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food issue the

july/august 2016

the state of fare

bargain bites

dining with a view

cooking in the capital


a note FROM the publisher Publisher/Editor Sioux Watson Advertising Sales Charis Painter | Ashley Carter | Sioux Watson Mark Holmes Creative Director Travis Aptt Graphic Design Lori Lay Social Media & Fashion Intern Ruhama Wolle Contributing Writers Dan Bain | Jenni Hart | Dave Droschak Karlie Justus Marlowe | David Fellerath Julie Johnson | Kurt Dusterburg | Carol Wills Carla Turchetti | Steven Major | Frank Harmon Anna Churchill | Paul Savery | Rachel Vachon Adam Sobsey

W

elcome to our first ever Food Issue! From cover to cover, we delve into the dining scene in Raleigh, which seems to change every week. We’ve got the latest on our local Farm-to-Table, where to eat outside, both on patios and rooftops, and a perspective on three people who have been in the restaurant business in Raleigh for a really long time. Have you heard about what a local group has coined as “Raleigh’s Food Corridor”? Learn how activists are wrestling with issues such as food deserts, sustainable food systems and building stronger community through food in the heart of Raleigh. People are having meals outside of their homes now more than ever. The latest statistics show that the average American household’s monthly expenditure on eating out has surpassed the monthly grocery budget. New York Magazine reports “Americans are spending more at bars and restaurants ($54.857 billion) than they are on groceries ($52.503 billion). It’s the first time it’s happened in recorded history.” If you’re tired of eating at the same old places, you better know your latest food and beverage scene in Raleigh so you can explore more options. Look

over our guide listed by day of the week, in order to expand new ways to stretch your dining dollar in “Bargain Bites”. This year the Raleigh-Cary area landed in seventh place in the country for “Highest Well-Being Community” for large communities. One reason might be that here in Raleigh, the three leaders of our local hospitals are collaborating together more than ever to make access to health care and preventative health care more consistently available to all Raleigh residents. They get together at least once a month to discuss innovative community health strategies and ways to collaborate. Read about their individual ideas and initiatives and how, by working together, each hospital is raising the level of health care for all citizens. Be sure to check out our special section featuring medical professionals in our area, and how their special areas of medical attention may be just the thing you need to keep yourself in fine form. Have a great summer,

Sioux

Photography Davies Photography | Stephen Xavier Matt Williams Photography Distribution Manager Joe Lizana Midtown Magazine is published six times annually. Any reproduction in part or in whole of any part of this publication is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher. Midtown Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or art. Unsolicited material is welcome and is considered intended for publication. Such material will become the property of the magazine and will be subject to editing. Material will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Midtown Magazine will not knowingly accept any real estate advertising in violation of US equal opportunity law.

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contents july/ augus t

2016

features 68 the state of fare

We take a trip to the State Farmers’ Market and Raleigh City Farm to show you what farm-to-table cooking really looks like.

74 cooking in the capital

Longtime a home to foodies and an evolving restaurant scene, Raleigh continues to bring people together over excellent meals and the creation of complex community connections.

90 the best bargain bites in town

We’ve put together a week’s worth of wallet-preserving eats – some dirt cheap, some just good values for the quality.

94 dining with a view There’s nothing like a warm summer night and a table with a view that elevates an ordinary meal at a restaurant into a premier dining experience.

100 eating around the world... at home Thanks to Raleigh’s exciting restaurant scene, it is possible to travel around the world without leaving the neighborhood.

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midtown magazine’s restaurant hall of fame Raleigh restaurants that have found the recipe for success and been satisfying diners for 20 years or more.

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contents july/ augus t

2016

departments 26 on the scene 36 bain’s beat 38 beauty style 40 beer & barrel 44 close to home 46 financial focus 48 giving back 50 raising the bar 52 sunday supper 56 the interview 60 what’s app? 62 wine review 64 your home (refreshing) 112 healthy you 151 out & about 162 everyday places

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midtown downtown 24 | midtownmag.com

food issue the

special thanks to davies Photography and Food-Seen by Felicia Perry Photography for our beautiful cover photo

the state of fare

bargain bites

dining with a view

cooking in the capital

july/august 2016

2015


The scene

on

taste

Beat the Heat

Locally sourced strawberries and gin make the perfect summer cocktail By Steven Major Hot summer days need cocktails like rainy days need umbrellas, and North Carolina has no shortage of hot summer days. Fortunately, the bartenders at Bittersweet have no shortage of cocktails. Kim Hammer opened the restaurant and bar in May of 2014, and her combination of great drinks and delicious food made with a focus on locally sourced ingredients has met with great success. Located on East Martin Street in the center of downtown Raleigh, it’s the perfect spot to step out of the summer heat and sip on something cold and refreshing. Striking the right balance with summer cocktails can be difficult; too sweet and it feels like you’re drinking spiked punch at prom, too bitter and the heat starts to get less bearable. Ordering what sounds like a refreshing drink only to find yourself focusing on your water and debating knocking the glass over so you can order something different is never enjoyable, which is why I often find myself ordering a trusty standby like the gin and tonic. But life is about trying new things and I had never had a drink at Bittersweet that I didn’t enjoy, so when I saw the Strawberry Letter 23 on the drink list I was cautiously optimistic and gave it a try. I have ordered many since. Made with gin, strawberries, lemon juice and basil, it’s light and refreshing and incredibly delicious. The strawberries are sweet, but they don’t dominate the drink. They’re locally sourced from Lil’ Farm in Hillsborough so instead of that syrupy sweet daiquiri taste many strawberry flavored drinks have, the flavor is much more mild and crisp. The basil, (also locally sourced from Raleigh City Farm) and the lemon offset the sweetness to add a tart and herbal flavor. Mixed with Durham Distillery’s Conniption, a dry gin with strong herbal notes and a crisp finish, the combination is perfectly balanced. It’s great for an after-work cocktail and works just as well in the evenings paired with some Vanilla-Rum Crème Brûlée. So the next time you find yourself downtown, go support your local farmers and a great local business and order a Strawberry Letter 23. 26 | midtownmag.com

photograph by davies photography


The scene

on

TECH

photography © DietSensor

Simple as a Scan

DietSensor Reveals Food’s Nutritional Value By Dan Bain Have you ever needed to know the nutritional value of a meal, but not had the convenience of a label to tell you? DietSensor has launched a pocket-sized scanner that can detect the chemical components of your food. No, seriously. The scanner, called SCiO, analyzes your food at the molecular level using spectroscopy – the observation of how molecules interact with light. Simply point it at your food, press the button, and receive information on the food’s calories, fat, carbohydrates, and additional content. While the device is great for dieters, its concept was actually intended as a tool for people with more serious medical needs, such as diabetes or heart disease. That’s why the founders developed a nutrition coaching app to work with SCiO, helping patients monitor, track, and plan their meals in accordance with their medical needs. The app includes a growing database of more than 600,000 different foods from 50 countries, and coaches users toward their nutrition goals. DietSensor should be available in September, but the SCiO device is available for $249 pre-order (plus a monthly fee of $10-20 for the app) at dietsensor.com.

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The scene

on

style

Fashion Plate

Profess Your Love for Food and Caffeine with Snappy Graphic T-shirts By Karlie Justus Marlowe Photography by Matt Williams Photography

Hungry for a twist on casual style? Look no further than your morning coffee order. Fueled by national pastimes of caffeine consumption and Sunday brunch, screenprinted graphic T-shirts emblazoned with food and drink favorites have taken the place of ironic band tees for laid-back weekend wear. “We carry these T-shirts because graphic tees are in style and on trend, and the verbiage can be funny,” said Linda Abdeljabbar, assistant manager at Uniquities. The Triangle boutique, which has Raleigh outposts in Cameron Village and North Hills, brought in a selection of tees from the Pyknic line for spring and summer. The line caters exclusively to fun and quirky food-centric lifestyle goods. Post up at Morning Times on the regular? Try the “Death Before Decaf” tee, cut in the brand’s signature slouchy dolman shape. Always make it a point to stop by Treat after a dinner out at Bida Manda or Provenance? The “Ice Cream is Cheaper Than Therapy” is a winner.

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Consider Sunday brunch at Humble Pie the only way to cap off the weekend? “Weekends Are for Waffles” is a lightweight cotton mix suitable for North Carolina humidity. “Uniquities caters to a variety of customers anywhere from teens and young professionals to the trendy mom,” said Abdeljabbar. ”Some customers can relate to the wording, as well think it is comical.” Abdeljabbar suggests an easy approach to styling the shirts, factoring in lazy summer days and multiple courses. “We like to style them with distressed or regular denim shorts and a casual shoe,” she said, pointing to the store’s crop of J Brand or Joe’s Jeans styles and Dolce Vita gladiator flats. On the contrary, tuck any of the grey-hued versions into a bright floral pencil skirt with blocky wooden platforms for a study in contrast – just don’t take them too seriously. “They are just for fun,” says Abdeljabbar.


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The scene

on

arts

photography courtesy of Dave Wofford

Taking the Long Way

Dave Wofford returns to Raleigh with 20-year retrospective By David Fellerath The printer Dave Wofford has been working so long in central Durham, with so many artists based in the western half of the Triangle, that it’s surprising to learn he started his career in Raleigh with Antfarm Studios in the Warehouse District. This summer, Wofford returns to the City of Oaks with a 20-year retrospective of his work, channeled through his Horse and Buggy Press, a graphic design, letterpress print shop, and book production studio. In a show that opened in Chapel Hill’s Cassilhaus before moving downstairs at CAM Raleigh – near his old studio – Wofford presents a survey not just of his work, but of his entire handmade aesthetic. The term “horse and buggy” conveys a time when people moved more slowly and took greater care with the things

they produced. True to form, the show features not just samples of Wofford’s work, but locally handmade furnishings: side tables by Al Frega, chairs and a lamp by Scott Howell, cushions by Jessica Ullom, a book rack by Tim Schrand. “We wanted to create a reading environment within the show, rather than just having people look at works on walls,” Wofford says. One of the older pieces in the show is a limited edition copy of an Allan Gurganus short story called “It Had Wings.” Featuring illustrations by Gurganus to accompany his whimsical tale of an old woman’s encounter with an angel in her backyard, the product is a hand-dyed memento that comes in a clam-shell box. Deliberately rare and beautiful, it’s a rebuke to the stacks of bestsellers on endcaps at Barnes &

Noble, all marked down 20 percent. (Even this last sentence seems quaint, from the late ‘90s, when “It Had Wings” was produced.) Aside from the essential material aesthetic of Wofford’s work, the show functions as a survey of the cultural production of Chapel Hill, Durham and Hillsborough. The show includes a translation of Rilke poetry by David Need, record sleeves for vinyl releases by Kenny Roby and The Mountain Goats, “Maji Moto,” a photojournal of life and drought in southern Kenya by Courtney Fitzpatrick, and poetry issues from Jeffery Beam (along with his wedding announcement). And sometimes it’s not art being produced, but children: a letterpress baby announcement from photographer Lalitree Darnielle and her Mountain Goat husband John.

“20 Years of Horse & Buggy Press (and friends)” opened at CAM Raleigh on June 13th and runs through August 7th. Visit horseandbuggypress.com and camraleigh.org. 32 | midtownmag.com


midtownmag.com | 33


The scene

on

sports

photograph courtesy of the Durham Bulls

Not Just Peanuts & Cracker Jacks Durham Bulls Leading Ballpark Concession Charge By Dave Droschak The Durham Bulls is a model franchise when it comes to minor league baseball achievement. It doesn’t get much better than a classic sports movie depicting the team that still resonates today, along with a beautiful ballpark setting annually translating to box office success. But something was missing. Two years ago the Bulls broke tradition from a longtime national concession company contract and launched Bull City Hospitality, with the team taking over all of the park’s concession and catering operations. The marching orders were simple – increase the quality of product and photograph courtesy of the Durham Bulls

The Atomic Crispy Chicken features chicken breasts marinated in a spicy secret sauce. Just ask for “The ACC”.

34 | midtownmag.com

one pound of Angus beef, grilled onions, bell peppers, cheese and special sauce come together to make the angus barn’s steak and cheese sandwich.

service with reasonable price points. “Those were things we felt we could move the bench marks on,” said Dave Levey, who was hired as the team’s director of food and beverage. Levey came to Durham with more than 20 years of food service experience at sporting and tourist destinations, including several NFL teams. “And I felt taking this job would allow me some nice creativity in the concessions industry.” What other park has a July 4th special that features a milkshake with real apple pie as the topper? Levey’s thumbprint on the food and beverage operations, and in particular on the concessions side, has centered on local and statewide partners with name recognition such as the Angus Barn, Moe’s Southwest Grill and Foothills Brewing. Concessions at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park even feature a health-conscious fresh fruit cart that “sells hundreds of dollars worth of product” each game. “It can be helpful if you can get a local brand or concept like Angus Barn in here, because people associate quality with the Angus Barn,” Levey said. “Fans don’t look at the price and say, ‘What’s the deal with this?’ And Moe’s has also met that challenge fairly well considering

we have a Moe’s location inside the stadium and a location not even 50 yards up the street. There is a slight price difference, but in the park you can get a very customizable burrito; you are going to get something you want.” The Angus Barn Steak and Cheese is a pound of beef that costs $16. Dig in. “We cut them in half all the time for people. It can be a two-person job,” Levey said of the popular offering. The Bulls also became the first minor league park to brew its own craft beer in-house. Bull Durham Brewery is brewed on the second level of the stadium, with two taproom carts on the concourse during games. So far, it appears that taking over the concessions operations has been a major hit for the Durham Bulls and their fans. “The attitude we’ve taken with Bull City Hospitality is to focus on our core items,” Levey said. “We want to have a great hot dog, not just a good hot dog. We want to have a great cold beer; a great soda. With the local partnerships we’ve created we want to focus on products that one out of every two people buys when they come into the park – and how do we make those people happy.”


midtownmag.com | 35


bain’s beat

Dining Ouch Fast Food Fadventures

by Dan bain, Fed Up Father, danbain07@gmail.com

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For the last 15 years, we’ve had to dine at chains and fast food places almost exclusively with two rowdy boys in tow. The only exception was a recent trip to Margaux’s, and we left the kids at home for that. But we were meeting several other couples to recount and complain about our shared experience in kids’ activities. There’s just no escaping parenting, especially at dinnertime. With kids, every meal is an adventure, and their adventures usually start at about the same time their words do. One of the earliest phrases learned by one of our sons was, “It’s hot.” That became his standard complaint. He’d be sitting in his high chair and we’d put a bowl of rice in front of him. “Ee hah.” We’d put a bowl of cereal in front of him. “Ee hah.” Once, I swear, we put a bowl of ice cream in front of him, only to have him complain, “Ee hah.”

