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Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art Education Pack

MiFA presents Australia’s first commercial showcase of contemporary Indonesian art, Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Bringing together some of Indonesia’s most compelling established and emerging contemporary artists, the exhibition aims to “close the gap” on the cultural divide between Australia and its closest neighbor.


ANGKI PURBANDONO

MARIA INDRIA SARI

AY TJOE CHRISTINE

PRILLA TANIA

BUDI UBRUK

SAMSUL ARIFIN

ENTANG WHIHARSO

SIGIT SONTOSO

EKO NUGROHO

SONI IRAWAN

FX HARSONO

TROMANA

HARIS PURNAMA

UGO UNTORO

I GUSTI NGURAH UDIANTARA

UGY SUGIART

JOMPET

YUDI SULISTIYO

MANGU PUTRA

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 2


THIS IS A MIFA EDUCATION RESOURCE PRODUCED IN ASSOCIATION WITH CLOSING THE GAP; INDONESIAN CONTEMPORARY ART

Level 1, 278 Collins Street Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3000 +61 3 9663 3304 http://www.mifa.com.au/ education@mifa.com.au info@mifa.com.au

Follow us on: Facebook: MiFA Education Twitter: http://twitter.com/MiFAgallery

Curators: Bryan Collie, Mikala Tai & Anita Archer Indonesian Consultants: Heri Pernard Art Management Exhibition Consultant: Santy Saptari Public Programs: Louise Joel Education Officer: Nicole Anderson Publicity: Lara Macpherson Editing: Anita Archer, Bryan Collie, Louise Joel & Mikala Tai Photography: Courtesy of Heri Pernad Art Management ©MiFA Education 2010 ©All images and text copyright of the artist and authors

This catalogue is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 3


CONTENTS HOW TO USE THIS EDUCATION PACK ............................................................................................................................................................. 6 ARTIST INFORMATION .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANGKI PURBANDONO .............................................................................................................................................................................. 7 AY TJOE CHRISTINE ................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 BUDI UBRUK .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 12 EKO NUGROHO ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 ENTANG WHIHARSO ................................................................................................................................................................................. 17 FX HARSONO ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 HARIS PURNAMA ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 I GUSTI NGURAH UDIANTARA ................................................................................................................................................................... 25 JOMPET ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26 MANGU PUTRA ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 MARIA INDRIA SARI .................................................................................................................................................................................. 30 PRILLA TANIA ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 31 Samsul Arifin ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 32 Sigit Santoso.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 33 SONI IRAWAN ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 TROMARAMA ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 38 UGO UNTORO ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 UGY SUGIART ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 42 YUDI SULISTYO .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 43 INTERVIEW WITH BRYAN COLLIE – CO-DIRECTOR OF MIFA ......................................................................................................................... 45 UNIT 1 ART .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 54 UNIT 1 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSES ....................................................................................................................................... 54 UNIT 1 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) ................................................................................. 55 UNIT 1 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT ............................................................................................................................................. 56 UNIT 1 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION ............................................................................................................................................. 57 UNIT 2 ART .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 60 UNIT 2 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE QUESTIONS ..................................................................................................................... 60 This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 4


UNIT 2 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) ................................................................................. 61 UNIT 2 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT ............................................................................................................................................. 62 UNIT 2 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION ............................................................................................................................................. 64 UNIT 3 ART .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 66 UNIT 3 ART – WRITTEN REPORT ............................................................................................................................................................... 66 UNIT 3 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE ......................................................................................................................................... 67 UNIT 3 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) ................................................................................. 68 UNIT 3 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT ............................................................................................................................................. 69 UNIT 3 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION ............................................................................................................................................. 71 UNIT 4 ART .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 73 UNIT 4 ART – A WRITTEN REPORT ............................................................................................................................................................ 73 UNIT 4 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE ......................................................................................................................................... 74 UNIT 4 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) ................................................................................. 75 UNIT 4 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT ............................................................................................................................................. 76 UNIT 4 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION ............................................................................................................................................. 78 UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 79 UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE .......................................................................................................................... 79 UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS – SHORT ANSWER WRITTEN RESPONSE ................................................................................................................. 80 UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 81 UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS – EXTENDED RESPONSE QUESTIONS ...................................................................................................................... 81 UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSE QUESTIONS ............................................................................................................. 82 UNIT 3 STUDTIO ARTS ................................................................................................................................................................................... 83 UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT .............................................................................................................................. 83 UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ESSAY ................................................................................................................................................................... 84 UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ORAL REPORT....................................................................................................................................................... 85 ARTWORKS.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 86

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 5


HOW TO USE THIS EDUCATION PACK

The Closing the Gap: Indonesian Art Today education pack has been developed to cater specifically to the course outlines and assessment criteria of the Art and Studio Arts Unit 1 – 4 Study Designs.

We encourage teachers to use this education pack at their discretion, MiFA education designs their education packs to be adapted and utilized with the understanding that each group of students requires an individually catered approach. The assessment tasks have been designed to cover a broad range of student understandings and competencies; we encourage teachers to alter the wording of assessment tasks to cater to their individual class needs. Suggested individual speaking times are subject to number of students participating as well as parameters set by the Teacher.

Despite how closely this education pack caters to Art and Studio Art VCE curriculum, we take no responsibility in the final outcomes of assessment; this education pack is to be used by individual teacher discretion. MiFA encourages school groups to visit MiFA through informal visits or specifically catered excursions. Please feel free to contact our Education Officer, Nicole Anderson, for further information or feedback.

Please note that in traditional Asian cultures it is customary to address persons by their last name first, some of the artists that are included in closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art still carry on this custom.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 6


ARTIST INFORMATION

ANGKI PURBANDONO Born: 1971, Cepriring, Indonesia

Lives: Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Education 1994-9

Indonesia Institute of Art, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

1993-4

Modern School of Design Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sept-Okt2009

Artist in Residency Program at Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Fukuoka, Japan

Dec 2006 – Feb 07

Landing Soon #1, Artist Residency at Artoteek Denhaag, The Netherlands & Cemeti Art House Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Residency Program

Sept 2005- Sept 06 2004

Asian Artist Fellowship at Changdong Art Studio, Seoul, South Korea 

1 month – Ruang Rupa Residency Program, Jakarta Indonesia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 

Noodle Theory, Garis Art, Jakarta, Indonesia

2 Folders From Fukuoka, Vivi Yip Art Room II, Jakarta

2009

Kissing The Methods, Richard Koh Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

2008

Happy Scan, Biasa Art Space, Seminyak, Bali

2007

Industrial Fiesta, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta

2006

Industrial Fiesta, Changdong Art Studio, Seoul, South Korea

2000

My Brain Packages, Centre Culturel Francais, Jakarta

1999

Kolasmaniac, Centre Culturel Francais, Yogyakarta

2010

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

Rainbow Asia, Hangaram Art Museum of Seoul Art Center, Seoul, South Korea

  

Asia Spectrum: Daegu Photography Biennale, Daegu Culture and Art Center, Daegu, South Korea ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta

Contemporary Art of Indonesia, MoCA Shanghai, China

Emerging Wave, ASEAN - Korea Contemporary Photo Exhibition, GoEun Museum of Photography, Busan, South Korea

Emerging Wave, ASEAN – Korea Contemporary Photo Exhibition, Hangaram Art Museum, Seoul, South Korea

Saemangeum Flag Festival 2010, Saemangeum Seawall, Saemangeum, South Korea

Space and Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

LOOK ! SEE ? Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

4th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale 2009 - LIVE and LET LIVE: Creators of Tomorrow - Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale, Fukuoka

Ilustrasi Cerpen Kompas, Bentara Budaya Jakarta, Yogyakarta and Bali, Indonesia

Guru Oemar Bakri (Anonimous Project), Jogja Gallery, Jakarta

BLUEPRINT of Jogja (Ruang MES 56), Tembi Contemporary Art Space, Yogyakarta

Kocon 2009 Spring International Digital Design Invitation Exhibition, Silla University in Busan, South Korea

City Oneminutes Project [video] Rietveld Arsenale – Venice Biennale, Arsenale Novissimo Venice

KOMPILASI: A Survey of Contemporary Indonesian Art, BUS Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 7


2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Jakarta Biennale XIII 2009 ARENA: Zona Pertarungan, Jakarta City, Indonesia

International Digital Design Invitation Exhibition, Zhejiang University of Techmology, China

Jawa Baru #2, Garis Art Space, Jakarta

REFRESH: New Strategies in Indonesian Contemporary Art – Valentine Willie Fine Art – VWFA Singapore, Singapore

CUT: New Photography from Southeast Asia – Valentine Willie Fine Art – VWFA Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur

Manifesto, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Boys|Girls-Contemporary Art, Youth Life and Culture in Two Parts, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Indonesian Dream, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta, Indonesia

Anonymous- Landing Soon Project by Artoteek Den Haag and Cemeti Art house, Erasmus Huis Jakarta, Indonesia

2 Pose Project (Ruang MES56), Jogja Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

3 Young Contemporaries 2007 – Valentine Willie Fine Art – VWFA Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur

Kuota: Inbox 2007, National Gallery Jakarta, Indonesia

FETISH: catalogue presentation, BIASA artspace, Jakarta, Indonesia

International Digital Design Invitation Exhibition, Pai Chai University, South Korea

Overload, Centre Culturel Francais, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

FETISH: objects art project #1, BIASA artspace, Bali, Indonesia

T-shirt from March, Bentara Budaya Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Anonymous-Landing Soon #1, Cemeti Art House and Cemeti Studio, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Open Studio – Document Changdong, Changdong Art Studio, Seoul, South Korea

Goyang International Art, Goyang, Seoul, South Korea

Bikini in Winter, LOOP Alternative Space, Seoul, South Korea

Bitmap International Digital Photo Project, LOOP Alternative Space, Seoul, South Korea

International Digital Design Invitation Exhibition, Joongbu University, Seoul, South Korea

Alterorgasm, Kedai Kebun Forum, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

About Beauty – Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin

Road/Route 1 Pocheon Asian Art Festival, Pocheon City, South Korea

Space and Shadows – Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany

Unfolded City, Biennale Jogja VIII, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Best Quality, CP Biennale Indonesia Bank Museum, Jakarta, Indonesia

Revolution Ugly-No Beauty, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Ruang MES56, Room No 1-EAT/347, Bandung, Indonesia

Where Troubles Melt Like Lemon Drops, Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten Hogeschool Antwerpen, Belgium

Omong Kosong#1, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Trans Indonesia, Govett-Browster Art Gallery, New Playmouth, New Zealand

Absolut Fotogram, Ruang Mes 56, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Milik Kita Bersama, Jogja Bergerak Radius 1 Km, Kedai Kebun Forum, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Top Collection and Beauty Point [Video Art], Internet Project

Ueber Beauty (http://www.ueber-beauty.com), Haus der Kulturen der Welt/ House of World Cultures, Berlin, Germany

Beauty Point [Video Art], International Media Art Award, Baden, Germany

Beauty Point [Video Art], Jakarta International Film Festival, Jakarta

Holiday in Jakarta, Passage de Retz, Paris, France

nd

st

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 8


Urban Moslem in Yogyakarta, Museum Nusantara, Delft, Netherlands

Moslem Fashion of Indonesian Women, Common Ground: Aspects of Contemporary Moslem Life in Britain and Indonesia, An International Exhibition Britain-Indonesia Photography Artists, Art National Gallery, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Photography Project Top Collection, Ruang Rupa, Jakarta, Indonesia

Holiday in Jakarta, Lontar Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Vector Junkie: Undiscovered Teritory, Oktagon Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Moslem Fashion of Indonesian Women, Common Ground: Aspects of Contemporary Moslem

Life in Britain and Indonesia; An International Exhibition Britain-Indonesia Photography Artists, Indonesia

Cool and Famous, Yogyakarta Art Biennale VII, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Dedi Dores, Ruang MES56, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Don’t Try This at Home!, Rumah Soboman, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Kata Rupa, Gelaran Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2001

Festival Kesenian Indonesia, STSI Padang Panjang, West Sumatera, Indonesia

2000

The Silent Chapter, Sika Contemporary Art Gallery, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

Art Photography Exhibition, Museum Negeri Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia

1999

REVOLUSI #9, Galeri Fotografi Jurnalistik ANTARA, Jakarta, Indonesia

1998

Slide Corner Slide Performance, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Message From Distortion, 50 Human Right Anniversary, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Festival Kesenian Yogyakarta X, Benteng Vredeburg, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Langkah, Ruang MES56, Yogyakarta

Festival Kesenian Yogyakarta IX, Benteng Vredeburg, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2003-4

2002

1997

th

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 9


AY TJOE CHRISTINE Born: 1973, Badun, West Java, Indonesia Education 1992-1997

FSRD, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Graphic Art

Selected Residencies 2008

Artist in residence in STPI, Singapore

Selected Awards 2009

SCMP Art Futures Prize Winner, Hongkong Art Fair

2004

Scholarship In Stiftung Kuenstlerdorf, Schoeppingen, Germany

2001

Top 5 of Philip Morris Indonesian Art Award

Selected Solo Exhibitions 

Symmetrical Sanctuary, SIGI Art Gallery, Jakarta

Lama Sabakhtani Club, Lawangwangi, Bandung

Panorama Without Distance, Hongkong Art Fair, Hongkong Convention & Exhibition Centre

Eating Excess, Singapore Tyler Print Institute, Singapore

Interiority of Hope, Emmitan Gallery, Surabaya, Indonesia

Wall Prison (part two), Scope Miami Art Fair, Miami

2007

Silent Supper, Ark Galerie, Jakarta, Indonesia

2006

Eksekusi Ego, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2003

Reach Me, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Aku/ Kau/ Uak, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2002

At The Day of German Unity, German Embassy, Jakarta, Indonesia

2001

Buka Untuk Melihat, RedPoint Gallery, Bandung, Indonesia

2010

2009

2008

Selected Groups Exhibitions 2010

ARTPARIS+GUESTS 2010, Grand Palais-Champs Elysees, Perancis

2009

Bandung Art Now, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Enam Pekan Perempuan, Salihara Gallery, Jakarta

Awareness, Canvas International Art, The Netherlands

Indonesia Contemporary Drawing, National Gallery, Jakarta

International Print Talk: From The Dark Background of Etchings, Ark Gallery, Jakarta

CIGE 2008, China World Trade Centre, Beijing, China

Expose#1- A Presentation of Indonesian Cont Art by Deutsche Bank & Nadi Gallery, Four Seasons Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia

Manifesto, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

E-Motion, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

180 x 180, One Gallery, Jakarta

Hello Print!, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta

A Decade of Dedication: Ten Years Revisited, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung, Indonesia

Shanghai Contemporary 2008, China

Indonesian Contemporary Art Now, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

China International Gallery Exposition 2007, China World Trade Center Beijing, China

Anti Aging, Gaya Art Space Gallery, Bali, Indonesia

2008

2007

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 10


2006

2005

2004

2003

Intimate Distance, Indonesian Women Artists, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Conscience Celebrate, Gandaria Heights, Jakarta, Indonesia

Shanghai Contemporary 2007, Main Fountain Square, Shanghai Exhibition Center, China

Art Singapore 2007, The Contemporary Asian Art Fair , Suntec City, Singapore

The 22nd Asian International Art Exhibition, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung, Indonesia

Petisi Bandung, Langgeng Gallery , Magelang, Indonesia

Kuota 2007, National Gallery , Jakarta, Indonesia

Jejak dalam Jejak, Goethe House, Goethe Institut, Jakarta, Indonesia

China International Gallery Exposition, China World Trade Center Beijing, China

Langgeng Contemporary Art Festival 2006, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang

Indonesian Contemporary Art Now, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

Taboo and Transgression in Contemporary Indonesian Art, Johnson Museum, Cornelly University, New York, USA

The Beppu Asia Biennale of Contemporary Art, Beppu Art Museum, Oita Japan

Tanda Kasih, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jejak-Jejak Drawing, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

21th and Beyond, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Vision & Resonance, Asian Civilization Museum, Singapore

Petisi Bandung, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Fragments-KII 13, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Persepsi dalam Vibrasi, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Sayap dalam Kata, Studio Budaya Langgeng, Magelang, Indonesia

K-ein Weg, Kunstverein Vreden, Germany

Schoeppingen zu Gast in Brauweiler, Koeln, Germany

Bingkai Narasi Kecil-KII 12, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Equatorial Heat, Shanghai Museum, China

Girl Talk, Edwin's Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

CP Open Biennale, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The 6th Triennale Mondiale D’Estampes Petit Format, Galerie d’Art Contemporain de Camalianes, France

Beijing International Art Biennale 2003, China National Museum of Fine Art, China

The 18th Asian International Art Exhibition, Hongkong Museum of Art, Hong Kong

Kecil Itu Indah 11, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Passion: Etno-Identity, The Indonesian Art Foundation (YSRI), Beijing and Shanghai, China

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 11


BUDI UBRUK Born: 1968, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Education 

1984

Yogyakarta Senior Visual Art School (Sekolah Menengah Seni Rupa Yogyakarta - SMSR), Painting Department

Selected Awards 2002

Indofood Art Award, Jakarta

2000

Grand Prize Winner of Phillip Morris Indonesian Art Awards

Philip Morris Indonesia Art Awards, Singapore Art Museum

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

Togetherness, Parco Sculpture Park Delchianti, Italy

2008

Beyond the Headlines, iPreciation, Singapore

2002

Ilusi Koran, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Central of Java

Transisi, Bentara Budaya, Yogyakarta

Selected Group Exhibitions 

Una Finestra Sul Mondo, Mycupoftea Gallery, Roma, Italy

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

2009

Blindness and Insight: Visions from the East, The Rotunda, Exchange Square, Hong Kong. A joint exhibition by iPreciation.

