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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Provide healthy options, promote healthy eating BY MARIA KIRKPATRICK

How can parents separate myth from fact as they try to meet the dietary needs of their families? It’s not easy, admits Carol Walsh, registered dietitian at The Corvallis Clinic in Corvallis. Her best advice: Just like learning to get dressed, learning to eat is a process. Parenting magazines, family-friendly television and movies and advertisements marketing to children all sell the notion that children need special foods and foods with packaging or shaping that appeals to youngsters. Not true, Walsh said. The idea that children need a different kind of food than adults absolutely is a myth, Walsh said. Kid-friendly meals and packaging? It’s just marketing. The food industry and its marketing convince some people that kids will only eat “kiddy” foods. A lot of those are highly processed, sugary, salty, colored foods. “It also is a myth that children should be served only bland foods,” Walsh said. ”Kids who are brought up in other cultures start eating seasoned foods with their families when they are young.” Parents should understand learning to eat well is a process that begins at an early age and continues

FOR YOUR BOOKSHELF For more guidance on raising healthy eaters, Carol Walsh of The Corvallis Clinic recommends books by registered dietitian and child feeding expert, Ellyn Satter. Walsh also suggests that Walsh’s books would make great gifts for baby showers. Satter’s books can be found in the library or online at ellynsat ter.com.

through young adulthood. Parents can allow children to experiment with the food adults eat so that they grow up seeing that eating that way is normal. Parents should remember that the first time children taste a new food, they might make a face or spit it out. Walsh’s advice? Instead of dubbing a particular food a failure and removing it from the menu, parents need to add it in at a different time or maybe try to add it in a different way, shape or form.

CORVALLIS GAZETTE-TIMES FILE PHOTO

Providing fresh fruit is one way to encourage healthy eating habits. adults think that kid-sized portions are larger than what their child might actually need. Due to “supersizing” it is hard for parents to know the right portions for themselves. “It’s the parent’s job to make the fruit and vegetables available,” Walsh said. “Let the children decide whether to eat and how much to eat. Maybe it just doesn’t appeal to them that day.” Recommended daily foods are just that — recommended. “That means parents should provide a variety of

healthy foods and let the kid choose to eat them, or not, depending on their appetite. Don’t assume that your child doesn’t like, or has stopped liking, a food just because they turn it down once or twice,” Walsh said. “Just keep providing it so you can hit on the day the child decides to join in and eat it.” If one parent doesn’t like a food, that doesn’t have to be a reason to avoid preparing the food. Walsh said it’s best to just put it out for an option so children are exposed to a See DIET on 7

Clear your plate? Another myth is that parents are responsible for deciding how much a child should eat. The age-old adage, “clear your plate” doesn’t and shouldn’t work. Parents worry their children don’t eat enough fruit or vegetables or enough at one meal, Walsh said. Part of that problem is that

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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Cloth diapers covering more BY JENNIFER ROUSE

When people come into WeeBunz, Amy Ghozeil’s Corvallis-based cloth diaper store, and ask for rubber pants — the bunchy, plasticy outer layer that older generations put on over their kids’ diapers to prevent leaks — she has to tell them that they’re out of luck. “We don’t have the rubber pants,” she said. “These are not like your grandma’s diapers anymore.” Folding up flat white rectangles and holding them in place with long metal diaper pins are out; specialty micro-suede fabrics and Velcro closures are in. In fact, according to parents who use them, cloth diapers aren’t so much harder than disposables. “I don’t think cloth diapers are really more work,” said Andrea Fifhouse of Corvallis, who has used cloth for both her children, aged 3 and 11 months. “It does add to the laundry, but we never have to worry about going to the store to buy more diapers.” The fact that Fifhouse and other parents like her are even considering cloth diapers tells a tale of its own. In 1997, an article in The New York Times proclaimed the cloth diaper “almost extinct.” Since their inception in the 1950s and the invention of superabsorbent polymer filling in the 1980s, disposable diapers grew to incorporate the vast majority of U.S. consumers. When Ghozeil was pregnant with her first child seven years ago, “there

JESSE SKOUBO | CORVALLIS GAZETTE-TIMES

Amy Ghozeil’s store, WeeBunz, offers the latest in cloth diapers. Just don’t ask for plastic covers. wasn’t a cloth diaper on a store shelf anywhere in Corvallis,” she said. But in the last decade, cloth diapers have begun to make a comeback. A 2008 Time magazine article reports that cloth diaper manufacturers are expanding at a rate of 25-50 percent per year, despite the troubled U.S. economy. The number of cloth diaper companies has exploded in recent years, with multitudes of options with names like HappyHeinys, Fuzzi Buns, and bumGenius, with a variety of fabrics, patterns, and styles available. Descriptions of modern cloth diapers read like high-performance athletic wear: components include microfibers, hemp,

and merino wool; stretch, absorbency, and wicking material are among the factors included in their design. After three years of cloth diapering with diapers she ordered off the Internet, Ghozeil started WeeBunz in 2006 and opened a retail

space in 2007. She said she’s received an enthusiastic response to the store. “There are a lot of people who really want to try to save money, and other people really want to reduce the environmental impact,” she said. See CLOTH on 4

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

FIND THE RIGHT CLOTH DIAPER FOR YOUR NEEDS Surprised or a little confused by the new array of cloth diapers? Check out our handy guide:

Pre-folds These are the most familiar type of cloth diapers: thick, 100 percent cotton flat diapers. If you use a diaper service for the laundry, this is the type they will give you. A waterproof cover goes over the top of the inner cotton layer. The covers are made of hospital-grade laminate fabrics that keep the diapers from leaking, and snaps or Velcro on the cover hold the whole thing in place. They’re the most economical diaper option.

Cost: $130-150 for a set of enough diapers and covers to cloth diaper fulltime. A diaper service is $20-27 per week.

All-in-Ones These, like the prefolds, have an interior absorbent layer and a waterproof outer layer, but the whole thing is sewn together, to be worn and washed as one piece. Some also include an extra interior layer that goes next to the skin and wicks moisture away from the baby. They close with snaps or Velcro. Taking these on and off is very similar to taking disposables on and off, which makes them the easiest to use.

Cost: The most expensive cloth diapering option, a set of two dozen allin-ones could be $300500 depending on the brand you buy.

Pocket diapers These are similar to the all-in-ones. They’re designed to be worn as one piece, but with a pocket to place an absorbent insert inside. You separate the layers when you wash them, which means they wash and dry more quickly than all-in-ones. Cost: This could vary depending on the type and number of inserts you use (some people use double inserts at night). $300-

400 for a set of two dozen.

