bottleneck are to develop your project. • If you have concept, solution is a presentation poster. It may be wise to ask the public to leave sticky note feedback on specific elements you are demonstrating.

233


GOAL ASSESSMENT Ideas can be genius but in a marge of institutional goals which make them irrelevant. With this tool, you can assess each idea with respect to institutional goals that may be predefined within your organization or that you may want to define for your specific project.

1 PROTOTYPE & TEST

5

2

Design solution A Design solution B Design solution C

4

3


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> GOAL ASSESSMENT

HIGHLIGHTS Goals Setting • Large organization may have several brands and portfolio whose goals differs from the main organization. In this case, it makes sense to utilize goals that directly relate to the brand or institution who owns the challenge. • Reviewing the Challenge Profile can be a good source of inspiration to drive goals.

Number of Goals • You may have as much goals as the project require. • If you have predefined goals for the project use the template corresponding to the number of goals that were set for it. • Write down goals at the extremity of each tips of the web diagram. • Start assessing solution design individually.

Solution Design Goals Evaluation • This web diagram helps you to visualize the performance of each solution design with respect to challenge goals. • You can assess each solution design under the same diagram and establish comparison. • The objective of this template is to help you define goals and accessing them before reporting the result on the Gain/Pain matrix.

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GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT This tool helps you to evaluate concept solution with respect to 2 factors; Organizational Goals and Implementation Constraints. After setting your goals and constraints. Evaluate your concept solution. Automatically discover what the best concepts are from the Pain/Gain Matrix.

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT SOLUTIONS

ORGANIZATION GOALS 1

2

3

SOLUTIONS 4

5

6

7

8

IMPLEMENTATION CONSTRAINTS 1

A

A

B

B

C

C

D

D

E

E

F

F

G

G

H

H

PAIN

LOW

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT

HIGH

PROTOTYPE & TEST

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT

LOW

GAIN

HIGH

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT

HIGHLIGHTS GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT SOLUTIONS

ORGANIZATION GOALS 1

% % % % % % % %

A B C D E F G H

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

% % % % % % % %

Gain • In this matrix, each number corresponding to a specific goal of the Goal Assessment tool. • You can attribute a goal to each number and eventually change the coefficient for each of these goals. • You can start assessing each Solution design (a,b,c..) with respect to Goals. • If you have done the Goal Assessment exercise before, you just need to report the result on this table.

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT SOLUTIONS

A B C D E F G H

Pain

IMPLEMENTATION CONSTRAINTS 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1 5 2 1 3 3 4 2

4 5 5 2 3 5 4 5

5 4 2 4 4 5 3 2

1 3 3 5 3 1 2 5

5 2 2 2 2 2 1 5

2 4 1 2 3 5 4 2

2 5 3 5 3 3 4 3

1 1 4 3 3 2 4 5

GAIN/PAIN ASSESSMENT LOW

Gain/Pain Matrix B D

A

C

HIGH

PAIN

• We have set attributes by default that you can modify with respect to your organizational priorities. • Once you are done, fill the table by attributing a note from 1 to 5. 1 being Low pain and 5 High pain. • To discover the result, move to the Gain/Pain Matrix

LOW

GAIN

HIGH

• The Gain/Pain matrix is automated. Once you introduce all evaluation from the Gain and Pain table, results will appear on this table. • You need to develop the ideas that are located on the top right corner. These ideas are LOW pain and HIGH gain, what we are looking for. • Other ideas could be developed as well, thus, they are of secondary priority.

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PROTOTYPE DECISION MATRIX This grid helps you to sort solution ideas and assess what the concept solution is about. The solution will be a service, system, space or product, most probably a combination of those. Place the solution ideas on the grid with respect to the nature of each ideas and idea contribution.

PROTOTYPE DESICION MATRIX PROTOTYPE & TEST

SYSTEM

SERVICE

SPACE

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

3

3

2

1

1

2

3

3

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

PRODUCT


ATRIX PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> PROTOTYPE DECISION MATRIX

SYSTEM

HIGHLIGHTS PROTOTYPE DESICION MATRIX

1

1

1

SERVICE 1

1

1

1

2

1

2

1

SYSTEM

1

1

1

2

2

2

1

3

3

2

1

3

2

2

1

2

2

1

1

1

Evaluate Solution

1

• For each solution, place the solution ideas on the grid according to what you believe the solution is about. The idea solution maybe a Service, System, Space or Product. Make a choice based on your assumption. • Some ideas would be a combination of Service, System, Space or Product decide which is the most prominent. SYSTEM • The cross separates the 4 types of concept ideas that contribute to your challenge solution.