2007

Transposisi: Paintings Collection of Central of Java -Jogjakarta Collectors, Jogja Gallery, Jogja

Korea International Art Fair, Seoul, Korea, presented by iPreciation

Taipei Art Fair, Taipei, Taiwan

Equatorial Heat, Edwin Gallery, Jakarta

Art For Aceh, Edwin Gallery, Jakarta

BARCODE, Yogyakarta Art Festival XVI

Equatorial Heat, Sichuan, China

2003

Zaman Edan, Bentara Budaya, Yogyakarta

2002

Mata Hati Demokrasi, Taman Budaya, Surakarta, Central of Java

Jula Juli, Bentara Budaya, Yogyakarta

Dimensi Raden Saleh, Semarang Gallery, Semarang Central of Java

Re-Kreasi, H. Widayat Museum, Mungkid

2001-2

Urip Mampir Ngombe, Bentara Budaya, Yogyakarta

2000

Phillip Morris Indonesia Art Awards, National Gallery, Jakarta

Phillip Morries Indonesia Art Awards, Singapore Art Museum Singapore

To Russia With Art, Russia

Phillip Morris Indonesia Art Awards, Agung Rai Art Museum, Bali Yogyakarta Art Festival X

Yellow Art, Zurich, Switzerland

1997

Yogyakarta Art Festival IX

1996

Yogyakarta Art Festival VII

1988

Final Task Exhibition, SMSR, Yogyakarta

2010

2005

2004

1998

1987

With Kelompok PANDAWA, Karta Pustaka, Indonesi Netherland Cultural Center, Yogyakarta

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 12


EKO NUGROHO Born: 1977, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Education 1997-2006

BFA, Painting Department, Indonesian Art Institute, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

1993-1997

High School for Fine Arts (SMSR), Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 

In the Name of Pating Tlecek, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Hidden Violence, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Under The Shadow, Pekin Fine Art, Beijing, China Under The Shadow, Pekin Fine Art, Beijing, China

Solo Exhibition of Eko Nugroho, Galerie Nouvelles Image, Den Haag, The Netherlands

It’s All About Coalition, National Museum of Singapore (commission Project), Singapore

Pleasure Of Chaos, Ark Gallerie, Jakarta, Indonesia, curated by Jim Supangkat

Multicrisis Is Delicious, Semarang Gallery, Indonesia, curated by Rifky Effendi

2007

In Wonderland, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur, curated by Adeline Ooi

2006

Merdeka Atoe Sms, Toimoi, Jakarta, Indonesia, curated by Farah Wardani

2005

Sorry I Am Late To Celebrate, Artnivora Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia, curated by Riffky Effendi

Eko Nugroho, Artoteek, Den Haag, The Netherlands

Jauh Di Mata Dekat Di Hati, Workshop and Exhibition, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Japan

Drawing Illustration in the Daily Newspaper In Out, Kunstvlaai, Westerpark, Amsterdam

Welcome Back Mayonaise, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2003

Fight Me, Via-Via Cafe, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2002

Bercerobong, (Like a Chimney), Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2001

Indonesia Vs Televisi, Mural Exhibition for Public Space, at Panembahan Number 1 Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2000

Herk, Mural Exhibition at Apotik Komik gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2009

2008

2004

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

Contemporaneity, MOCA Shanghai, China

Indonesian Art Now: The Strategies of Being, Art Jogja 2010, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Pameran Illustrasi Cerpen Kompas 2009, Travelling Exhibition: Bentara Budaya Jakarta, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Balai Soedjatmoko-Solo, Bentara Budaya Bali, Indonesia

2009

Heat Wave, Lombard Freid Projects, New York, USA. Curated by Lea Freid.

Space and Image, Ciputra World Marketing Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Hongkong Art Fair

Lonarte 10 Festival, alongside the beach in Calheta, Madeira Island, Portugal

The 2010 Next Wave festival: The Ultimate Time lapse Megamix, Melbourne, Australia

Paralinear, Pekin Fine Arts, Beijing, China.

The Comical Brothers, National gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Lihat! Video Art form Indonesia, Galeria Jesus Gallardo, leno Mexico

Miami Art Fair, USA

Biennale Jogja X: Jogja Jamming, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Exposigns, Jogja Expo Center, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Cream International Festival for Arts and Media Yokohama, Japan

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 13


2008

Beyond the Dutch, Centraal Museum, Utrecht, The Netherlands

4 International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

X Biennale de Lyon: The Spectacle of the Everyday, Lyon, France

Tales from Wounded-Land, Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York

Fluid Zone, Jakarta Biennale XIII, Jakarta, Indonesia, curated by Agung Hujatnika & Ade Darmawan

Dorodoro Doron, Hiroshima Contemporary Museum of Art, Hiroshima, Japan

 

Designing Peace: A Show of Imagination, Museum of Contemporary Art and Design at the School of Design and Art, College of St. Benilde, Manila, Philippines. Expenditure, Busan Biennale 2008, Busan, South Korea

Something From Nothing, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA, USA

Dari Penjara Ke Pigura, Salihara Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Manifesto, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia, curated by Jim Supangkat, Rizki A. Zaelani, Farah Wardhani, Kuss Indarto

Expose#1 – A Presentation of Indonesian Contemporary Art by Deutsche Bank & Nadi Gallery, Four Season Hotel, Jakarta,

TH

Indonesia

2007

CIGE, China International Gallery Exposition, Beijing, China.

The Bridge Art Fair, New York, USA.

Gemaskered/Mask, Heden, The Hague, The Netherlands

Geopolitical Of Animation, The Andalusian Centre of Contemporary Art, Sevilla, Spain

Scope, Basel, Switzerland

China International Gallery Exposition, China World Trade Centre Beijing

Anti Aging, Gaya Fusion Art, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

Militia, OK Video, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Fetish, Biasa Art Space, Bali, Indonesia

100 Years Affandi, Gedung Arsip Nasional, Jakarta, Indonesia

Wind From The East, KIASMA Museum of Contemporary, Helsinski, Finland

The Past The Forgotten Times: Six Indonesian Artists Interpret Indonesian History, Traveling Exhibition: The Hague – The Netherlands, Cemeti Art House - Yogyakarta, Erasmus Huis - Jakarta, Yaitu Art House - Semarang, Bliz Art - Shanghai, Fringe Festival – Singapore

2006

2005

2004

2003

5th Asia Pacific Triennial, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia

Dirty Yoga, Taipei Biennale, Taipei Fine Art Museum, Taiwan

Going Digital, The Kirk Theater, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Sub/Version, OK Video, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Shadow And Spaces, HKW, Berlin, Germany

Three Young Contemporaries, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Bali Biennale, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia

Move On Asia, Animation and Single Channel Video Art Festival, Remo Gallery, Osaka, Japan

Reformasi, Contemporary Indonesian Artist Post 1998, Sculpture Square, Singapore

Melbourneconnection Asia, Kuala Lumpur, Hanoi, Manila, Yogyakarta, Shanghai

Have We Met, The Japan Foundation Forum, Tokyo, Japan

Equatorial Heat, Sichuan Museum, China

Filter, De Schone Kunsten Gallery, Harlem, The Netherlands

Countrybution, Yogyakarta Biennale, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 14


2002

2001

2000

1999

Ok Video, National gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Exploring Vacuum, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

3030, Edwin Galeri, Jakarta, Indonesia

Read, British Council, Jakarta, Indonesia

Tali Ikat, (Fiber Connections)", Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sama, Sama (Together), City Mural Project Flyover, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Gelart, Gelaran Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Kabinet Komik Indie, Gelaran Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Young Artist Exhibition 2000, Purna Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Buldozer, Bentara Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Yogyakarta Art Festival (FKY) XI, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Indonesian Art Festival (FKI), Benteng Vredeburg, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Selected Performances 2010

Perseteruan Getah Bening, collaboration with Catur Kuncoro (puppeteer), Yennu Ariendra (musician), Ig Sugiarto (lighting designer), Gunawan Maryanto (writer) at Lembaga Indonesia Perancis, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2009

Skandal Jeruk Purut, collaboration with Catur Kuncoro (puppeter), Toro (Puppeteer), Yennu Ariendra (musician). Private performance for American Arts Presenters at Yayasan Bagong Kussudiardjo, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Perseteruan Tubuh, Anatomy Puppet Project for Biennale Anak Jogja at Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta

L’arc En Ciel Sous la Pierre (Rainbow Beneath A Stone) at the Open Air Theatre, Vaulx-en-Velin, Lyon, France. Veduta, Lyon “Bineale X”, France

Contemporary Puppet Performance, collaboration with Catur Kuncoro (puppeteer), Toro (puppeteer), Yennu Ariendra (musician), Ig Sugiarto (lighting designer), Andy Seno Aji (stage designer) at Grand Indonesia Shopping Center

Wonder Diamond, collaboration with Catur Kuncoro (puppeteer), Dr Matthew Isaac Cohen (Puppeter), Toro (puppeter), Yennu Ariendra (musician), Ig Sugiarto (lighting designer), Andy Seno Aji (stage designer) at Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2008

Video Art Works 2009 

Bungkusan Hati di Dalam Kulkas/A Wrapped Heart Inside the Refrigerator, Catur Kuncoro (puppeteer), Joned Suryatmoko (Theater director/writer), Eko Nugroho (Visual Artist), Yennu Ariendra (musician), Ig Sugiarto (lighting designer), Andy Seno Aji (stage designer). Teater Salihara, Jakarta, Indonesia Dance of The landlord

2008

Intimacy

2007

Yesterday was Tomorrow

2006

It’s All About The Destiny Isn’t It?

I am Not A Vegetarian

Let Me Love Me

Maling

2004

Dark Disco

2003

The Breeder

2002

Bercerobong

2001

Reborn

2005

Selected Collections 

Tropen Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Asia Society Museum, New York, USA

Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) Brisbane, Australia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 15


Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, USA

Private Museum of Dr. Private Museum of Dr. Oei Ong Djien, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Museum and Art Gallery of the Nothern Territory, Darwin, Australia

Akili Museum, Jakarta, Indonesia

Haus Der Kulturen Der Welt, Berlin, Germany

Artoteek Den Haag/HEDEN , The Hague, Netherland

ARK Gallerie, Jakarta, Indonesia

Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt, Germany

Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kualalumpur, Malaysia

Singapore Art Museum, Singapore

Selected Projects 2010

Art Jog 2010, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2009

Cream, International Festival for Arts and Media Yokohama, Japan.

BMW Jakarta, Indonesia

2008

National Museum of Singapore, Singapore

2006

Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia

2004

Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Japan

Selected Residencies 2009

Veduta Project, Lyon Biennale X 2009, Lyon, France

2008

Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA

Singapore National Museum, Singapore

Heden, Den Haag, The Netherlands

2007

Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland

2006

Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia

Taipei Fine Art Museum, Taipei, Taiwan

Artoteek Den Haag, The Hage, The Netherlands

Rimbun Dahan, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany

Amsterdam Graphics Atlier (AGA), The Netherlands

Fukuoka Contemporary Art Museum

2005

2004

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 16


ENTANG WHIHARSO Born: 1967, Tegal, Indonesia Education 1994

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting, Indonesian Art Institute, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Awards 2007

2006

1996

Copeland Fellowship, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, USA

Pollock – Krasner Foundation Grant

Vasl International Artists’ Workshop, Karachi, Pakistan

Ford Foundation Travel Grant

Top Ten Painters, Indonesian Art Awards, Philip Morris Group of Companies and Indonesian Fine Art Foundation, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Residencies 2003

Galerie Tangente, Eschen, Liechtenstein

1999

Pacific Bridge Contemporary Southeast Asian Art, Oakland, CA, USA

1998

CentreCity Contemporary Arts, Providence, RI, USA

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

Love me or die, National Gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

2008

Black Goat is my Last Defense, 5 Traverse Gallery, Providence, RI USA

Black Goat, The Drawing Room Contemporary Art, Manila, Philippines

Black Goat Space, Ark Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

I am Black Goat, SMU Concourse, Singapore

2007

In Toxic, Rumah Seni Yaitu, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia

2006

Puppet Blues, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

2005

Inter-Eruption, Bentara Budaya, Jakarta, Indonesia

2004

Sublime Tunnel, Circle Point Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

Hurting Landscape: Between Two Lines, Gallery Agniel, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Hurting Landscape, Chouinard Gallery, Hong Kong

Hurting Landscape, Rhode Island Foundation Gallery, USA

Hurting Landscape, Circle Point Art Space, Washington, D.C., USA

NusaAmuk, Indonesian National Gallery & Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

Amuk, CP ArtSpace, Washington D.C, USA

NusaAmuk, Indonesia National Gallery and Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

NusaAmuk, Purna Budaya Art Center and Bentara Budaya Art Center, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Amuk, CP Art Space, Washington, D.C. USA

Entang Wiharso, Chouinard Gallery, Hong Kong

Meeting Souls, Gallery Agniel, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Visit to Sacred Place: Cultural Interrogation, Installation, Taman Martani, Indonesia

Meeting Souls, Hewlett Gallery, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

The New God Series, Hunt-Cavanagh Gallery, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

The New God Series and Ceremony of the Souls, Java Gallery and Camara 6 Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Evidence on Earth, CenterCity Contemporary Arts, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 17


Strange Journey, Santi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Strange Journey, Native Gallery, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Strange Journey, Benteng Vrederburg Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Idea is Form, National Gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

Idea is Form, Purna Budaya Art Center, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1995

Conflict, Dreams and Tragedy, Purna Budaya Art Center, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1994

Final Work, Sasana Ajiyassa, Art Institute of Indonesia, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1997

1996

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

2007

Rainbow Asia, Hangaram Art Museum of Seoul Arts Center, Seoul, South Korea

And_Writers, First Nanjing Biennale, Jiangsu Provincial Art Museum, Nanjing, China

Contemporaneity: Contemporary Art of Indonesia, MOCA Shanghai, Shanghai, China

ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Grass Looks Greener Where you Water it, ARTPARIS + GUESTS 2010, Grand Palais, Paris, France

Jogja-Jamming, Bienalla Jogja X, Jogja National Museum, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Post Tsunami Art, Primo Marella Gallery, Milan, Italy

Highlith of ISI, Jogja National Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

In Rainbow, Esa Sampoerna Art House, Surabaya, Indonesia

From 2D to 3D, Sin Sin Fine Art, Hong Kong

Prague Biennale 4, Prague, The Czech Republic

Self Portrait, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Emotion, Indonesia National Gallery and Visual Art Magazine, Jakarta, Indonesia

Manifesto, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Third Space: Cultural Identity Today, Mead Art Museum, Amherst, MA, USA

Grounded in Space, Eli marsh Gallery, Amherst, MA, USA

Indonesian Invasion, SinSIn Fine Art Gallery, Hong Kong

A New Force of South East Asia, Asia Art Center, Beijing, China

Tribes, Sin Sin Fine Art, Hong Kong

Wind from the East, Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland

The Big Picture Show, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore

The International Print Portfolio: Artists’ Expression of Universal Human Rights, Michigan State University Museum, Michigan, USA

2006

2005

Neo-Nation, Yogyakarta Biennale XI, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2 Open Terra Cotta Biennale, Dumaguete, Philippines

Indonesia Contemporary Art Now, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Fetish, Biasa Art Space, Bali, Indonesia

(Un)Real, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Interpreting, Semar Gallery, Malang, East Java, Indonesia

Waging Peace, Hera Gallery, RI, USA

Jakarta Biennale XIII, Indonesia National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Ecounter", National museum of China, Beijing, China

Actualizing Insight Virtuality, Indonesian Pavilion, 51st Venice Biennale, Italy

nd

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 18


Second Beijing Biennale, Beijing, China

Jakarta Biennale XIII, Indonesia National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Urban/Culture, CP Biennale, BI Building, Jakarta, Indonesia

Here & Now, Yogyakarta Biennale VIII, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Olympiade, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Wings of Color, Wings of Words, Kyai Langgeng Art House, Magelang, Indonesia

Passion: Etno-Identity, Capital Library Gallery, Beijing, China

Leu Hai Su Art Museum, Shanghai, China & Galeri Canna, Jakarta, Indonesia

Re-creation, Museum H. Widayat, Magelang, Indonesia

The Mind's Eye of Democracy, Taman Budaya, Surakarta, Indonesia

Not I, Am I?, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Not Just the Political, Museum H. Widayat, Magelang, Indonesia

The Problematic Desire, Casa de Cantabria, Madrid, Spain

Indonesian Contemporary Art: A Cultural Journey, Museum of Modern Art, Moscow, Russia

One Hundred Years of Modern Indonesian Art, One Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Art Beat, BankRI, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

6th Yogyakarta Biennial, Purna Budaya Art Center, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1998

11th Indonesia National Biennial, Taman Ismail Marzuki, Jakarta, Indonesia

1995

Fifty Years of Freedom: Return of the Heart", Vela Art Gallery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

1993

Bentara Budaya Art Centre, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1991

3rd Yogyakarta Arts Festival Exhibition, Benteng Vrederburg Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1989

Reli Sketching, Sasana Ajiyasa, Art Institute of Indonesia, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1988

Sasana Ajiyasa, Art Institute of Indonesia, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1987

Art Institute of Indonesia, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

Selected Speaking Engagements 2002

Gelaran Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

2001

Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

1999

San Francisco Museum of Asian Art, San Francisco, California, USA

Carnegie Melon University, Hewlett Gallery, Pittsburgh, USA

Providence College, Hunt-Cavanagh, Gallery, Providence, USA

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 19


FX HARSONO Born: 1949, Blitar, Indonesia Education 2005-present

Lecturer, The Faculty of Art and Design, Pelita Harapan University, Tangerang (west Java)

1987-91

Jakarta Art Institute, Indonesia

1974

STRI “ASRI”, Yogyakarta (Painting), Indonesia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

FX Harsono Testimonies, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore

2009

The Erased Time, national gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta

Surviving Memories, Vanessa Art Link, Beijing, China

2008

Aftertaste, Koong gallery, Jakarta

2007

Titik Nyeri/ Point of Paint, Langgeng Icon Gallery, Jakarta

2004

Mediamor(e)phosa, Puri Gallery, Malang, Indonesia

2003

Displaced, National Gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta

Displaced, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

1998

Victim in Cemeti Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1996

Suara (Voice), Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

1994

Suara (Voice), National Art Gallery, Gambir, Jakarta, Indonesia

1989

S1 Examinations at Jakarta Art Institute Gallery, Indonesia

1973

Exhibition in Solo with KLPMY

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

2007

Contemporaneity/Contemporary Art in Indonesia, Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai

Recent Art of Indonesia, Soobin Art Plus, Singapore

Homo Ludens, Emmitan CA Gallery, Surabaya

Pleasures of Chaos, Inside new Indonesian Art, Primo Marella gallery, Milano, Italy

Beyond The Dutch, Centraal Museum, Utrecht, Netherland

Face Value, Exhibition of 4 artists, Agus Suwage, Budi Kustarto, Astari Rasyid and FX Harsono at SIGIarts, Jakarta

TechnoSign, Surabaya Art link, Surabaya

Milestone, Vanessa Art link, Jakarta

Highlight, ISI, Jogja National Museum, Jogjakarta

Art With Accent, Group Exhibition four country China, Japan, Korea, and Indonesia, Guang Zhou, China