A combination Most cloth diapering parents use a combination of styles. Some might use the cheaper pre-fold and cover option at home, but invest in a few of the more expensive all-in-ones or pocket diapers because they’re easier for babysitters or grandparents to use. Cost: depends how many of each you choose. WeeBunz offers package deals with a mixture of pre-folds and some pocket diapers: its “Deluxe Diapering Package” costs $198. — Jennifer Rouse, for Early Years

Cloth Continued from 3

Environmental impact Do cloth diapers actually help the environment? In the 1990s, 22 states considered taxing disposable diapers to deal with their environmental impact, and diaper manufacturers fought

back, claiming that the extra cost of laundering cloth diapers offsets their environmental benefits. Cloth diaper advocates, however, say that studies claiming disposable diapers were more See CLOTH on 8

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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Find balance with young children SAMARITAN HEALTH SERVICES

With all the lessons, teams and other activities available to children these days, many parents feel a sense of obligation to provide as many opportunities as possible. There are concerns about children missing out on an activity they Christy could po- Rummel tentially excel at — and, while most of us won’t admit it — a quiet worry that other kids will get a leg up on our own offspring. This desire to expose our children to sports, music, clubs and more has resulted in many households being overscheduled on a daily basis. Christy Rummel, a master of science in nursing and a family nurse practitioner with Samaritan Health Services, offers some cautions about this fast-lane lifestyle. “Balance in life is essential, and this is even more important for the young child,” said Rummel, who specializes in integrative medicine for the entire family. “Too much stimulation, activities and commitments can overwhelm a child. He or she can feel obligated to perform well in order to achieve love or acceptance. It also can overstimulate and cause problems with sleep and subsequently affect school performance.” Rummel offers a few tips to ensure a balanced family schedule:

• Keep things simple. If you have multiple children, choose one activity/sport for each child during a particular season. • Try to be actively involved yourself in activities the child is interested in. This is more important because it harbors love, relationships and focuses back on family as the main teacher of life skills. You get the added benefit of doing the activities with your child. You could throw a baseball together, play basketball together, go on a hike together, or do the garden-

ing together. This simplifies things. In addition, children want to learn from the person they love, respect, and know the best, and that is often their parents or main caregivers. • Think about yourself, too. When your child is at an activity/sport, either do something active with your other children or exercise while your child is busy participating. • Set a specific time for bedtime, and keep this consistent even during summer and after school activity time. This can often help with or

prevent problems with behavioral sleep problems. • Ensure there’s family time. Plan to have designated family time for dinner, game night or whatever brings your family together. • Start a family calendar. This can help lower stress and keep everybody on the same page. “Remember, you can’t do it all, for yourself or for each one of your children,” said Rummel. “Each child’s experience is unique, and thus creates the uniqueness in our personality and character.”

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Yoga class stretches imagination BY MARIA L. KIRKPATRICK

“Stand tall and reach to the sky like a tree.” “Curl up small like a turtle.” Such are the instructor’s directions to participants in the Thursday morning Little Yogis class at EcoFusion Fitness in Corvallis. Brandee Gerow, owner at EcoFusion, has created exercise and yoga classes just for preschoolers to get them and their parents moving, stretching and relaxing together. Gerow, a preschool parent herself, understands the benefit of motion and agility and uses her knowledge to guide participants in techniques that can help calm and achieve focus. At EcoFusion, toddler yoga and preschool yoga include a lightly structured practice of yoga poses, set to a theme, story or songs. “Loose structure allows for changes to the flow of class depending on the children’s energy levels, moods and amount of focus, or lack thereof,” Gerow said. “Through these poses, games, stories and songs, children learn creativity, focus, stillness and techniques to redirect themselves while gaining strength and balance.” Through yoga, Gerow hopes to teach children techniques to calm and focus their attention when necessary, even though they may not know it. “And it’s fun,” she said. “Parents and children find it hard not to laugh when jumping around like a frog or practicing breathing techniques while making silly faces.”

EcoFusion fitness owner Brandee Gerow strikes a pose with a young student in the Little Yogis class for 3- to 5-year-olds. The classes permit youngsters to have a fun experience in a comfortable setting. MARIA KIRKPATRICK FOR EARLY YEARS

Suzanne Davis, owner and instructor at Love Yoga in Albany, also teaches yoga to youngsters. She said parents tell her that the breathing and relaxation techniques are useful during outbursts and especially before bedtime. Even though it may seem that the child is paying little attention to the motions, Davis said parents often report back that their child

shows family and friends what they learned in class. “This activity with parents is a good bonding time,” Davis said. A typical class will teach poses that help improve balance, focus and strength. They may be performed individually, with a parent or as a group. Toward the end of class, there are a few minutes of Savasana — total re-

laxation time — on the mat. Parent involvement is required, but they are encouraged to let loose and allow their children to be silly. A bit of light redirection is all that may be necessary. Gerow understands it takes time for children to become accustomed to new friends and be comfortable with the setting and wants See YOGA on 13

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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Diet

Continued from 2 variety of foods. Let them see adult food and even call something “grownup” food to encourage children to try something new. Learning to eat new foods is all a part of growing up. “Just like they choose clothes from the options the parent provides,” Walsh said, “parents can allow kids to choose what and how much to eat from what they have decided to make available for the family meal.”

Snack-time myths A third myth, Walsh said, is that children need constant access to snacks. Many households set aside a cupboard or pantry shelf for snack items and allow children to get them when they want. “While some snacking can be beneficial,” Walsh said, “many kids are allowed snacks all day long.” Unfortunately, most “snack foods” stored this way are highly processed and laden with salt and sugar. The biggest problem, however, is that when kids have continual access to even healthy snack foods, they are unlikely to be hungry at meal time. It is a lot easier for them to turn up their noses at a balanced meal when they aren’t very hungry. Parents are less likely to hear “I don’t like that,” if their child hasn’t eaten for a few hours. Instead, offer snacks that are similar to the food groups you’d offer for a meal and schedule the snack times. For example, instead of a bag of cheesy crackers or a granola bar, offer a quarter

of a sandwich and small glass of milk. Young children have small stomachs and it’s not unusual for active children to take a break for a snack. It’s the parent’s job to make that snack count for a food group and to schedule snacking so it doesn’t disrupt the next meal. Finally, Walsh said, is the myth that vegetable haters are likely to have nutrient deficiencies. Not true. While vegetables are good for the body, they are not the most important food group. Fruits supply a lot of vitamins and minerals and whole grains also provide valuable nutrients. “As children learn to like vegetables, they will eat them,” Walsh said. “Put

ANDY CRIPE | CORVALLIS GAZETTE-TIMES

Teaching healthy eating habits can be as simple as picking out fresh fruit at local farmers markets. things out there so children can grow to consider them. Try preparing vegetables different ways and purchase them in season for more fresh flavor.” Children are not always born with adult taste buds. Growing up as with growing to like certain foods all is a work in progress. Parents are there for

guidance. It is a parent’s responsibility to plan menus using good sense. “Everybody makes food mistakes,” Walsh said. “It is important to remember that, and to know that you and your children can learn from them.” Maria Kirkpatrick is a freelance writer who lives in Corvallis.