PROTOTYPE DESICION MATRIX 2

2

1

2

2 SERVICE

3

1

2

2

1

1

1

3

3

2

3

3

1

1

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

1

1

6

1

1 1

SPACE

1

PRODUCT

SPACE

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

2 1

2

2

1 1

1

2

2

3

3

• Each sticky note has a tree symbol with a mention about the idea contribution. (The trunk, the branch or the leaf.) • Place2 your solution on the grid with respect to idea contribution. 1 • Note: At any time in the process, you may add ideas to the concept solution. Change the idea contribution value, business line, etc. As a general guideline, make2sure that 1 the findings and discovery make sense to you.

Result Interpretation 3

2

PRODUCT 1

1Idea Contribution 1 1

1

• Totalize the points that you have harvested for each solution idea. The high2 1 est result is your primary process, the second highest result is your secondary process. • Interpret these 2 results with the Process Matrix and find out which process is 2 the most 2 suitable 1 to develop your solution. • E.g.: The highest result is 6 for SPACE and the second highest is 4 for SERVICE. SPACE is the primary process and SERVICE the secondary process. Reporting 1 these 21 values in1the Process Matrix we can see that process number 3 is the most suitable. 3

PRODUCT

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PROTOTYPING MATRIX The highest score from the Process Assessment is the primary process, the second highest score is the secondary process. Once you have cross the values of your primary process and secondary process, you discover the suggested process to develop your solution design.

PROTOTYPING MATRIX PRIMARY

PROTOTYPE & TEST

SERVICE

SPACE

SYSTEM

PRODUCT

SERVICE Experience Prototype

Service Image

Story Board

Service Image

Experience Prototype

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Story Board

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Story Board

Mockup

System Map Construction Iteration

SYSTEM Conceptual model

Service Image

Story Board

Experience Prototype

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Mockup

System Map

System Map

SECONDARY

Construction Iteration

Service Image

SPACE Mockup

System Map

Story Board

System Map

Experience Prototype

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Service Image

PRODUCT Service Image

Conceptual model

Story Board

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Mockup Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Mockup


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> PROTOTYPING MATRIX

HIGHLIGHTS

ATRIX

Process Requirement

PRIMARY SPACE

SYSTEM

PRODUCT

Service Image

Experience Prototype

System Map

Service Image

Service Image

Story Board

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Story Board

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Service Image

System Map

Mockup

System Map

PING MATRIX Construction Iteration

• For each challenge solution, you will find a suggested process. Execute the tools from the left to the right sequentially. Keep coming back to the previous tool to refine your findings.

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Service Image

System Map

System Map

ERVICE

Mockup

PRIMARY SPACE Alternatives

SYSTEM Mockup

System Map

System Map

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

• This means that you can choose which tool could work best for you. This does not preserve you to execute both of them if you believe that information is relevant to your design.

Mockup

Service Image

Service Image

Experience Prototype

PRODUCT

Service Image

Experience Prototype

Conceptual model

Service Image

Service Image

System Map

Service Image

ory Board System Map

Construction Iteration

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Service Image Mockup

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Story Board

Construction Iteration

Story Board

Construction Iteration

System Map Construction Iteration

RY

PACE

ory Board

ory Board

tory Board

stem Map

PRODUCT

Suggestion • In this case, we recommend you to utilize both the tools in parallel. Utilize each tool findings to improve your design again and again. • As a general rule, remember that each tool is iterative. After finishing with a tool, move to the second, third and come back to the first. Keep going this way until you reach the desired outcome. • And why not look at other tools in the toolkit and try whatever seems relevant to you. You can only gain from the experience. Conceptual model

Service Image

Experience Prototype

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration Conceptual model

Service Image

System Map

Construction Iteration

Story Board

Mockup

System Map Construction Iteration

System Map Conceptual model

Service Image Construction

Service Image

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Construction Iteration

Mockup

Mockup

System Map

Experience Prototype

Service Image

System Map

System Map Construction Iteration

Mockup

Mockup

Construction Iteration

Service Image

Conceptual model

Construction Iteration

Conceptual model

Service Image Construction Iteration

Mockup

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STORYBOARD The storyboard is a graphical technique that helps at understanding user tasks across a specific process of execution. It includes a picture or drawing that focusses on the user experience. Storyboard can be used to describe the current user experience as well as the desired one.