I think it became a game with him. It’s not that he didn’t like the food, it’s just that he had other things he’d rather have been doing at that time. To this day, if his food is too hot, he asks if he can go back upstairs to watch two more minutes of television while it cools off. I also think he tends to fill up quickly; he’s always eaten like a bird. He’ll take two bites of a $15 hamburger at a restaurant, then say, “I’m full.” But in my mind, it sounds like, “Ee hah.” While one of the boys insisted ice cream was hot, he secretly loved it. Not so with his brother, who refused to try it for the first three years of his life. On his first birthday, he enjoyed the requisite cake, but would only cast a suspicious glance at the cold stuff in the bowl. He might have touched it with his finger, but would go no further. It wasn’t until we were at a friend’s birthday party two years


later that he finally gave in. (As usual, peer pressure trumped parental assurances.) He had one taste from an ice cream cup, and was hooked. Thus began a long history of visits to Dairy Queen, where he also discovered toppings and eventually Blizzards. It was during one of these visits that we were sitting around the table, quietly enjoying our ice cream in a restaurant full of patrons, when I made the mistake of asking my wife Kim how hers tasted. She said it was good, and returned the question. Mine was good, too. Our three-year-old must have felt left out, because he suddenly slapped his hands on the table and exclaimed, “My ice ceam… deYISHUSH!” and placed so much emphasis on the last two syllables of “delicious” that every person in the restaurant heard him, and immediately turned to gawk at us. That’s not so bad, though; it was arguably even cute. But there were other occasions when the words weren’t so adorable. About a year later, we were at On the Border, and he was working on a puzzle on the kids’ coloring sheet. I think it was similar to a Jumble puzzle, where he had to unscramble the letters of four words, then use one circled letter from each word to form the answer to an incredibly corny joke. The joke was something like, “What did fishing cavemen like to catch?” And the unsolved answer was, “Jurassic ----.” One by one, he solved the other words and filled in the letters C, A, R, and P. Yes, I’m afraid the punchline was, “Jurassic carp.” As if that weren’t awful enough, our boy genius chose that particular moment to be the only time I can remember when he wasn’t able to sound out a word. It had never happened before, so I didn’t see it coming when I asked, “So what does that spell?” Whereupon he also chose this moment to be dramatic in answering me, standing up on his chair and throwing his head back to proudly shout, “Crap!” to the entire restaurant. With all eyes on me, the only thing I could do was smile at him and say, “Not quite. It’s actually pronounced, ‘carp.’ But that was a good try!” And then sink under the table like I was stuck in a Jurassic tarpit. The best adventure with words, however, came two years later, at Bojangles’. We’ve always loved that place – to the point where Kim ate

there enough during both pregnancies to instill a love of their menu in both boys – but I’d understand completely if Bojangles’ didn’t love us in return. During his first-grade year, he went through a phase where he thought it was funny to mispronounce every word he said for an hour or two. The way he did this was to start every word with the same letter. On the night in question, that letter was F. This means that evening, he said a whole lot of F-words. But only one of them was the F-word. It started out innocently enough, with him telling me all about his fay – how fool had gone, what he thought of his feachers, etc. We both thought it was pretty funny when he talked about fearning to fraw with folored fencils at his favorite flass, which of course was fart. Then we went foutside to flay a fame fogether, until we felt fungry. By that time, his Fommy was fome from fork, so we asked her if she’d like to go to Fojangles’. She said fes. At Bojangles’, the game continued while we ate our ficken filet fandwiches, and he stood on our fench, looking out the findow and announcing all of the fehicles friving by on the fighway. “Far! Fotorcycle! Factor Failer! (They have feighteen feels, you know.)” Little did I know there was a truck coming soon. And even that would have been okay, if he’d replaced only its first letter. But for whatever reason, he’d just started treating consonant blends as single letters, and switching out the entire phonetic sound – rather than changing “tractor” to “fractor,” he’d changed it to “factor.” Likewise, “trailer” became “failer” and “truck” became…offensive dinnertime conversation. Especially when shouted. Even more especially when shouted in front of a group of postchurch blue hairs sitting nearby. The only person more shocked than they were was his mother. “What did you say?” she demanded. Which of course was the worst thing to ask, because he started to answer. I think we drowned out his reply with our protests, though. Some people complain about screaming babies in restaurants, but a screaming baby is a luxury. It’s when they learn to talk that the problems occur. And we’re supposed to take them to fancier places? Truck that. midtownmag.com | 37


beautystyle Jane Iredale Powder Me SPF It’s vital to wear SPF whenever exposing your skin to the damaging UV rays of the sun. Stay glamporous with this handy all-in-one makeup and SPF combo that keeps you protected and looking fresh in the summer heat. Even better, this loose-powder formula features a flocked sponge applicator to avoid messy application, and a mirror on the top of the lid so you have everything you need. >>$47, janeiredale.com

Glamping Must-Haves

Hammock Tent

when the great outdoors meets high maintenance It may not be expected, but I’m a gal who loves an outdoors getaway or camp adventure once in a while. Of course, if I’m going to do the outdoors, I’m going to do it in full-on GLAMPING mode. This means glamorous camping, and while I’d prefer to go all out with electricity, running water and even a disco ball, traditional camping can even be spruced up with some basic “glamsite” essentials. It’s the simple things in life. Here are my top glamping accessories: by anna churchill, Synergy Spa, Aesthetics & Wellness, feelsynergy.com

Avène Thermal Spring Water Just a quick mist on your skin, and you’ll instantly feel up to six degrees cooler. This natural spring water is clinically proven to help calm, soothe and soften the skin. Take it on a long hike, or on the canoe when you need a quick jolt of coolness. I recommend the 50ml size for traveling, unless you’re a mistaholic – then you may wish to carry the 150ml or 300ml sizes. >>$9-$18.50, aveneusa.com 38 | midtownmag.com

If you can’t have a tent with walls and a four-poster bed, a hammock tent is the next best thing. Hammock tents put traditional tents to shame, as they provide the shelter you need but keep you off the ground to help deter bugs and stiff muscles. Various and affordable options in styles and configurations give you plenty of choices to accommodate your crew. >>$250 and up, available online or at participating outdoor outfitters

YETI Rambler Tumbler These popular, insulating, no-sweat tumblers are great for all types of beverages – hot, cold, and even sparkling! Why not fill one up with Belstar Cuve Rosé and enjoy a nice walk through nature? >>$29.99-$39.99, yeticoolers.com

Meow Meow Tweet Herbal Insect Repellent This smell-good, all natural, and highly effective herbal repellent from Meow Meow Tweet has a blend of citronella, rosemary, lemongrass and other essential oils. It’s kind to the nose but powerful enough to combat mosquitoes without using toxic chemicals. With the threat of mosquito-borne viruses causing concern this summer, be sure to maintain your glamour and health by wearing this repellent over your daily SPF! >>$18, meowmeowtweet.com


midtownmag.com | 39


beer& barrel

Copper Kettles

North Carolina distillers move beyond the moonshiners’ legacy By julie johnson

There’s a new aisle in the local ABC store devoted entirely to distilled spirits from North Carolina. Barely over a decade ago, not one of these companies existed. Today, our state is second only to Kentucky in terms of the number of distilleries. There are now 53 of them, 21 of which opened in the last year, with more in the planning stages. Trace our love of strong drink to the Moravians who settled Salem and established the Single Brothers’ Distillery in 1773. Or to that unique stew of religion, Prohibition and taxation that gave us moonshine and NASCAR in the last century. But the modern surge in Tar Heel distilleries probably owes a debt to the success of craft brewing, and the shared appeal of local production and distinctive character. Since the first steps in producing distilled spirits are nearly identical to the process of making beer, the two are fermentation siblings. The other impetus for this overnight growth was the passage just over a year ago of a bill that permits North Carolina distilleries to sell one bottle per customer per year directly to any adult who tours the distillery. This has provided a modest but important revenue stream for small distilleries – as well as giving curious drinkers new destinations where they can learn and taste. Those tourists, however, may be surprised to learn that not all distilling companies control every stage of their 40 | midtownmag.com

production process. “One of the dirty secrets of our industry is that 75-80 percent of American distilleries do not make their own alcohol from scratch,” says Scott Maitland, president of the NC Distillers Association and founder of Top of the Hill Distillery. Instead, they buy neutral grain spirits from bulk producers, then redistill it, flavor it or age it to their own specifications. This is perfectly legitimate, although many distilling companies coyly skirt the subject. But the fact is, leaving the fermentation and initial distillation to a big producer often makes sense and can provide a gentler entry into the business. Distilling equipment is expensive. And unlike home brewing, a hobby that serves as an incubator for brewing professionals, there is no amateur league where future distillers can legally perfect their craft before going pro. Home distilling is frowned upon (See: ‘shine, revenooer). Neutral grain spirits, which all come off the still clear, can be steered in many directions after distillation, allowing secondary producers great flexibility. Spirits distilled at 95 percent alcohol, filtered, can become vodka. To make gin, start with spirits that do not exceed 80 percent alcohol, and redistill the spirits with juniper and other botanicals (aromatic herbs and spices). If the grain base is over 51 percent corn and the fermented spirit is aged in a new American oak barrel for color and flavor, it becomes bourbon.


photograph courtesy of Stephen Garrett

Top of the Hill Distillery in Chapel Hill, producer of the TOPO line of distilled beverages.

Barrel aging takes time: it’s not unusual to see young distilleries launch with white spirits (“moonshine,” vodka and gin), then add the brown spirits (bourbon and other whiskies) later. The seven distilleries in the Triangle all operate under the terms of the same state license, but they run the gamut all the way from those that flavor or spice neutral grain spirits produced by others to full grain-toglass production. At Durham Distillery, the art lies in the redistillation of neutral, corn-based spirits with a heady assortment of botanicals to make two different Conniption gins, both of which are receiving positive national attention. The 88 proof American Dry is bright with cucumber and citrus, and dialed back on the expected juniper; the more assertive 114 proof Navy Strength brings bold cardamom and pepper. Barrister and Brewer, the company behind Mystic Bourbon Liqueur and Heart of Mystic Bourbon, is making the transition from the most modest to the most involved expression of distilling under the state’s license. The company opened in 2013 in shared space in Durham leased from Brothers Vilgalys Distillery, which produces a spiced Lithuanian liqueur. For its first three years, Barrister and Brewer midtownmag.com | 41


photograph courtesy of Barrister & Brewer

photograph courtesy of Molly Milroy, mollymilroy.org

For three years, the Mystic bourbon and liqueur (left) were being produced at a site shared with Brothers Vilgalys Distillery, makers of traditional Lithuanian Krupnikas liqueur (above). Mystic is moving to a new farm distillery this summer.

commissioned a contractor to create a bourbon to the company’s recipe. Onsite in Durham, the distillery filtered the bourbon, then bottled it from the barrel as Heart of Mystic, or added honey and spices to create the liqueur, an American interpretation of a Scotchbased sipper one of the founders brought home from a trip to Scotland. This summer, the company makes the leap straight to full grainto-glass production, on a 22-acre farm/distillery north of Durham. Founding partner Jonathan Blitz says “We’re going to build a distillery, grow heirloom corn, and we’ll also have some of the botanicals for our products. We’re going to do the whole process there with products that we produce from the land.” Along with traditional tours, the company will offer distiller-for-a-day experiences for small groups, Blitz explains. “You’ll get that experience of going from the grain from the field, into the grain mill, into the cooker, into a fermenter, and in the afternoon see that whole batch come into a finished white dog [raw spirits straight from the still] and go into a barrel.” In Chapel Hill, Top of the Hill Distillery has been a comprehensive grain-to-glass operation from its beginning in 2012. All of the products are organic, with ingredients sourced from within a 100-mile radius. The grain base for all the TOPO spirits is 100 percent wheat, an unusual choice at a time when bourbon, which is corn-based, is the 42 | midtownmag.com

hottest spirit around. “I think the biggest fallacy is that bourbon is the ultimate expression of American whiskey. Why does bourbon dominate the scene?” TOPO’s founder Maitland asks. “After the Civil War, everybody’s broke. Bourbon was the rotgut whiskey prior to the war; it explodes after the war because everybody’s broke. Rye whiskey, which was 70 percent of the market, drops to 10 percent. And wheat whiskey disappears altogether because it was seen as too expensive: wheat whiskey is not made for 150 years.” “Bourbon became the tradition in the South because that’s what Granddaddy drank. And why did Granddaddy drink it? Wheat whiskey is what Granddaddy would have drunk if he’d had any money.” Maitland speculates that the cachet we attach to the age of bourbon is simply related to the fact that young corn whiskey is unpalatable, making

the aging necessary. Wheat whiskey, he maintains, is so smooth right off the still that aging on wood is only needed for flavor and color, not to mellow the spirit. TOPO’s Eight Oak Carolina Whiskey is aged on wood chips, not in barrels, and takes advantage of the flavors of eight different combinations of wood and char (toasting). And what of North Carolina’s iconic spirit, moonshine? Maitland chuckles. “My definition is if you are putting ‘moonshine’ on a label, by definition it’s not moonshine, because moonshine means liquor on which no taxes have been paid. However, in the vernacular, people are now using the term ‘moonshine’ to describe any white spirit that’s not vodka or gin, and that has not been aged in wood.” After 243 years of distilling history, moonshine has become respectable, sitting side by side on the shelves with an array of other distinctive Carolina spirits. photograph courtesy of Top of the Hill Distillery

organic wheat from TOPO’s partner farm, Winslow Farms, in Scotland Neck, NC.