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Cloth

Holly Canan holds a bundle of diapers at South Side Suds where she does the laundry for her diaper service ‘Baby Go Lucky.’ The return to cloth diapers as the choice of young parents has seen an explosion in diaper services such as Canan’s, which was profiled in 2010.

Continued from 4

environmentally friendly than cloth were flawed and failed to take into account the water and petroleum used to manufacture the disposable diapers. When it comes to saving money, cloth diapers cost more initially — expectant parents will spend several hundred dollars investing in a full set of cloth diapers. However, parents spending $50 or more per month at the grocery store for disposables will likely spend more than a thousand dollars on diapers before their child is potty-trained. Cost was one big reason Brenda and Michael Ellis of Adair Village decided to use cloth diapers for their two sons. “When you’re a stay-athome parent, you kind of feel that pressure because you’re not earning a paycheck,” Brenda Ellis said. “Cloth diapering is one big way I can put in a little more work and help out the pocketbook a lot.” What about the laundry? Today’s cloth-diapering parents don’t find themselves boiling vats of soiled diapers on the stovetop to

sterilize them or doing a complicated routine of swishing, soaking, rinsing and washing. Most parents dispose of any solid waste in the toilet, put the dirty diapers in a dry pail, and then do a load of diapers in the washing machine a few times a week. “With the advancement in washing machine technology, it does all of the work,” Fifhouse said. “We just have to remember to put them in.” Diaper services, like the Corvallis-based Baby Go Lucky diaper service, can provide you with diapers and handle the laundry for you, for a fee. A “full service” diaper service package is $27 per week. Ghozeil said she actually likes the fact that she can wash her kids’ diapers as often as she feels like it. “If it’s the middle of the night and my baby has a virus and is going through diapers like crazy, we don’t have to rush to the store to get more,” she said. “I can just throw in a load of laundry and make as many clean diapers as I need.” Ellis said she uses a mix

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JESSE SKOUBO CORVALLIS GAZETTE-TIMES

of cloth and disposable diapers, depending on the situation. “When I first started, I was very rigid about using only cloth,” she said. “Now, I would say we use cloth about 85 percent of the time.” When they go camping or on long trips, they switch to

disposable, she said. “Cloth diapering is not necessarily simpler,” she said. “You have to weigh your priorities and find a balance that works for you.” Jennifer Rouse is a freelance writer who lives in Albany.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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SIDS rate drops as deaths investigated BY MARIA L. KIRKPATRICK

ETHAN ERICKSON | CORVALLIS GAZETTE-TIMES

Katie McQuillan sets her daughter Ainsley McQuillan, 9 months, in her crib on her back to avoid sudden infant death syndrome.

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“Back to sleep.” That’s a phrase that sends relief to new parents. It also is a safety reminder being offered by pediatricians. Sleep should be a relaxing moment. Instead, for many new parents, baby’s sleep can be a time of anxiety and concern of unexpected death. Many new mothers admit to lying awake listening to their baby breathe during sleep, fearful of sudden infant death syndrome. SIDS is defined as the death of an infant that cannot be explained after an autopsy. SIDS as a cause of death is decreasing as coroners look further into the causes of infant death. In fact, sudden unexpected infant deaths still number about 4,500 annually in the United States and only half of those are determined to be SIDS, said Katie McQuillan, a pediatrician at The Corvallis Clinic. “Reasons for the other half are discovered after a thorough investigation.” See SLEEP on 10

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Sleep Continued from 9

Many times, McQuillan said, the diagnosis of SIDS is made too early — and, she added, research has determined many SIDS deaths were caused by unsafe sleeping environments. Ninety percent of SIDS occur before 6 months of age. The risk peaks at around 2 to 4 months. And the most important thing parents can do to reduce the risk is to put their babies to sleep on their backs, McQuillan said – hence the catchphrase “back to sleep.” Since 1992, when the back-to-sleep campaign began, the number of sleeping deaths has been reduced by half. Unfortunately, 25 percent of people still don’t put their infants to sleep on their backs. The reason, McQuillan explained, is they worry that choking on burp up is a greater risk. But research in the 1990s found that a larger number of infants were dying while resting on their fronts. As to why infant sleeping deaths still happen, many older caretakers and babysitters aren’t familiar with the back-to-sleep concept and put baby to sleep on their stomachs. Another danger that can result in infant death is smothering on crib accessories. “Stores are still marketing cute bumpers, blankets and stuffed animals,” McQuillan said. “Infants just need a firm mattress and tight fitted sheet.” Other tips: Don’t overdress your baby for sleep, make sure infants can’t pull

their clothing over their head and keep toys outside the crib. People often ask doctors about sleep positioners but, McQuillan said, those are not safe. Doctors began warning people about those a year ago. McQuillan said it’s easy to let baby fall asleep in bed with mom after nursing or during attempts to snuggle to sleep, but this can be dangerous, especially on a couch where there are large cushions and cracks between pillows. Co-sleeping is not recommended, although this has raised some controversy between doctors and attachment-parenting advocates. If you must co-sleep, McQuillan said it’s best to keep your bed as sparse as the crib, with a firm mattress and tight fitted sheets – no fluffy pillows or bulky comforters. “Cushions and pillows are not good,” McQuillan said. “You want a firm, empty surface.” Making sleep safety a priority is good, but parents also need to take into account the larger environment. New research has found a correlation between secondhand smoke and SIDS. Maternal smoking is the strongest risk factor leading to SIDS and secondhand smoke doubles the risk of SIDS. All this may sound daunting, but McQuillan offered a final word of assurances: The risk of infant baby death overall is less than one in 1,000.