STORYBOARD PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> STORYBOARD

HIGHLIGHTS Tool • The Storyboard is composed of photographic boxes accompanied by title and eventual explanation text. • Best storyboard would be self-explanatory and would not require text explanation. • The text could refer external elements that cannot be explained on the visual. Thus, you limit visual representation to the most important touch point. • Does not hesitate to adopt a singular graphic style. Regardless the technique you chose; hand drawing, photography or digital images. • Adopt systematic color coding for the personages, product or environment. That would greatly contribute to user’s understanding. • A storyboard may have content between 6 to 10 photographic boxes.

Process • Start by identifying the main tasks and put them in sequence. To do so, you may start by representing a maximum of the task each on individuals’ sticky note. Afterwards, start hierarchizing, eliminating and combining task to limit yourself to the most important tasks. • Draw a quick thumbnail scenario, question yourself and take a feedback from others. Reiterate until you are satisfied with your design. • If you chose to work with photography, request friends to play the role of your personage. Make their acting meaningful.

Preparation Execution • You do not need much material for this exercise. A few pen to draw a scenario. • A digital camera to take pictures. • A software like Illustrator or Photoshop to overdraw pictures if needed. Alternatively, paint can do the job.

Checklist of Materials Always think the key user touch points. Draw your scenario from the end user perspective.

243

Be consistent across the scenario using the same actors for each personage, maintain a graphic language.

Test • New task flow can be a source of resistance as it may disturb stakeholders’ privileges in the particular ecosystem. For this reason, it is important to collect a regular feedback while developing the new task flow. • The Storyboard is good to use to create understanding between stakeholders. You may take the stakeholders representatives walkthrough your storyboard. Collect their feedback and stimulate debate.

Template • You may find storyboard example on the internet. Type keywords in your domain to understand the best practices in terms of graphic design trends. • Go animate, Crazy talk, Iclone and Powtoon allows you to create graphic storyboard based on template images and persona. It is good to start with. • Some of these platforms allow you to make a virtual personage, speak and interact with each other.


CONSTRUCTION ITERATION The storyboard is a graphical technique that helps in understanding user tasks across a specific process of execution. E.g.: Driving through a fast food chain would include a sequence of tasks to reach the desired outcome for the user.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> CONSTRUCTION ITERATION

HIGHLIGHTS Tool

Checklist of Materials

• Construction Iteration is usually made of paper, cardboard and thermocol. It is a low-cost prototyping technique. • The objective is not to create “something nice” but to understand the volumes and functions of a particular design. • This technique helps you to understand the desired size and the volume of things. • Construction Iteration focuses especially on user touch point. We speak about physical touch points in this case.

Process • Identify existing objects that could be used as a base to create your design. Boxes, cans, pipes, straw, etc. Use these basic elements to create the volume of your design. • Stick buttons, screen and added functionalities to your design. • It won’t work and it won’t look nice. That’s not the purpose. The purpose is to understand that functional elements may not be at the right place, that volumes could be disproportionate. • Reiterate until you get product volumes and functionalities at the right place.

Preparation Execution • A good idea may be to start recuperating all kinds of cardboard and plastic elements that would inspire you to create something once you see them. Meanwhile, you can start with classical stationery and craft. • Basic cutting and fixing elements.

Be curious and try different combination to create something. Focus on user touch point, what they want to do and how practical it will be to do it on your design.

245

Integrate your Construction Iteration on the user environment.

Test • This tool is about self-learning. You test as you go. You keep trying different volume combination to discover the “ideal” design. • Test is a part of the exercise itself. You pass the test once your design has achieve a certain level of aesthetical and functional performance.

Template • Your store room will be the best resource for this exercise. With few basic elements, you can recreate most of the products you use daily. • You may find opportunities to innovate by resizing volumes and change the functionalities.