Allegorical Bodies, A-Art Contemporary Space, Tai Pei City, Taiwan

Respublicum Anniversary Galeri Canna, 7th, Galeri Canna Jakarta, Indonesia

3 Nanjing Triennialle, Nanjing, China

Manifesto, National Gallery, Jakarta

Space/Spacing, Semarang Gallery, Semarang

Quota 2007, Langgeng Icon Gallery, Jakarta

Artchipelago Alert, Tony Raka Contemporary Art Gallery, Ubud Bali

Imagine Affandi, National Archive Centre, Jakarta, organized by Semarang Gallery

rd

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 20


Out Now, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore

The Past Forgotten Time, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

Anti Aging, Gaya Fushion Contemporary Art Space, Ubud Bali

Quota 2005, Langgeng Icon Gallery, Jakarta

Taboo and Transgression in Contemporary Indonesian Art, Herbert F.Johnson of Art Museum, Cornel University, USA

Text Me, Sharman Gallery, Sidney, Australia

Eksodus Barang, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

Reformasi, Sculpture Square, Singapore

Exploring Vacuum 2, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

CP Open Biennale, Jakarta

Membaca Frida Kahlo, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

International Print Triennial, Kanagawa, Yokohama, Japan

Print Making In The Future, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

50 years Graphic Print in Indonesia, in Bentara Budaya, Jakarta

Reformasi Indonesia – Protest in Beeld 1995 – 2000, Museum Nusantara, Delft, Nederland

Kwangju Biennial, Kwanju, Korea

Kanazu Forest Museum, Japan, Art Document 1999 in Kanaz

Singapore, Volume & Form Singapore 1999

1998

Purna Budaya, Yogyakarta, Meet 3:3 in Jogjakarta, 3 artists from Indonesia and 3 artists from Germany

1997

Cemeti Gallery, Yogyakarta Slot In The Box, Indonesia

Tokyo, International Contemporary Art Festival, Japan (NICAF)

Fukuoka, Organize by Museum City Project

Tradition/Tension held by Asia Society, exhibition continued to Vancouver- Canada, Perth - Australia, Seoul – Korea, New York,

2006

2005

2003

2001

2000

1999

1996

USA 1995

Asian Modernism held by Japan Foundation, Japan

1994

Biennial Contemporary Art TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

1993

Baguio Art Festival in Baguio, the Philippines

Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia

1992

Artist Regional Exchange (ARX 3) exhibition in Perth, Australia

1988

Graphic Design Exhibition with IPGI and JAGDA at DEPDIKBUD Art Gallery in Gambir, Jakarta, Indonesia

1987

Graphic Design Exhibition with IPGI and Japan Graphic Design Association

SRB exhibition Proyek I - Pasar Raya Dunia Fantasi at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

1986

Purna Budaya in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

1985

Graphic Design Exhibition with IPGI at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

Exhibition of Art on the Environment, Proses 85 at Galeri Seni Rupa Ancol, Jakarta, in coorperation with Walhi and SKEPHI

1983

Graphic Design Exhibition with Ikatan Perancang Grafis Indonesia (IPGI) at Mitra Budaya, Jakarta, Indonesia

1982

Art on the Environment exhibition at Parangtritis, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1979

SRB III Exhibition at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

1977

SRB II Exhibition at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

1976

Concept SRB Exhibition at Balai Budaya, Jakarta, Indonesia

1975

Exhibition SRB I at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

1974

All-Indonesia Painting Exhibition I at TIM, Jakarta, Indonesia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 21


Three-man exhibition at Balai Budaya, Indonesia

Exhibition at PPIA Surabaya with KLPMY, Indonesia

Other Activities 

Speaker during Artists Week at Adelaide Festival

Took part in an artist exchange program for 3 months at the South Australian University, School of Art, in Adelaide, Australia

1975

Established New Art Movement (Gerakan Seni Rupa Baru:SRB) with 10 young artists from ITB, Jakarta and ASRI

1974

Took part in Black December movement in Jakarta

1973

Set up Kelompok Lima Pelukis Muda Yogyakarta (KLPMY), or Group of Five Young Artists from Jogjakarta

1992

Publications 1990

Published “Dialog Seni Rupa” Magazine with Hendro Wiyanto and Siti Adiyati under the Dialog Seni Rupa Foundation

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 22


HARIS PURNAMA Born: 1956, Delanggu, Klaten, Indonesia Education 1984

Indonesian Art Institute, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1975

School of Art, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Awards 2007

The Schoeni Public Vote Prize, Sovereign Asian Art Prize Pratitha Adhikarya (painting, illustration, ornament), Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1974

Pratitha Adhikarya (painting, illustration, ornament), Jogjakarta

Solo Exhibitions 2009

The Babies: Allegory of Docile Bodies, COCA Museum, Seattle, USA The Babies: Allegory of Docile Bodies, Bentara Budaya Jakarta, Indonesia

2008

Unbridgeable Future, Vanessa Art Link, Beijing, China Burn Baby Burn, Hong Kong International Art Fair, Hong Kong

2007

Alien:nation, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2006

Di Bawah Sayap Garuda, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

1984

Luka Project, STSRI ‘Asri’ Campus, Gampingan Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

Homo Ludens, Emmitan CA Gallery, Surabaya, Indonesia Space and Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta Biennale X, Yogyakarta

2009

Scope Art Basel 2009, Switzerland Prague Biennale 2009, Praha Hibridization, North Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia Post-Tsunami Art, Primo Marella Gallery, Milan, Italy Art Bologna 2009 Dallas Art 2009

2008

Refleksi Ruang dan Waktu, V-Art Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia The Highlight, Jogja National Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia Allegorical Bodies, A Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan Art Asia Miami 2008, Miami, USA Art Paris – Abudhabi 2008, Abudhabi, U.E.A. Art Taipei 2008, Taipei, Taiwan ACAF, New York, USA rd

Reflective Asia, 3 Nanjing Trienalle, Nanjing, China Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair 2008, Shanghai, China Canna Gallery, Jakarta CIGE 2008, Beijing, China Space/Spacing, Semarang Gallery, Semarang Manifesto, National Gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia 2007

Kuota:Inbox 2007, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia Art Singapore 2007, Singapore Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair 2007, Shanghai, China This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 23


Imagined Affandi, Gedung Arsip Nasional, Jakarta, Indonesia 2006

Icon Yogyakarta, Yogya Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2005

Kisi-Kisi Jakarta, The National Gallery of Indonesia

1986

Pasaraya Dunia Fantasi, Taman Ismail Marzuki, Jakarta Art Centre, Jakarta, Indonesia

1985

Proses 85, Pasar Seni Ancol Gallery, Jakarta

1983

Environmental Art, Parang Tritis Beach, Jogjakarta, Indonesian

1979

Kepribadian Apa (Pipa), Senisono Art Gallery, Jogjakarta Seni Rupa Baru, Taman Ismail Marzuki, Jakarta Art Centre, Jakarta

1978

Pelukis Indonesia Muda, Taman Ismail Marzuki, Jakarta Art Centre, Jakarta

1977

Kepribadian Apa (Pipa), Senisono Art Gallery, Jogjakarta

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 24


I GUSTI NGURAH UDIANTARA Born: 1976, Tampaksiring, Gianyar, Indonesia Education 

Indonesia Institute of Art (ISI), Jogjakarta

2000

Best Artist ISI's annual Dies Natalis

1999

Semi finalist of the Phillip Moris Indonesia Art Award

Best Artist ISI's annual Dies Natalis

Best Water Color Artist

1995 Selected Awards

1997

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

Pop Imagery, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

2002

From Contemplation to Comedy, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

2007

Art Singapore, Singapore

ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Semarang Contemporary Art Gallery, Jakarta Art District, Grand Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jogja Jamming, Biennale X, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Kado #2, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

IVAA Archive AID, National Museum, Jakarta, Indonesia

In Rainbow, Esa Sampoerna Art House, Surabaya, Indonesia

Spacing Contemporary, Jogja Art Fair #2, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Loro Blonyo Kontemporer, Tri Bhakti House, Magelang, Indonesia

Jogja Art Fair #1, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Hybriditas, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Sexy Nian, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Re-Inventing Bali, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Survey, Edwin’s Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Neo-Nation, Biennale IX, Taman Budaya Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Shanghai Art Fair, Shang Hai, China

ARTvertising, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Portofolio, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Boeng Ajo Boeng !:100 Tahun Affandi, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Shout Out !, FKY 2007, Taman Budaya Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Sayap, I Nyoman Gunarsa Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Tribute to Young Artists, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

IVAA Book AID, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Eksistensi, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 25


JOMPET Born: 1976, Jogjakarta, Indonesia Education 1999

Gadjah Mada University, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Honors and Awards 2010

Asia Art Award Finalist, Loop Gallery, Seoul, South Korea

2008

Academic Art Award, Yogyakarta Institute of Art, Jogjakarta

Residencies 2010

Geumcheon Art Space, Seoul, South Korea

2007

Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

Solo Exhibition 2010

Java’s Machine: Phantasmagoria, Osage Gallery, Hongkong

2009

Java’s Machine: Phantasmagoria, Osage Gallery, Singapore

2008

Java’s Machine: Phantasmagoria, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

Contemporaneity, Shanghai Museum of Contemporary Art, China Loss of the Real, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung Art HK 10, Hongkong Asia Art Award Exhibition, Seoul Olympic Museum of Art, Seoul, South Korea The Tradition of The New, Shaksi Gallery, Mumbai

2009

Jogjakarta Biennale X, Jogja National Museum Beyond the dutch, Centraal Museum Utrecht, The Netherlands th 10 Lyon Biennale, Musee d'art contemporaine, Lyon, France Perang, Kata dan Rupa, Salihara Gallery, Jakarta Tradition of the New, Sakshi Gallery, Taipei Magnetic Power, Coreana Museum of Arts, Seoul, Korea Biennale Cuvee, OK Offenes Kulturhaus Oberosterreich, Austria Kompilasi, Bus Gallery, Melbourne Jakarta Biennale, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta

2008

Yokohama Triennale, Yokohama, Japan Landing Soon, Group exhibition, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta Manifesto, Group Exhibition, National Gallery, Jakarta

2007

Jogjakarta Biennale, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta Equatorial Rhythms, Stenersen Museum, Oslo, Norway ‘OK Video #3, MILITIA, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta Anti Aging, Gaya Fusion Art, Ubud-Bali

2005

Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Japan CP Bienalle, Indonesian Bank Museum, Jakarta Revolution Ugly, No Beauty, Cemeti Arts House, Jogjakarta

2004

Insomnia 48, Arts House, Singapore st

Move on Asia, SBS 1 Floor Atrium, Korea Artscope, Selasar Sunaryo Artspace,Bandung

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 26


Identities vs Globalization, Chiang Mai art Museum, Bangkok National Art Gallery, Dahlem Museum, Berlin 2003

Transit, 8 views of Indonesia, Umbrella Studio Contemporary Arts, Australia Urban Art Project, Subway Stations, Melbourne, Australia

2002

Worm Fest III, Plastique Kinetic Worms, Singapore

VISUALS ON STAGE 2009 2006 2002 - 2004

Garibaba’s Strange World, Dance Theatre with Pappa Tarahumara and Hiroshi Koike King’s Witch, a contemporary orchestra with Tony Prabowo and Garasi Theatre Laboratory Mnemosyne, Collaborative work of Kunauka Theatre Company Tokyo and Garasi Theatre Laboratory WAKTU BATU Series, Theatre performance by Garasi Theatre Laboratory

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 27


MANGU PUTRA Born: 1963, Sangeh, Bali, Indonesia Education

1990

Fine Art School, Batu Bulan, Bali, Indonesia

Indonesian Art Institute, Visual Communication Design, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Awards 2002

Indoford Art Award, second place, Jakarta, Indonesia

1994

Finalist for Phillip Morris Award for painting entitled ‘Imagination Under the Sea’

1990

Best work of Visual Communication Design, 6 Anniversary of the Indonesian Institute of Art, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1988

Best work of Visual Communication Design, 4 Anniversary of the Indonesian Institute of Art, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

th th

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

Teater Rakyat, National Gallery Jakarta

2008

Silent Worlds, Gajah Gallery, Singapore

2007

Mandala, Bidadari, Ubud-Bali, Indonesia

2006

Belief, Rupa Gallery, Singapore

2005

Spiritual Landscape, Gajah Gallery, Singapore

2003

Di Tepi Cahaya Bali, Bentara Budaya Jakarta, Indonesia

2002

Gerutu Air, Tanah dan Batu, Santi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2000

Nature, Culture, Tension, Jezz Gallery, Denpassar, Bali, Indonesia

1999

Solo Exhibition, Chedi Gallery, Ubud-Bali, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

Bali and Beyond, Sanggar Dewata Indonesi, Bentara Budaya Bali

Contemporaneity: Contemporary Art in Indonesia, MOCA, Shanghai, China

Reborn, H2 Gallery, Semarang

Milestone,Vanessa Art Link,Jakarta ,Indonesia

“POLI{CROMATIC} V-Art,- Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta

Art Taipei,Vanessa Art Link Beijing

Indonesia Contemporary Drawing Andi Galeri,Galeri Nasional Jakarta

M Daegu City,Korea Selatan

The Six Master From Bali,Maha Art Galeri,Denpasar Bali

NextNature, National Gallery of Indonesia-Vanessa Art Link, Jakarta, Indonesia

Milestone, Vanessa Art Link, Jakarta, Indonesia

Second Odyssey,Srisasanti Gallery

Expanding Contemporary Realism, Akili Museum Of Art ,Jakarta,Indonesia

Manifesto,Gallery Nasional Indonesia,Jakarta

Le Mayeur`s Lunchbreak, Santrian Gallery

Merti Bumi,Lerep Art Village,Semarang,Indonesia

Indonesia and the Mainstream, Canna Gallery at CIGE, Beijing, China

The Highlight,Dari Medium Ke Transmedia,Indonesia Institute of The Arts Yogyakarta

Two Generation of Contemporary Balinese Artists From Expressionism to Pop Art,Canna Gallery

S D I Now,TonyRaka Art Gallery,Ubud-Bali Indonesia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 28


Beijing Art Fair,China

Shanghai Art Fair,China

Art with an Accent, Art64 Gallery-Vanessa Art Link, Guangzhou, China

Ar(t)chepelago Alert, Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud-Bali, Indonesia

Global Warming, Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud-Bali, Indonesia

Angkor-The Djin Within,Gajah Gallery,Singapore

The 7 Nude Crouquis Exhibition,Seoul,Korea

Bali-Jeju,Jejudo Art Hall,Jeju,Korea

Milestone,Vanessa Art House Jakarta,Indonesia

Erotica,Tony Raka Gallery,Ubud-Bali,Indonesia

Reading Multi Culture,Haus der Weltkulturen,Berlin,Germany

Milestone,Vanessa Art House,Jakarta,Indonesia

Still Life,TonyRaka Gallery,Ubud-Bali,Indonesia

The Big Picture,The Fullerton Hotel,Singapore

Tamarind,In Pursuit of Identity,Nava Art Gallery,Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

Contemporary Indonesia Fine Art,Art Singapore

Grand Opening Exhibition,Tama Gallery,Ubud-Bali,Inndonesia

Penjelajahan Diri18 pelukis,Raka Gallery,Ubud-Bali,Indonesia

Membaca Raden Saleh,Semarang Gallery,Java,Indonesia

Second Aniversary Exhibition of Canna Gallery,Jakarta,Indonesia

2001

Selamatkan Laut Kita,National Museum,Jakarta,Indonesia

2000

Aspect of a Mountain,Sidik Jari Museum,Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

1999

Sanggar Dewata,Art Centre,Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

Ganesha Gallery,Jimbaran,Bali,Indonesia

ASEAN Building,Jakarta,Indonesia

1998

Group Exhibition,Art Centre Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

1997

Bali Arts Festival,Art Centre,Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

1996

Group Exhibition,Bali Clif Hotel,Bali,Indonesia

1995

Sanggar Dewata,Art Centre,Denpasar,Bali,Indonesia

1994

Arts for AIDS,Rudana Gallery,Ubud,Bali,Indonesia

ASEAN Arts, Singapore

Indonesian Arts Awards,Hotel Shangri-La,Jakarta

Sanggar Dewata,Museum Gunarsa

1993

Sekolah Tinggi Seni Indonesia,Denpasar-Bali

1992

Bintang Palapa, Surabaya,-Java

1990

Sanggar Dewata,Art Centre,Denpasar-Bali

1987

Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

th

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 29


MARIA INDRIA SARI Born: 1976, Jogjakarta, Indonesia Education 1995

Indonesian Art Institute, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Awards From1982 to1995, Indria Sari has won 86 drawing competitions in regional, national and international competitions, among others: 1982

World School Children’s Art Exhibition, Korean Children’s Center The Yook Young Foundation

1987

Ministry of Education and Culture DIY – Kyoto Prefecture, Kyoto, Japan

1989

Shankar’s International Children’s Competition, New Delhi, India

1990

Ministry of Education and Culture DIY, Kyoto, Japan

1990

Painting Competition ASEAN, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

Melepas Seragam, Ars Longa Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2010

Jogja Art Fair 2010, Taman Budaya Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2010

10th Anniversary Exhibition of One Gallery, One Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2010

Arts Liberation Front #1, Biasa Galery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2009

Rang Rawa Project – a project responding to a swamp in Bayem river, Sonopakis, Kasihan, Bantul, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2009

Sanggar Bambu, Jogjakarta Biennial X, Jogja National Museum, Indonesia

2009

Gebrak Guru Gambar, Beber Seni XII, Taman Budaya Jogja, Indonesia

2008

Dinamika Estetika 45 Tahun SMSR, Taman Budaya Jogja, Indonesia

2007

Gema Wanita, Beber Seni IX Jogjakarta, Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Sanggar Bambu, Tembi Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Ekspresi-Ekspresi Perempuan Jogja, Temby Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2006

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 30


PRILLA TANIA Born: 1979, Bandung, Indonesia Education 

2001

Fine art, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

Selected Residencies 2008

Taiwan

2007

Arts residency program in Western Australia, International Art Space Kellerberrin Australia (IASKA) and Fremantle Arts Centre

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2008

Tanah di dasar samudera, cemara 6 gallery, menteng, central jakarta, indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

Shopping, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Loss of the Real, Nu-Substance Festival by Common Room Network Foundation, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, West Java, Indonesia

2009

Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, Video Of The Month, Mangga Tetangga (Neighbor´s Mango), Berlin, Germany

MediActions, Japan

Microcosmos, MD Art Space, Jakarta

Hybridization, North Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jakarta Biennale 2009, Jakarta, indonesia

Beyond the Dutch. Indonesia, the Netherlands and the visuals arts from 1900 until now, Centraal Museum Utrecht, the Netherlands

2008

Singapore National Museum, SIngapore

2006-2008

The Past – The Forgotten Time, exhibition project by Cemeti Art House: Artoteek, The Hague; Netherlands Institute for War Documentation, Amsterdam; Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta; Erasmus Huis, Jakarta; Rumah Seni Yaitu, Semarang; Biz-Art, Shanghai, and National Museum of Singapore (as part of M1 Fringe Festival)