SAFETY TIPS TO REDUCE RISKS Health practitioners offer the following safe sleeping guidelines to reduce the risk of suffocation and sudden infant death. Remember to instruct babysitters and family members who are caring for your baby. • Always place infants on their backs for sleep, for naps and at night. • Place babies on a firm sleep surface covered by a tight fitted sheet. • Do not place soft objects, toys and loose bedding in your baby’s sleep area. • Do not allow smoking around your baby. • Keep your baby’s sleep area close to, but separate from, where you and others sleep. • Try a pacifier when placing the infant down to sleep but don’t force a baby to take one. • Do not let your baby overheat during sleep. — Maria Kirkpatrick, for Early Years

High stress can cause sleep woes Strained marital relationships can disturb children’s rest EARLY YEARS

Stress in a marital relationship may be triggering sleep issues in children, a new study concludes. “Young children are potentially influenced by the quality of the marital relationship,” said Anne Mannering, one of the researchers who worked on the study. Mannering is an Oregon State University faculty member in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, but she was at the Oregon Social Learning Center when she and her collaborators conducted this research. See STRESS on 13

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

11

Education program helps with development BY MARIA L. KIRKPATRICK

Parents with concerns about their young child’s development are not alone. The Linn Benton Lincoln Education Service District offers free Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education programs to help children with special needs. “We help get children ready to learn in kindergarten,” said Debbie McPheeters, program administrator for Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education. Intervention specialists and therapists visit with children, newborn to age 3, and their families in the home to assess the level of delay in a child’s development and create a program to promote development. Early Children Special Education therapists help children ages 3-to-5 prepare for school by teaching social and coping skills. Also available are speech groups. Many preschools work with the Early Intervention Program to get children assistance before kindergarten, when the responsibility becomes that

Helping children before they arrive in kindergarten is the focus of the early intervention program operated by the Linn Benton Lincoln Education Service District.

FYI For information about the Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education programs offered by the Linn Benton Lincoln Education Service District, go online to www.lblesd.k12.or.us or call 541-589-9751, ext. 106.

of the school district. Children who meet disability criteria may have autism, hearing and visual impairment, orthopedic impairment, traumatic brain injury and/or communication delays. The programs serve as many as 600 children in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties. McPheeters said about 11 percent of the children in the program don’t need continued services. For those who do, specialists work with the child to prepare them for kindergarden and work with the child’s school district to get a learning program in place before the school year begins. “On the first day of school, it’s all set,” McPheeters said. While not all of the children referred to the program may be a concern,

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McPheeters said the program does follow up and keep tabs on those determined to be borderline. Many doctors refer parents to the programs but for

anyone looking for guidance, information can be found online at www.lblesd.k12.or.us or by calling 541-589-9751, ext. 106.

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Sleep

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

SAFETY TIPS TO REDUCE RISKS

High stress can cause


Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Stress Continued from 10

Specifically, researchers found that marital instability when the child was 9 months old was related to sleep problems at 18 months — including difficulties falling asleep and staying asleep. The reverse did not appear to be true — that is, children’s sleep problems did not predict marital instability.

In the study, researchers interviewed more than 350 families with adopted infants; the fact that the children were adopted allowed the researchers to eliminate the possibility that genetic factors could be involved somehow in the findings. Marital instability was ranked using a standard four-

Yoga

Continued from 6 parents to be OK with allowing for the adjustment. “There are no overnight transformations,” she said. “Just like it takes time to learn a new task, skill or sport, yoga will take time. If you have a rambunctious child who is reluctant to participate or just wants to run around, let them observe the class a few times and they may just decide it looks like fun.” Gerow hopes her students take their yoga practice into adulthood to help keep them be flexible, strong and able to manage stress. Little Yogis class is 30 minutes and is held once a week, currently 10 a.m. Thursdays, at EcoFusion Fitness. With enough interest, Gerow will add an additional weekday class and a weekend class that will continue indefinitely. Classes are $10 drop in rate or $70 for a 10 class pass. Children are free with paying adults and parents

‘Yoga will take time.’ BRANDEE GEROW ECOFUSION OWNER

can bring more than one child. Visit www.ecofusionfit ness.com for information. Love Yoga currently offers classes for ages 6-10 and welcomes children who are able to join in the beginning adult class. Davis said to get a class going for younger children, check out her site at goloveyoga.com and let her know your interest.

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

point research measure, with couples independently answering questions such as “Has the thought of separating or getting a divorce crossed your mind?” Mannering said the couples were predominately middle class, white and fairly well-educated. All had adopted their child within the first three months of birth. It’s not at all clear what cues infants may be picking up on to determine whether there’s stress in a relationship. “We don’t have information from this study to an-

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swer that,” she said. Mannering’s research team is now investigating whether the relationship between marital instability and child sleep problems persists after age 2 — and what role the parent-child relationship might play in these associations. “We do know that young children may be more susceptible to stress within the family,” she said. But much more work remains to be done on the topic, she said. OSU News and Research Communications contributed to this story.

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Simple game can boost learning BY MIKE MCINALLY

A “head-shouldersknees-and-toes” test that has helped to gauge levels of self-regulation in toddlers appears to be just as effective with children overseas as it is with U.S. children, according to research that includes work done by an associate professor at Oregon State University. And the news gets better for parents: Another study suggests that games such as the “heads-and-shoulders” task can help to boost the levels of self-regulation in children. Megan McClelland, an associate professor of human development and family science at OSU, and her colleagues have spent years probing the importance of self-regulation in children and seeing whether the “heads-and-shoulders” game can offer insights into that. Self-regulation, roughly defined, is the ability of children to control their behavior and impulses. In the “heads-andshoulders” task, children are asked to perform the opposite action to an oral command. For example, if they get the command to touch their toes, the proper response is to touch their heads. In some ways, it’s reminiscent of the old “Simon Says” game — and McClelland said it gets pretty complex over the five minutes needed to perform the test. “It gets pretty confusing, actually,” she said, and children often respond initially by saying things like “This is a tricky game” or “Are you

TIPS FOR PARENTS

FILE PHOTO

Repeating the ‘head-and-shoulders’ game helps improveself-regulation in young children, says OSU’s Megan McClelland, left. trying to trick me?” think before they act. The game essentially See SELF-REGULATION on 15 forces children to stop and

How can parents help to build self-regulation skills in their children? Megan McClelland of Oregon State University offers these tips: • Be sure to set clear limits — and “be really consistent with those limits,” McClelland said. • Be warm and responsive to your toddlers. • Look for opportunities to let your children take the lead at solving problems or working out issues — a process McClelland called “autonomy support.” “Resist the temptation to jump in and solve a problem,” she said. “Back off and let them solve the problem.”