SYSTEM MAP A way of representing complex ecosystem, when many microsystem are interdependent. System Map focuses on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;big pictureâ&#x20AC;? to provide an understanding of stakeholders relationship with systems, policies, technology and target.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> SYSTEM MAP

HIGHLIGHTS Tool • System Map usually comports a central object and gravitational functions that all work as an ecosystem. • Visual hierarchy. By understanding the importance of each function and give it an appropriate size within the ecosystem. • Synthesis. Complex ecosystem is too big for us to detail each and every function. From this, we need to restrict ourselves to the most important end user touch point. • Systematization. Similar function, system, mechanism, resources, etc. are repeated all across the ecosystem. Systematize labeling and representation.

Process • In short, you start from the BIG PICTURE containing fuzzy elements to narrow down to the most essential. • You can execute this process by occupying a wall and a stick on all the elements of your ecosystem. • Use sticky note, printed documents, printed photography to visualize your thoughts. • You keep reorganizing information as the new elements to integrate the ecosystem. • Once you believe that you have collected all the elements you wish to see in your ecosystem, start working the visual hierarchy, synthesize and systematize your communication format. • You will need multiple attempts to reach the desired outcome.

Preparation Execution • If you choose to work on the wall which is still the best way to go, you will need to print documents and photos. • If you use Visio or Muraly, you may create a file with all the documents you wish to see on your ecosystem.

Checklist of Materials Design is about Economy, Culture Governance and Technology. Make sure you considered all these aspects.

247

Systematize, Hierarchize, Synthesize. Nothing is free, whatever you place on your ecosystem should add meaning or remove it.

Test • System Map are best to test with stakeholders representative that understands their place and interest within the ecosystem. • Drive them through the System Map and collect their feedback and suggestions. • You may leave a printed copy to them to write on it. Suggest correction and improvement. • Utilize colored sticky note to identify categories of issues within the System Map.

Template • There is a very few reference to the System Map and no specific process to create them. The quality of the System Map highly depend on the level of iteration. The more you keep redesigning and recreating the design element, the more quality you will get. Thus, do not try to “fix” the System Map early, be open to experimentation. • Browse System Map in your domain. That would give you the opportunities to observe the different types of design languages that best suit your domain of expertise.


CONCEPTUAL MODEL An exploration of the multiple possibilities a design could be. Functional and aesthetical preference, model of interaction. It is mainly the same design but seen from different angles in such a way that stakeholders can make an informed decisions.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> CONCEPTUAL MODEL

HIGHLIGHTS Tool • You need to explore design possibilities by creating several models of design. • The challenge behind this exercise is to think conceptually. Understand the mindset, behavior, attitude, and lifestyle behind a specific design. • To think conceptually associate to your design strong personalities, characters, heroes or opinion leaders. Capture in your design with the values that characterize these personages. • This tool invites you to explore aesthetic and functional option for your design.

Process • Shift your mind into Conceptual Model. Inspire yourself with magazines, fashion and design trends website. • Create a list of value, adjective, ambiance or emotion you would like to explore with Conceptual Model. • Make sure each direction you take is unique. • Do not combine things or try to make your design “universal” In other words, if you design for everyone you’ll end up designing for no one. • Design each model with a determined lifestyle.

Preparation Execution •The Storyboard is a graphical technique that helps in understanding user tasks across a specific process of execution. E.g.: Driving through a fast food chain would include a sequence of tasks to reach the desired outcome for the user.

Checklist of Materials Think conceptually, associate meaningful words in your design. Give your design a strong personality. Forget “universal design” or design for everyone.

249

Create at least 3 Conceptual Model to compare.

Test • The test would be relevant only if you have significantly different solutions to present for selection. • Be consistent with the prototyping format. Designs should be different but comparable. For example; you do not want your user to select a particular design just because he/she likes the color. • Conceptual Models are good to understand the customers. You may present it to them and collect their feedbacks. Ask why they like the specific model and why they rejected the other. That would help you to progress towards your final design.

Template • Look at the conceptual design trends on the internet. Inspirational design that communicates value and emotion. Transpose these trends on your design models. • Sharpen your eye with lots of shopping. Visit a boutique that you usually don’t prefer. Understand why people like these things, what are the values they communicate to them. • Become a design trendsetter.


MOCKUP Initially, Mock Ups can be of very low quality. But as the designers understand better the volumes and functional aspects of the product, the mockup can be of higher quality. A Mock Up is used to demonstrate what a product or space will be after industrialization.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> MOCKUP

HIGHLIGHTS Tool

Checklist of Materials

A mockup can be 2 types: • Functional Prototype. This type of prototype would provide the service but won’t have the desired look and feel. It needs to be a full scale and it is usually executed before the aesthetical prototype. • Aesthetical Prototype. This type of mockup gives the look and feel of a product, service or space. It may be full size or scale size depending on the nature of the subject. Creating an aesthetical prototype does not prevent you from making it functional, however, for a practical reason it is difficult to realize.