Tour and Taste the

Spirits of the Triangle All seven of the Triangle’s distilleries offer tours (or will shortly), where adults can learn about their individual processes and purchase a single bottle directly from the distillery. Their products are also available at your local ABC store. Barrister and Brewer (Durham) Tours: Coming soon whatismystic.com facebook.com/mysticbourbonliqueur The Brothers Vilgalys Spirits Company (Durham) Tours: Wednesday-Friday 4-7pm, Saturday 2-5pm, free, reserve online brothersvilgalys.com Durham Distillery (Durham) Tours: Owner-led, Friday evening, $10, reserve online; quick tours Saturday 2-7pm, $7, walk-in only durhamdistillery.com Fair Game Beverage Company Wine and Spirits (Pittsboro) Tasting Room: Friday 1-9pm, Saturday 1-7pm, Sunday 1-5pm Tours: Friday 6pm, Saturday 1:30pm & 2:30pm, Sunday 1:30pm, $10, call or email to reserve fairgamebeverage.com, 919.245.5434 info@fairgamebeverage.com Pinetop Distillery (Raleigh) Tasting Room: Opening in July Tours: Starting in July, check website for details pinetopdistillery.com Raleigh Rum Company (Raleigh) Tours: Saturday 2pm, free, no reservations raleighrumcompany.com Top of the Hill Distillery (Chapel Hill) Tours: Thursday 6:30pm, Friday 6pm and 7:30, Saturday 4pm & 5:30pm, $20, reserve online topodistillery.com

SANDLIN FAMILY LAW GROUP

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close tohome

A Reliable Recipe

The steady, healthy growth of Susan Caldwell’s Flour Power Studios

By corbie hill PHOTOGRAPHY By MATT WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY

In 2008, Susan Caldwell lost a lot of weight. She did it the traditional way, and it was hard work – lots of exercise and eating well. Caldwell dropped an impressive 150 pounds and was featured in People Magazine’s “Half Their Size” issue that year. For her commitment to health, though, this was only the beginning. She became a certified personal trainer and started a small youth fitness program. To promote smart nutrition choices, she would occasionally bring in basic cooking equipment and do simple recipes with the children. The kids loved it – so much so that they were disappointed on days they were just working out. “You could see the sadness on their faces,” Caldwell recalls. “‘What do you mean we’re not cooking?’” Later that year she started teaching youth cooking classes at her house, and the rest is history. Today, she’s the founder and CEO of Flour Power Studios, a kids’ cooking studio with four locations, including a brand new studio in Cary – the first franchised location. In 2015, Caldwell’s entrepreneurship won her one of the Triangle Business Journal’s “Women in Business” awards, and her plan is for there to be 50 Flour Power locations within five years. When Caldwell puts her mind to something, whether it’s losing weight or running a business, she has a remarkable track record: if anyone can do it, she can. Caldwell wants to grow, and she wants to grow smart. She wants to grow right. She wants Flour Power to be all over the Southeast, but only if it can be invested and 44 | midtownmag.com

a Proud young chef shows off a cookie.

involved in local communities. “I’m not the kind of person who is going to choose a franchisee just because they have the money. They have to be involved in the communities,” Caldwell says. “They have to understand what it’s like to be a small business owner and be up to the challenge.” Caldwell wanted the new Cary location, which opened at Parkside Town Commons in June, to be the first franchise. She knew Cary needed a place like this, and that location sold out a summer camp not only before any other location, but before it even opened. In the next year, she’d like to open three new franchise locations. “I am all about slow, controlled growth,” she says. “That is probably the opposite of what most people say.”

Flour Power founder and CEO Susan Caldwell.


Flour power indeed: A cooking class gets ready to dig in.

Indeed, Flour Power has been rising for years already. In 2008, it was still an experiment of sorts: Caldwell operated Lil’ Chef, as the business was initially called, out of her home. It became so popular that she had to kick her husband and kids out of the house on weekends so she could run classes. In December 2009, she took over half a gym space in Falls River Town Center and converted it to a kids cooking studio. By 2011, Caldwell moved the business to North Hills, changed the name to Flour Power, and opened a new studio with two kitchens – and twice the space. “Midtown is an amazing place. It is the hub, to some degree, of Raleigh,” Caldwell says. She identifies with its ‘live, work, play’ slogan, and knows Flour Power has an excellent home here. By 2013, she wanted to expand. Caldwell is from the area and had to see if her success stemmed from her community ties or if the model could flourish in a new environment. So she opened a studio far from Raleigh, in south Charlotte. The 2100-square foot facility there is thriving, she happily reports. In 2015, she opened a location in Falls River Town Center; 2016 brought Cary, and the future should bring many, many more studios. Still, her mission centers on health and wellness. “I’m a big believer in hands-on cooking and the more hands-on kids are with food, the smarter choices they make,” Caldwell says. “They’re more likely to try more foods.” It’s a good fit for children who may not play sports, she says. There’s still friendly competition (though it’s more like Iron Chef than Ironman) and teamwork (though this involves oven mitts, not baseball mitts), and kids come away with a broad understanding of what goes into their food and where it comes from. They learn food science: they do experiments and blow stuff up. The kids come home a lot nicer, too. Four times a year, Flour Power offers children’s etiquette classes. Caldwell can’t abide rudeness or bad manners, so she doesn’t. And parents love what she achieves - with cooking, with etiquette, and with simply providing a safe and trusted environment at Flour Power. “We see so many repeat customers. Having owned this business now for seven or eight years, we’ve watched kids who started out with us in preschool who are now going into middle school,” Caldwell says. “Parents know when they bring their kids to trackout camp or summer camp, it’s like leaving them with family.” midtownmag.com | 45


financial focus

Rent Your Home and Avoid Taxes on Sale By Joshua Furr, Rental Specialist

In 1997 Congress passed new rules about the sale of personal residences. The tax code now allows a married couple that has lived in their primary residence for at least two years to sell that home and totally exclude taxation on the first $500,000 of gain. Single individuals can exclude up to $250,000 in gain. The home sold has to have been your primary residence, and you have to have occupied it as your primary residence for two of the preceding five years. Many people are aware of this rule, which is a real break for homeowners selling in a market where prices are increasing as today’s home prices surely are. What most homeowners do not know is that they can actually move out of their primary residence and rent that home for close to three years, and still sell it as a primary residence and avoid taxes on the gain in value as described above. This is because the new rules say that the sellers must have occupied the property as their primary residence two of the preceding five years, and those years do not have to be the two immediately prior to the sale. Why does this matter? How might I use this to my benefit? Expert prognosticators in the field of housing economics all seem to be saying that we can expect significant appreciation in value over the next 3646 | midtownmag.com

48 months (see PulseNomics. com). With that being true, it may well be smart to hold the home you live in now and rent it for the next two to two and a half years to gain the coming increases in value. For example, if you currently live in a $400,000 home, and it is expected to appreciate ten percent over the next two and a half years, that is a potential gain in value of $40,000. Why walk away from that? Many savvy homeowners are using a strategy with which they refinance their present primary residence while they still occupy it as their home. In that refinance they are pulling out cash that will be used as a down payment on their next home. With mortgage interest rates still at historical lows, it makes sense to leverage the next home as much as possible to preserve capital. Most homebuyers put no more that 20 percent down, and many use higher leverage than that. After refinancing their primary residence while still owner occupied

(which leads to a lower interest rate and lower fees), the property owners use the cash from the refinance as a down payment on a new primary residence – but they do not sell the original property. They hold it and rent it for up to two and a half years to reap the reward of continued appreciation over that time period. This strategy allows the property owner to have two properties appreciating in value, instead of one. And this strategy can be used every two years. There are particulars in each person’s home ownership situation, so to fully understand the rules that apply in a situation like this, one would be wise to review IRS Publication 532, which is available on the IRS website (www.IRS.gov/publications). Or give me a call and I will help you evaluate your individual situation.


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giving back

Relieving Hunger, Reclaiming Health We feed. We teach. We grow.

By carol wills photography By Ruhama Wolle

Riley, Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s Cat-in-Residence, prowls the hall outside Cindy Sink’s office. His entire job is to maintain the home-like ambience of the building where Sink, Director of Marketing, Communications & Development for the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle (IFFS), keeps a close watch on the agency’s work of feeding, teaching and training people at risk for hunger in a seven-county area, including Wake, Durham, Orange, Chatham, Johnston, Nash and Edgecombe counties. Riley, with his coal-black fur and shining green eyes, seems to be very proud of the enterprise of which he is a part – and no wonder. How did the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle come into being? IFFS is the outcome of the efforts of two energetic women – co-founders Jill Staton Bullard and Maxine Solomon – who, 27 years ago, noticed that restaurants and grocery stores often discard foods that are still edible. Bullard, who is Christian, and Solomon, who is Jewish, saw an opportunity to recover such food and distribute it to hungry people, many of whom live in “food deserts” – communities without grocery stores or other sources of nutritious food. That’s how the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle came into being. Today IFFS has grown into a thriving enterprise that receives regular donations from grocery stores, restaurants, corporations and individuals, and distributes them in refrigerated trucks to low-income neighborhoods, schools, food pantries and senior centers, usually within a day. Cindy 48 | midtownmag.com

Cindy Sink, Director of Marketing, Communications and Development, with the Mobile Tastiness Machine.

Sink sums the program up by saying, “We look at how we can meet people’s needs where they are.” She notes that IFFS recovers six million pounds of food per year that would otherwise be wasted. ‘We feed, we teach, we grow’ is really a structure for how this organization functions,“ Sink says. ‘We feed’ are the first words of the IFFS tagline. IFFS is a member of the national Feeding America network of food banks, along with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. IFFS employs about 40 staff members and utilizes the generous and caring efforts of about 6,500 volunteers who sort, package and distribute food to those in need. Volunteers prepare BackPack Buddies for over 2,000 children each Riley keeps a close eye on the IFFS staff. week during the school year. BackPack Buddies bags are filled with


Kitty Banks, Catering Kitchen Manager, and Cindy Sink.

weekend meals and snacks, and are given to youngsters who qualify for free or reduced-price meals at school. IFFS also runs its own food truck (known as the Mobile Tastiness Machine) to bring hot, healthy meals to children in low-income communities during the summer. Volunteers pack grocery bags for seniors living on fixed incomes who may not have access to a grocery store. The Shuttle’s refrigerated trucks deliver healthy food – produce, eggs, meat, prepared entrees and canned goods – through Mobile Markets, where families can “shop” for free. The second part of the tagline, ‘We teach,’ refers to IFFS’ educational programs, such as Cooking Matters classes that teach families how to shop for and prepare tasty, nutritious meals on a budget. IFFS not only teaches recipients how to prepare meals for home, but also conducts an 11-week culinary job training program for unemployed and under-employed adults, and helps graduates find employment in the food industry. Sink says that 18 months after graduation from the training program, over 70% of their graduates are employed. The last two words of the tagline, ‘We grow,’ refer to IFFS’ educational programs that help grow skills for selfsufficiency. In addition to learning how to prepare food, IFFS is teaching people how to grow their own food. In southeast Raleigh, the Camden Street Learning Garden is a community garden where each participating family has a plot. “Growing food empowers participants with skills they can use for a lifetime, but more than that, gardening together builds a sense of community,” says Sink. IFFS’ Seed to Supper program utilizes NC State Extension Master Gardeners to teach low-cost vegetable gardening to beginner gardeners. Additionally, IFFS is developing a Junior Master Gardener Program to incorporate into elementary and middle schools. The IFFS Teaching Farm on Tryon Road is a place where volunteers help grow food to be donated, and incubator farmers learn small-market farming. These beginner farmers learn as they grow and sell their produce at the on-site farm stand open Thursday through Saturday during the growing season. Check out farm stand hours, volunteer opportunities, and other ways to get involved at www.foodshuttle.org. In addition, you are invited to participate in the BackPack Buddies Mediathon to End Childhood Hunger on July 13th. WRAL-TV and Mix 101.5 WRAL-FM will present a day-long food drive and fundraiser featuring local companies and community members coming together to help hungry children. midtownmag.com | 49


raising thebar

What About the Kids? we’ve got answers to your legal questions

Q

My ex-wife and I have been sharing custody of our children for years (I have them every other weekend). We never went to court regarding custody and have nothing in writing because we have never had any conflicts about the schedule. She is remarrying and intends to take our children to live in California. Can I stop her? Technically, no, there is nothing that you can do to stop her from moving. However, you can seek the Court’s intervention to stop her from taking your children with her to California by filing a claim for custody as soon as possible. Depending on the specifics of your ex’s plans to move to California, it may be possible to get the court to hear the matter immediately and enter orders that would keep the children in North Carolina pending a full hearing on your child custody claim.

Have a question? Let us hear it: info@midtownmag.com

MeettheCounsel

Deborah Sandlin

Susan Goetcheus

Sandlin Family Law Group www.sandlinfamilylaw.com Certified in the area of family law by the NC State Bar This is paid legal advertisement. The information contained in this article is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. No attorney client relationship is created by the publication and reading of this article. All domestic matters are different and all specific questions should be directed to an attorney who can answer those questions and provide legal advice based on your unique circumstances.