2006

Base Gallery, Tokyo

2005

ICA, London

Established video collective VideoBabes with two other video artists, Ariani Darmawan and Rani Ravenina

Other Activities 2004

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 31


SAMSUL ARIFIN Born: 1979, Malang, Indonesia Education 2007

Indonesian Art Institute, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

The Maker, Ark Galerie, Jakarta, Indonesia

2008

Goni’s Journey #1, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 

ART Singapore, Singapore

ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

Soccer Fever, Galeri Canna, Jakarta, Indonesia

Spacing Contemporary, Jogja Art Fair #2, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta

In Rainbow, Esa Sampoerna Art House, Surabaya

REFRESH: New Strategies in Indonesian Contemporary Art - Valentine Willie Fine Art - VWFA Singapore, Singapore

Behind the Pencils, Semarang Contemporary Art Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

A Slice of Indonesian Contemporary Art, Soka Gallery, Beijing

Jogja Art Fair #1, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta

Manifesto, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Neo Nation-Biennale Jogja IX, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

100 Tahun Affandi, Museum Arsip, Jakarta, Indonesia

IVAA Book AID, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Boeng Ajo Boeng : Tafsir Ulang Nilai-nilai Affandi, Museum Affandi, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

200 Tahun Raden Saleh : Ilusi-Ilusi Nasionalisme, Jogja Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Advertising, Indonesian National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Bocor #3, Cemeti Art House, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Shanghai Art Fair, Shanghai, China

2006

2nd Triennial for Indonesian Graphic Art

2003

CP Biennale

2010

2009

2008

2007

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 32


SIGIT SANTOSO Born: 1964, Java, Indonesia Education 1993

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Faculty of Fine Art Indonesia Institute of Arts (ISI), Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Awards 2007

Finalist of Sovereign Asia – Asia Award, Hong Kong

2006

Finalist of Sovereign Asia - Art Award, Hong Kong

1994

Best Work at Biennale IV, Jogjakarta

Nominee among the best 10 of The Phillip Morris Group of Companies Indonesian Art Awards

1992

Best Work at Festival of Indonesian Art University Student

1990

Best Work at The V Anniversary of ISI, Jogjakarta

1987

Best Work at Festival of Indonesian Art University Student

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2005

Paradoks Batas, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta

2003

Painthinkting, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

Crossing And Blurring Boundaries, Andi’s Gallery, Galeri Nasional, Jakarta, Indonesia

Reality Effect, SIGI Arts, Galeri Nasional Indonesia, Jakarta

Homo Ludens, Emmitan CA Gallery, Surabaya

Soccer Fever, Galeri Canna, Jakarta

Transfiguration, Semarang Gallery, Grand Indonesia, Jakarta

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta

Recent Art Forum Indonesia, Soobin Art Plus, Singapore

Masih Ada Gus Dur, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang

Ecce Homo, Semarang Gallery, Semarang

Reality Bites, 25 Anniversary of Edwin’s Gallery, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Kado#2, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Reach Art Project! – Act One, Edwin’s Gallery-Plaza Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

Biennale Jogja X, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta

Common Sense, Galeri Nasional, Jakarta

Art Taipei 2009, Taiwan

Rai Gedheg, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta & Jakarta

Jejak-Jejak Drawing, Galeri Nasional, Jakarta

Objective Border, Sri Sasanti Art House, Jakarta

Distance, Tony Raka Gallery, Bali

In Rainbow, Esa Sampoerna Art House, Surabaya, Indonesia

Art Hongkong 2009, Hongkong

Reborn, H2 Art Gallery, Semarang

The Highlight: dari Medium ke Transmedia, FSR ISI, Jogjakarta, Indononesia

Dari Penjara ke Pigura, Galeri Salihara, Jakarta, Indonesia

Imagined Affandi, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

th

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 33


Manifesto, Galeri National Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

Self Portrait, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

New Age-New Blending: New Generation Chinese & Indonesian Artists Exchange, New Age Gallery Collaboration with Edwin’s Gallery, Beijing, China

Strategies Towards the Real – S. Soedjojono and Contemporary Indonesian Art, National University of Singapore Museum, Singapore

Perang Kembang, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

A New Force of South East Asia: Group Exhibitions of Indonesian Contemporary Artists, Asia Art Centre, Collaboration with Edwin’s Gallery, Beijing, China

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

Jogja Biennial, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Indonesian Contemporary, 1918 ArtSpace, Collaboration with Edwin’s Gallery, Shanghai, China

Conscience Celebrate-September Art Events, Fine Art Exhibition,

organized by Edwin’s Gallery, Gandaria City, Jakarta, Indonesia

Boeng Ajo Boeng!, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Imagined Affandi, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

Gendakan, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Domestic Art Objects/DAO, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

ICON: Retrospective, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Behind the Realism, V-Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Wedding: Tobacco and Art, Magelang, Indonesia

Pameran Seni Religius 2006, Galeri Nasional, Jakarta, Indonesia

Scene of (Wo)man, One Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Draw, Museum dan Tanah Liat, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Paradoks Batas, Sigit Santoso and Sugiyo Dwiarso, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

KUOTA 2005 : Rupa dan Peralihan, Kemang Icon, Jakarta, Indonesia

Intermezo, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

21 and Beyond – Personality and Variance –, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Equatorial Heat, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Meta Etalase, Galeri Semarang, Semarang, Indonesia

Realisme Banal, Gracia Art Gallery, Surabaya, Indonesia

Equatorial Heat, Sichuan Museum, Organised by Edwin’s Gallery, China

Bingkai Narasi Kecil – KII 12, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Barcote, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Gedebook, Kedai Kebun, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Object(ify), Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Water of Words, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Persepsi dalam Vibrasi, Drawing Exhibition, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Age of Madness, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

KOMPAS Daily’s Short Story Illustration, Bentara Budaya Jakarta and Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Passion: Etno-Identity, The Indonesian Art Foundation (YSRI), Beijing and Shanghai, China

Reading Space, Muara Art House, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Mata, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

st

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 34


Tropical, Museum Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Kilas Balik, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Exploring Realism, Galeri Canna, Jakarta

Dimensi Raden Saleh, Galeri Semarang, Semarang, Indonesia

Diversity in Harmony, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Paket 2002, Puri Art Gallery, Malang, Indonesia

Contemporary Asian Art Exhibition, Art Singapore, Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Centre, Singapore

Kecil itu Indah 9, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2000

Foto Realisme Indonesia, Edwin’s Gallery, Bali, Indonesia

1999

Ragam Bahasa Pelukis Muda, Edwin’s Gallery, Bali, Indonesia

1997

Kecil itu Indah 5, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

1996

Kecil itu Indah 4, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

1995

Touring Exhibition of Yayasan Seni Rupa Indonesia, Indonesia

Indonesian Realism Image’s Exhibition, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Six Senses, Edwin’s Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Biennale IV’s Exhibition, Purna Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

The Indonesian Fine Arts Exhibition, Jakarta, Indonesia

1992

JADEX Exhibition, Jakarta Design Centre, Jakarta, Indonesia

1988

Commemorate of the Children, Book and Toy day’s Exhibition, Bentara Budaya Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia

1987

Group Exhibition, Purna Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2001

1994

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 35


SONI IRAWAN Born: 1975, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Education 2006

Indonesian Art Institute (Fine Art Faculty), Fine Art, majoring in Graphic Art

Selected Awards 2001

1998

Phillip Morris ASEAN Art Award Finalist

Best Five Phillip Morris Indonesian Art Award

Best Graphic Work, Refleksi Zaman

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010

Ode to Permata Unguku, Semarang Gallery, Grand Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

2001

Mural exhibition, Apotik Komik, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 

ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Wallstreet Art, Galeri Salihara, Jakarta, Indonesia

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta, Indonesia

Dua Kota Dua Cerita, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

Biennale Jogja Jogja Jamming, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Malaysia Art Expo, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Bazaar Art Fair, Ritz Carlton, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jogja Art Fair #2, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Fundraising Online IVAA archive aid 2009, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

We’re Millionaire, AOD Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

In Rainbow, Esa Sampoerna Art House, Surabaya, Indonesia

Guru Oemar Bakrie, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

HYBRIDIZATION, North Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

STREET – NOISE, Semarang Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia

Fresh 4 You, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Jogja Art Fair (JAF) #1, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Loro Blonyo Kontemporer, Magelang, Indonesia

Urban Art Fest Mural Project, Kompas newspaper anniversary, Pantai Karnaval, Ancol, Jakarta, Indonesia

69 Sexy Nian , Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Komedi Putar , Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2006

Fringers Art, Toi Moi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2005

Art For Aceh, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2004

Neo Indies, Kedai Kebun, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

GEDEBOOK!!!, Kedai Kebun Forum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Mural Exhibition, Duke Distro & Clothing, Bali, Indonesia

CountryBution (Biennale Yogyakarta VII), Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Digital Art Exhibition, Gramedia Bookstore, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

NOBODY, Mon Décor Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Age-hibition, Edwin Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2010

2009

2008

2003

2002

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 36


2000

1999

Mural exhibition Mural Sama-sama (Apotik komik), Lempuyangan fly over, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Eksplorasi Medium dan Gagasan (Graphic Exhibition), Bentara Budaya, Jakarta, Indonesia

Asean Art Award exhibition, Bali, Indonesia

Hitam Putih Rasa Strawberry, Purna Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Indonesian Art Award exhibition, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Plus (+) Edisi Khusus, Gelaran Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Kelompok Otak Berbenah (Graphic Exhibition), Lembaga Indonesia, Perancis, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Graphic exhibition coloring etching with Red Point & Eva Pietzkers

Indonesian Graphic Exhibition, Cipta Taman Ismail Mardjuki Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Graphic Exhibition Jogjakarta Art Festival (FKY), Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Sebaiknya Pameran, (Graphic Exhibition), ISI Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Graphic Exhibition FKI I, Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Sanggar Bidar Sriwijaya, Purna Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Graphic Exhibition Lustrum III ISI Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta & Bali, Indonesia

Tiga Kota (Printmaking exhibition), Jogjakarta, Bandung & Jakarta, Indonesia

Menjelang Millenium Ketiga (Graphic Exhibition) with Alumnus ASRI, Menuju Indonesia Baru, Natour Garuda Hotel, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1998

1997

1996

1995

Refleksi Zaman (Graphic Exhibition), Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Alugraf (Printmaking exhibition) with Red Point, ISI Etch Studio Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Jogjakarta Art Festival (FKY) Graphic Exhibition, Benteng Vredeburg, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) Dies Natalis, ISI Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Kelompok MISI Grafis 93, (Graphic Exhibition), Galleria Mall, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Dialog Dua Kota, (Graphic Exhibition), Cipta Taman Ismail Mardjuki Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jogjakarta Art Festival (FKY), Bentang Vredeburg , Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Visual Art Studens (Graphic Exhibition) with artists from Australia

Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) Dies Natalis, Sasana Ajiyasa ISI, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Multimedia Exhibition with Cemeti Yogyakarta and Dutch artists

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 37


TROMARAMA

Febie Babyrose (1985, Jakarta) Bachelor of Fine Art, Institute Technology of Bandung, Indonesia Herbert Hans Maruli A. (1984, Jakarta) Bachelor of Fine Art, Institute Technology of Bandung, Indonesia Ruddy Alexander Hatumena (1984, Bahrain) Bachelor of Fine Art, Institute Technology of Bandung, Indonesia

Screening 2010

2009 2008 2007 2006

        

Long Night of the Austrian Museums, Kunsthalle Wien, Austria Children’s Season, Moving Image Gallery, SAM 8Q, Singapore Arts for Health, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore A Window to the World, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima, Japan Europe on Screen, Europe Film Festival, Jakarta, Indonesia URBANimation, Jakarta, Indonesia HELLO; FEST vol 4 Video Animation Festival, Jakarta, Indonesia HELLO; FEST vol 3 Video Animation Festival, Jakarta, Indonesia Video After School vol#1, Universitas Widyatama, Bandung, Indonesia

Workshop 2009  Tropical Lab, Presented by Lasalle College of Arts, Singapore Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010  MAM PROJECT 012: TROMARAMA, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan Selected Group Exhibitions th 2010  VideoZone V, The 5 International Video Art Biennial, Tel Aviv, Israel  Art Gwangju 2010, KimDaeJung Convention Center, Gwangju, South Korea  Experimentelle Deutche-Indonesien Musikvideos, Goethe-Institute, Jakarta, Indonesia  I will cut thrU: Pochoirs, Carvings, and Other Cuttings, The Center for Book Arts, New York/ The Heimbold Visual Arts Center, Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY, USA  Contemporaneity / Contemporary Art in Indonesia, Museum of Contemporary Art Shanghai, Shanghai China  A Changing Surface: Prints in the Age of Digital Media, Center for Contemporary Art, Sacramento, USA  Lihat! Video Art from Indonesia, Gallery Jesus Gallardo, Leon, Mexico  Crash Project: Image Factory, SigiArts Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia  Dua Kota Dua Cerita, Semarang Contemporary Art Gallery, Semarang, Indonesia  Philagrafika 2010: The Graphic Unconscious, Philadelphia, USA  Halimun The Mist, Lawangwangi Art and Science Estate, Bandung, Indonesia 2009  Jakarta Contemporary Ceramics Biennale #1, North Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia  Tropical Lab, Praxis Space, Lasalle College of Arts, Singapore  FAIRIES, Vivi Yip Art Room, Jakarta, Indonesia TH  OK. VIDEO COMEDY, 4 Jakarta International Video Festival, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia  We’re All Millionaires, A.O.D Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia  C-Arts Show with Vivi Yip Art Room, Grand Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia  Hybridization, North Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia  Cross Animate, space*c Coreana art & culture complex , Seoul, South Korea  Bandung Art Now, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia 2008  After Ten Years, Friends Call Us Unkle Book Launching, Live Visual Installation, Bandung, Indonesia  Refresh: New Strategies in Indonesian Contemporary Art, VWFA Singapore, Singapore  Singapore Biennale 2008 “Wonder”, Singapore  A Decade of Dedication: Ten Years Revisited, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung, Indonesia  Grafis Indonesia Sekarang, Tembi Contemporary, Bachelor of Fine Art, Institute Technology of Bandung, Indonesia 2006  Chapter One: Der Ach , Paper Model and Custom Sneakers Exhibition, Bandung, Indonesia  Bandung New Emergence, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung, Indonesia

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 38


UGO UNTORO Born: 1970, Purbalingga, Central Java, Indonesia Education 1996

Graduated from Indonesia Institute of Art ( ISI ), Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Awards 2007

1998

1994

Man of The Year 2007 Tempo Magazine version

Best Artist and Work, Quota Exhibition, Galeri Nasional Jakarta by Langgeng Gallery

Philip Morris Award Indonesian Art Award, Jakarta. The Best 5 Finalists

Philip Morris ASEAN Art Award in Hanoi, Vietnam

Philip Morris Indonesian Art Awards, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 

Poem of Blood, in Rome Contemporary Art Fair, Italy

June, Nadi Gallery

Terrible Desire, Langgeng Gallery, HK Art Fair, Hongkong

Poem of Blood, Biasa Art Space-Bali, Shanghai Art Fair

Poem of Blood, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Short Short Stories, Art Forum, Singapore

Poem of Blood, National Gallery, Jakarta

Short Short Stories, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur

My Lonely Riot, GaleriBiasa, Bali, Indonesia

2004

Silent Texts, Edwin's Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2002

Goro-Goro Ugo Untoro, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

2001

Embun Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Boneka dan Buku, Rakuti Gallery, Surabaya, Indonesia

2000

Menggugat . . . Sisipus Tertawa, Java Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

1999

The Bad of Ugo, Sika Gallery, Bali, Indonesia

1996

Cemeti Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

1995

Corat-Coret 91-95, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2009

2008

2007

2006

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

ARTJOG 10, Taman Budaya, Yogyakarta

Homo Ludens, Emmitan CA Gallery, Surabaya

Arte Fiera, Bologna, Italy.