• Be clear about your objective: Function Vs. Aesthetic. Function should be determined first. • Make it at the right size. Full size or ≤ to ¼.

251

• Iterate, try low quality prototype before starting a high-end prototyping techniques.

Test Process • As a general guideline, fail early and cheaply. That means that your early prototype can be executed with paper and cardboard. Just to understand size mechanism and functionalities. • Once you are clearer about your design, try more advanced materials like metal, plastic, wood, etc. • Finally, you may want to develop your model in 3D printing. • Lesson from history: The famous design James Dyson developed not less than 5127 prototypes to reach the revolutionary vacuum solution now sold around the world.

Preparation Execution • Cardboard prototype can be executed anywhere. • Material like wood, plastic and metal requires basic workshop facilities. • CNC (Computer Numerical Control) like 3D printing, laser cutting, lathes require specific infrastructures that are available locally.

• Functional Prototype. It aims at understanding if the basic usability challenges have been solved and the user is comfortable using the design. • Aesthetical Prototype. Demonstrates the perspective look and feel of the brand experience. Aesthetical prototype needs to create the whaaa! effect. To proceed comparative testing of your design with the competitor’s product, it is advised to remove the brand elements to avoid –Brand bias.

Template • Most standard products have suggested measurement you can find on the internet. You can download the base blueprint for almost anything. • For many products it is a common practice to redesign over the existing one. Product volumes do not always change radically. Thus, you can reuse existing products to redesign over it.


SERVICE IMAGE A unique picture that describes at once all the interaction possibilities with the design. The Service Image illustrates the main functions of a product, service, system or space. Graphic design helps in presenting the design in a compelling manner.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> SERVICE IMAGE

HIGHLIGHTS Tool

Checklist of Materials

Service Image is an illustration that would contain a central object which is determined by you. The central object would be the product or a system that has the most touch point with the user. • Other elements that interact with the central object can gravitate around. • Hierarchy of information is important; objects size determine their importance. • The whole picture needs to adapt a seamless design language. Typography, color, graphic elements.

Process • Identify the central object for your composition. • Determine the size of other gravitational objects around your central object. • Select the function of your design you wish to emphasize. • Find a systematic way of labeling elements and providing details. • Icon could be a part of your design by symbolically representing functionalities.

• Make sure your Service Image includes the most important touch point for the user. • Prioritize functions you wish to detail. • Use a systematic design language. • Have a marketing approach for presenting the solution.

Test • Design show. If your approach is to reveal a new design to the public and collect their feedback. The Service Image would be well appropriate as it does not cost much and allow any user to understand what your design is all about. • Comparative design. Service Image is also used to compare a solution to another. It is particularly useful when businesses want to develop the different alternatives before going for the best one.

Template Preparation Execution • The storyboard is a graphical technique that helps in understanding user tasks across a specific process of execution. E.g.: Driving through a fast food chain would include a sequence of tasks to reach the desired outcome for the user.

253

• Marketing illustration is the best inspirational material to create Service Images. • Representing all functions in a single page can be challenging. You may find help in using tools like Mental Map to bring information about visual hierarchy. • Get inspiration from graphic design workshop to find the design elements that could contribute to your design.


EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPE The Experience Prototype aims in materializing a series of touchpoints with the user in such a way that we can understand what the experience will be. From the Experience Prototype, designers discover new insights they need to take for the account in the design of a Product, Service, System or Space.

PROTOTYPE & TEST


PROTOTYPE & TEST >> TOOL >> EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPE

HIGHLIGHTS Tool

Checklist of Materials

• This tool focuses on customer’s touch point. Which means, the key instances where a customer has a relationship with the system we are designing. • Designing an Experience Prototype does not mean that you need to design all the screens. Only the most important screen. However, you must design these screens in a sequence that you can narrate as a story. • There are multiple possibilities to design an Experience Prototype. It can be by drawing, digital images, pictures or a mix of all.