50 | midtownmag.com

Since my ex-wife has always been the children’s primary caregiver, do I really have any chance of getting custody of the children and stopping her from taking them to California? Yes, you do. When one parent wishes to relocate, the court examines several factors specific to the relocation question. While there is no absolute rule that would bar the relocation of one parent with the children, it would be a rare case to allow a relocation which alters a successful custodial arrangement in which both parents have regular and consistent contact with the children.

Is it true that the court will always give preference to placing the children in the custody of their mother? No, that is not true. Basing a custody decision on gender is unconstitutional. The court will consider many different factors in deciding child custody, but above all the court is tasked with determining what custodial order is in the minor children’s best interest. What specific facts does the court consider when determining who should have custody of the children? Each case is determined by its particular facts and circumstances but the court is generally guided by long recognized principles, including but not limited to keeping siblings together, maintaining the status quo to the extent possible and maximizing the roles that each parent has in the children’s lives. Unfortunately, many parents involved in custody disputes will focus on attacking each other, but the court is seldom interested in those attacks. Rather, the court is interested in the practical considerations about your children’s lives that impact them on a day-to-day basis. Those considerations include things like where your children attend school in relation to where each parent lives, what extracurricular activities the children enjoy and which parent is best situated to support those activities, what medical or psychological needs impact the children’s lives, what custodial schedule best supports the children’s routines and schedules, and like concerns. The court will also want to hear evidence about each child’s specific personality and each parent’s relationship with each child.


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sundaysupper

Pioneer Restaurateur

celebrating tradition, community and diversity By paul savery photography By davies photography

In 2006 I took a new job in downtown Raleigh and began to wander around looking for a good lunch spot. Downtown Raleigh was drab and moribund, and a desert for good restaurants. The pickings remained slim until about about 12 months later, when I stumbled upon a newly opened Mexican restaurant at 106 South Wilmington Street. Decorated in vibrant colors and serving food made from fresh ingredients, the staff was diverse and friendly, and this oasis was presided over by a woman with a beautiful smile and a warm greeting. This place, was Centro Mexican del Corazón, and the woman was Angela Salamanca. Angela is the restaurant owner and one of the pioneers leading the downtown Raleigh local business revival. Originally from Colombia, Angela had an uncle (Carlos – the owner of Dos Taquitos, another Raleigh restaurant) who gave her the inspiration to enter the restaurant business. “His generosity and passion have been such a changing force in our family, and I know I am not the only one who has benefited from his gift.” Angela is proud that her restaurant’s food “is representative of all of us that work here. Made from scratch, made with love and intention, by the hands of women and men who have come to this country with the promise of a dream. We are a family!” Centro’s menu offers many traditional Mexican dishes: Pozole, a traditional soup with pork and hominy; Tortas de Papa and Calabaza, a combination of chayote patties, cheese and roasted potatoes; and Chilaquiles Chilangos, a dish consisting of 52 | midtownmag.com


corn chips in red chile sauce with queso fresco and a fried egg. Beef tongue is one of Angela’s favorite meats. Tongue is popular in Latin America (and many other parts of the world). While growing up in Colombia, tongue was a treat for Angela and it remains one of her favorite taco fillings. If you are lucky, you’ll stumble in on a day she puts tongue on the menu as a special; she recognizes it is a minority taste in USA. Just over a year ago Angela opened a new bar above her restaurant called Gallo Pelón, which she says is the first Mezcaleria in the Southeast. Mezcal is distilled alcohol made from the agave plant, native to Mexico. She is very dedicated to educating her customers about the finer points of the premium Mezcal she has specially imported for Gallo Pelón. Recently she took her bar staff to meet some of her Mezcal producers in Oaxaca, where years before she attended cooking classes. (Cheap tequila drunk to excess at student parties has tarnished this category of drinks.) The bar serves snacks like yucca frites and tamales until midnight. Angela is committed to making a difference in her community and is very proud of her Day of the Dead party, which takes place on the last Saturday of every October. Surely it is one of the most colorful annual celebrations to be held downtown. The event was launched six years ago to commemorate the death of her sister. Following Mexican tradition, she sets up one altar outside Centro and another one in a local cemetery, where people place offerings such as photos and trinkets of deceased loved ones along with flowers and other tokens. The two altars are the starting and finishing lines for a 5K race followed by a dance-off costume contest. She describes the race as “celebrating tradition, community and diversity” as well as being a fundraiser for the Brentwood Boys and Girls Clubs of Raleigh. “At home, I keep things simple when cooking. In my fridge there is always spinach, eggs, bacon and cheese. We also keep quinoa or rice at hand. Fish is our protein of choice, and we share with our neighbors whatever is in the garden.” She cooks at home when her two daughters are with her, Sunday through Wednesday, and likes to invite other family, neighbors and friends over to eat. One of her summer favorites is the Italian classic combination of vine fresh tomato, fresh basil, and fresh mozzarella cheese. Her essential go-to cookery book for cooking at home is Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty Angela has selected ‘Envuelto con Salsa de Cerdo’ as her Sunday Supper recipe for Midtown Magazine readers. She describes this dish as “a take on corn bread, but creamier, with a touch of jalapeno.” The bread is topped with pulled pork and a tamarind sofrito sauce. “I love this dish because it makes sense. It is a representation of South meets Latin. It is familiar to the Southern palate while very representative of Latin flavors,” enthuses Angela. midtownmag.com | 53


Envuelto con Salsa de Cerdo serves 4

“Wrapped with Pork Salsa” Cotija-Corn Cake 1 cup corn meal 4 cups frozen corn ½ cup sugar 3 tsp salt 5 eggs 2 cups Cotija cheese 2 tbsp chopped jalapeño 1 cup heavy cream 1 cup chicken broth 3 tsp baking powder Directions Blend all ingredients in a blender or food processor, saving a little of the corn to fold in whole. Pour into butter-coated 8x8 inch baking pan. Bake at 300 degrees for 30 minutes. Let cool before serving.

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Tamarind-Pork Salsa
 6 bacon strips, chopped fine 2 cups pico de gallo 6 oz frozen tamarind 1 tbsp pork fat 2 cups shredded pork 1 tsp salt 1 cup chicken broth 2 tbsp barbecue sauce Directions Fry the chopped bacon and add barbecue sauce. Add the pico de gallo and chicken broth and cook on medium until all the liquid is reduced. Add pork fat, frozen tamarind and shredded pork and cook for 5 minutes. Add salt to taste. Top a portion of corn cake and serve.


2016

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midtownmag.com | 55


the interview

15 Questions With:

Greg Cox

Triangle Food Critic Talks Life, Love and Liver Pudding Sandwiches By Karlie Justus Marlowe photography By davies photography

In the digital age of extreme personal branding, one of Greg Cox’s shining achievements is anonymity. As the News & Observer’s restaurant critic for the past two decades, Cox keeps a low profile to discourage preferential treatment when reviewing both tried-and-true and latest-and-greatest Triangle eating spots. He knew he wanted to be a writer at a young age, when one of his poems was published in the local paper. The food part? It’s a bonus. “Just didn’t know I’d become a food writer, didn’t even know there was such a thing,” said the North Carolina native, who likes to burn off working breakfasts, lunches and dinners with bike rides on the American Tobacco Trail.

...whatever James Bond says, it’s stirred, not shaken...

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Midtown Magazine: What is your signature cocktail? Greg Cox: Something old school: Depending on the weather and my mood, a negroni, a manhattan, or a martini. Two parts gin, one part vermouth. That’s gin, not vodka – and whatever James Bond says, it’s stirred, not shaken. MM: What is your greatest fear? GC: Dying before my time – which, as I understand it according to Einstein’s theory of relativity, is 30 years older than I am at any given moment. MM: What is your most treasured possession? GC: In the kitchen, my knives. On a desert island, my copy of the Norton Anthology of Poetry. Neither has let me down over several decades of use, and both are capable of cutting to the heart of the matter at hand.

MM: What is your favorite word? GC: Syzygy. I love the sound, and it’s a great word if you’re playing hangman. I just haven’t figured out how to work it into a restaurant review. MM: What would your superpower be? GC: Ability to eat tall mounds of tacos in a single sitting. Or as much of anything else I’m in the mood for, without having to worry about the health consequences. MM: Who would play you in the film of your life? GC: It’s already been made. I was Anton Ego in Ratatouille. MM: What’s your favorite bingewatching TV show? GC: Pretty much any British murder mystery series. Problem is, I seem to have burned through everything available on Netflix and PBS. Any suggestions are welcome, I’m getting desperate. MM: What is your guiltiest pleasure? GC: A bourbon and a cigar on the patio, okay, I don’t really feel guilty but my wife says I should. MM: Who would you invite to your dream dinner party? GC: Alton Brown, Nigella Lawson,


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Anthony Bourdain, Ina Garten. We’ll make it a potluck, I’ll provide the drinks. MM: What vacation spot do you return to again and again? GC: The North Carolina shore. Anywhere from Wilmington to the Outer Banks. It’s all good, as long as I can find fresh seafood and a beach to walk on. MM: Which living person do you most admire, and why? GC: Malala Yousafzai, winner of the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize, for her courage and truly inspiring example of a meaningful life. MM: What is your favorite smell? GC: Cedar needles, crushed between my fingers. The smell transports me instantly to childhood Christmases, when my father would take my brothers and me out into the woods behind our house to choose and cut just the right tree. The aroma intensified once we got it inside the house, and eventually I came to identify that smell with the start of the Christmas season. MM: What is something that people would be surprised to know about you? GC: My favorite sandwich when I was a kid was liver pudding with mayo on white bread. I still occasionally treat myself to one. MM: What is the closest you’ve come to death? GC: When I was a toddler, I “borrowed” my mom’s keys when she wasn’t looking, and decided that an AC power outlet would make a great ignition to start my pretend car. I don’t think that’s what they have in mind when they say “He lights up a room.” MM: What is the most important lesson life has taught you? GC: Patience – though I have to admit that I’ve been a slow learner in that particular subject.

Have a suggestion for next issue’s “The Interview”? Send it to us: info@midtownmag.com.

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what’s app?

A Mobile Passport? the top picks for July and August

GIFYme • Free

Silk 2 • $.99

GIFYme is an app that allows you to use filters to create video loops & gifs. It provides you with a platform to showcase your creativity by allowing you to create easily & share short videos in animated GIF or MP4. After creating these gifs, you can then use them on WhatsApp, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, Email & iMessage/SMS.

With Silk’s award-winning magic brush, anyone can be an artist. Relax, express yourself, and create mandalas and wallpapers. With the swish of a finger, Silk strands mingle and fuse, weaving together into wonderful works of art. Silk supports all iPhones and iPads, is enhanced for 3D touch, and is specifically designed for the Apple Pencil.

Talkshow• Free

Fitplan • Free

Talk shows can be about anything: sports, TV, politics, music, business...or your favorite GIFs. It’s as easy as sending messages, pics and GIFs with your friends. Invite your friends to join you in your Talkshow, and notify your followers when your Talkshow is live. Your audience can favorite your shows, react to your messages with emoji, and ask to join you as a co-host. Share your Talkshow to the web so the world can see what you’re talking about.

Mobile Passport • Free

VUE • Free

VUE is a video camera empowering users to capture memorable moments, edit them through adding filters, stickers or montage, and most importantly, share them with the world. VUE offers you an excellent opportunity to create cinematic videos with ease. The only thing you need do is tap. Finding Dory: Just Keep Swimming • $3.99

Inspired by the Disney•Pixar film Finding Dory, journey with Dory and friends through fin-tastic levels to find her family! Follow the bubbles as you travel from the reef to shipwrecks, kelp forests, the Marine Life Institute, and more. Try to earn three stars on every level, and choose funny items to customize your journey in surprising ways. *Prices are subject to change.

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Use the exact training routines of the world’s best athletes to become the best version of you. Follow the daily workout routines of the athletes that inspire you, get detailed sets, reps, rest times and tips that the athletes use to gain the extra edge, watch each athlete perform exercise demonstrations in high-definition video; see your weekly workout schedule at a glance and track your progress. Skip the line at the airport when entering the USA with Mobile Passport! Officially authorized by US Customs and Border Protection, Mobile Passport allows travelers to submit their passport control and customs declaration information via their iPhone or iPad and bypass the regular line to enter the United States. This app effectively replaces the traditional blueand-white paper declaration form required of all travelers entering the US by air. Operator • Free

Operator connects you to experts to find what you want, when you want. Search, buy, deliver – one app to download. Whether it’s buying the perfect gift, tracking down the hottest shoes, tickets for an event or the best home decor – an expert will find it for you.


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wine review Chemin des Sables IGP Cotes Revees

Bougrier Rosé d’Anjou

South of France, France Chemin des Sables offers freshness, lightness and delicious flavors. The wine has a beautiful pale pink color. This pleasurable wine is distinguished by its quality and its packaging. To be enjoyed chilled.

Loire, France This crisp, refreshing blush hails from France’s best terroir for fresh wines, the Loire Valley. Filled with fresh berry and fruit notes, this is ideal for warm days on the patio, as well as elegant poultry dishes.

Fresh, Strawberry, Citrus, Light-bodied

Crisp, Strawberry, Raspberry, Light-bodied

1099

$

9

$

99

Chateau de Nages Buti Rosé Rhone, France Fragrant and fresh aromas of ripe cherries and melon mixed with rose petals. This blend of Grenache and Syrah displays

the bouquet in flavor, along with some raspberry, in a light – to medium-bodied style. All of the wonderful ripe fruit flavors fade into a crisp finish. Crisp, Cherry, Melon, Raspberry, Light-bodied

1199

$

Domaine Mousset Cotes du Rhone Rosé

H to H Cotes du Rhone Rosé

Cotes du Rhone, Rhone, France This delightful and crisp Rosé offers fresh flavors of strawberry and cherry. Made primarily from Grenache, this dry and clean Rosé is nicely balanced with a refreshingly long finish.