The Birth of Color, Syang Art Space, Magelang

Puisi Rianto Tiwikromo, Galeri Semarang

Space and Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta

The Chomical Brothers, Galeri Nasional Jakarta

Emotional Drawing, MOMAT, Tokyo, Kyoto, Japan

Emotional Drawing, National Museum, Seoul, Korea

ArtHK 09, Hongkong International Art Fair

Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Polychromatic, V-Art, Jogjakarta

Kunduran Truk, Kersan Art Studio, Jogjakarta

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 39


2008

2007

2006

2005

Indonesia Contemporary Drawing, Andi Gallery, National Gallery Jakarta

Perang Kata dan Rupa, Komunitas Salihara Jakarta

The Topologi of Flatness, Edwin Gallery, Jakarta

Funrising, IVAA Yogyakarta

Next Nature, Vanessa Art Link, Jakarta

2 Oddysey, Srisasanti, Jogjakarta

Common Sense, SIGI Arts Jakarta

Kado, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

Invito All’Opera (Invitation to the Artwork) a collaboration between Biasa ArtSpace and II Ponte Contemporanea Rome

Tjap Djaran:Katuranggan di Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta

Biasa Gila, Biasa Gallery, Jogjakarta

Seksi Nian, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta

Artikulasi/Articulate, One Gallery Jakarta

Perang Kembang, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta

Animal Kingdom, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta

Indonesian Invation, Sin-sin Gallery, Hongkong

CIGE, Beijing

Yustoni Voluntero, Cahyo Basuki Yopi, Ugo Untoro, D Tour, Koong Gallery, Jakarta

Scias Cia – Ugo Untoro, Biasa Art Space, Bali

Emotional Drawing, Momat, Tokyo, Japan

Expose #1:A Presentation of Indonesian Contemporary Art by Deutsche Bank & Nadi Gallery

Sincere Subjects, SIGIarts Gallery, Jakarta

Indonesian Contemporary All Star, Tujuh Bintang Art Space, Jogjakarta

Arus-Arus Terpencil, Emmitan CA Gallery , Surabaya

Hight Light, JNM, Jogjakarta

Indonesia Contemporary Art now, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta

FETISH, Biasa Art Space, Bali

Imagined Affandi, Gedung Arsip Jakarta

International Literary Bienale, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang

Boeng Ajo Boeng, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Jogjakarta

‘Conscience Celebrate’, Jakarta

IAAE, Selasar Sunaryo, Bandung

Quota, Langgeng Gallery, National Gallery Jakarta

Quota, Edwin Galery, Beijing

8 Young Contemporaries, Art Forum, Singapore

Mysterious Dolls, Old Prints, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta, Indonesia

Signed and Dated: 10th Anniversary, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur

Icon – Grand Opening exhibition, Jogja Galeri, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Rampogan, Taman Budaya Solo

Langgeng Contemporary Art Festival 2006, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Art and Tobacco, Gedung Serba Guna, Magelang, Indonesia

Beauty and Expression of Terror of Indonesian Contemporary Art, Gallery Loft, Paris

nd

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 40


The Broken Mirror: Portrait of the Self, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Sculpture Expanded, CP Artspace, Jakarta, Indonesia

Equatorial Heat: Indonesian Painters Exhibition, Sichuan Museum, Sichuan

Objecthood, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Olympics-art exhibition, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Sayap Kata, Sayap Rupa, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Dolanan, Tanah Liat Studio, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

LOVE, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Sorak Sorai Identitas, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Borobodur Agitatif, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

Membaca Ruang-Ruang, Rumah Seni Muara, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Kado, Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

What's in Your Pocket? Purna Budaya Art Centre, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Countrybution: 7th Yogyakarta Bienalle of Contemporary Art, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Jula-Juli Yogya, Bentara Budaya Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Not I. Am I? CP Artspace, Washington DC

Tali Ikat / Fiber Connections, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Urip Mung Mampir Ngombe, Bentara Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Keras Kepala, Cemeti Art House, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Not I am I? Nadi Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Biennale Jogjakarta, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Contemporary Indonesian Art, Duta Fine Art Foundation, Jakarta, Indonesia

Philip Morris ASEAN Art Awards Exhibition, Hanoi, Vietnam

Mata Perupa Bercermin di kalbu Rakyat, Jogjakarta Palace, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Duo Exhibition, Galeri Kedai Kebun, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

5th Jogjakarta Biennale, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Philip Morris Indonesian Art Awards Exhibition, Jakarta, Indonesia

Slot in the Box, Cemeti Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

1995

Anak Negeri, Surabaya, Malang & Bogor, Indonesia

1988-1994

ISI Gallery, ISI Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Solidaritas Seni Sono

Jogjakarta Festival of Art (FKY), Jogjakarta, Indonesia

The Jakarta International Fine Art Exhibition, Jakarta, Indonesia

Young Painter Artist of Jogjakarta Exhibition, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

2004

2003

2002

2001

1998

1997

1996

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UGY SUGIART Born: 1969, Wonosobo, Indonesia Selected Solo Exhibitions 2009

Bodyscape, MD Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

2007

KIAF, Seoul, Korea

Space & Image, Ciputra World, Jakarta

C Art Talk & Show, Grand Indonesian Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia

PPKI 2009, Jakarta Convention Centre, Jakarta, Indonesia

Up & Hope, D’peak Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

Borderless World, 2nd Anniversary Srisasanti Gallery, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

BRI Platinum Bazaar Art Jakarta, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia

Daegu Art Fair, Exco Building, Daegu City, Republic of Korea

Freedom, Mon Décor, Taman Budaya Yogyakarta and Indonesia National Art Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Merti Bumi, Kampung Seni LEREP Ungaran, Semarang, Indonesia

Kere Munggah Bale, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Tanda Tanda Zaman, Mon Décor Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

The Thousand Mistery of Borobudur, Jogja Gallery, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Mahluk Bermain, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

200 Tahun Raden Saleh, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

100 Tahun Affandi, Bentara Budaya Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Shadows of Prambanan, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Borobudur, Amanjiwo Resort Hotel, Borobudur Magelang, Indonesia

Neo Nation – Biennale Jogja IX, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

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YUDI SULISTYO Education 2008

Indonesia Institute of Art (ISI), Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Selected Performances 2006

Trash Culture experimental performance, TPA Taman Sari, Bandung, Indonesia

Selected Awards 2003

Finalist Indofood Art Award, Jakarta, Indonesia

1999

4 Winner Nomination, National Comic Competition Depdikbud Pusat Jakarta, Indonesia

1998

The Winner, National Comic Competition Depdikbud Pusat Jakarta, Indonesia

Runner Up, National Comic Competition Depdikbud Pusat Jakarta, Indonesia

Runner Up, National Comic Competition Depdikbud Pusat Jakarta, Indonesia

1997

th

Selected Group Exhibitions 2010

2009

2008

2007

Bazaar Art Jakarta, Sygalls. Pasific Place - Ritz Carlton, Jakarta, Indonesia

Art Jog 10, Indonesian Art Now: The Strategies of Being. Taman budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

15 x 15 x 15 mini art project #3, recreate x reality x representation, Galeri Soemardja, Bandung, Indonesia

'UN SEGMENTED', Galeri Kita, Bandung, Indonesia

'Almost White Cube', CG Artspace, Plaza Indonesia 3rd floor, Jakarta, Indonesia

ADOPT! ADAPT!, Tujuh Bintang Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

HEROISME, Mon Décor Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

'Everything You Know About Art is Wrong', Bale Tonggoh, Selasar Sunaryo Art Space, Bandung, Indonesia

Art Fair Jakarta, Indonesia

Up & Hope, D Peak Art Space, Jakarta, Indonesia

Spacing Contemporary, JAF #2 / 2009, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Contemporary Archeology, SIGIart gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Literary Biennale, Galeri Salihara, Jakarta, Indonesia

EXPOSIGN 25 Anniversary Indonesia Institute of The Art (ISI), Jogja Expo Center, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Jogja Jamming, Jogja Biennale X, Taman Budaya, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Senang-Senang, Tujuh Bintang Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Neo Nation, Jogja Biennale IX, Jogja National Museum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Manifesto, National Gallery, Jakarta, Indonesia

Setelah Kebangkitan 20 Mei, Jogja Gallery, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Narrations of a Nation, Galeri Mon Décor, Jakarta, Indonesia

Utopia Negativa, Langgeng Gallery, Magelang, Indonesia

HERO, Tujuh Bintang Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Homo Homini Lupus, Galeri Mon Décor, Jakarta, Indonesia

Deer Andry, Ruang depan S14, Bandung, Indonesia

Metaphoria 15 x 15 x 15 project volume II, Soemardja Gallery, Bandung, Indonesia

Indonesian Education exhibition, Bogor, Indonesia

1001 Concept Magazine Cover, Concept Magz, Jakarta, Indonesia

Tribute to Young Artist, Sangkring Art Space, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

Insert Character, Kedai Kebun Forum, Jogjakarta, Indonesia

th

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Bandung Mall Portrait, collaborative exhibition with Wilfrid Rouff. CCF, Bandung, Indonesia

Fictitious Reality, Soemardja Gallery, Bandung, Indonesia

2005

Thursday, collaborative exhibition with Hock E Aye Vi Edgard Heap of Birds Soemardja Gallery, Bandung, Indonesia

2004

Rupatorium, Aula Barat, ITB, Bandung, Indonesia

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INTERVIEW WITH BRYAN COLLIE – CO-DIRECTOR OF MIFA Nicole Anderson Bryan Collie

Why do you think it is important to promote Asian art in Australia today? I think it’s important because they are our closest neighbour, it’s a developing country and their contemporary art scene is at present of International standard. In Australia we have no artists at present that are showcased in the secondary market, I mean Sotheby’s, Christies, Bonham’s, most of the international auction houses you never see an Australian contemporary artwork in it, we are in the Asia Pacific region so we should be showcased in those arenas. In Indonesia now its looked at as the new emerging art scene, there are artists there now that are being showcased in Paris, New York, Italy and being picked up by museums around the world, we don’t have that in Australia. The other thing is that Australians perceive Indonesian art as woodcarvings and batiks, they don’t perceive it as an important country in art, it’s ignorance basically, so we want to change that and actually become much closer to them and then so share our cultures.

NA

Why do you think that Indonesia specifically is producing better artists than say China or Korea?

BC

Well they’re not better artists they’re just in Korea, their contemporary art market has been established in the past twenty years and it has been growing in recent times, China in the last ten or fifteen years has just exploded, it has become in some ways unaffordable. Indonesia has only emerged in the last five years where it had the opportunity of seeing what’s happening throughout Asia and they have had a lot of new artists through viewing different media, through the internet, through communications really. They have decided that it’s their turn and they’ve just let their heads go basically and they have been producing amazing work.

NA

What is the art community like in Indonesia?

BC

Very strong, when I was there it felt like if I was in Paris in the 1880’s, it’s very intellectual, the artists are very close, they know each other, they discuss what they are doing, they criticise. They have curators that continually write about the works, they have discussions with students about the works. So it’s a strong community, it’s a colony and that means that it grows because they have people that work together, they criticise, they say ‘this is what you should be doing, try it this way’ so it’s what happened in France, you know like colony’s that grew like the Bloomsbury school in London that we don’t have any more. Most artists in Australia just paint in their studio, it’s a very private thing, they just do their own thing and I think that’s why it’s not very strong, there is no influence from the outside. They (Indonesian artists) take it well, the criticism, I’ve been there when they say ‘That’s a load of crap’, they tell them what they think because they’re close, so it’s like a big family of artists.

NA

What is the position of an artist or how does general society view artists in Indonesia?

BC

The general society, it’s very important in Indonesia, especially in Yogyakarta there have been generations and generations of artists so it’s just part of their culture.

NA BC

It’s perfectly acceptable for a teenager to say ‘I want to be an artist’ and not have the pressure from society or family to become something more academic like being a doctor? No they are very proud of their artists; it is quite a prestigious thing in Indonesia to be an artist.

NA

How important are artists in Indonesian History and within contemporary Indonesian culture?

BC

In their culture they are very important and there are a lot of publications about their artists. They have three or four in the seventies, even earlier artists who were influenced by European artists that have come to their country. In the past thirty to forty years they have been quite important and because of that influence some of the artists travelled to Europe and became important there. So that’s the recognition of Indonesia having good artists, they’re important to their culture but have been more important since the Western influence came into it. They represent what they want they want to become because people like Gunawan and Affandi who was the godfather of modern art, I mean he’s known throughout the world as an important artist. So they obviously look at him and go well ‘I want to do that, I want to be internationally recognised’ most artists do it because one they have the passion in them. They want to be in museums too, that’s their goal, it’s the main thing, not the money or the selling of their work, but to be recognised as a

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great artist and to be placed in books in history. It’s what I think every artist around the world want most is the recognition of their art.

NA

What are the main differences (if any) are there between Indonesian and Australian Artists?

BC

I think the main difference is a huge because they are a colony, they are an artist colony and they have a lot of passion and it shows through in their work. A lot of it is from struggle and pain that they paint, political issues that have affected them profoundly and they tell stories in their art of their life and to me looking at the work it’s got energy that I don’t see in our contemporary market. I think that’s because the artists here paint mostly for themselves and to a market in some way and I don’t find the energy in their work or the passion in their work, I find it looks like it’s contrived, which a lot of people won’t want to hear. The Indonesian market has been driven though passion.

NA

What are the further education pathways for artists in Indonesia

BC

In Indonesia some of the Universities are huge in their art faculties, they’re massive, they have big departments for Photography, for Sculpture, for Painting, for Textile Design. The education for art is one of their main priorities, the whole of Yogyakarta and Indonesia is very focused on culture of the performing arts and the fine arts.

NA

Do you think that this will change as the Western market comes interested in Indonesian work?

BC

Yeah it will, because the money part comes in and then they paint for a market. But at the moment it’s quite exciting, and that is one of the main reasons that I am interested in preserving that, like with the old masters, in that they need to have a place in history for the future generations to look back on. Most of it, the work, will be sold outside of the country, they will lose this beautiful period of this revolution in contemporary art and well this is the start of it. It should be kept in the country but it’s not, it is being sold as we see in the auction houses on an international platform that’s outside the country so it’s going to all parts of the world.

NA

In the first exhibition catalogue from MiFA, Asia Now (2010), Anthony Gardener wrote: If we want to see and experience some of the best art being made anywhere across the globe these days, then we need to look to practices in Taiwan and China, in Indonesia in India, in Vietnam and Korea, because that is where this art is being produced.1 Do you agree with this quote and if so why do you think Asia is producing artists that are so strong in technique and concept?

BC

I think that for the same reason that it’s happening in some ways as in Indonesia, so many people in those countries that are talented that have been painting in more of a traditional sense, like in China they had to paint to a certain way because they weren’t allowed to do it. So obviously there was going to be a revolution at some stage where they could break away where they could do what they want and a lot of artists now can because of the technology that is available and seeing what’s out there. You can get on the net, you can be influenced by so many people and see images of them and I think that’s caused a revolution in contemporary art, information and the closeness, we can talk to people anywhere in the word and people travel, it’s easy. Countries become richer so they can actually do things, like in Vietnam the tourist industry has changed because they have been at war for so long. So obviously for some of these artists there is a lot of passion in what they’re doing and also they do it because it’s a part of their life, it’s their existence so they want to it be good and there is a lot of competition. But I think it’s a lot through experience, the experience of just trying to survive and you get a lot of passion and energy in their work. If they’re good their good, it doesn’t matter if it’s traditional or contemporary, they’ve got some energy in them that people want to know too.

NA

Do you think that passion comes from living a country that has struggled through enormous upheavals?

BC

I do, I think a lot of great painters have come through, not just in Asia, but through things that have happed in their lives. There is a lot of natural people who are artists who have eventually been given the opportunity to paint because their cultures become a lot more stable and they can afford to do things unlike before. Things become more accessible like paint, canvasses, money to be able to buy these things because their countries have become wealthier and experiences through travel. There are all these amazing things that can happen when people have the opportunity of doing something that they’re

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passionate about. By going to University and saying ‘I want to be an artist, I want to be an artist’, so they go and study it but it doesn’t mean that you are, it doesn’t mean that you have that burning desire, like a singer, some people open their mouths and a beautiful note comes out it’s the same with art. It’s the same, people try to do it, you can study it and learn the technique, it just doesn’t cut it, you always know the ones, the purest voice it’s the same with art, it doesn’t matter what medium it is, if it’s transposed onto a canvas or writing is the same to me.

NA

Do you think that Indonesia has always produced engaging work or is it just that they have slowly gained more recognition within Western countries?

BC

No I think it’s because they’ve had modernist artists that have been painting for the last thirty years and they’ve been known as good artists but they haven’t had the opportunity of getting to the International market. I think because the new artists coming up and because of auction houses like Sotheby’s and Christies needing to get new material they’ve looked at different countries, China was one, Korea is now becoming quite important in the secondary market which is putting lot more focus on galleries and what they own, in the Middle East another market that is exploding, they’ve had a great art market in the last thirty or forty years and no one had really picked it up but now they have. I think China had started it and it had just been rolling around and there are cultures that have become richer like Indonesia, Vietnam and Korea and their younger generation is becoming richer and looking for more contemporary work that has helped the market too.

NA

Do you think that being able to advertise works across the world digitally has pushed these artists into recognition at a quicker rate than before?

BC

Yeah, its information, its people going ‘yeah I like that, I wanna know more about it, I can see it’. Technology has defiantly pushed the art market. You have the power to instantly know, if you want to know about an artist work you can Google it and if you’re really interested in it you can go and see it you know?

NA

How do you think Asian artists will be represented in the Australian market over the next few years?

BC

I think that it will grow quite rapidly, I think for what we’re doing here at MiFA now it’s going to be the watershed for it, when people see the quality of works that are produced from Indonesia and South East Asia they will look twice at what they have been buying. That will help the Australian art market too because it will show what’s out there and what they are doing is just not up to scratch and if you want to be an artist you’ve got to really work at it. And I think that viewing other peoples work it will be a lot more beneficial for emerging Australian artists.

NA

Is it presumptuous to presume that Contemporary Asian artists want to ‘make it’ in the Western Art scene?

BC

No, they do! It’s very important for them, because they have been accepted in their own country and for an artist I think they’re main goal is to be recognised all over the world. I mean it’s the biggest buzz you can get, it’s like being an actor or a singer and the arts are very similar. Again same principle, some people can do it some people can’t some people have to be taught. It’s all pretty simple I think, we just make it difficult and intellectualize it, like contemporary art, what is it?

NA

How does the Indonesian art market differ from the Australian art market?

BC

People who buy art in Indonesia, thousands of people go to the art fairs; even though they can’t buy they are interested. The thing in Indonesia is that a lot of people who buy are from Indonesians or they come from the South Asia region, so they come from Singapore, from Hong Kong and internationally, it has a much stronger international presence than we do.

NA

Is the Indonesian market paying roughly the same for these artworks as to what we are in Australia?

BC

Yeah, it’s the same, in fact for the quality of the work and the standing of the artist it is quite cheap. These works aren’t just being locally sold, they are being internationally sold, not all of them but there are artists that are coming up where the quality of the work is well worth the price that they are selling it for. So they are exceptional quality works in a decorative price bracket if you are doing interior decorating, it’s good value and the materials that they use are very good, they are not just cheap canvas and stretchers, they use proper materials and they are very fussy about what they do.

NA

Many artists in Australia have at least one ‘day job’ to support their arts practice, is this also common in Indonesia? Most of the artists that we’re dealing with don’t but then there are a lot of artists that are out there that I haven’t talked to that may be doing it, I would say that’s probably the case.

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BC

How prominent is the influence of Indonesian culture in relation to the artwork, the conceptual process and their approach to communicating to the audience?

NA

Very important, most of them relate what’s happening in their culture, the stories, the meaning to their pictures. They always intellectualize it although why they do it, what makes them do it I’m not sure. They use curators to express that when they have their showings, so nearly every time they have an exhibition they have a curator that is payed to talk to the artist and then write and research why they do what they do.

BC

What do you think artists need to do to officially compete against these major artists that we are seeing emerge from Asia? I think to get onto the same wave, because obviously we’ve got good artists here but I think that the artists should see what’s happening around their neighbourhood. I mean its all close, to have other countries that are not in our region that are obviously embracing it and doing something about it. The museums are buying it; the major galleries in most European countries are handling artists from Indonesia. The secondary market is defiantly throwing millions of dollars into it because they know they are going to take a lot more out of it. They see it as a growth market and here we’re not even aware of it so by having shows like we’re having here which are really high risk, expensive logistical shows to bring over for a commercial gallery, things like this can change people’s ideas. They can see what they are selling for, the value that you get, the quality that you get, the acceptance that has been around the world through newspaper articles that we’ve been collecting and auction prices and catalogues. A lot of people don’t realize that it’s happening so if they can see it and physically touch it and see what it’s selling for, that’s important.

NA

BC

Do you think that the Australian scene is ‘snobby’ within Australia but also with the rest of the world?