Process • As a general rule, you want to fail early at low cost. That means, you do not want to invest your time in detailing your design and then realize that you went wrong. Thus, we suggest that you keep on trying solutions at low cost before moving towards advanced prototype techniques. • Here is a proposed sequence of tools, feel free to try other techniques. • Hand drawing • PowerPoint • Photoshop

Preparation Execution • Make sure you have plenty of stationary to work with. • Collect templates from the internet about screen size, best practices for print, signage, etc. as your design suggests. • Once again, on the internet, you can find plenty of icons, buttons, design elements you can use for your design.

• Be sure to prioritize the user touch point and focus on the main functions of your design. • Put yourself in the shoes of your user while designing.

255

• Ask your neighbors if they understand your design. • Take comments and suggestions seriously, do not feel offended.

Test • Test early, fail early and cheaply. • Design a test protocol. This means a sequence of questions and tasks you would execute with every user. • Ask the user to test your prototype. Do not explain how it works. Just ask the user what he understands from what you are presenting to him. • Ask these questions: • What do you think it is about? • What do you think you can do with this? • How does it work? • Is it the way you would like to do things? • Do you find it useful? • Etc.

Template • There are plenty of templates you can find on the internet for this exercise. • Keywords: PowerPoint interface template, Mobile phone screen template, Wireframe design; • Software: Axure; Keynotopi; Flash.


APPENDIX


257


THE AUTHORS BASSAM ALKHARASHI

MICHAEL ALLEN

Eng. Bassam AlKharashi has over 20 years of experience in the fields of Business Process Management, Strategic Management, Business Innovation, Service Design, and Performance Management, working in leading public & private organizations in Saudi Arabia.

Michael is a passionate idea generator and innovator. He has been working in the field of improvement and innovation for over 17 years and helped some of the largest private and public sector organizations in the UK, Northern Europe.

He is an experienced consultant and visual facilitator. He worked with local and global teams to develop various reference models such as Office of BPM (Procetera), Office of Strategy (Stracetera), Sprint Methodology for Process Improvement, and Business Innovation Methodology.

He talks and writes about the latest trends in innovation on his blog, Everything Brilliant starts with an Idea (everythingbrilliant. co.uk).“I’m fascinated by brilliant ideas and where they came from. How is it that some people seem to have loads of brilliant ideas? Or do we all have brilliant ideas, but most of us simply can’t describe them and get other people excited about them? Michael hopes to inspire people to share their ideas by doing exactly what – he publishes all his ideas online. “Our instinct is to keep our ideas to ourselves and not to share them. I take the opposite view – you can have any of my ideas for as long as you promise to do something with them because without execution, ideas are worthless.”

@bkharashi

bassamalkharashi

@BrillianttIdeas

michael-allen-b03360


259

PATRICK ROUPIN

Patrick advocates innovation for business, government and nonprofit organizations across Europe and Asia. His area of expertise includes organizational transformation, entrepreneurship, creativity and facilitation. Patrick was awarded with the prize Victor Papanek, design for the real world. He is deeply human-centered in approach and ground rooted to business realities. He believes in the power of engagement to get the best from team work and facilitation. Believes in alternative thinking to open sky for business growth and social progress. Expertise in creating stories and scenarios to ease the risk and client’s feasibility. Enable leaders’ achievements with organizational behavior and systemic thinking. He loves to dismantle paradigms and create opportunities for new perspectives to grow. He talks and writes about creative leadership at www.kovent.com. @patrickroupin

patrickroupin

MICHAEL WILKINSON

Michael Wilkinson is a Certified Master Facilitator™ and the founder and Managing Director of Leadership Strategies, Inc. His unique talent, skills and passion for facilitation form are the core of the company’s mission and are the reasons for which he is a much sought after as a facilitator, trainer and speaker. Michael is the author of the best-seller book: The Secrets of Facilitation, The Secrets to Masterful Meetings, The Executive Guide to Facilitating Strategy, CLICK: The Virtual Meetings Book, and Buying Styles. Michael is one of the nation’s leaders in the facilitation industry. He is a board member of the International Institute for Facilitation and founder of The Facilitator Database. He has been awarded both the Certified Professional Facilitator™ and the Certified Master Facilitator™ designations for experience and demonstrated expertise in facilitation. In 2016 he was named to the International Facilitation Hall of Fame by the International Association of Facilitators. @LeadStrat

MichaelWilkinson


THE DESIGNERS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CELERINA ARAZA BEGUAS

Celerina is a Managing Director of ES Assisting. She has over 15 years of experience in the fields of Business Administration, Project Management, Creative Designs, Publishing and Digital Marketing. She worked with various clients in public and private organization in the USA, Canada, Australia, Europe, Saudi Arabia and South East Asia. She leverages her experiences across a wide range of industry sectors to help companies, by bringing a range of multi-disciplinary solutions to every problem. She embraces strategic thinking and business innovation to deliver on clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objective.