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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WHAT PARENTS CAN DO Some classic childhood games have the critical ingredients needed to help teach self-regulation skills, said Megan McClelland, an associate professor at Oregon State University. In all of them, she said, children “have to stop, they have to think and they need to act.” The best ages to do this? McClelland said research suggests children aged 3 ½ to 5 are in a “sensitive window” when they can really start to learn these skills. You remember all of these games: RED LIGHT, GREEN LIGHT: One child is

the stoplight; the others are the cars. When the stoplight says “Green light,” the children run toward the stoplight. When the stoplight says,“Red light,” the children must stop. Children who don’t stop go back to the starting line. One fun variation: If the stoplight yells “yellow light,” the children must walk. SIMON SAYS: When Simon says,“Simon says,‘jump,’” everybody must jump. But if Simon only says “Jump,” and somebody jumps, that child must sit out the rest of the game. The last player standing

becomes the new Simon. HIDE AND SEEK: One children is “it” while the other children hide. The “it” player counts to 10 and then must look until all the other children are found. The first player found becomes the next “it.” DANCE: Start by having children dance slowly to slow music. Then have them dance fast to fast music. Stop. Then tell them to dance slowly to fast music, and vice versa. – Reprinted from the 2010 edition of Early Years

Self-regulation Continued from 14

“It’s not just sitting at a computer,” McClelland said. “It’s actually having to inhibit yourself and your movements. There’s something really hard about that for 4- and 5-year-olds.” In earlier work, McClelland and her colleagues have determined that the better children do at the “headsand-shoulders” task, Megan the more McClelland likely they are to have good self-regulation skills — and the more likely they are to achieve academic success. (Last year’s edition of Early Years had a report on those findings.) Since then, the researchers have performed studies in Asian countries — where, McClelland notes, children are arguably more compliant — to see if the results hold up. They did.

“The children who do better on the test perform significantly better” academically, McClelland said. But the researchers also have found something that should encourage parents worldwide: A new study by McClelland and OSU alumna Shauna Tominey concluded that children who started the school year with low levels of self-regulation saw gains as they played “heads-andshoulders” and similar games. (Parents can help as well; see the related stories.) The results, McClelland said, were clear-cut enough that the control group — those students who weren’t playing the games initially — eventually had to be included. “Ethically, we need to give everyone an equal opportunity to do this,” she said. Schools and teachers are starting to clamor to use the “heads-and-shoulders” test, but more work remains before it can be rolled out to school districts. “Educators are intensely

interested in a measurement tool that assesses selfregulation, is easy to use, and requires little training or materials,” she said. That’s where a $1.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education will come in handy; the money will pay for a four-year study to measure, evaluate and refine the “heads-and-shoulders”

task. The task rates students on a scale of 1 to 10, but McClelland said it’s important to be able to standardize the tests — and its scoring. “We need to be able to know what a score means,” she said. Angela Yeager of OSU’s News and Research Communications contributed to this story.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Experimentation key to growth Here are a few fun ways to help kids get dirty while learning about the world

‘Remember that your child, furniture, floor, table, etc. can all be cleaned up.’

PARENT ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM

interested in bird identification. Take a large pine cone and tie a ribbon or yarn to the top to make a hanger. Then have your child cover the pine cone in creamy peanut butter. Then roll the pine cone in birdseed, completely covering the pine cone. Hang outside a window and watch the birds feed. This information is offered by Parent Enhancement Program, a childabuse prevention program serving Benton County that provides education, inspiration and empowerment to young parents under the age of 26, and their children. For more information about the program, call 541-7588292.

According to Playskool’s Play Panel of Child Development Experts, “Sensory experiences are necessary for the brain to learn.” Parents need to keep in mind that kids need to get messy. It helps them to develop their sensory skills, fine and gross motor, and their sense of creativity. So when your child wants to do something messy remember that your child, furniture, floor, table, etc. can all be cleaned up. Try not to get frustrated and enjoy the experience with your child. Here are some suggestions to help create some fine messes.

Broom and mop painting Find some old brooms and mops to use as paint brushes. Roll out some butcher paper or other large piece of paper. Get a couple colors of paint and paint trays. Encourage your children to dip the broom and mop into the paint then paint the paper. This is such a fun experience and the artwork makes great wrapping paper. Also

EARLY YEARS FILE PHOTO

Getting dirty and experiencing a variety of different things are key ingredients for children to learn about the world around them. your children are using Peanut butter bird feeders large motor skills to move This activity teaches the broom/mop back and your child about natural forth. sciences, the importance Finger painting with Karo of caring for the environment and basic animal Your kids will love the care. Kids love anticipatfeel of this squishy and slip- ing when the birds come to pery paint. All you need to feed and may even become do is put Karo syrup into a couple of bowls, mix in whatever color of food coloring you want and then experience painting on paper or in the bathtub (then just wash it down). This activity is a fun way to teach that by mixing colors you create new colors. The paintings will eventually dry on the paper, although it takes a few days.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

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CLASSES Here is a partial list of childbirth and new parents classes offered by Samaritan Health Services. The Corvallis Clinic also offers classes; for a partial listing of the clinic’s classes, see the listing on page 19. Call the phone number listed with each class for dates, times and other information.

All about breast-feeding Learn how to optimize successful breast-feeding. Husbands and partners welcome. Free. Offered at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Highway in Lebanon. Call 541-451-7872 for details. Also offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive. Call 541-768-5244.

Anesthesia and pain relief options An anesthesiologist will explain pain control options during labor and delivery, and discuss the benefits and risks of each. Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Free. Call 541-7684752.

Becoming a new sister or brother Children will learn about baby care and see a film on pregnancy, delivery and adjusting to the new baby. Recommended for children 30 months or older, this class helps begin the process of sibling preparation and familiarizes children with

the hospital. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany; call 541-8124301. Also offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis; call 541-768-4752. Also offered at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Highway, Lebanon; call 541-451-7872.

Boot camp for new dads Expectant “rookie” fathers learn from “veterans” who bring their young babies to class. Cost: $20, includes book. Offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Call 541-768-4752.

Breast-feeding, part one Topics include getting started, supply and demand, the benefits of breast-feeding, preventing common problems, and breastfeeding after a cesarean birth. Free. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Call 541-8124301.

Breast-feeding, part two Topics will include pumping and storing milk, schedules, developing a personal plan, and issues to discuss with your employer. Free. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Call 541-812-4301.