NA

I think that the art scene within Australia is naive and in some ways it’s very individual, it’s what each person does. There are artists that actually get out there and really work at it, people like Sally Smart, she is a really get out there go artist that has been accepted in New York, Asia, she works at it. She actually gets out there and is aware of the market; we need more people like Sally to lecture she would be perfect to have, to talk about her travels and artists that have done the same and know how hard it is, the competition and how to break into these markets. Also the cost to her, it has cost her over time and she’s got it back, so people like Sally would be important as a spokes person to get our culture to what’s happening around us. I think the government should really look at it to, museums say they are interested but they really don’t understand most of it or their not interested because they have their own agenda of buying Australian art which is crazy. It should be more contemporary, not just in Asia pacific or the world, but I think we should start close to our shores and that means through us doing that, the shows that we are doing will bring more understanding that it’s not just a third world country it’s a very decided western thinking modern country that just has traditional beliefs and traditional ways of life that we always take as third world.

BC

What is the relationship between exhibiting artists and Galleries in Indonesia? Mostly I feel that it’s business, the galleries use curators to actually pick their art for them and write about it. To me, not all but to most of the galleries it’s a business transaction. They take commissions like we do here, a lot of the pricing is not consistent though and because each gallery gets the work and prices it to what he/she should sell it for, it’s not consistent and that’s something that should change, there should be consistency in the pricing. A lot of the galleries don’t have artists that are stable, they sell their works but other galleries sell their works, that’s something that has to change too. Artists aren’t signed to one gallery, that’s the main case; a few of the galleries handle particular artists that don’t sell their work elsewhere. The scene is emerging and it is young and they need a stronger gallery association. I have been told that they do have a gallery association now but I don’t know, I haven’t seen their articles of association or who it is, but I’ll do that when I live there. I think the discussion between the artist and the gallery in terms of how much the artist wants to make of their work can be quite flexible, but they have to change that, they have to be professional about what they’re doing. I mean because international galleries don’t work that way, they work so that they know that if there is a gallery in Milano selling the artists work then it will be the same price as it is in Indonesia. They have to have that consistency otherwise it’s not in their interest to sell their work because you’ll lose clients; they’ll say ‘I can buy the same thing half price’, which is crazy! They are starting to realize that now and that will change, it’s just a matter of time.

NA

How much say does an artist have in how their work is displayed in the gallery?

BC

From what I’ve seen a lot, they are pretty fussy about that and how it’s displayed so they are very professional about the way that the galleries are set up and the way that they have it. All the galleries that I have been into are quite professional, I think it’s just the pricing thing that I think is wrong, it should be consistent and it isn’t. I think that has a lot to do with how

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prestigious the gallery is and maybe how greedy it is.

NA

What differs in the role of the curator in Indonesia compared to Australia?

BC

Well we don’t really have curators here, the gallery does it internally and also really they don’t a curatorship like they in Indonesia. They do beautiful publications and then they have an academic who provides an analysis of what goes up and an artist statement. While the show is on they usually have young art students and artists coming in to talk and discuss in the gallery about the work, the reaction they have. The artists also discuss it and what he/she thinks about it, so they get the artist statement verbally too. They have these seminars which is really good it’s really professional, so they take their artwork very seriously and here it’s just open up and if it looks good sell it.

NA

What is the most common way for artists to promote themselves in Indonesia?

BC

Through art fairs they are selected, they have art fairs that have selection periods, they might be sending images in over the period of six or eight months and out of that selection period the selectors keep two hundred works out of two thousand. They are then brought in for a second selection process which might take them down to one hundred and fifty. Then they have those works that don’t go in to the fair that people can still see in their warehouses if they are interested. It’s almost like doing the Archibald Prize, there is a selection process and they have masses and select it down to a few. They have a lot of up-and-comings so they have works at their art fairs that range from $3,000 up to $50,000 or $60,000 US. Like our art fair here, they get thousands of people; museums, dealers, collectors fly in from different countries and purchase and then they ask about other artists that are available, the up-and-comings who would be suitable for their own galleries. We have these sort of art shows but there is not the connection with international dealers, it’s the galleries own interest in sending the works, they don’t want to share their artists with other people; they just want to sell them. That’s why it’s such a good place for dealers to source their works because they are such good quality and so many good artists that are affordable, it can grow on an international platform. Australia doesn’t have that facility, I don’t know where dealers would come from overseas to find Australian artists to take anywhere else, it doesn’t happen here. That’s the thing that we need to cultivate, we’re in Asia, we don’t want to be isolated, we’re an Asian country and we’re in an Asian economy not a western economy so we should be taking part in that too. They do masses of advertising, these are just people that you deal with at the fairs but the fairs are run by private companies that have an agenda of promoting artists and they do a lot of it. It’s a part of the commission and charges that they advertise, they do a lot of graffiti because they can pay people to paint on walls, doing beautiful graffiti works to advertise fairs. They do this a few months before it so they have a lot of promotion leading up to the fairs, where it is a bit hard to do that here and you can’t just graffiti any wall to put an ad up. It’s also art what they do, people leave it there because they like it. They are much more aware of our market then we’re aware of theirs, a lot of the more senior artist come to our art fairs here and internationally and their never critical, they stand back, they don’t say ‘I don’t think this is all that good’. Even if they are not impressed they say ‘Yes it was interesting’ and they know that a lot of it’s just not interesting. They will comment from someone from Korea that they have there, some things they like, it’s not all bad but I think their use to looking at a lot more exciting things. They go to Shanghai, they go to China, they go to Miami, this is where we think of Indonesians as a third world country but really they are more aware of the contemporary art market that’s happening around the world than most of the artists here, or the galleries.

NA

Do they have a large street art scene in Indonesia?

BC

Yeah they have a huge one, it’s very good too and their street art scene is like Melbourne.

NA

Do you think that Indonesia will be able to preserve the traditional ways of life seeing as they are adopting more traits of Western culture?

BC

That’s a good question, when I was there I went to artists that were bringing in quite a lot of money, an average of $30,000 $60,000 US and that’s big money in Indonesia, that’s like saying they make half a million dollars each time they sell a picture. What I notice is that they still live in their villages, they still have their chickens wandering around, they haven’t changed their lifestyle but they do travel a lot, they travel a lot around the world to Europe, America but they keep their traditional lifestyle.

NA

So they tend not to take on the ‘ego’ that we tend to see in a lot of artists who become major players in the world market?

BC

No they keep it under control and I think that they keep it under control because they have a very deep culture in their history of tradition. The western way of life is in there because of their religion doesn’t cut it, they know that they don’t want

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to change; it would change their life too much, so they keep it well balanced in between. But they still think western and they still can be western but they don’t do it in that way we do. They still keep their culture, they still like their chickens running around and their places by the paddy fields and they drive nice cars but they keep their culture. One of the artists sits in a tiny corner of her kitchen and produces amazing artworks, in a kitchen! She said ‘I do it because this is my world, when I have pots and pans falling down in my painting that means I’m having problems, every things a mess, the kids are screaming etc’, it’s all about her environment these amazing artworks. And now an international gallery is interested in her! What an amazing story, this is the first time she had put her work into an art fair, it could change her whole life!

NA

When Australian galleries work with Asian artists is there any major cultural differences that we need to be respectful of?

BC

No, what they expect is honesty, just like any artist, it’s just like talking to artists here. They just have a different culture, backdrop and a different way of living, foods. They have a much slower attitude, it’s laid back it’s not an alcohol induced society, they’re all fun, they still swear, they still smoke and drink a little and have fun, they’re exactly the same as us. It’s a much more relaxed, it’s an easier, softer existence than what we have, so their chilled but still very Western. You don’t need to approach them with any type of sensitivity, you would do it as you would with an artist in Australia, in fact they welcome criticism and your opinion because they want to talk about it and they’re not going to be offended.

NA

Do you think that because we can see works on the Internet now that people are less likely to visit galleries?

BC

No, I think it all depends on the level; a lot of people buy paintings because they want something on the wall. People who collect art want to see what it looks like but they have to be able to view it. No I think that in some ways it even benefits the galleries, the Internet.

NA

Do you think that art will become easier to buy on the internet?

BC

Yeah it will, buyers will trust the gallery and know the quality of the work, they will be able to send it back if they don’t want it. It will be wonderful. We will be selling here work on the internet internationally, buyers will want the condition report and trust the gallery and it’s so easy to do it now with digital technology.

NA

Do you think this will encourage people to buy or it will create more problems for the gallery?

BC

It will give you a wider audience, it’s about how many people will view it because here we advertise and it’s just in Australia. To advertise on the internet you only have to only put a name in now and it will come up in a search engine, buyers will search for artworks in this way internationally. People would search for the artists that we have in this exhibition and find them on the website and they’ll want to buy them, they could be from Indonesia, Hong Kong, America, Italy, France!

NA

Does a show can have a better outcome if you’re a bit more relaxed and take the attitude of ‘what happens is going to happen’ or do you feel that if you put more effort in the better it will be received?

BC

No you’ve got to be involved in it, as I said before the Indonesian curators pick the art that they want, they think it’s good. We wanted to pick artists that we thought that the Australian public would say ‘Oh wow, that’s good’. You know, it’s no good having a show that you put in so much effort into and people walk in, walk around and walk out again. Every time someone walked in and goes around to every picture and say ‘Oh that’s an even better one!’ that sort of thing because then it’s memorable, they talk to people and they say to their friends ‘Oh you should see what’s happening’. We’re trying to change the perception of what the art is and if we let other people do that their perception and our perception could be completely different, it could be very boring! I want people to enjoy themselves and want to come back, it has to be fantastic. So we had to explain that to the artists and because we were getting closer to them by staying there, going out for dinner with them, having fun, they want you to be a part of their lives so they’re going to give you the best, they understand where you’re at and they’re very honest so they’re going to give you what you ask for. And they did, so we have the best show! We don’t know if it’s going to sell but we have the best possible show that we could.

NA

What were some of the obstacles in putting together this show?

BC

The main obstacles I found were when I went to see the artists are that they have a lot of people from Western countries approaching them. They wanted to know me as a person so when I was there I didn’t push it, I didn’t want to ask them for their works, I wanted to understand what they were doing, to meet them in their own environment, meet them socially. I wanted to tell them what our vision was of what we were doing and what we hoped to achieve by having this show. A lot of it, I think the best thing that we had to give them was the title of the show, when I said that we’ve chosen the show as Closing the Gap, and they asked why and I said ‘Well, really in our culture people think of Indonesia as a party town and

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drinking and massages and girls, batiks and getting your hair done and that’s it. The other thing that they probably think of is bombs and terrorists, they don’t think of a third world country as a Western thinking modern society and that your art is way in front of ours in contemporary art. With any country, time or period, centuries and centuries back, art is the most important part of the culture it is the blood of it, without art in the culture it’s nothing. You find it in tribes and anywhere in the deep Amazon you find art, it doesn’t matter but culture has to have it. To present your art, it’s an important part of being proud and getting to know people, so through art I think we could bring our cultures together. For us to have a major show by you, as we are just starting out as a gallery would be a big coo for us. We need to have artists of substance and because you are the best artists in Indonesia and you are recognized worldwide, it would be an honour for us and we want to start a relationship. We want to do something that is very difficult to succeed at but we have the right people who are backing us and helping us so we have the right staff to achieve what we want to do but you have to want to do it too. We want the best of your works’ I didn’t mention anything about prices ‘we just want to showcase your work so we can showcase the best contemporary works, so we can Close the Gap’ and that’s what I told them all and then we had some of our main supporters come over to Indonesia and then they knew we were serious. These people are serious artists, not just out to make a dollar, they want to know what you’re doing, how you’re going to produce the catalogue, who’s going to curate it, how is it going to be hung, what is the space like – all these things they ask, which is perfect. To do what we’ve done as a team, it’s all come together to get the best of the best and hopefully they’ll be here for a long time, we can have individual shows. It’s taken a year and a whole lot of hard work to get to where we are now, not just pick random works from pictures and we’ll see how we go. It’s like a stage show, so we believe that artists have done their best, they’ve learnt their parts, we’ve been the conductors putting it all together and now we’re ready to see if it works, to see if people want to buy the record. It’s as simple as that but it’s a long journey but this exhibition will be the watershed of what could happen. I believe that because we have the attitude here of being a very relaxed, we love what we do, we’re passionate about it, we’re approachable, I think that being there on the ground and being passionate about what we do and very professional as well, we’re got their trust and they admire what we are doing and I know they want to help us. It would have been a long time happening if we hadn’t done this show, at the moment it’s probably the best time to do it and the other benefit is that because we’re dealing with the Asia pacific region, it is the perfect forum for relaxed communication between the arts and business. By having major shows will get people and companies to talk which will help us in the long run as they want to get involved as it cost a lot of money to run a gallery and we need people to get involved.

NA

How did you go about curating the exhibition?

BC

That was really exciting because we were aware of what was happening in the secondary market. I’d been dealing with Asian Pacific art for a long time, but not the contemporary artists, all the master paintings so we went through the sales over the past five years and looked at artists we liked. I then Googled important Indonesian artists in the secondary market and then by going to Indonesia and meeting artists in galleries and being taken around and seeing works that I liked. So we got an idea of what the galleries had and met other artists at opening and it started to form, then we thought these are the artists we feel would be good, some are very important but less commercial and some are very commercial but in some ways not as important, in a museum sense anyway. We had to balance it out so what I said at the start it’s like you don’t know what you’re going to get, you only get to talk to the artists about the work your seeing, works that they’ve already done so if you see something you like and tell ‘ if you do something around that area we’d be happy’. I then said to each artists is ‘what I need is… wow, I don’t care how big it is but when I walk in and see it I want to be able to go WOW. So if you paint a picture that you think is WOW – I know wow is a stupid word but wow to me is a big one – I want that! So the wow factor we need, so if it’s not WOW we’re not going to take it’, we’re talking with friends here. So then we let go, we wanted new works for the show and gradually, gradually we got images of their paintings and we’d say ‘Wow, that’s good’ or I’d go to an art fair and saw something that was ‘Wow’ and we’d buy it. So eventually it came though and it’s WOW!

NA

We can see in the MiFA exhibition Closing the Gap: Contemporary Indonesian Art, there are many strong artists, is the show just a selection of a artistically rich country or is this the best Indonesian artists?

BC

It’s an exhibition of the best of the best and the up and coming of the best. So it’s a selection of many, many, many good artists and it’s really the main artists of the moment. There are two artists that we didn’t get because we just couldn’t but it’s a selection of the best and some that we believe that are really good, like the textile designer, she is incredible!

NA

Is there a difference between working with Female or Male artists?

BC

Yeah there is a big difference, females are easier. I like working with female artists they are easy to talk to, men don’t like to be criticised where as women don’t mind it, they are more open to discussion about what they do. I think male artists seem to say ‘No, I know what I’m doing, leave me alone, just sell it’, but that’s just generalizing. All the women artists I’ve ever dealt with are easy and receptive when you give them criticism.

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NA

How important do you think is it to have a strong relationship with the artists you represent?

BC

It’s absolutely imperative, if you don’t have that you won’t last.

NA

Do you think a lot of galleries neglect that?

BC

Yes, they do because they make the association because they are selling their works but they don’t actually make it a personal one. I think as an artist you need to know what they are doing; you need to be able to talk to them, to discuss where they are going with your work. You just don’t take their works and pat them on the head, it’s like a relationship, a friendship and you have to keep it going. They need communication and to know what’s going on, they want to you to know what direction their going in its only comments but it’s still personal. They stick with you, but a lot of galleries don’t do it.

NA

How do personally define contemporary art?

BC

Contemporary art is easy it’s anything that you feel like thinking its art; some people think it’s a lot of rubbish and some things are really good. It’s so broad contemporary art, they think it’s hard to understand, but its expression, it’s like graffiti it’s just what people are expressing in their lives and sometimes it’s fantastic and sometimes its crap. It’s what resonates with a person and what it does to them, sometimes it can make someone happy, and sometimes it can make them sad sometimes it can make them uncomfortable but if it has some energy in it that gives you a feeling for it then it’s doing what it’s supposed to do.

NA

So why do you think that people move away from Contemporary art in general?

BC

A lot of them don’t see good contemporary art there’s contemporary art where you think “My god that’s fantastic I have to have it” and then there’s contemporary art where you think “My god, what’s that?”, there’s some swept up leaves with some rubbish in it, I mean recently I was at Federation Square having a coffee with a friend and I was looking at the garden next to us and I was said “Oh my god, what are they doing here it looks like someone has gone to the dump and thrown stuff in there” and she said “Well that’s what it’s supposed to look like … that’s art” but to me that it wasn’t I thought “ok if it works it looks like a dump” but it’s ridiculous, no one is going to recognise that unless you knew what it’s about. I mean it’s been done before where something emerges, they put a whole lot of stuff outside a modern building and it grows naturally and they think that’s art, and it maybe but to me it doesn’t work, it’s just trying. There are so many facets of contemporary art and so many people saying ‘no I don’t like it’, but usually people like contemporary art when they think ‘I like that, I’d like to put it on the wall’. Contemporary art, what is it? Some people will put an apple in a cup and say ‘That’s art’, but it isn’t, not to me anyway, art is what Chen Ping is doing, because it’s powerful. Some people can’t see it, they think it’s just a whole lot of paint; it’s about how it makes you feel.

NA

How much of a role do you think Contemporary Asian art should play in schools and what is the most important thing students can learn from this exhibition?

BC

I think it’s really important that they see what’s happening in Asian culture because it’s going to be a big part of their life now. They should perceive it as normal and not just as it’s ‘Australian’ or ‘Asian’, we shouldn’t’ think that way; we shouldn’t think that it’s any different. We should just think that its art, it’s about what it makes you feel and the reaction you have to it, it shouldn’t matter whether it’s Australian or Asian, its art wherever it comes from. I don’t think we should put people into those categories, its art and I know we are dealing with the Asian Pacific region but it should be taken as what it is. How does it affect you? That’s what’s important but it should be a part of learning, this is what’s happening here, it should be a part of what they are leaning, we’re right next to Asia. When you get to know a culture through art forms it’s easier when you go there, you can understand how they think, why they think that way.

NA

What’s the most important thing that students can learn from Close the Gap?

BC

I think wanting to know more about what they’re looking at, not just the paintings or the culture but the people behind them and what you can learn from their culture. What can you learn from it, what do you like? It’s a Muslim country, when I went there I was seeing the girls dressed in white with their headdresses praying I was thinking ‘This is going to be different’ but it’s not, they are actually not. They are the same as you and me and they have the same feelings and passions, what we can learn from them is that they respect themselves more, which is appealing. They still have the same way of thinking, they like to party, some don’t drink but they like life, they are just like us, they eat, drink, dance at night clubs, have boyfriends/girlfriends

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but they have a lot more respect for themselves, male and female. They have a different society because they have a harder life that they respect themselves more and I think younger people could learn from that here, the way they act in their lives.