@cabeguas

celerinabeguas

KOSTIANTYN AKSONOV

Kostiantyn is a Freelance Graphic Designer from Ukraine who believes that great design can make the world a better place. His main specialisation is print design. He can make any type of printing production for sturtups, small and middle business. See Kostiantyn`s Behance portfolio through the following link www.behance.net/aksyan

@kosaksonov

kostiantyn-aksonov


261

JUNO ABREU

Juno Abreu is a freelance illustrator based in the Philippines and currently studying Architecture. He also draws for childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books under Vibal Publishing House and Independent Writers. Juno has had his artworks and comics published in FHM and by Summit Media. You may visit his artworks at junoabreu.carbonmade.com

@june_abreu

Juno Abreu

HARRIS IAN UGABAN

Harris is a Senior Graphic Designer at ES Assisting. With more than 5 years helping a variety of industries, including but not limited to: Educational Institution, Consulting Firm, Digital Advertising Agencies, Publications, Real Estate with the design of their marketing materials for print and web. His passion as a distinctive visual artist is his key strength. He is an innovative and driven individual who sees design as a hobby as well as a job.

@heyheyHarris

hicugaban


INDEX #

12 Bricks Exercise 22 Toolcards 3 Innovation Horizons

A-E # 22

211 82

C

Culture Change

Call to Action

96

Challenge

55

Challenge Abstraction

66

3d Printing – Direct

179

Challenge Example

55

3d Printing – Indirect

179

Challenge Process

54

4 Basic of Good Writing

103

Challenge Profile

55

4 Ideation Techniques

107

Challenge Setting Interview

92

4 Types of Prototype

191

Checkpoint and Ask for Feedback

83

Choosing Which Ideation Tool to Use

A

A clear view of picture of the key steps in the innovation process

A 31

Activity: challenge checklist writing

77

Allow yourself to be inspired

20

Analysing the challenge profile

106

Architect Level

30

Architecture

31

B

Be Inquisive Blind Test

B

20

181

Blue Sky Thinking

14

Building Your Innovation Strategy

33

Business process innovation

25

109

Co-Creation

36

Color Code

152

Complex Ecosystem Design

D

Data Innovation

25

Define Innovation Strategy

33

Defining the Objectives of Innovation Facilitation 50 Deriving Benefits From Engagement

16

Describe the 3 Innovation Horizons in Order to Seek Clarification on Their Priorities