20109700 2 X 2.00 FIRST CHRISTIAN PRE-

Caring for your new baby Learn about newborn care, including how to hold, burp and diaper your baby. Free. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Call 541-812-4301.

Childbirth preparation/ Lamaze Lamaze is a series of sessions preparing the expectant mother and her support person for labor and delivery.

Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Cost: $60. Call 541812-4301. Also offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Cost: $65 a couple. Call 541-768-4752. Also offered at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Highway, Lebanon. Cost: $50, scholarships

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

CLASSES Continued from 17

Sitter” completion card. Cost: $45. Participants must be at least 11 to 13 years old and registration is required. Offered at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Highway, Lebanon. Call 541451-7047.

available. Call 541-451-7872.

Childbirth preparation/ Lamaze in a weekend Learn about labor and birth, possible complications, breathing and relaxation. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W. Albany. Cost: $70. Call 541812-4301. Also offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Cost: $75. Call 541-768-4752.

Super Sitter

Childbirth preparation/ Lamaze refresher This class is open to couples who have attended a Lamaze class within the last four years. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Cost: $30. Call 541812-4301.

CPR for family and friends: infant only Covers infant CPR and choking. Cost: $10, Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W. Albany, Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis and Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Highway, Lebanon. Advance registration required. Call: 541-768-6629.

Expectant parent class Learn about newborn care and talk with a pediatrician.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Childbirth, Lamaze, CPR and breast feeding are among the classes offered by Samaritan hospitals and The Corvallis Clinic. Offered at Samaritan Pediatrics, 3517 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Free. Call 541-7684900.

Infant massage Learn how you can use touch to help your baby release accumulated tension and relax her or his body. Offered at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 N.W. Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. Cost: $20. Call 541-768-4752.

Your incredible newborn

Family Matters Join a pediatrician or nurse

practitioner to learnout about your Check baby’sMike characteristics and beHenneke’s haviors. Free. column in the Offered at Samaritan Albany paper. GeneralSunday Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave.

20119406 2 X 2.00 KINDERMUSIK | Ear

S.W., Albany. Call 541-812-4301.

Safe Sitter Learn all you need to know to babysit in this one-day course. Each participant who completes the course will receive a “Safe

Learn how to supervise children, handle emergencies, prevent accidents, and diaper, dress and feed babies and children. Participants must be at least 11 years old. Prerequisites: advance registration and payment. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave. S.W., Albany. Call: 541-926-1543

Your incredible newborn Join a pediatrician or nurse practitioner to learn about your baby’s characteristics and behaviors. Free. Offered at Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 1046 Sixth Ave.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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RESOURCE GUIDE Hospitals If your baby is born at the hospital, begin there. Check into the many support services and continuing education classes offered by Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Samaritan Albany General Hospital and Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital.All provide early pregnancy and childbirth preparation classes for parents-to-be and parental classes for after baby’s arrival. (A partial list of classes begins on page 17.) • Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 541-768-4752 • Samaritan Albany General Hospital, 541-812-4301 • Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, 541-451-7872 The hospitals also offer a wide range of support groups, covering topics such as child-bearing loss, grief and sudden infant death syndrome. For a brochure or more information, call one of the numbers listed above or visit www.samhealth.org.

The Corvallis Clinic The Corvallis Clinic offers many resources for new parents, including medical experts on newborns, child development, lactation, immunizations, pregnancy, childbirth, child behavior and women’s health. To learn more about pediatric, family medicine and women’s health physicians accepting new patients, call the clinic’s Find-a-Physician specialist at 541-757-3757.You can also browse the clinic’s provider and service directories and request an appointment online at www.corvallisclinic.com. Here are some of the classes offered by The Corvallis Clinic for expecting parents:

• “Baby Bundle” prenatal talk: Obstetricians present a 90-minute talk covering the most important topics for moms and dads-to-be. Call 541-

738-2075 or go to www.corvallisclinic.com/ classes for details. • “Healthy Baby” prenatal talk: Learn the essen-

pharmacy services are available. Services are culturally and linguistically appropriate. While services are not free, they are tials of caring for your new offered on a sliding fee scale. baby. Call 541-738-2075 or go to Private insurance, Medicaid, www.corvallisclinic.com/classes Medicare and self-pay are acfor details. cepted. For appointments or information, call 541-766-6835. Family Connections • Immunizations:All infant Another source of information and childhood vaccines.Adult for new parents is the Family vaccines such as tetanus-diphConnections program at Linntheria,influenza,and pneumoBenton Community College. By calling 541-917-4899 or 1- coccal pneumonia.Travel vac800-845-1363, you can access cines.All immunization services are by appointment.Call 541information about child care, 766-6835. parent education, a parent ad• WIC: Women, Infants and vice line and children’s activiChildren’s Supplemental Nutrities. Or send an e-mail to connect@linnbenton.edu or check tion Program (WIC) is a health out the website www.linnbento and nutrition program for pregn.edu/familyresources/family nant women, women up to six months after delivery, nursing connections. mothers up to 12 months after Benton County Health delivery, and children from Department birth to age 5. WIC also provides checks for fresh fruits Locations: • Benton Health Center, 530 and vegetables at summer N.W. 27th St., Corvallis, 97330. farmers markets and farm Phone: 541-766-6835. Hours: stands, breast-feeding educaMonday and Tuesday, 8 a.m.-5 tion and consultations and has p.m.; Wednesday, 11 a.m.-7 some breast pumps for those p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 8 who qualify. For WIC appointa.m.-5 p.m. ments or information, call 541• Lincoln Health Center, 121 766-6835. S.E. Viewmont Ave., Corvallis, • Maternal and child health: 97333. Phone: 541-766-3546. Maternal Child Health Program Hours: Monday through Friday, provides services to pregnant 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wednesday, women, young children and noon-7 p.m. their families through three • East Linn Health Center, home visit programs: Maternity 100 Mullins Drive, Suite A-1, Lebanon, 97355. Phone: 541451-6920. Hours: Monday,Tuesday,Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed from noon to 1 p.m.); Wednesday, 1-5 p.m. Services include: • Medical care: The Health Centers provide affordable, high quality medical care for people of all ages. Staff includes family practitioners and pediatricians. Mental health and addiction services plus

Case Management, Babies First!, and CaCoon. All families enrolled in home-visit programs receive home visits from a public health nurse, culturally sensitive care and help in accessing other community resources. For more information about maternal and child health programs, call 541-7666835.