1

NA

Do you think when China finally takes over from the US as the most powerful and influential countries in the world will that provide greater opportunities for Australians in the global art industries?

BC

Which they will. Yeah, we have a lot of talent here. My daughter is in film and I’ve said to her ‘Don’t just think about here, there is a massive film industry in Asia and what they have is a massive lack of western actors there’. Look outside this country, it’s so hard here now but we do produce great people in the arts. We have to think globally now.

NA

What advice would you give to a student coming out of year 12 who wants to peruse a career in the arts?

BC

Don’t be so naive about getting into the arts, it’s a tough industry, you have to understand how hard it is to be an artist and how good you have to be. Look at what’s out there, not just in the galleries around you but look outside at what’s going on around the world, what the competition is. We’re not just here now, were in an international market, a global market and if you want to succeed as an artist then you have to do a lot of work. What we’re doing now is opening up competition.

NA

Now looking back at your career, what percentage has been pure passion and what percentage has been the business man in your approach?

BC

I think most of it is pure passion, not business; I don’t like selling things I don’t like personally so even if there is money in it I won’t sell it if I don’t like it. So it’s probably 85% passion and the rest is business.

NA

Do you think this is the best way to approach the arts?

BC

No, I talk people out of buying things all the time and lose money. It’s hard, people have different eyes, some people see things differently but you have to sell things that you really believe is good and that means everything, not just the work but also the price. If they still love it but you don’t, you just say ‘If you really like it, then you like it’ but when you sell it to them and try to give them the best price because sometimes I think people change their tastes and don’t like it anymore and then they want to bring it back and then you can’t sell the damn thing. So in some ways that’s the 15% because I don’t want it back, I didn’t even want to sell it in the first place, so you also have to be able to work with the artists that you represent and say to them ‘I really don’t want that picture’, I don’t want things that I don’t enjoy selling. There are issues in it, passion or business? You have to have passion but I’d sell a lot more things if I was business like, I’d just say ‘Yeah, buy it’ but then you’ve got a client that’s bought the wrong thing.

Anthony Gardener, Asia Now Exhibition Catalogue, 2010, pg 14 MiFA, ISBN: 978 – 0 – 9807731 – 0 – 1 Bryan Collie has been a prominent and respected member of the Australian Arts community for more than thirty years. He is a well known as an accomplished art dealer, with extensive networks and relationships throughout Australia and internationally. Collie established the hugely successful Melbourne Art Exchange in the late 1970s, now known as Melbourne Fine Art. Melbourne Art Exchange grew in the 1980s in the bustling hub of Melbourne’s Flinders Street, became one of the leading galleries in Australia. It continued to expand, and include Jarman Framing and Eastgate Framing under the parent company of The Melbourne Art Exchange. Jarmans Eastgate prospered under Collie’s ownership and formed what is today Eastgate Gallery – a highly regarded Gallery and Master Framing business. In the mid 1990s, Melbourne Art Exchange became Melbourne Fine Art Gallery and is now a much loved and frequented space located in Bourke Street in the business district. Collie is an approved valuer under the Australian Government’s Cultural Gift’s Program since 1991. This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 53


UNIT 1 ART UNIT 1 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSES THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND MEANING

SIGIT SANTOSO

UGY SUGIARTO

1.

Compare how Santoso and Sugiarto have successfully implemented formal elements in their work to represent male emotion?

2.

These works by Santoso and Sugiarto express two similar emotions but to varying degrees; clearly identify how you think the artists have used symbolism to communicate enhance these emotions to the viewer.

3.

Using formal elements to support your argument, write an extended response that AGREES or DISAGREES with this statement: In these two works by Santoso and Sugiarto, both have used direct reference to historical artworks or cultures and therefore their works are not unique.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 54


UNIT 1 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND MEANING

ENTANG WIHARSO

UGO UNTORO

1.

Imagine that you are Wiharso or Untoro and have been approached by a magazine to write a short blurb on the artworks pictured above. The magazine would like specific details about the chosen media and why it was chosen in direct relation to communicating with the audience.

2.

In direct reference to the Formal and Personal frameworks, critically analyse how selective colour has been used by Wiharso and Untoro in these works.

3.

A. Looking closely at Untoro mixed media piece, comment on your interpretation of the work in reference to the Personal Framework B. Have students read the excerpt from the link below. C. After reading this excerpt, reflect on your previous interpretation of the work. Using Untoro’s work as support for your argument, write a short statement about how background knowledge of an artists’ practices, inspiration or influences can influence your response and appreciation of artworks and their contexts. Note: For Background information to inform the answers to these questions here is an article about Untoro’s connection to horses; http://ugountoro.com/index.php?page=media-archives&postid=9

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 55


UNIT 1 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND MEANING

1.

Class Discussion: Facilitate a class discussion on one of the chosen artists from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. This requires you to cover; -

a visual analysis; how has the artist used Formal elements successfully or unsuccessfully and how do they contribute to the meanings and messages in the artworks? Etc technique; has the artist used the chosen materials effectively? Do the chosen materials support or affect the ‘intended’ interpretation? Etc style: does the work reference a past movement or artist? Is the style relevant to the artist’s cultural background? symbols: has the artist used symbolism within their work?

In order to do this you need to be thoroughly familiar with the artwork and the artist. This will require you to prompt questions, get students to discuss their opinions and back up with evidence, draw students’ conversation back to the artwork when necessary and present the artwork in an appropriate manner.

2.

Debate: Choose and artwork from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. As a group or with two individual students prepare a debate that explores; What is the true intention of …… and the purpose of their work? Debaters may take on an identity (such as artist, art expert, historian etc) and must use visual examples to support their argument. The class will then decide which team and/or debater is successful.

3.

Elements and Principles: Using the artworks from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art pick 3 works (at least one work should be three dimensional) and clearly identify the Elements and Principles used in each one. -

Which ones were most common? Why do you think this was? Which one do you feel communicates to you the most? Why do you think this is? Out of the Elements and Principles that you have identified, pick one Element and one Principle that you feel is the most important in communicating to the audience. What makes these stronger than the others that the artist employed in their work?

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 56


UNIT 1 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND MEANING

1.

Documentary: In a group of 4-5, create a documentary informed by the exhibition Closing the Gap: Contemporary Indonesian Art at MiFA. Although you have flexibility with the way you structure your Documentary you must consider several key aspects that will shape the final outcome. STYLE

How are you going to present the information? 1. Who is your target audience? -

Are you presenting to a general audience, students, international audiences etc What might you have to consider once you have chosen your target audience? For example, if you are presenting this Documentary to Primary School students, then your language and presentation style will be significantly different than if you were to target Secondary School students.

2. How are you going to present the information? -

You could take on the persona of a local or iconic Arts identity, create a new ‘character’ or be yourself. Are you going to be serious or use a bit of humour? You could pretend that you are in the future looking back at the Exhibition from a historical point of view by including Black and White film. Will you need costumes?

3. Are you going to include videos or voice over’s? -

CONTENT

Consider style of speech; Documentary presenters usually have a particular style/rhythm of speech which you may want to include into your presentation. To inform this research David Attenborough, and other British documentary presenters on YouTube.

Information that you must include in your Documentary: 1. Content of the exhibition; artworks and artists. 2. Exploration of key elements used in exhibition; comparison of artworks by same or different artist/s or analysis of one artist. 3. Artist focus: choose one artist to feature in your Documentary, how does their artwork reference their personal experiences, interests, 4. How does the artist use Symbolism in their work; if they use symbolism in their work is it universal, cultural or personal?

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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Opening title and end credits: -

In the end credits you might want to include; This is a …. production, created in association with, thanks to …. Music, images and information; remember to correctly credit sources in your end credits.

Length: -

Your documentary must be within 5 – 10 minutes Your opening title must be no longer than 15 seconds Your end credits must be no longer than 30 seconds

Media: Video editing software; If your school does not have specific Video Editing Software: -

Windows Movie Maker can be downloaded for free from the Microsoft Website for PC’s iMovie can be downloaded for free from the Apple website for MAC’s

Important note: The MiFA or MiFA Education can only be used in conjunction with this assessment task.

2.

PetchaKutcha: PetchaKutcha started in 2003 in Tokyo as a way to present information quickly. The speaker is given 20 slides or images and 20 seconds to speak about each. The term PetchaKutcha comes from Japan and is used to describe the sound of conversation (‘chit chat’). Using images from the MiFA exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art create a PetchaKutcha style presentation for your class. You can take on one of the following personas: an artist from the exhibition, one of the curators from the exhibition, an Indonesian art expert or yourself. You must focus on the Formal or Personal Framework: Use your 20 slides wisely, you may choose to focus on one artist/artwork or a number, but make sure that you clearly cover the chosen Framework. Remember: Although you only have one slide, you can edit it to contain a number of images or pieces of information but don’t make it too busy for the audience. ** This is a perfect activity to introduce students to the first two Frameworks; Formal and Personal as it is quick and will help students identify the main points on which they should be focusing on. For more information check out the official PechaKucha website: http://www.pecha-kucha.org/ http://www.pechakuchamelbourne.com/

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or


3.

Artist Study: Choose two artworks by two different artists from the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Deconstruct the works in terms of the Formal and Personal Frameworks to present to your peers. When doing this you must consider the following; -

how the Elements of Art, Principles of Design and concepts have been used in the artworks and how effectively they have been used how the artist has used the Elements and Principles to communicate the artworks meanings and messages the media/materials, equipment, application techniques and processes have been used and the impact it has on the meanings and messages what you like and dislike about the artworks and why

Try to make your presentation as engaging for your audience as possible. You must include information and images using two or more of the following: PowerPoint, Sound, Video/Film or Animation. Some hints: -

Make sure that you choose artists in which you can find suitable background information. All of your evidence for your personal opinion should come from the artworks and must be based upon how the artist has used Elements and Principles Ask your ‘audience’ about what they think and what they can see to aid your presentation

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 59


UNIT 2 ART UNIT 2 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE QUESTIONS THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND CULTURE

JOMPET

I GUSTI NGURAH UDIANTARA

1.

MiFA gallery has shown a broad range of Contemporary Indonesian Arts in the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Discuss how/if you think an artist’s Nationality can impose or embed itself into their artworks and if you think that this is always a conscious act.

2.

Critically discuss how the two artists Jompet and I Gusti have communicated specific cultural issues within these works. Make specific reference of how they have used at least TWO Elements combined with at least TWO Principles to strengthen their meanings and messages.

3.

Using the Formal and Cultural Frameworks construct a persuasive argument that AGREES or DISAGREES with the following statement; Jompet and I Guti have explored ideas of power and traditional gender representations to successfully communicate with specific intent. This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 60


UNIT 2 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND CULTURE

MARIA INDRIA SARI

AY TJOE CHRISTINE

1.

The relationship between mother and child can be vastly different in different cultures. Do you think that Sari’s work explores the Indonesian relationship between mother and child, why or why not? Use Formal elements to support your argument.

2.

Do you feel that Sari and Ay Tjoe have represented the human form in direct relation to the Indonesian culture? Why or why not?

3.

Both of these works have been created by female artists, how do you think that these images support or How do you think that Sari and Ay Tjoe are reflecting their cultural gender in these works?

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 61


UNIT 2 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND CULTURE

1.

Create a visual comparison between one of the works from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art and a Contemporary Indigenous Australian work. Include: -

the cultural context of the work/s the use of the Formal elements other ways in which the artworks may relate to each other any background information that may influence the audiences opinion of the work do the artworks break or strengthen social attitudes in relation to Indigenous or Indonesian art? does the artwork serve a specific social function?

The presentation style used is up to teacher discretion.

2.

Create a historical timeline of how the female form has been presented through Indonesian art. Compare this to a timeline of how Western (English, American and Australian influences) culture has represented the female figure.

- Focus on the intention of the works; why were they created? Did they have a specific purpose? - Where were in history where the major changes? What were they? - A clear and thoughtful analysis of why you think that different cultures view and value the female form differently.

 Be careful not to get into a debate about if you think the representations are right or wrong. Although your opinion is important to how your view artworks, this exercise is just to look at the differences and why they are different. A debate about your opinion might come in to a class at a later time when looking at Visual Culture.

 If a whole group is to do this task, then each group could focus on a specific period of time and broaden the cultural inclusions to the timeline.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 62


3.

Create a story book based on one of the artworks from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art that is aimed for a Year 3/4 group. You need to focus on at least one of the Frameworks that you have studies so far and have the choice of focusing on as many or as few artworks as you feel fits into your story successfully. Suggested materials: -

Illustrator/Photoshop Recycled materials Photocopies of artist works

When you present your book to the class you need to; -

read through your book discuss how you have covered the selected Framework and give a critical analysis of the selected work in relation to the Framework discuss how the book would be used in a Year 4 group

This gives you the perfect opportunity to show your comprehension of the Frameworks as putting things in simpler terms can make them more familiar and easier to understand. A great way to strengthen your knowledge is to teach someone else! Don’t feel that your story or style has to be complicated, sometimes simple is better! You could make up a story, create a character that takes you through the work, there are endless possibilities but remember your target audience. The Year Level can be changed if there is the opportunity to read the books with a Primary School Group. Mediums and style of presentation is determined is at Teachers discretion.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 63


UNIT 2 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 1 – ART AND CULTURE

1.

Promotional Pack: MiFA is working in conjunction with the Indonesian Tourism Promotion Board (TPB) to further promote Indonesia as a strong Mecca for the arts within the Asia-Pacific. The TPB want their campaign to move beyond the stereotyped Indonesian holiday experience and want tourists to become more aware of what the country has to offer in relation to the Arts. It has been decided that the best way to do this is to use artworks that have already been exhibited in Australia, more specifically the artwork from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Your advertising team is to choose an artwork or artworks from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art that you think will best promote the diversity and integrity of the quality of work in the show. You then need to create a pitch to the rest of the advertising department (your class and teacher) to have your campaign successful. The pitch is expected to cover why the artwork/s and/or artist/s were chosen in relation to: -

An analysis of the artwork/s in relation to the Formal Framework The quality of Indonesian contemporary art Their reflection of beliefs, values and traditions Challenge the Australian social attitudes towards Indonesian contemporary art

Your presentation can include one or all of the following: -

Power Point Video Pamphlets, posters and/or other advertising materials

-

Play/Skit (maybe for a TV ad?) Any other mediums that are relevant to your target audience Mock website design

How you insert the required information is up to you, be innovative! To look at the current tourism promotion from Indonesia: Visit Indonesia: http://www.indonesia.travel/ Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Republic of Indonesia: http://www.budpar.go.id/indexprofil.php

2.

Inquiry Interview: To further develop your understanding of how contemporary Indonesian art and culture is seen within your local community you are going to conduct an Inquiry Interview. In a group of 2-4 write a minimum of 15 questions that you feel are most important to scale the knowledge of at least 10 interviewees on Indonesian art and culture. The data that you collect will be presented in a multimedia presentation that should include video or sound that highlights your main This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 64


findings as well as your opinion in reaction to these findings. To conclude your inquiry, reflect on your initial impressions to the works from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art and if your opinion of the quality of contemporary Indonesian art has changed and why. Some points to ponder: -

You may like to take on a character or persona to make you more comfortable, but don’t let this character take away from the important data that you are acquiring. You can use artist works from the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art to use as visual aids in your interviews. For your data interview a large range of age groups, some people to politely ask to participate are; teachers, friends, family members, community members etc. You may like to broaden your inquiry by asking for peoples help through the internet (people you know, friends parents or safe online communities that you are involved in)

Note: If this is going to be used as a whole class project, it would be ideal for groups to focus on one area or specific topic.

3.

Symposium Discussion: You are a Melbourne Art Historian that has been asked by MiFA to create a presentation at a Symposium on the importance of Asian Art in the contemporary art scene. Using the images from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art, you are to discus; “Representations in Indonesia Contemporary Art; History, Traditional Techniques and Gender Roles.”* In order to strengthen your discussion, you are to Focus on TWO OR MORE of the Frameworks. Remember that you would have a range of audience that may not only be visual learners. Although it is hard to cater to everyone you can make your presentation interesting by using a combination of media and techniques into your delivery. You must include two or more of the following to support your argument depending on your expertise; -

PowerPoint Sound Video/Film Animation Hand-outs (must be relevant and provide valuable information to the audience)

*Note: This topic is intentionally broad so students can identify, provide evidence of and clearly discuss their personal opinions of the works individually and as a collection. Visual Learners: learn through seeing Auditory Learners: learn through listening Tactile/Kinaesthetic Learners: learn through moving, doing and touching

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 65


UNIT 3 ART UNIT 3 ART – WRITTEN REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 1 –INTERPRETING ART

1.

Find two artworks that you find confronting within the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art then research two other works pre 1970 that give you the same reaction. Closely explore these reasons in conjunction with the Analytical Frameworks and reflect on the artists indented meaning of the work.

2.

Raden Saleh (1807 – 1811) is considered one of the most famous Indonesian master painters with works that are considered to be influenced by the European Romantic painters of that period. Using the Analytical Frameworks, compare the influence of the European style within Saleh’s work and discuss if you think Saleh had an impact on Indonesian painters today, using artists from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art to support your argument.

3.

Considerable effort and time goes in to most beautiful works of art. Looking at the two dresses by Samsul Arifin in the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art, discuss why you think that the clear lines and meanings between Fashion and art have blurred. To support this argument use the Analytical Frameworks and use fashion in at least two pre 1970 artworks.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 66


UNIT 3 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 1 –INTERPRETING ART

ANGKI PURBANDONO

EKO NUGROHO

1.

Discuss how you think these artworks represent contemporary Indonesian culture in direct reference to the Analytical Frameworks to support your argument.

2.

The use of selective colour has major impact on how an audience will perceive an artwork; selective colour can represent personal meaning, a specific mood/feeling or act as a symbol and so on. Nugroho and Edward Steichen in the work The Flatiron, 1904*, have selectively used cool blues, analyse how and why they have chosen selective colour to communicate the audience by using the Analytical Frameworks to support your argument. * http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/33.43.39

3.

Nugroho work adopts a comic quality and usually has a strong commentary element about events happening around him. Using the symbols represented in his work and the Analytical frameworks discuss your interpretation of this visual commentary.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 67


UNIT 3 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 1 –INTERPRETING ART

SAMSUL ARIFIN

TRAMORAMA

1.

Discuss the complexities as a young student in talking about highly conceptual contemporary artworks that do not clearly define the artists’ intention through the artwork itself. You are able to use any artworks to answer but be sure to reflect on the Analytical Frameworks to clarify your opinion.

2.