Cotes du Rhone, Rhone, France This Rosé is blended to deliver the true characteristics of refreshing acidity and red fruit flavors. This wine pairs beautifully with seafood and lighter fare.

Crisp, Strawberry, Cherry, Light-bodied

Crisp, Cherry, Strawberry, Light-bodied

1299

62 | midtownmag.com

999

$

$

BY michael gallo, CSW, Wine Manager – Total Wine & More


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your home

Refreshing

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Padma Planation Kubu Lounge Chair, $598 Nesting Tables (comes in a set of three), $650 Available at Sew Fine II 64 | midtownmag.com


“Land of The Free” Original Frame Canvas, 69½” x 54½”, $3,200 Available at The Galleria

Leather Chair – Serengeti Natural Hide, $1690 Banyan Tree – Printed on Recycled Aluminum, $1825 Available at beyondblue

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Vintage CocaCola Beverage Set, $42 Batik Napkins (4/$12) and Towels ($12/each) Available at Revival Antiques

Modern Style Upholstered, Tufted Back Chair, $899 Available at The Galleria midtownmag.com | 65


Odyssey Sofa, $2,229 Scoop End Table, $539 Available at Ambiente Modern Furniture

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Louis XVI White Lacquered Cane Chair with cushion, $850 Pelzer Yellow Pillow – 21” x 21”, $294 Available at Hunt & Gather, Seaboard Station


The 2015 Midtown Hero Award was presented to Doug Vinsel, former President of Duke Raleigh Hospital and Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce chairman, for his commitment and leadership to the Midtown Community.


THE STATE OF FARE By Adam Sobsey Photography by Davies Photography

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J

ohn Ford was going to be a pilot – got his license, all that – but he’s now the head chef at Cameron Bar & Grill in Raleigh. Really the two professions are not so different: you must make quick decisions on the fly, and trust your training and instruments up in the rarefied air of the job while keeping your thoughts firmly on the landscape and weather. As Ford puts it, aptly, of both: “I hate being bored.” Ford is Eschelon Restaurant Experiences Group’s reigning Manager of the Year, an accolade he earned partly by making Cameron Bar & Grill an unexpected locavore haven. Local food dots Cameron’s upscale pub-style menu; the highlight is Ford’s Saturday farm-to-table feature: a special teeming with ingredients he sources from the region’s bounty, reinvented every week. On a warm Saturday morning in May, Ford is at the State Farmers’ Market in Raleigh, his chef ’s coat drawing curious looks from shoppers as he conceives the night’s farm-to-table special. He wants to build it around the strip steaks he has back at the restaurant. It isn’t long before an arresting display of purple and gold cauliflower catches his eye.

“.. bacon has a unique ability to transform other foods into something magical.”

(far left) A Saturday farm-to-table feature at Cameron Bar & Grill; (left) John Ford, Cameron Bar & Grill Head Chef.

“Let’s keep it ECU,” he wisecracks, referring to the colors of East Carolina University athletics. He loads up his bag, to which he adds some red and white new potatoes (a nod to the hometown NC State Wolfpack, perhaps?). Then, his culinary gears spinning, he picks up seasonal asparagus from Tart’s Farm. Moving purposefully now to Ronnie Moore’s Fruits and Veggies, he asks the vendor about the best herbs – a good chef trusts his growers. “Got some good lavender,” he’s told. It’s a risky choice – lavender’s perfumed intensity can overwhelm a dish – but along with trust comes a willingness to take risks. Ford buys the lavender, and some thyme. To integrate the lavender into the dish, he has another idea: tomatoes, which are just coming into season. So he stops by Langdon Farms’ stall and scoops some up. Back at Cameron, Ford gets right to work. The cauliflower florets are separately and quickly blanched – just two minutes – so they retain their crunch. Then he submerges them in an ice bath to brighten their purple and gold hues. The potatoes are roasted with the herbs, olive oil and a touch of white wine for deglazing; meanwhile, Ford hollows out the tomatoes and stuffs them with a slightly smoky Lissome cheese from Boxcarr Farms in Cedar Grove, mixed with a little cream and more of that lavender and thyme. He tops the stuffed tomatoes with panko. What to do with the asparagus? Easy. As Ford puts it in his bio, “bacon has a unique ability to transform other foods into something magical.” So he wraps a few asparagus stalks in a belt of bacon. They’ll be grilled that way and propped up against the steak, which will be crowned with the stuffed tomato: “height-factor,” Ford explains. The finished dish is more than a dazzling riot of color. There’s something royal about it, too, like a red king holding his staff, seated on a purple and gold throne, with his garland of lavender. Ford’s Saturday farm-to-table special at Cameron Bar & Grill is just one of many examples of the reach and rootedness of farm-to-table dining around the Triangle. This is no longer a fad, but simply how we dine now: a commitment to good flavor and health, to the environment, and to our economy. Probably nowhere is the farm-totable spirit and soul more alive, more midtownmag.com | 69


Some of the delicious and colorful produce you can find at Raleigh City Farm.

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central and more fertile in Raleigh than at Raleigh City Farm. James Edwards – aptly and succinctly “@organicist” on Twitter – mans the Raleigh City Farm Saturday morning stand at Peace and Blount Streets, and he’s also the man who cofounded the farm and grew the produce he’s selling. A quietly intense guy who was raised not far south in Seagrove, he spent years as a cook and chef, finally co-owning his own restaurant, Off the Square in Albemarle. But he wanted to get “deeper into the food system,” he says. Edwards sold Off the Square and came to Raleigh, where he and a high school classmate, Chris Rumbley, connected through friends with developers who were forward-thinking enough to consider turning a vacant city lot not into yet another building, but rather an urban farm. As Rumbley puts it, “we started to give structure to an idea that didn’t have a clear way forward.” The first load of soil was spread on the site in 2013. It didn’t take long for nearby chefs

to come calling. “We found supportive customers in downtown restaurants right away,” Rumbley says. Sean Fowler of Mandolin, which opened less than three miles from the farm about a year earlier, says, “It was a unique concept to me. It was cool to see an empty lot downtown transformed into a cornucopia, and cool to see something on the plate that was grown right here in Raleigh.” Fowler has a particular fondness for Raleigh City Farm’s radishes and hakurei turnips, both part of the wide-ranging, flavorful brassica family, in which Edwards specializes. Mandolin has also used the farm’s lettuce for his fried pig-ear salad – Mandolin’s take on the traditional wedge salad. Other regular clients include Ashley Christensen’s restaurants, Busy Bee/State of Beer, Capital Club 16, Fiction Kitchen, Garland, and Kimbap. Once Raleigh City Farm set down roots, it quickly grew offshoot enterprises. One is the Farmers’ Collective, a group of about 25 farms spread across central North Carolina whose produce is gathered at Raleigh


City Farm and redistributed to area chefs. (The Collective also operates “Farmshare,” a CSA.) A third presence on the farm is Endless Sun Produce, which grows hydroponically on the site and provides, among other vegetables, year-round lettuce to Raleigh restaurants and retail customers. The trio now operate as separate business entities, with Rumbley running the Farmers’ Collective and Edwards rooted at Raleigh City Farm. Restaurants source their produce from both, as well as from Endless Sun. There is “a balanced demand and production plan,” Rumbley says, which offers not only consistency and variety – Fowler of Mandolin was happy to find a source of pawpaws through the Farmers’ Collective – but uncommon freshness. Jason Smith, the owner of 18 Seaboard, immediately after singing the praises of the City Farm and the Collective, called Rumbley to find out what was available. By the next afternoon, midtownmag.com | 71


A Farmers’ Collective feature dish at 18 Seaboard.

he had built an entire special around it: a flavorful springtime dish of grilled chicken breast with a salad of Farmers’ Collective greens and shaved Chioggia beets. You can also source these vegetables for your own kitchen at the Raleigh City Farm stand on Saturday mornings. You might see a cook from Standard Foods, which is right behind the farm stand, wander over to pick up a little produce, or just to chat collegially with Edwards. Raleigh City Farm remains the city’s culinary ground zero, the place where Raleigh’s farm-to-table legs are most firmly planted. Yet Edwards wants to expand it. Not geographically – Raleigh City Farm is cozily nestled into its city block – but socially and economically. This is, after all, a business in an urban market economy. He envisions, for example, opening another restaurant someday – one that would source its produce more completely from Raleigh City Farm, in a direct symbiosis. But his plans involve more than bringing the farm to the table; he wants to bring people to the farm, and not just on Saturday mornings at the stand. There are already volunteer opportunities that educate and stimulate, like “Wine and Weeds on Wednesday,” a collaboration with neighboring Wine Authorities. There is the potential for more: to make 72 | midtownmag.com

Raleigh City Farm not just a fertile spot for vegetables, but for the community as a whole, a place given to experiment and outreach that transcends simple commerce. “This isn’t about making money,” Edwards says, laughing at his slow-food finances. “It’s learning.” His small but potent acre is his classroom, and it’s calling for consumers – that is, all of us – to attend to its aspirational reimagining of how urban life might work, and to consider the entirely different model of socioeconomic life implicitly proposed by a venture like Edwards’. As ancient as food cultivation is, Raleigh City Farm’s approach is, in our times, very new. But perhaps we’re ready for it. Perhaps in some way Edwards isn’t talking only about produce when he says, “We all want to taste something we’ve never tasted before.”

CSA PDQ Raleigh City Farm’s produce stand is open Saturday mornings, 9am-12pm at 800 Blount Street (raleighcityfarm. com/farmstand). If you can’t make the trip, Wake County abounds with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs and other sources for home delivery of locally grown and produced food, as well as many more that offer convenient pickup locations, such as Double T Farm (double-t-farm.com), Hilltop Farms (hilltopfarms.org), and Wild Onion Farms (wildonionfarms.com). Here are some recommended home delivery services:

Bella Bean Organics bellabeanorganics.com

Papa Spud’s papaspuds.com

Britt Farms brittfarms.net The Produce Box theproducebox.com Coon Rock Farm coonrockfarm.com


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cooking in the

capital A Cultural and Culinary Experience By Rachel Vachon Photography By Davies Photography The evolution of Raleigh’s food scene has no doubt been influenced by the outsiders attracted to NC State University and the Research Triangle Park’s draw of employees from all over the country and world. Our capital city is growing and thriving, and continues to welcome new people and businesses, embracing our native Southern food culture and outside influences through the variety of food served. Longtime a home to foodies and an evolving restaurant scene, Raleigh continues to bring people together over excellent meals and the creation of complex community connections. The evidence is with our large pool of chefs – new area chefs, North Carolina natives who left to learn the craft and have boomeranged back to open restaurants, and chefs and food professionals within the city who have been at it a very long time. This last group has witnessed the changing times and food fashions, and survived by their commitment to provide the best food possible to a growing and changing metropolis.

Chef Walter Royal, Angus Barn On a day-to-day basis, Chef Walter Royal oversees a wide range of cooking responsibilities. He is the executive chef for the Angus Barn and a separate dining area known as the Wine Cellar. There are also two private catering facilities – adjacent to the Angus Barn is indoor/outdoor lakeside catering space the Pavilion, and Durham’s American Tobacco District boasts Bay 7; both are available for private events. Additionally he oversees the menu at a concessions stand at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park, which serves the Angus Barn Original Steak Sandwich. At all locations he delights guests with his excellent cuisine. Since beginning his career over 37 years ago, he’s worked in a variety of restaurants. Walter knew he wanted to be a chef since he was a young boy of 14, cooking alongside his mother and grandmother. This early experience inspired him to continue to learn and move forward in his career, attending culinary school in Atlanta before moving to the Triangle and working alongside and training with many of the most influential chefs here. “I think cooking and being in the restaurant kitchen is in my DNA,” Walter says. An early opportunity he had was to work with Edna Lewis, a chef who authored several books about Southern cooking at Fearrington House Restaurant. Working with Edna Lewis, another AfricanAmerican chef, allowed Walter to really

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dive into the world of cooking, and heavily influenced his cooking abilities and style. He worked alongside Ben Barker there and eventually moved to work with him at Magnolia Grill, continuing later with stints at Bonnie Brae and his own restaurant before landing the top spot at Angus Barn. Walter’s kitchen, one of the largest in the area, is a fun place to work, yet operations often change from day to day. He keeps menus fresh by experimenting with a variety of food cultures and styles together. “It is a wonderful thing to know you can make people happy through feeding them and educating them about food,” Walter says. His monthly three-hour cooking classes at the Angus Barn are almost always sold out a year in advance; stay posted for openings on the not-yet-posted 2017 schedule, on the Angus Barn website. Jill Santa-Lucia, Catering Works As a little girl growing up in Fairport, New York, Jill Santa-Lucia was inspired to cook at a young age by her grandmother, who taught her to cook and bake. “My grandmother was an amazing cook and baker; in terms of cooking, she had the most influence on me as a child,” Jill says. As she got older, Jill continued to learn everything she could about cooking, working in restaurants in high school, studying Julia Child’s book Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and learning the aesthetics of displaying food and tables from watching Martha Stewart. Eventually she attended Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island and received her culinary degree. In 1989, with the help of sister Lorin, Jill began a new adventure in Raleigh. “I started Catering Works with the passion to cook and nurture people through my cooking. I love setting a pretty table, and making people feel like they are guests at their own party.” As president and culinary director of Catering Works, she and her team oversee everything 76 | midtownmag.com

from the cooking and food presentation to personalized menus and event design. She helps clients fulfill their vision for an event and customizes it accordingly, estimating that she feeds, on average, 1,000 people a day. Jill’s heart to care for and nurture people really shines through in her work. Whether it’s organizing, planning and producing an event and menu for a client or cooking lunch every day for her employees, she enjoys creating moments that create a sense of connection. She

is also passionate about helping people understand where their food comes from and what ingredients she uses. Experimenting is also a part of what Jill enjoys about her job, trying recipes that involve uncommon proteins and exotic fruits and vegetables. It is hard to pin down her most special recipe. “For now my favorite dish is a vegetable coconut curry, but next week it could be a fig pizza or anything with figs,” Jill says. “One of my all-time favorites is Timpano – it’s an all-day process and a show stopper.”