Linn County Department of Health Services SERVICES FOR CHILDREN 0-18 YEARS OF AGE Office sites: • Albany: 315 Fourth Ave. S.W., Albany, 97321. Phone: 541967-3888 or 1-800-304-7468. Hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed from noon to 1 p.m. • Lebanon: 1600 S. Main, Lebanon, 97355. Phone: 541451-5932 or 1-888-451-2631. Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed from noon to 1 p.m. • Sweet Home: 799 Long St., Sweet Home.97386.Phone: 541367-3888 or 1-800-920-7571. Hours typically are 8:30 a.m.to 5 p.m.,but call for times and days. Closed from noon to 1 p.m. Services include: • Immunizations: Immunizations are available for children 0-18 years. Payment is based on See RESOURCES on 20

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

RESOURCE GUIDE Continued from 19 ty. Babies First serves all of Linn County. Call 541-967a sliding scale from $7.50-$15 per shot. Various grants are oc- 3888, ext. 2676. • CaCoon Care Coordinacasionally available to provide tion Program: Public health free immunizations at special clinics or under special qualify- nurses provide home visits to Linn County parents with ining conditions. Shots are given fants and children birth to 21 at office sites listed above. • WIC: Nutrition program for years with special health care needs. The goal of this prolow-income pregnant and gram is to work with the parent breastfeeding or postpartum women, infants, and children to to provide care coordination for their children with special age 5. Supplemental food health care needs. Case manvouchers plus nutrition inforagement and advocacy are promation and education, diet vided as well as referrals to earscreening, and monitoring of child growth and development ly intervention and other needplus referrals to health care and ed special health care services. CaCoon serves all of Linn social services provided. OfCounty. Call 541-967-3888, fered at the office sites listed ext. 2676. above. Other services include: Maternal-child health pro• Vital statistics: Birth cergrams include: tificates for 0-6 months of age. • Healthy Start: Healthy • Reproductive health servStart home visitors work with ices: Family planning, birth Linn County families having their first baby to provide infor- control, low or no-cost vasectomy program. mation, parenting tips and referral services for families preParent Enhancement natally or shortly after the baby Program is born. New parents receive a Parent Enhancement Procall from a Healthy Start home gram is a nonprofit agency ofvisitor offering assistance and a “Welcome Baby” gift from the fering outreach services free of community. Eligible families may receive home visits with parenting information and support to help their new baby and family get off to a healthy start. Healthy Start serves all of Linn County. Call to sign up for Healthy Start, 541-924-6910. • Babies First Program: Public health nurses provide home visits to Linn County parents with infants and young children up to 5 years of age who are at risk for health and developmental delays. The nurse provides specialized developmental screens, case management, and referral to local community and regional services. Health information is provided on the child’s development, feeding and child safe-

charge to parents, pregnant and/or parenting, male or female, living in Benton County, age 13 through 25, and their children. Current services, offered by staff and volunteers to participating families, include BUDDYs (mentors), parent and adult life skills classes, social activities, in-home visits, transportation, child safety equipment, educational assistance, supervised playroom, opportunities for parent volunteerism, clothing and food closet, parent newsletters, Latino family outreach, fathers outreach and referrals to other agencies. For more informa-

EARLY YEARS FILE PHOTO

Parents can find a wealth of places for help and advice on raising their children, as well as places to go and things to do. tion, visit the webside www.pep.peak.org or call 541758-8292.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

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Helping kids settle into a new home Moving can often be more disruptive for children than parents realize BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

ous,” said Miller. Moving can be more disFOR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ruptive for kids than parFor children, the excite- ents realize, added Doug ment of moving into a new Tynan, a child psychologist home is often clouded by with the Nemours Foundauncertainty. Parents can tion in Newark, Del. Be preease the transition — start- pared to handle tears or unusual behavior as children ing at the dinner table. adjust to their The ritual ‘Don’t take it new setting, he of sitting down to a family personally if they said. meal can help “Don’t take walk into a kids start to it personally if wonderful new they walk into a feel at home, said Nancy house and burst wonderful new Darling, a psyhouse and burst into tears.’ chology prointo tears,” said fessor at OberTynan, who esDOUG TYNAN lin College in timates it takes CHILD PSYCHOLOGIST Oberlin, Ohio. five to six weeks She also urges adherence to for children to adjust to a bedtimes. move. “When kids feel like He recommends that everything is changing, parents talk openly with they need that stability,” she children about the move as said. “They need attention soon as they decide it’s goand stability.” ing to happen. “The more That may mean anything information the better,” he from choosing familiar said. “Be as up front as pospaint colors in the new sible.” When John Seyerle’s felhouse to letting kids be part lowship was ending at a of decorating decisions. Barbara Miller, an interi- hospital in Columbus, Ohio, or designer in Portland, he and his wife, Maria, told their daughters, Anna, 8, who has moved with her and Sophia, 5, that a move children three times, paintmight be in their future. ed their new rooms the When he took a job in same color as their old ones. Cincinnati, the couple took “I try to keep things as the girls house hunting. much the same (as possible) — especially if they’re nervSee MOVING on 22

20118665 2 X 1.00 PEP/PARENT ENHANCEME

TOM UHLMAN | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Anna Seyerle, 8, foreground, reads a book while her mother, Maria, and little sister, Sophia, 5, read on the bed with their dog, Lulu, in their new home in Wyoming, Ohio. Engaging children in familiar activities immediately after a move can help them adjust to new surroundings.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Moving Continued from 21

“We did talk about what their criteria were for a new house,” Maria Seyerle said. “They wanted a swing set and tub with jets.” The girls, who got their swing set shortly after moving into their new home in June, have adjusted well, Maria Seyerle said. “That’s not to say that they don’t have their moments of being sad,” she said. “We’ve made it clear that we have mixed emotions too.” Tynan, Darling and Miller offered these additional tips to help children adjust to a new home: • Introduce children to their new home: If possible, take them to the new house before the move. If they don’t have a chance to see the interior, take photos or show them the online listing. Talk about how the family will use the new spaces. • Let them help arrange their new space: Give kids a floor plan of their new room and let them decide where to place the furniture. • Show them their new school: If the school has a website, spend time online getting to know the building and its teachers. Arrange to visit the school in person as soon as possible. • Pack with care: Pack the kids’

TOM UHLMAN | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Starting regular family activities quickly after a move to a new home can help children settle in faster. room last so they face as little disruption as possible. Unpack their room first at the new house. • Let them help: Give children a box to pack. Tell them to put their most valuable possessions in it. If possible, let them carry the box with them when traveling to the new house. • Show kids around the new house: When you arrive, take kids on a tour. Point out the location of light switches, bathrooms and other useful details. Make sure children know how to get to their parents’ room during the

night. Consider using night lights or placing glow-in-the-dark stickers on light switches to help kids feel more comfortable. • Take them around the neighborhood: Visit a playground or other attractions they might like. Point out positives, such as proximity to a pool, ball field or ice cream shop. • Keep children active: Sign them up for sports teams, classes and other extracurricular activities as soon as possible. If the move occurs during the summer, try to register for a camp or class that will include local kids.