92

Design Innovation Architecture

27

Develop Innovation Leaders

36

Drawing

47

24

Conceptual Model

248

Constraint

118

E

Constructing Challenges

94

Constructing Your Idea

102

Execute Innovation

Construction Iteration

244

Experience Prototype

Contribution to Challenge Resolution

164

Explain the Process to Get Started

Converge

161

Eye Tracking Test Room

Converge Process

162

Creating Challenges From These Insights

91

Creating Engagement

28

Creative Attitude

104

25

Example Solution Design

D 170 39 254 86 181

F

E

Facilitator Guide

31

Facilitator

26

Creativity

21

Facilitator Guide for Innovation

31

Creativity & Innovation

21

Factors Map – Grouping

72

Creativity Booster

20

Factors Map – Labeling

73


INDEX

F-H

Factors Map â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Linking

71

Factors Map â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Listing

70

From Ideas to Solutions

160

Functional Prototype

181

G

G

Gain Assessment

184

Gain/Pain Matrix

186

Getting Started Getting Started With Ideation

12 108

Getting Started With Innovation Challenges

78

Go Where Ideas Thrive

20

Go Where Smart People Go

20

Goal Assessment

182

Goal Assessment Tool

183

H

Hardware Prototype

H

178

Horizon & Want

59

Horizon 1

60

Horizon 2

60

Horizon 3

60

How to Use This Guide

50

I

Idea Assessment Canvas

IG H

165

Idea Bridge

112

Idea Bridge Model

114

Idea Categorization

165

Idea Elimination

168

Idea Hacks

138

Idea Hacks Model Idea Selection

43 170

Ideas

20

Ideate

99

Ideate Process

100

Ideation Environment

105

Ideation Ground Rules For the Facilitator

111

Ideation Techniques

43

Identifying Challenges

64

Identifying Needs

89

Imagination

14

Impact/Feasibility Assessment

168

Influencing Factors

68

Information Visualization Community Development

25

Initiation to Business Innovation

10

Innovation

14

Innovation Architecture

27

Innovation Challenges

54

Innovation Conceptual Model

206

Innovation Construction Iteration

244

Innovation Culture

36

Innovation Diagnosis Canvas

62

Innovation Excellence

18

Innovation Experience Prototype

200

Innovation Horizon

15

Innovation Horizons (Graph)

60

Innovation Level

38

Innovation Maturity

19

Innovation Maturity Model Innovation Mock Up

19 208

Innovation Office

36

Innovation Outlook

15

Innovation Process

30

Innovation Service Image

204

Innovation Story Board

188

Innovation Sub-Process

39

Innovation System Map

198

Innovation Trends

24

Inspiring Model

58

Intelligent Sticky Notes

169

Interview Questionnaire

76

Interview Records

41

Interview Screener

75

Introduction Invention

9 14


INDEX K

Knowledge and Experience Illustration

L

Land of Innovation

M

Maintain Your Creativity Book

I-S K

42

L

12

M

21

Managing Innovation

32

Marketing Technology

18

Mock-Up

O

One Way Mirror Test Lab

189

O

181

Our Capabilities

63

Our Clients

63

Our Culture

63

Our Organization

63

Our Partners and Community

63

Our Position in Our Marketplace

63

Out-in Innovation

25

Outcomes of Each Phases

39

P

P

S

S

Pain Assessment

236

Select the Right Prototype/Test tool

188

Pain/Gain Assessment

236

Service Image

204

Photo/Video

47

Services

26

Posters

233

Setting the Scene

86

Preparing Idea Hacks Workshop

140

Setting Up Workshop With Multiple Member

84

Preparing the Idea Bridge Workshop

116

Social Innovation

24

Preparing the Reverse Innovation Workshop

146

Software 2d/3d

47

Preparing the Subtraction Workshop

130

Solution Assessment

172

Process Assessment

187

Solution Design

170

Prototype & Test

175

Some Samples of Good Challenges

81

Sponsor

59

Prototype & Test Process

46

Prototype Decision Matrix

192

Stakeholder Group - Representative

74

Prototyping Matrix

193

Stakeholder Group – Labeling

74

Prototyping Tools

47

Stakeholder Group – Linking

74

Prototyping/Testing Matrix

47

Stakeholder Group – Listing

74

Stakeholder Map

R

Radical Innovation Reasons to Innovate

182

R

Stakeholder’s Interview

76

Stakeholders Expectations

32

24

Stakeholders Voice Can Help You To…

32

16

Start & Stop Date

58

Reduce Anxiety

104

Storyboard

194

Reverse Innovation

107

Strategic Goal

182

Reverse Innovation Model

107

Strategic Innovation Canvas

33

Strategic Innovation Canvas (example)

33

Subtract

43

Subtract Model

43

Reward and Recognition

59


INDEX

S-W

Subtraction

43

System Map

198

T

T

Terms and Definition

51

Target Audience Test and Prototype

59

175

The Benefits from Transformation and Innovation 17 The Benefits Gained from Engaging People

17

The Business Case for Innovation

19

The Drawing Challenge The Facilitator Role

104 26

The Idea Assessment Canvas

164

The Idea Bridge Consist of Five Key Parts

115

The Ideation Tools

109

The Innovation Process

30

The Innovation Process and Where This Guide Fits 31 Timeline Tool Cards Tools

U

15 211 27

U

Understanding the Barriers

110

Utilizing Influencing Factors

74

W

What is a Prototype? What is Innovation Challenge?

W

46 55

What is Innovation?

14

What is Prototyping?

177

What is Testing?

180

What Makes a Successful Challenge?

55

When to Use This Tool?

84

Where To Start?

40

Who are Your Stakeholders

32

Why Challenge?

55

Why Should I Read This Book?

11

Wrapping Up

90


Facilitating Innovation  
Facilitating Innovation  
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