She gives full credit for her success to the many people who have helped her and have worked alongside her over the years. “We have been so fortunate to work with great, hardworking, fun people who make it a joy to go to work every day,” Jill says. “Also to having loyal customers who have stayed with us through our years of development, trying new recipes and menus, and have given us great feedback to grow. I have a very supportive and understanding family who understands what it takes to have this business. Encouragement goes a long way.” Chef Andrew Pettifer Margaux’s Chef Andrew Pettifer from Margaux’s Restaurant grew up in South London and discovered his enjoyment of cooking while he was in school. Andrew explains that London schools had classes in woodworking, metalworking and home economics. He chose woodworking – as did most of the boys, according to Andrew – but midtownmag.com | 77


discovered the trade was not his strong suit and switched to home economics. It was here, at the age of 14, that he learned of his love for cooking. He later went on to college for an apprenticeship in cooking. Since then, Andrew’s training has had a variety of influences, some of which have come through traveling to places such as Bali and Brazil. He even settled in Sydney, Australia for a time to work and continue to improve his skills. Andrew credits his experience in Australia with being a significant part of getting his grounding and proving his dedication to his craft. While there, he worked as a cook for four days and then went to school on the fifth day, which was paid for by his employer. This allowed him to learn both the technical and cooking aspects of the industry and how to run a business. As his wife was originally from Raleigh, they moved back to that area in 1996. It was then Andrew began working at Margaux’s. When

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he joined the staff, Andrew took the all-French menu and turned it into a fusion of French, Southern and Asian foods. As both co-owner and chef, Andrew oversees the entirety of the back house operations at Margaux’s, from working with vendors to planning, organizing and preparing the menu, which changes every day. While Andrew doesn’t have a favorite dish to prepare, he does enjoy experimenting when he cooks. Andrew believes in empowering his staff to cook, to be creative and really gain experience. His kitchen is a fun environment that works together as a team where every member has input. “I like people to be creative and come up with their own dishes that we work up and put on the menu,” Andrew says. Despite the long hours and tough aspects of running a restaurant at times, Andrew says it is very rewarding and he loves what he does. “It’s a labor of love.”


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Raleigh’s restaurant scene is exciting and vibrant, with frequent new additions. But there are also some hall-of-famers that have been satisfying diners for 20 years or more. Here are some of the restaurants that have found the recipe for success. By Carla Turchetti

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photographs courtesy of Bloomsbury Bistro

Bloomsbury Bistro At Bloomsbury Bistro in Raleigh’s Five Points neighborhood, the focus is on fresh and in-season. The menu rotates every six weeks to reflect the availability of ingredients. Chef and owner John Toler was trained in classical French cuisine, and Bloomsbury offers up French food with an ethnic flair. That means on any given night the foie gras mousse parfait can co-exist on the menu with the Moroccan-style crispy lamb shoulder chop on a bed of spicy chickpeas and couscous. The Bloomsbury dining room is a quiet, intimate and elegant setting. There is also hearty fare available on the special bar menu. bloomsburybistro.com midtownmag.com | 81


photograph by Kris Shultz

Irregardless Café When founding chef and owner Arthur Gordon served the first patrons at the Irregardless Café in 1975, he was ahead of his time with a vegetarian menu, a commitment to locally sourced food and sustainable practices. Over the years the menu has added seafood and meat, but the farm-to-table commitment is still going strong and the restaurant has its own community garden. “Irregardless is the first vegetarian restaurant I knew in Raleigh 25-plus years ago,” says Patti Nore from Raleigh. “It has expanded its menu yet stuck with the “hippie-ness” of great alternative food other than meat. Arthur and his wife are simply awesome. Even after the horrific fire, which closed the restaurant for eleven months, his staff continued to get paid. The music, atmosphere, and the entire venue is, to me, the best Raleigh has to offer.” There is live music nightly at Irregardless and diners have been known to push back the tables and dance irregardless.com

photograph by ruhama wolle

photograph by matt williams photography

photograph by matt williams photography

The Mecca The Mecca Restaurant has been open in Raleigh since 1930 when Nick and Helen Doumbalis opened up a luncheonette at the corner of Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. They expanded and opened the current location on E. Martin Street in 1937, and Doumbalis family members still run the restaurant today. In its long history the Mecca has been a popular spot for politicians and people involved in state government. “The Mecca is the restaurant of choice for lunch downtown by all politicians, judges, elected officials, celebrities and downtown employees,” says Carol Chapman, who worked downtown for years. “Where else could you get Southern home cooked food like biscuits, sweet potatoes, chicken and dumplings, plus all the local news at the same time? The Glorified Jumbo Hamburger has been on the menu at The Mecca since 1958. Their late-night hours are a more recent addition. mecca-restaurant.com 82 | midtownmag.com


Margaux’s Located on Creedmoor Road in North Raleigh, Margaux’s Restaurant opened its doors in May of 1992. The menu is changed seasonally to take advantage of fresh ingredients that are available, and the three-course fixed price menu is loaded with tasty options. The décor is eclectic and the walls are usually filled with art. Cofounding owner Steve Horowitz is a huge supporter of Raleigh’s arts scene. Many Raleigh residents consider Margaux’s their family dining destination. “I’ve been going to Margaux’s since I was a teenager; we consider it our family restaurant and birthday celebration spot,” says Raleigh native Nesha Daubenspeck. “The food is always delicious and the chefs do a wonderful job of mixing up the menu with the seasons. There is a reason Steve Horowitz and his restaurant have been around 20-plus years. Steve has watched our family grow up just as we have watched his.” margauxsrestaurant.com

Angus Barn The big red barn and the silo on Glenwood Avenue mark the spot of a legendary Raleigh restaurant, the Angus Barn. Rookie restaurateurs Thad Eure, Jr. and Charles Winston swung the barn doors open in June of 1960. Thad Eure’s daughter, Van Eure, is the current owner and operator of this self-proclaimed “beefeater’s haven” that also specializes in seafood and celebrations. “When I made a reservation on Open Table I commented that it was for my daughter’s birthday and every person we came in contact with that night, from the host to the waiter to the guy who filled our water glasses, wished her a happy birthday,” says Margaret Nobles of Raleigh. “It was truly special and appreciated. Not to mention her crème brulée was on the house.” And the Angus Barn wine cellar is its own special place. “If you truly want a magical, memorable night, go to the Angus Barn for one of their special dinners in the wine cellar,” says Liz Crute. “My husband and I went to both the Downton Abbey and Titanic dinners. Truly incredible food, wonderful wines, and dressing up made it a fabulous evening to remember.” angusbarn.com midtownmag.com | 83


photograph by matt williams photography

42nd Street Oyster Bar The 42nd Street Oyster Bar and Seafood Grill traces its beginnings to 1931 as a grocery store that served draft beer and oysters. In 1987, Thad Eure, Jr. of Angus Barn fame, along with several partners, fashioned it into a restaurant with a motto “seafood any fresher would still be in the ocean”. There really is an oyster bar, and oysters on the half-shell are shucked by hand to order. The menu changes daily and includes the locations where the oysters were fished. There are many seafood options on any given day, in addition to chicken, beef and, of course, oysters. The sides are Southern in nature and include legendary hush puppies. The restaurant has its own nighttime scene with live music. 42ndstoysterbar.com

photograph by ruhama wolle

photograph by matt williams photography

Clyde Cooper’s BBQ On January 1st, 1938, with $50 in his pocket, Clyde Cooper opened the doors to his barbecue restaurant on Davie Street in downtown Raleigh. He ran the place for 50 years before he sold it, but even today there have hardly been any changes to the menu. The owners describe the food as clean and simple. The barbecue is made from pork shoulder because it’s a lean cut and is still done the way Clyde described it, as just having a “kiss of vinegar”. The potatoes and Brunswick stew have been on the table since the beginning. The biggest change happened when the original building that housed the restaurant, which is believed to have been built in 1884, was torn down and Clyde Cooper’s BBQ was relocated to its present location on South Wilmington Street. Some of the wooden booths from the old location were moved into the new. clydecoopersbbq.com

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photograph by Food-Seen by Felicia Perry Photography

photograph by Food-Seen by Felicia Perry Photography

Winston’s Grille Winston’s Grille is another Raleigh restaurant that was born on the Angus Barn family tree. It opened in 1986 as Winston’s Restaurant and the owners were Will O’Neal and Charles Winston, Jr., whose father opened the Angus Barn with Thad Eure, Jr. It was a more formal dining space in the 1980s and the owners decided to take it a little more casual, and it evolved into Winston’s Grille and an elegant, casual and comfortable space. The menu is traditional American with an emphasis on foods prepared from scratch. It is a popular spot for Sunday brunch and it is known for its complimentary blueberry muffins. winstonsgrille.com photographs courtesy of vinnie’s steakhouse

Vinnie’s Steakhouse & Tavern Vinnie’s is a destination for its Certified Angus Beef but the seafood, including jumbo lobster tail and tuna, is equally as good. The centerpiece of the dining room is the wine cellar. There are white linens on the tables and comfy leather seats to sink into and relax. The bar is a bustling scene with a regular cast of who’s who in Raleigh on the stools. Bartender Steve is the best in the business, and you’ll get white linen under your meal should you order there. And let him pick the wine. vinniessteakhouse.com midtownmag.com | 85


photograph by Hannia Jara

Alexa Presas serves up arepas to a hungry customer.

makes sure the dish at hand looks as good as possible. Hannia and Pedro left a few minutes ago, and when they did the young couple switched away from the cool jazz station that had piped Miles Davis and such into the truck. The subdued chill of saxes and muted trumpets is replaced with the blue collar swagger of a pop country station.

Food Truck Insider

Midtown writer Corbie Hill wanted to know what it’s like inside a local food truck. He worked a shift at Arepa Culture to find out. On a hot June afternoon, I strolled across the parking lot of Big Boss Brewing in Raleigh toward the Arepa Culture truck just beside the patio. I’d asked to work a shift: I wanted to see what it was like inside a food truck. I wanted to write about it. Sure thing, they said – how’s Friday? So I got my Arepa Culture shirt, slipped it on and went to work. By Corbie Hill 5:18pm: For the next few hours, the Arepa Culture family and I will be in close proximity: right now, though, I’m just meeting my new coworkers. There are four: Hannia Jara and Pedro Rodriguez own the truck, while their son Marcel Jara and his girlfriend Alexa Presas, both 19, work in it. Pedro moved to North Carolina from Venezuela 33 years ago, and that nation’s cuisine inspired the truck. Hannia and Marcel are from Costa Rica, while Alexa grew up in Raleigh. She and Marcel have dated since they were high school freshmen, and she’s basically family by now. They’re all completely at home in the Arepa Culture truck and around each other, and they welcome me easily and instantly. 5:39pm: I’m learning the ingredients: here’s the stewed chicken, here’s the sweet barbecue, and here’s the beef. Under the lid here at the sandwich station are the sliced avocados, tomatoes, pico de gallo, and various kinds of 86 | midtownmag.com

cheese. Below are sauces. Beside the grill are the arepas, an English muffin-sized Venezuelan maize bread that’s inherently gluten-free. Hannia contacted the company that makes the masa flour Arepa Culture uses, and they confirmed it: nothing but corn. 5:45pm: Hannia checks the thermometer up front and notes that it’s 100 degrees in the truck. I chuckle – this is what I came to experience, after all. There are people inside Big Boss and on its patio drinking beer. Later they will be hungry.

6:19pm: I stand at the sandwich station and mirror Marcel. First, I put the arepa flat on the cutting board. I press it gently with my palm and slide a plastic knife into the side – it has to be plastic, as the soft corn dough will stick to metal – and it slides through with little resistance. Now I have two halves. I put it in a large triangle of foil and fold it around the back and I drop in a little white cheese. Onto the grill goes sautéed peppers and onions and fresh greens, which cook down. The peppers, onions, and greens go in the arepa, then more cheese goes on top, and then I throw a few little slices of avocado on the top, just for kicks. Voila: I have made myself a Veggie Lovers. 6:28pm: I take my first bite, and it is good. The white corn flour arepa is a perfect staple: anything would go well on this. I try the cilantro sauce and I like it. I try the hot sauce, and it’s amazing, a smoky, thick, de árbol pepper sauce of Pedro’s creation. I put a little more hot sauce on. Then a little more. Then even more. I can’t get enough. 6:34pm: I try the Fish Lovers. It’s a wildly different flavor, based on the savory punch of smoked salmon and capers, yet the subtle arepa flavor complements it nicely. 6:44pm: Marcel is still handing me food. He wants me to try a cachapa, a yellow photograph by Hannia Jara

5:49pm: “So you haven’t eaten an arepa before?” Marcel asks me, excited to see what I think. 5:54pm: Alexa is hungry, so Marcel makes her a Reina Pepiada – that is, a chicken salad with avocado arepa. He really cares about presentation, so even when he’s making supper for his girlfriend he

Arepa Culture’s Veggie Lovers arepa.


corn pancake folded around melted cheese. This kind of food is common throughout Latin America, though it has different names and is prepared differently in different countries. In Costa Rica, for example, it’s served open. I’m stuffed, but I take about half a cachapa and bite in. “Holy crap,” is all I can say. It’s so good. 7:05pm: Alexa and Marcel are both in school at NC State, he for biology and she for psychology, and the young couple has just signed a lease for their first apartment together. Marcel wants a career in medicine, requiring many more years in school, but he doesn’t feel like this and the arepa business are mutually exclusive. He wants to make Arepa Culture a brand. 7:10pm: A line forms. People are hungry. It’s go time. 7:25pm: Business is moving now, though this is a pretty gentle shift I’m working – Hannia didn’t want me overwhelmed on my first day. At festivals, when they’re really cranking out arepas, they form an

8:58pm: It’s the end of a thirty-odd minute rush, and I get some water. This is spacious for a food truck, I’m told, and I believe it: the three of us have been hustling this whole time without tripping over each other or feeling crowded.

photograph by Hannia Jara

The end of the shift: Alexa Presas, Corbie Hill, and Marcel Jara.

assembly line, all four of them locked in, focused, and making food. 7:57pm: The orders are still coming in and I think I’ve found my rhythm. This is fun. 8:29pm: The temperature in the truck has fallen to 95, but by now I actually feel hot. I’ve been on the grill a good bit, both making fresh arepas from masa flour and serving the meat portions, and at this point I’m sweating profusely.