How have Arifin’s and Tramorama’s choice of using black affected the way they communicate with the audience? Imagine that these works were created in purple or green, how do you think that you would view them differently?

3.

Look at the use of symbolism in these two works, if you had to give them a gender which would it be? Consider how the artists have created these works and the use of elements and principles. Reflect back on this written piece in one month’s time and write discuss your opinion again, has it changed?

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 68


UNIT 3 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 1 –INTERPRETING ART

1.

Visual analysis You will need:     

1 whiteboard marker or Sharpie 8 pieces of tracing paper or clear sheet of plastic (such as Transparency Film) Copies of two artworks from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art Two artworks pre 1970 that you have been studying in class – teachers choice Paper clips or bulldog clips

1.

Put one layer of the transparency over each image and clip it on with your paper clips or bulldog clips.

2.

Working on one image at a time, circle each element or principle and write any arts language and put small E&P on the bottom of the transparency and do this for each of your 4 artworks.

3.

On your fresh transparency label all your thoughts, parts of the work that communicate best to you and label that sheet communications and do this for each of your 4 artworks.

4.

Now put both transparencies on top of each work and compare the differences. Write a page on what the differences you have found, were you surprised by how much you could think about the works, which artwork had more identified, does it make you feel more confident in your knowledge, has this changed or challenged your opinion about the work, did you find something in the work/s that you hadn’t picked up on before?

Discuss your findings with the rest of the class and also discuss how an audience’s perception of an artwork can differ from person to person.

2.

Six Degrees of Separation All artworks are connected, no matter how different the subject matter or the medium/s used there is usually at least one Element, Principle or theme that can connect them for comparison. Using 15 artworks that have been chosen by your teacher from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art create a visual map of how all of the artworks are connected. Think carefully how you are going to plan this out as the connections will be abundant. Include the Analytical Frameworks and any other bits and pieces that you think are important to document. When you are done compare your findings with the rest of your class, did everyone have the same findings, why or why not? This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 69


3.

Angry artist Pick an artist from the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. You are the artist __________ and you have just read a review from a very prominent exhibition reviewer from a newspaper. The interviewer has written an insulting and has misrepresented the real meaning of your artwork. Of course you are quite upset (to say the least) and have decided to take action, you are going to write to this reviewer and set the record straight, if he/she cannot interpret your work correctly then you are going write the review from your expert knowledge on the work. You intend to point out all the mistakes in this review and include a copy of the artwork with handwritten notes.

-

Choose an artwork that you originally disliked but have had your opinion change, write down some of these ideas so you can use them as the ‘reviewers’ comments.

-

Use the Analytical Frameworks when describing ‘your view’ of the work.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 70


UNIT 3 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 1 –INTERPRETING ART

1.

Grant funding Now that you have started to work closely with your ideas for your next phase of work, you are seeking funding to further finance your amazing plans. The MiFA Grants council have narrowed the selection down to just a handful and they have asked you to give a five minute presentation to prove to them why you deserve the grant. The catch is that you will be working with the best of the best Indonesian artists, they have given you a sneak peak of these artists in the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art, so be sure to mention them in your presentation. In this presentation they have asked you to present: -

your inspiration: four artists that have had a great impact on your current works, they expect you to recognize not only contemporary artists, but also artists pre 1970

-

meanings, messages and aesthetical influences: what you take from these artists and how their influence can be seen in your work to date and what you have planned work for the immediate future (Analytical Frameworks as well as meanings and messages)

TIP: Some of the members of the council can be a bit tired from all their hard work, so don’t neglect to clearly outline your similarities. They also like to be entertained, so make sure you use more than one mode of presentation!

2.

Game Show In a pair create a game show that allows you to show your knowledge on four artists from Close the Gap: Contemporary Indonesian Art as well as two artists each of your choice from your chosen studies this semester. The game show will be put into four sections: Formal Framework, Cultural Framework, Personal Framework and Contemporary Framework There are many templates on the internet that you can use as a basic idea, if you do use one of these you need to enhance its presentation quality in some way. You can split your class up into groups of 3-4 and add in a bonus round for extra points. This will not only test your knowledge but your classmates and teacher/s.

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3.

Materials and methods plan: Using two works from the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art to closely study, one must be a three dimensional piece. Write a short statement about how you feel about the works, what do you like, what don’t you like and why did you choose them? 1. For each work, make some assumptions about each of the works; how long it took to make, if it was easy or hard, how much planning went into the work, conceptual input etc 2. You are now going to pretend that the works that you have chosen are imaginary artworks that you are going to make yourself, but you are very meticulous and like to plan out every element. Make a table for each of the works that will incorporate: -

Experimentation time

-

Amount of materials used and a rough budget of how much it will cost

-

Actual hours spent working

-

Problems you might encounter and how you are going to work around them

-

How much you would eventually charge for the work

Think about these aspects very carefully and use the images provided to study the works. 3. Compare the outcomes of the two artworks, what did you find? How easy is it to estimate how much time it takes to create a piece of work? What were the differences between the three dimensional work and the other work chosen? 4. How do you feel about the artworks now? Has your opinion and assumptions changed in relation to: -

the artist

-

the artwork

-

the time value of one work in relation to another

You may present this to your class as a Multimedia project but have the choice of what programs/materials you utilize.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 72


UNIT 4 ART UNIT 4 ART – A WRITTEN REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 4, AREA OF STUDY 1 – DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

1.

Clearly outline how Gender roles have been portrayed within the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Explore how the artists have intended to symbolise the gendered body within their work and consider how they contrast to artist from the period of the Renaissance.

2.

The art market in Indonesia is on the brink of exploding within Australia but what are the potential benefits and pitfalls that will fall as the demand for contemporary Indonesian art and how does this compare with the demand for contemporary Australian art by using examples of Del Kathryn Barton, Patricia Piccinini and Ricky Swallow? Use the interview with MiFA co-director Bryan Collie as well as the article in the Asia One news (link below) as well as at least two commentary articles from your own research to support your argument. http://news.asiaone.com/News/The%2BStraits%2BTimes/Story/A1Story20080402-57465.html

3.

Bryan Collie makes several references and comparisons between the international standing of Australian art and Asian art and the role of the Galleries and Auction houses in their popularity. Conduct your own research and compare how contemporary Australian artworks have stood up against Asian artworks throughout the past five years. Compare one Australian artwork and one Asian artwork that have been record breaking sales and give an analysis of why you think this is the case with reference to the Formal Framework.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 73


UNIT 4 ART – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 4, AREA OF STUDY 1 – DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

SONI IRAWAN

HARIS PURNAMA

1.

In what ways do the artworks challenge your preconceptions about Indonesian art? Where do you think you got these preconceptions?

2.

As a viewer of art as well as an artist, there are artworks that can push your boundaries of personal comfort. Discuss the difference in how the artworks by Purnama and Irawan affect you and if you think their messages are less important because they do so

3.

Each of us responds to artworks differently and will connect with works depending on personal taste. Discuss how personal taste, experiences and nationality can get in the way of engaging with an artwork. Use direct reference to two artworks that you have already studied this year as well as the work of Purnama and Irawan.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 74


UNIT 4 ART – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES (SUPPORTED BY VISUAL REFERENCES) THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 4, AREA OF STUDY 1 – DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

YUDI SULISTIYO

BUDI UBRUK

1.

How do you think that historical knowledge as well as artist commentaries influence and inform people’s decisions upon contemporary art? Make reference to one of these artworks from Sulostiyo or Ubruk as well as one artwork that you have studied this year.

2.

In your personal opinion, which of these artworks by Sulostiyo and Ubruk do you think is stronger to represent the Indonesian culture? Why do you think this is? How does your personal experiences and knowledge reflect on this decision?

3.

Seeing as the internet has made information readily available that it enhances or hinders our opinions and value of artists’ works? Use the interview An interview with artist Ay Tjoe Christine as your example. An interview with artist Ay Tjoe Christine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHxP3KkTaI4

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 75


UNIT 4 ART – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 4, AREA OF STUDY 1 – DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

1.

Art politics: Dear Sir or Madame, The art world has been divided lately by an inflammatory statement made by an prominent member of the ‘Out with Art’ party saying; An artist’s nationality is always evident through their technical style and subject matter. This has caused a large stir within arts around the globe and we are asking the prominent members of the Australian art community to present papers to tell us what they think of this outlandish ignorance! We hope that we can count on your agreeing that this is ridiculous and haven’t been swayed by this comment. Obviously we will have to spell it out in plain terms for this anti-art party so please consider using visual examples, commentaries and bowl them over with your knowledge on the Analytical Frameworks. We hope that we can count on your support! Yours sincerely, The ‘Art for everyone’ party.

2.

Issu – An online response booklet To promote how easy it is to learn about contemporary artworks you are going to publish your own booklet based on Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Each student will be given one or two artworks by their teacher to thoroughly explore for this publication. You need to include; -

The artwork with the correct dimensions A formal analysis of the artwork Any background information about the artist that you have found A personal reflection of the artwork, how you have responded to it Three questions you think the viewer should ask themselves about the artwork

Note: This is also a great recourse to include in your resume and application to further education courses in the arts! This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 76


3.

Interactive timeline Choose an issue or topic that you have covered in Unit 4 and create an interactive timeline to present to your class. Make sure you cover the importance of these events and how they have impacted on arts practice today. For example you could choose: -

Art as a recorder; what role has art played throughout history? Censorship; artworks that have caused major scandal Evolution of art through a particular culture e.g. Indonesia The rise of Installation art Art history time line; popular movements

Easy tutorials on how to do this are available on the internet, here is an example: http://www.ampercent.com/create-interactive-timelines-excel-web-tools/5419/

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 77


UNIT 4 ART – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: ART UNIT 4, AREA OF STUDY 1 – DISCUSSING AND DEBATING ART

1.

Multimedia Debate Using artworks from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art as well as other artworks that you have studied as a group this year prepare a debate based on the statement by co-director of MiFA, Bryan Collie; With any country, time or period, centuries and centuries back, art is the most important part of the culture it is the blood of it, without art in the culture it’s nothing. You find it in tribes and anywhere in the deep Amazon you find art, it doesn’t matter but culture has to have it. The success of the debate will be heavily dependent on evidence through; visual examples, music, video, use of commentaries and knowledge of the Analytical frameworks. The class will then decide which team and/or debater is successful.

2.

Video response Create a video response to the interview between Co-Director of MiFA Bryan Collie and Education Officer Nicole Anderson, with the intention of posting it on YouTube*. Make sure you have well founded opinions and are able to back them up with examples. Create an opening title and end sequence that cites any artworks, music or other borrowed materials.

3.

Interactive Timeline As a class research artists and/or artworks that have been censored throughout history and make a list. Divide this list between the class to research further. Create an interactive historical timeline to collate this research. http://www.ampercent.com/create-interactive-timelines-excel-web-tools/5419/

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 78


UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS – EXTENDED WRITTEN RESPONSE THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 3 – INTERPRETATION OF ART IDEAS AND USE OF MATERIALS

1.

Since Raden Saleh in the 1800’s how have international art movements influenced the direction of Indonesian art?

2.

When comparing the works in Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art is it safe to say that the Indonesian artists use the same materials and techniques as contemporary Australian or American artists but in a unique way? Give specific reference to artists to strengthen your answer.

3.

Discuss how Sugiarto has referenced Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker and how the image of the contemplative male has changed through cultures and throughout one hundred years.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 79


UNIT 1 STUDIO ARTS – SHORT ANSWER WRITTEN RESPONSE THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 1, AREA OF STUDY 3 – INTERPRETATION OF ART IDEAS AND USE OF MATERIALS

1.

Discuss three artists in Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art that have used identifiable sources of inspiration from other artists or cultures within their works.

2.

Compare how three artists in Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art have employed paint in significantly different ways which affects how the audience interprets the work.

3.

Indonesia has a strong history in textiles although Maria Indria Sari and Samsul Arifin are the only artists in Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art that have included textiles within their work. Discuss why you think this is and how they have used a culturally rich medium in contemporary application.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 80


UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS – EXTENDED RESPONSE QUESTIONS THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 2 – IDEAS AND STYLES IN ARTWORKS

1.

Ay Tjoe Christine and Francis Bacon both use abstraction of the human form within their works. With direct reference to the elements and principles argue how each artist has used abstraction to produce similar yet strikingly identifiable styles that are each unique.

2.

Within their works Purbandono and Purnama have used symbolism and repetition. Compare how each artist has these in varying degrees of obviousness and how it impacts upon your interpretations of their works.

3.

Compare the work of Maria Indria Sari with Judy Napangardi Watson through the elements, principles and mediums. How has each of the artists represented traditional aesthetic qualities from each of their cultures into their contemporary practice?

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 81


UNIT 2 STUDIO ARTS – SHORT ANSWER RESPONSE QUESTIONS

THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 2, AREA OF STUDY 2 – IDEAS AND STYLES IN ARTWORKS

1.

Discuss how the lack of symbols used within Ay Tjoe Christine work can affect and influence they audience.

2.

What are the similarities and differences of the employed elements and principles in Jean-Michel Basquiat, Philistines 1982, and Soni Irawan’s work?

3.

Identify an artwork within Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art that you feel best uses elements, principles and symbols and why.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 82


UNIT 3 STUDTIO ARTS UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ANNOTATED VISUAL REPORT

THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 3 – PROFESSIONAL ART PRACTICES AND STYLES

1.

Select two artists from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art and two artist’s pre 1970. With the inclusion of examples of these works, create a Venn Diagram that explores; historical/cultural context, meanings in the artworks, elements, principles, materials, influences, symbols.

2.

Compare Soni Irawans work from Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art to Australian Indigenous paintings as well as a work from Del Kathryn Barton. Compare how they use of repetitive pattern to communicate ideas and meanings.

3.

Using your selected artists, show evidence of how you can see each artist develop their technical styles and conceptual process through a timeline of their works.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 83


UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ESSAY THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 3 – PROFESSIONAL ART PRACTICES AND STYLES

1.

Select one artist from the Surrealist art movement and relate two of their works to two artists Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art. Explore how the artists you have chosen have used symbolism to enhance the meaning of their works.

2.

How do the artists in the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art pay homage to their cultural heritage within their own works? Make reference to how the artists use materials, techniques and essays.

3.

The majority of the artists in Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art have used monochromatic or very limited colour palettes. Compare two artists from the exhibition with two other artists from another period of art history. Explore the reasons why these artists employed this method in relation to meanings and messages as well as explain your opinion on how the artists have justified this in their choice of subject matter.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 84


UNIT 3 STUDIO ARTS – ORAL REPORT THIS SECTION OF THE EDUCATION PACK IS TO BE USED WITH: STUDIO ART UNIT 3, AREA OF STUDY 3 – PROFESSIONAL ART PRACTICES AND STYLES

1.

Using the Venn diagram that you used in your Annotated Visual Report as the start of background research, present your findings to the class. You can choose to use any media format to present your report but make sure to use visual references.

2.

Discuss how artists in the exhibition Closing the Gap: Indonesian Contemporary Art have represent contemporary gender roles and how they relate to the traditional gender roles in Asian Cultures. Use visual references to support your findings.

3.

In Sigit Santosos work After the Crucifixion #2, 2010, has interpreted a strong Catholic belief and appropriated it into a different cultural context. Discuss how other artists through history have appropriated the Crucifixion of Jesus in artworks and how they have been met buy audiences around the world.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 85


ARTWORKS

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Angki Purbandono Chili Dancer, 2010 Neon Box, 200 x 100 x 20 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 87


Angki Purbandono Sinchan Chili, 2010 Neon Box, 100 x 150 x 20 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 88


Angki Purbandono Foremon, 2010 Neon Box, 200 x 50 x 20 cm

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Ay Tjoe Christine Study of First September Doll, 2010 Mixed Media on Canvas, 150 x 125cm This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 90


Budi Ubruk Stock Market, 2010 Oil on Canvas, 200 x 150 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 91


Eko Nugroho Duo Petualang Berbulu, 2010 Installation, hardboard, embroidery, 300x600cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 92


Entang Wiharso Undeclared Skins 2010 Aluminium and Brass Cast, Varied Dimensions approximately 100 x 100 cm each This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 93


FX Harsono Rewriting The Erased Name No. 6, 2010 Oil on Canvas, 100 x 270 cm This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 94


FX Harsono Memory of a Name – Rewriting The Erased #1, 2009 C- Print, Edition of 5

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 95


FX Harsono Memory of a Name – Rewriting The Erased #2, 2009 C- Print, Edition of 5

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 96


I Gusti Ngurah Udiantara Level of Beauty, 2010 6 Layer Cutting Aluminium, 117 x 109 cm

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Jompet War of Java, Do You Remember?, 2008 Human sized figures in mixed media.

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 98


Mangu Putra Out of Control, 2010 Acrylic on Canvas, 190 x 190xcm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 99


Maria Indria Sari I am big, you are small, 2009 Mixed Media, 100 x 100 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 100


This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties.

101

Maria Indria Sari Playing in the Kitchen (series of 8 pillow dolls), 2010 Textile, thread, buttons, safety pin, zip and multiplex, Varied Dimensions approximately 160 x 70 cm each


Maria Indria Sari Playing in the Kitchen (Washing Machine), 2010 Textile, thread, buttons, safety pin, zip and multiplex, 150 x 60 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 102


Prilla Tania Space Within Time #7, 2010 Still from Stop Motion Video, Edition of 6

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 103


Prilla Tania Space Within Time #7, 2010 Still from Stop Motion Video, Edition of 6

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 104


Samsul Arifin You Can See (Black), 2010 Fabric and Dacron, 175cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 105


Samsul Arifin You Can See (White), 2010 Fabric and Dacron, 175cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 106


Sigit Santoso After the Crucifixion #2, 2010 Oil on Canvas, 200 x 150 cm This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 107


Soni Irawan Come to Me #2, 2010 Oil bar, acrylic and permanent marker on canvas, 200 x 200 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 108


Tromarama After and After, 2010 Still from Video animation, 3 min 18 sec Music by Brian Setzer

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 109


Tromarama After and After, 2010 Still from Video animation, 3 min 18 sec Music by Brian Setzer

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 110


This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 111


Tromarama After and After, 2010 Still from Video animation, 3 min 18 sec Music by Brian Setzer

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 112


Ugy Sugiarto Muse, 2010 Acrylic on Canvas, 200 x 150cm This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 113


Yudi Sulistiyo Memonry WW1, 2010 PVC Pipe and Cardboard Pulp, 270 x 135 x 210 cm

This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 114


This resource is the intellectual property of MiFA Gallery and Nicole Anderson and cannot be reproduced without permission from both parties. 115


Education Pack: Closing the Gap, Indonesian Contemporary Art  

Education Pack

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