Air cleaners can help kids living with smokers THE BALTIMORE SUN

A Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study shows that air cleaners can significantly reduce household air pollution and lower rates of asthma symptoms among kids living in homes with smokers. However, kids remain at risk of some effects of secondhand smoke. So, the study researchers concluded that air cleaners should only be used as a temporary measure as smokers seek to quit.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

Zeroing in on your child’s lack of focus BY HEIDI STEVENS CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Your 6-year-old’s attention span seems to be getting shorter and shorter. Can you help with specific exercises or activities? Parents’ panel: “Have a quick chat with the teacher to see if your kid’s attention span is atypical compared to his/her schoolmates. Back at home, try doing more activities together that require multiple steps and prolonged concentration but produce fun results, like making smoothies or baking a pie.” “There are video games that encourage deeper attention and longer-term strategy: ‘Spore,’ for one. Or the Wikipedia game where you start them at one entry (the Liberty Bell, say) and challenge them to get to another (ice cream) in the fewest possible links. At the same time, since short attention spans seem to be related to one or another of the home’s video screens, consider going back to the strict usage limits you enforced when they were younger and you were more idealistic.”

Expert advice: “It’s highly unlikely a child’s attention span is actually getting shorter,” says Susan Kaiser-Greenland, author of “The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate” (Free Press). “My guess is, it’s not really that his or her capacity to attend is getting shorter, just that the child is becoming understandably more distracted by more and more interesting things.” A simple remedy is to try lessening the distractions. Homework, crafts, reading time should happen in a quieter place — away from a blaring TV, sparring siblings and other people’s phone conversations. But that’s just a start. Kaiser-Greenland recommends teaching children a more mindful approach to concentration. “It’s about developing a more universal worldview of attention, balance and compassion: the new ABCs,” she says. “Attention alone isn’t enough.”

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CLASSES Continued from 18 for your changing body. S.W., Albany. Call 541-812-4301.

Child safety seat inspection Make sure that your baby’s first ride home is a safe one. This is a great opportunity for you to gain information about the proper use and installation of child/infant safety seats. Safety recall information will also be available. Available in Albany. Call for information: (541) 917-7727 Available in Corvallis second Tuesdays, 8 to 11:30 a.m. Call for information: (541) 766-6961.

Breastfeeding and returning to work

Available in Albany Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. Cost: $27 per month Call for information: (541) 917-7777.

Postpartum class Explore the unique challenges women face during the days, weeks and months after delivery of a new baby. We will discuss healing after birth, activity and exercise, emotional changes, sexuality, sleeping issues, baby blues and postpartum depression. Available in Albany, first and third Thursdays, 6 p.m. Call for information and to register: (541) 812-4301.

Preparing for twins

This session will educate and Tips and tricks for providing optimum nutrition for your baby prepare parents expecting a multiple delivery. A nurse will answer after returning to work. Call for information: (541) 768-4752. questions and discuss delivering twins or triplets. Fit for two Available in Corvallis. PrerequiStay fit and comfortable during site: attend when you are beand after your pregnancy with tween 20 and 26 weeks along. this workout designed especially Call to register: (541) 768-6908.

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Albany Democrat-Herald, Albany, Ore., Corvallis Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Ore.

RESOURCE GUIDE Continued from 19 ty. Babies First serves all of Linn County. Call 541-967a sliding scale from $7.50-$15 per shot. Various grants are oc- 3888, ext. 2676. • CaCoon Care Coordinacasionally available to provide tion Program: Public health free immunizations at special nurses provide home visits to clinics or under special qualifyLinn County parents with ining conditions. Shots are given fants and children birth to 21 at office sites listed above. • WIC: Nutrition program for years with special health care needs. The goal of this prolow-income pregnant and gram is to work with the parent breastfeeding or postpartum women, infants, and children to to provide care coordination for their children with special age 5. Supplemental food health care needs. Case manvouchers plus nutrition inforagement and advocacy are promation and education, diet vided as well as referrals to earscreening, and monitoring of child growth and development ly intervention and other needplus referrals to health care and ed special health care services. CaCoon serves all of Linn social services provided. OfCounty. Call 541-967-3888, fered at the office sites listed ext. 2676. above. Other services include: Maternal-child health pro• Vital statistics: Birth cergrams include: tificates for 0-6 months of age. • Healthy Start: Healthy • Reproductive health servStart home visitors work with ices: Family planning, birth Linn County families having their first baby to provide infor- control, low or no-cost vasectomy program. mation, parenting tips and referral services for families preParent Enhancement natally or shortly after the baby Program is born. New parents receive a Parent Enhancement Procall from a Healthy Start home gram is a nonprofit agency ofvisitor offering assistance and a “Welcome Baby” gift from the fering outreach services free of community. Eligible families may receive home visits with parenting information and support to help their new baby and family get off to a healthy start. Healthy Start serves all of Linn County. Call to sign up for Healthy Start, 541-924-6910. • Babies First Program: Public health nurses provide home visits to Linn County parents with infants and young children up to 5 years of age who are at risk for health and developmental delays. The nurse provides specialized developmental screens, case management, and referral to local community and regional services. Health information is provided on the child’s development, feeding and child safe-

charge to parents, pregnant and/or parenting, male or female, living in Benton County, age 13 through 25, and their children. Current services, offered by staff and volunteers to participating families, include BUDDYs (mentors), parent and adult life skills classes, social activities, in-home visits, transportation, child safety equipment, educational assistance, supervised playroom, opportunities for parent volunteerism, clothing and food closet, parent newsletters, Latino family outreach, fathers outreach and referrals to other agencies. For more informa-

EARLY YEARS FILE PHOTO

Parents can find a wealth of places for help and advice on raising their children, as well as places to go and things to do. tion, visit the webside www.pep.peak.org or call 541758-8292.

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20120243 3 X 3.00 PRESBYTERIAN CHILD C

Early Years 2011  

Early Years 2011

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