9:08pm: Pedro and Hannia are back. Thunder is booming in the distance, but customers are still lining up (and I get the feeling they will until the storm hits, forcing them inside). Hannia sits in the newly installed passenger seat and holds Pedro’s hand while he sits in the driver’s seat. “You gotta be there at the good times and the bad times,” Hannia says: they come out to Big Boss on slow days and on busy days. Today fell somewhere in the middle, and that’s fine. 9:32pm: I leave just as the first drops fall. The thunder is really loud now, and I walk out of the camaraderie that developed quickly and naturally with Hannia, Pedro, Marcel and Alexa and into the rain – literally. I miss my new friends already. I have to come back to this truck.

Try Arepa Culture for yourself; visit arepaculturenc.com and follow them on your social media of choice.

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“I hate spending money I don’t really have, and then winding up disappointed,” says Cody Eyman, a hairstylist at the Purple Door salon. She’s

MONDAY LUNCH

Yes, we recommended Guasaca last year, but everyone we asked raved again in 2016 – including chefs, the most trusted source there is. Guasaca specializes in Venezuelan arepas (a sort of warm corn-pita) stuffed to fill-your-own specifications, or choose a house “signature” arepa. “It’s so cheap and so filling,” Eyman says. A local restaurateur agreed: “The real deal.” 4025 Lake Boone Trail, Suite #107 MONDAY DINNER

expressing something we all feel about dining out: no matter the cost, you want it to count, even when you’re seeking a bargain. We’ve put together a week’s worth of wallet-preserving eats – some dirt cheap, some just good values for the quality. Add some of these into your own lineup.

mi. A traditional pimento cheese sandwich is spiked with pickled green tomato and arugula. Or head straight for the ice cream floats, milkshakes, fizzes and desserts – the Cracker Jack Sundae should mend just about any ill. 702 North Person St. TUESDAY DINNER:

Alert: Tuesday is the best night of the week to find deals; ask around and about. A good bargain is Cameron Bar & Grill, which offers hearty $5 burgers and $3 cans of craft beer every Tuesday. Much of the restaurant’s produce is locally sourced, making Cameron a cut or five above the usual pub fare. 2018 Clark Ave., Cameron Village

BY ADAM SOBSEY Margaux’s offers a Monday “Prix Fixe Mayhem.” It’s $21.95, for three courses, and there’s an ample selection so you aren’t punished for seeking a bargain – the prix, not the fare, is fixe. The $21.95 special is also available for early birds Tuesday-Friday from 5:30-6:30; even the regular price, $32.95, isn’t extreme. WEDNESDAY LUNCH: 811 Creedmoor Rd., Suite #111 The $9.95 lunch buffet at Kabab and Curry is so filling, and so popular, that you might want to skip breakfast and get TUESDAY LUNCH: there for an early lunch – it gets crowded. The buffet is well At The Pharmacy Café you can head for the medicines or stocked with Indian favorites, but three bonus selling points: find a possibly better cure for what ails you at the lunch 1) South Asian food is very vegetarian-friendly; 2) Kabab counter – and this is no ordinary lunch counter. The kitchen and Curry also features Nepalese and Tibetan fare (including sources food locally and offers unexpectedly creative dumplings); 3) How many places can you find goat for lunch? sandwiches like “The Duck”: a sort of Chinese-style banh 2418 Hillsborough St.

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(clockwise from above) Guasaca arepa & salsa Grill; the pharmacy café’s duck sandwich and crackerjack sundae; Cameron Bar & Grill’s charleston burger.

WEDNESDAY DINNER:

The casual, cheerful Remedy Diner is, like Kabab and Curry, a veggie and vegan haven – but there’s plenty of meat on its bones, too. At $15, the nightly Blue Plate Special (after 5pm) is the most expensive item on the menu, but it’s also the largest. You may want to return for The Remedy’s weekend brunch (hard not to want a dish called “The Hot & Gooey”), but allow for a wait. 137 East Hargett St. THURSDAY LUNCH:

The pleasant al fresco seating at Sunflowers Café matches its fresh and bright food. (There’s good indoor seating, too.) Light, healthy sandwiches and salads are Sunflowers’ calling cards, but there are excellent soups, too, as well as satisfying Mex-influenced fare. Sunflowers gets busy, but counter service is efficient. Don’t miss the fresh-squeezed lemonade. 8 West Peace St. THURSDAY DINNER:

On Thursday nights at Kimbap Café, $49 gets you three items from the menu and an entire bottle of wine – date night, done and done.. Kimbap’s Korean-inspired menu has good variety, including a hearty Farmers’ Market Stew that starts with a 12hour broth and slow-cooked brisket,

then piles on the veggies and egg. And keep an eye out for Kimbap’s very reasonably priced wine and beer dinner events, which offer up to seven courses plus pairings for as little as $55 per person. 111 Seaboard Ave., #118 FRIDAY LUNCH:

With the weekend underway, you want some adventure – so take I-40 to the bazaar that is Grand Asia Market and make for the food court, where you can drive yourself pleasantly crazy trying to choose from the dozens of items. Noodle soup? Dumplings? Fried rice? Chinese-style roast duck and barbecue pork? When you’re done eating, you can stock up on Asian groceries. Pro tip: hit the bakery on your way out. 1253 Buck Jones Rd. midtownmag.com | 91


Mexican-meets-Low-Country-Southern cuisine at Jose and Sons in Downtown Raleigh.

SATURDAY LUNCH:

Buy your produce and flowers at the State Farmers’ Market, then go to the Market Shoppes building and find the tiny Market Grill, which offers made-to-order, no-nonsense, deeply satisfying breakfast and lunch sandwiches at ancient prices, including a good chicken salad on toast for a whopping $2. This is the kind of timeless place where, when you ask the employees how old it is, they look at each other quizzically and answer, “Twenty years maybe?” It feels eons older. 1201 Agriculture St. SATURDAY DINNER:

Jose and Sons, in the renovated depot building downtown, has “Mexican-Meets-Low-Country-Southern cuisine,” Eyman says. The menu ranges from mussels in a coconut-habanero broth to flautas and shrimp and grits. Portions are big – the Gouda Mac N’ Queso appetizer, which includes kale, suffices for a meal. The $45 Chef ’s Picnic For Two will probably feed at least three. And the bar serves up good cocktails, all at $10 or less. 327 W. Davie St. BONUS:;;;: SATURDAY LATE NIGHT:

The cheap, delicious burgers at the legendary Char-Grill need almost no introduction, nor do its beloved shakes. Perhaps most importantly, you can get them until 2am (Hillsborough Street location only), and the late-night line is itself a form of entertainment. 618 Hillsborough St. SUNDAY BRUNCH / LUNCH:

Sometimes you need a break from the Sunday brunch restaurant lines, long waits, and familiar eggs-and-whatever. It’s summer, it’s Sunday, and you want to get outside. Find food trucks! Start with roaminghunger.com/rdu to see who’s where, check Twitter, drive past fairs and other public events. Bring a blanket, or just sit in the car and devour. Congratulate yourself on eating your way cheaply through the week.

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what about the kids? They don’t eat much and they have simple tastes: they’re kids! Chain restaurants offer all kinds of deals for children, but in the locavore spirit (even for young’uns), here’s a collection of seven local joints where you can fatten them up without thinning your wallet. Always call ahead to check on these free (or nearly free) promotions for kids, as they can change or get eighty-sixed without much notice. In most cases, to get the deal you have to purchase an adult meal – a beer is never a bad idea, either. Carolina Ale House Raleigh and Cary (three locations) When: Tuesdays, 5-9pm Deal: Children under 12 eat for $.99 Chubby’s tacos/Guacamaya Raleigh and Cary (three locations; new name) When: Tuesdays Deal: Children eat for $1.99 Neomonde Raleigh When: Tuesdays Deal: Children under 10 eat free with purchase of adult meal Player’s Retreat Raleigh When: Sundays Deal: Children 12 and under eat free with purchase of adult meal The Point at Glenwood Raleigh When: Tuesdays, 5-7pm Deal: Children 12 and under eat free with purchase of an adult meal Remington Grill Raleigh, Cary, Louisburg When: Mondays Deal: Kids 12 and under eat free (off kids’ menu) with purchase of adult meal midtownmag.com | 93


DINING VIEW with a

There’s nothing like a warm summer night and a table with a view that elevates an ordinary meal at a restaurant into a premier dining experience. Raleigh offers many unique opportunities to head outside and grab a bite. By Carla Turchetti

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photograph courtesy of lonnie poole golf course

Terrace Dining Room at Lonnie Poole Golf Course There is no better way to relax after a round of golf than with a beverage and a bite and a sweeping view of the city of Raleigh. That’s the view from the Terrace Dining Room at the Carol Johnson Poole Clubhouse at the Lonnie Poole Golf Course on NC State’s Centennial Campus. Golfers know part of playing this challenging course means hoisting the bag on your shoulder and making the climb. But the payoff comes when you get to the views from the clubhouse.

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photograph courtesy of LM Restaurants

“What we love about the rooftop at the Raleigh Times is that it’s an intimate space yet because it’s only one story above ground, you’re still connected to the street,” says Greg Hatem, founder of Empire Eats. “And because it’s at the corner of Main and Main, it’s a great place for people watching.”

photograph courtesy of LM Restaurants

Taverna Agora’s rooftop is a gathering place where friends can get together for sharing plates that include traditional Greek favorites like tzatziki, hummus, stuffed grape leaves and spinach pie.

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Taverna Agora

Babylon

This Greek kitchen on Hillsborough Street is home to an open-air rooftop patio shaded by trees and surrounded by twinkling lights. It’s a magical place to enjoy a drink. Taverna Agora relocated to this spot near Glenwood South from its original location in northwest Raleigh, and the move included adding this popular outdoor dining space. “Taverna Agora Greek Kitchen & Bar’s fantastic rooftop patio is the perfect location to enjoy lunch, dinner or cocktails with friends,” says Mindy Stroupe with LM Restaurants, Inc. “Twinkling lights, grapevines and beautiful flowers adorn the patio and evoke a romantic setting like no other in the Triangle. The large, over-arching oak trees create a treehouse-like feel while the amazing city views of downtown Raleigh remind you that you’re in the heart of the city. This beautiful, tranquil space is open daily and available to rent for private events.”

Enter the gates at Babylon on North Dawson Street and you are transported to a hidden Moroccan courtyard. The lush space includes reflecting pools, an outdoor bar, and heat lamps for when it’s chilly. This old yarn mill has a sophisticated and exotic feel to its courtyard. “The beauty of the Babylon patio is that it offers an instant escape right in the heart of Raleigh,” says Lisa Jeffries, who handles public relations for Babylon. “From the expansive reflecting pool that’s the perfect backdrop for after-work cocktails, to the oven-fired Al Forno Outdoor Kitchen that features a fresh, Mediterranean-inspired menu, there’s something for everyone on the patio at Babylon.”

The Station Once upon a time The Station on North Person Street was an Amoco Gas


photograph courtesy of empire eats

Station on the edge of historic Oakwood. Now it is a restaurant that includes a spacious front patio with individual dining tables, an outdoor bar, and fire pits for chillier days and nights. You can enjoy drinks and pub fare outside and it is a dog-friendly space, so man’s best friend is welcome to relax as well.

The Raleigh Times The Raleigh Times bar is housed in a 100-year-old building, but the outside spaces are thoroughly modern. Head upstairs to the rooftop bar for fantastic views of downtown Raleigh. Or go lower and enjoy outside seating on the sidewalk in front of the building. The rooftop isn’t just for evenings and late nights; The Raleigh Times also offers lunch up above.

Busy Bee Cafe The rooftop at the Busy Bee Cafe in downtown Raleigh is a great place to enjoy their trademark side of tater tots. The roof offers a fantastic view of downtown Raleigh and regulars say positioning yourself outside there about an hour before sunset midtownmag.com | 97


photograph courtesy of north hills

Chuy’s Tex-Mex Chuy’s Tex-Mex at North Hills likes to go big or go home – with its burritos and its outdoor patio area. If you can grab a table on a Friday night in the summer, you can see the Midtown Tribute Concert Series from your seat.

photograph by davies photography

photograph by davies photography

photograph courtesy of saints and scholars

adds fantastic golden lighting to the view. “The Mash & Lauter patio offers Belgian-inspired food, beer and cocktail menus in a private setting in the heart of downtown,” says David “Woody” Lockwood, co-owner of the Busy Bee. “ We’re open every day from 5pm until 2am, and we’re available for private events.”

Humble Pie Did you say a tiki bar is your favorite place to be in warm weather? Then you need to get to the patio at Humble Pie Restaurant in downtown Raleigh. “At Humble Pie our hope is to provide a welcome retreat for anyone wishing to dine al fresco in downtown Raleigh’s 98 | midtownmag.com

(clockwise from left) one of the many Bee-inspired cocktails at The Busy Bee cafe; It’s casual, comfortable and relaxing on Humble Pie’s patio and a great place to catch up with friends; On comfortable summer nights the crowd fills the patio at Saints & Scholars and enjoys the full calendar of live music.


photograph courtesy of lafayette village

The Green at Lafayette Village is a neighborhood gathering spot in North Raleigh with places to run free and play as well as sit down and enjoy the varied outside dining options that ring the courtyard.

Arts and Warehouse District,” says Joe Farmer, the restaurant’s co-owner. “Our patio and 20-seat tiki bar are covered and cooled with ceiling fans, and surrounded with beautiful landscaping.” On the patio, plate sharing is encouraged and the weekend brunch is popular.

Lynnwood Grill & Brewing Concern The rooftop at the Lynnwood Grill & Brewing Concern’s location in northwest Raleigh is a great spot to gather with friends, sit among the treetops and catch an amazing sunset. Lynwood serves the beer it makes at its two Raleigh locations, and the fried pickles are a popular side.

Saints and Scholars This Irish pub has a bustling scene on its patio. Besides drinking and dining there is corn hole, live music, and no shortage of children in the earlier hours making the most of this outdoor playground. It’s not easy to see Saints and Scholars from Spring Forest Road. Just head toward Jason’s Deli and keep going towards the back.

Lafayette Village The Lafayette Village Shopping Center in North Raleigh may be in the Hall of Fame for outdoor dining. The entire complex was built around a European courtyard theme. Dogs romp and children play in the center while diners sit outside a ring of restaurants that includes the Village Grill with its outdoor televisions, Sushi One for Japanese fair, Farina Neighborhood Italian for Italian, Jubala Coffee for espresso drinks and biscuits, Vinos Finos Tapas and Wine Bar for South American wine and empanadas, Crafty Beer Shop for interesting brews and JoCa’s Gourmet Dawgs N’ Shakes for hot dogs and homemade chips. Pull up a chair. Fill the dog’s bowl with water. Sit. Stay. Eat. midtownmag.com | 99


EATING A RO UN

D ...at ho m ORLD e EW TH Thanks to Raleigh’s exciting restaurant scene, it is possible to travel around the world without leaving the neighborhood. Go global with 10 of our favorites - plus a bonus choice, because you can never have too much international cuisine. By Carla Turchetti 100 | midtownmag.com


PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVIES PHOTOGRAPHY

Argentinian/Cuban Oakwood Cafe The diminutive Oakwood Cafe is a small dining room delivering big servings of Argentinian and Cuban flavor. The Argentinian flair includes homemade empanadas with beef, chicken, or spinach and cheese fillings. The taste of Cuba can be found in the pork sandwich, the yuca and the plantains. Diners suggest: The homemade hot sauce is a home run with those who like a little spice.

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVIES PHOTOGRAPHY

Turkish Troy Mezze Lounge The owners of Troy Mezze Lounge in downtown Raleigh’s City Market hope they are transporting guests to the Mediterranean with the menu and the atmosphere of the restaurant. Main courses include meats and vegetables cooked in clay pots and lamb pops up as chops, in skewers and even on top of pizzas. Insider tip: The Turkish Bazaar atmosphere is enhanced some nights by music and even belly dancing. Don’t forget to enjoy the entertainment with a real Turkish coffee after dinner. midtownmag.com | 101


PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVIES PHOTOGRAPHY

French Saint Jacques Saint Jacques is an intimate spot that consistently receives rave reviews for its authentic French cuisine. Chef restaurateur Serge Falcoz-Vigne studied in Paris and operated a restaurant there before relocating to the United States. The menu is loaded with classic French food, from pâté and escargot to duck confit and crème brûlée. Diners rave about the steamed Prince Edward Island mussels, cooked with white wine, shallots, bacon and cream, and garnished in parsley.

Ethiopian Abyssinia Ethiopian Restaurant Abyssinia offers an authentic Ethiopian dining experience using injera, a yeast-risen flatbread, as sort of a serving spoon for the rest of the food. There are no utensils – diners eat together from the same plate using their hands in symbol of loyalty and friendship. A traditional seasoning is berbere, made from red chili peppers, garlic and spices, which adds the red color to many Ethiopian dishes. Unusual menu item: Goat served several different ways.

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Venezuelan Guasaca Arepa & Salsa Grill The signature dish at Guasaca is the madeto-order arepas built on a Venezuelan bread base that is corn, not wheat. Arepas are then filled with a variety of meats, beans, rice and vegetables. The corn base makes these a delicious gluten-free option. The namesake: Guasacaca is a traditional Venezuelan sauce made from avocado, fresh parsley, coriander, bell pepper, onion, garlic, salt, oil and vinegar.

Italian Bruno Seafood and Steaks Bruno Seafood and Steaks in North Raleigh is an elegant, white tablecloth environment with a sophisticated patio tucked away in a shopping center adjacent to the Wakefield neighborhood. The menu is loaded with classic Italian dishes. Selections vary seasonally, but two of the most ordered items are the Trout Amandine and the New York Classic Delmonico Steak. There really is a Bruno, and one of his favorite items on the menu is the lamb chops.

German/Polish J. Betski’s If it’s classic schnitzel you are craving, then J. Betski’s at Seaboard Station is the place for you. The German and Polish cuisine is a smorgasbord of kielbasa, sauerkraut and pierogies, and there is even quail on the menu. The beer list is fully stocked with German selections. Big finish: The Chocolate-Hazelnut Torte with sea salt, caramel and crispy bacon.

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Japanese Mura Mura at North Hills takes great pride in its specialty sushi rolls. Offerings include the Carolina, which is tuna, avocado and jalapeño, as well as the Wolfpack, which is tempura shrimp and avocado. There is also a wide variety of entrées grilled teppanyaki style – everything from tofu to filet. Customer favorite: The Bento box with seaweed salad, shrimp, rice, tempura vegetables and a choice of beef, chicken or tuna.

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PHOTOGRAPH BYTerrence Jones


Mexican Las Marias Tacos Y Pupusas This restaurant lets you know what the specialties of the house are by putting them right there in the name. The tacos are authentic Mexican with a variety of fillings, and the pupusas are a Salvadoran dish that features thick, handmade corn tortillas stuffed with cheese, pork and cheese, chicken or vegetables. Menu suggestion: Birria is a classic, spicy Mexican stew; Las Marias makes it the traditional way, with goat, as well as an alternative recipe with beef.

Vietnamese Pho 79 & Crawfish Fresh ingredients melded with Vietnamese spices dominate the menu at Pho 79 & Crawfish. The traditional Pho Noodle Soup is available featuring different cuts of beef with rice, noodles, onion, scallop and spices. And the Crawfish is prepared Vietnamese-style, which is a blend of Asian and Cajun spices. Diners say: The sauce on the crawfish is so good you’ll want to enjoy every last slurp.

Korean Seoul Garden Seoul Garden specializes in authentic Korean barbecue. Numerous cuts of beef as well as pork, chicken and shrimp can all be grilled tableside. Seoul Garden also serves up Bibimbap, which is known as the ultimate Korean comfort food. It is a rice bowl that includes sautéed vegetables, chili paste, and beef, chicken or tofu, all topped with a fried egg. A signature dish is Bulgogi – thinly sliced premium cuts of beef that are marinated and then grilled. In Korean, ‘bul’ means fire and ‘gogi’ means meat. midtownmag.com | 105


midtowndowntown

Celebrating

SecondSaturday Monthly Food Event Builds Connections Between Downtown Businesses and Urban Agriculture to Strengthen Community By Karlie Justus Marlowe Erin White talks a lot about making connections. Fresh out of a meeting with a horticulture professor at NC State University, he excitedly shares some of his latest collaborative ideas. “We were talking about educational opportunities for people in the South Park neighborhood,” he said. “One of the questions that came up is how we can capture some of the intellectual capital at NC State. Could people in the neighborhood take horticulture courses there, either online or through certificate programs?” White is the founder of Community Food Labs, a Raleigh design and consulting company with a focus on sustainable food systems. For the past three and a half years, he’s focused on a small grid in downtown Raleigh that encompasses both the city’s poorest communities and its fastest-growing food scene, banking on the power of introductions and conversation starters to create a stronger community through food. 106 | midtownmag.com


Participants in the Blackberry Brigade get their hands dirty for a good cause.

Physically, the Raleigh Food Corridor stretches along the two miles of Blount and Person Streets, from South Park through downtown and up to Mordecai. It connects food deserts, fast-changing neighborhoods and Raleigh’s oldest historic districts. “In a city like Raleigh, we see there’s disparity,” said White. “There are some people without opportunities and some people with a lot of opportunities co-existing really close together. A food desert can be a good place to start talking about the needs that exist here.” The term food desert is used to describe areas with low income and low access to food based off of the number of grocery stores and a variety of factors such as high unemployment, low access to transportation and negative health outcomes like diabetes and obesity. “In Raleigh you’ll find food deserts all over the place. In addition to southeast Raleigh, you have small pockets north of downtown and in southwestern Raleigh where those same qualities come together,” said White. “There’s a difference between the USDA term based off of censustracked boundaries and what you see out on the street.”

Together with a leadership board of eight area non-profits, White’s team set out to make connections to benefit both residents and businesses. “The Food Corridor is a connecting tool that connects potential resources with other potential resources,” he said. “Can we develop urban agriculture enterprises and marketing channels up the Food Corridor so they can sell to downtown businesses, connecting the resources with the products?” Six months into its planning, it became clear the movement needed a tangible way to promote its mission. That’s when Second Saturday was born. “Second Saturday is a vehicle to bring energy and tangible projects to the Corridor,” explained White. “The Corridor itself is a lot of ideas and a little theoretical, and Second Saturday is a way to bring people to the place to connect them, host conversations, build gardens, celebrate that we can all be here together, generate new ideas. It’s the monthly day that happens.” In its third year, the monthly event is still evolving. Similar in set-up to the arts-focused First Friday event, Second Saturday occurs every month between April and November around downtown Raleigh and includes a wide variety of food-related events ranging from historic preservation talks and foodie film screenings to cocktail how-tos and front porch art sales. Each month focuses on seasonal items, like July 9th’s blackberries and tomatoes theme and the August 13th focus on watermelon and okra. “One of my favorite Second Saturday events from last year that we’re planning on doing again this summer is the Blackberry Brigade, in collaboration with the Piedmont Picnic Project,” said Jennifer Truman, the event and media

(far left) Vacant plots in downtown Raleigh have been turned into urban gardens; (left) Second Saturday events include flower marts, preservation panels, foodie film screenings, and more.

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Using local ingredients, downtown eatery Centro worked with the Boys and Girls Club to create a Second Saturday DIY salsa stand.

coordinator at Community Food Labs. “They created maps for teams to forage for blackberries and compete for the most poundage. We sold the berries to local chefs and the money was donated to a non-profit.” In addition to interactive events hosted by museums, non-profits, residents and urban gardeners, downtown businesses have participated with unique food offerings. Videri Chocolate makes a special chocolate only available during the event, and in 2015 Centro partnered with the Boys and Girls Clubs to make a DIY salsa stand on the sidewalk outside the restaurant using local ingredients. This year, the team hopes to ramp up community conversations around key food issues like technology, accessibility and composting, to connect residents and businesses, and better measure the financial impact and attendance of the monthly collection of events, while keeping with its core mission of connection and collaboration. “A lot of people come to downtown Raleigh to eat at restaurants and experience a cool foodie scene,” said Truman. “What we do with Second Saturday, through fun workshops and other events, is bring it back full picture to see how food works, see where the gaps are and talk about how to fill them in.”

Get Involved Attend: Check the Second Saturday Facebook page the week of the event to map out your own personalized schedule. Host: Have an idea for an event related to growing, cooking, eating, selling, or composting food? Contact secondsaturdayraleigh@gmail.com. Support: Visit raleighfoodcorridor.org to find the list of the eight non-profits that make up the corridor’s leadership team, and donate or coordinate volunteer opportunites directly with them. Get friendly: Through the corridor’s new Friends of the Corridor membership program, individuals, businesses, non-profits and restaurants can donate a one-time fee in exchange for invitation to special members-only events and more. 108 | midtownmag.com


midtowndowntown

Je Ne Sais Quoi Downtown Restaurants With That Certain Something By Jenni Hart

You can’t have a great dining-out experience without good food and prompt, thoughtful service. But what makes a meal truly memorable? Although the French term je ne sais quoi refers to those qualities that defy description, a few of our favorite downtown restaurants are worth the effort. lucettegrace My first visit to lucettegrace, I sat in a sunny window on a perfectly crisp spring morning, sipping a refreshing iced chai tea latte and enjoying a rare, uninterrupted hour catching up with an old friend. I patted myself on the back for ordering the Dixie Cannonball – a hearty cheddar biscuit filled with savory sausage gravy – but was equally nourished by the bright energy of the space. When I returned a few weeks later, this time with a sweet tooth, my first bite of Candy Bar Cake spoiled me for every dessert I’d ever tasted that was too heavy and cloyingly sweet. Nostalgic for the patisseries I’d been to in Nice, Cannes and Vienna, I added lucettegrace on South Salisbury Street to my growing list of favorite downtown spots.

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Joule Coffee + Table If it is possible to fall in love with a space, I’m downright smitten with Joule Coffee & Table. The building itself will mark its hundredth year in 2017, and Joule’s front of house is the perfect marriage of light industrial and vintage aesthetic. Exposed ductwork is suspended below tin ceiling squares, bookending the near-century span of 223 South Wilmington Street. The lighting is soft and nicely diffused. And even during the busiest times, I’ve been seated with a companion in the main dining area and still enjoyed an easy conversation without too much ambient noise or bustle. The staff is always warm and friendly, with just the right level of attentiveness. The menu is imaginative without being trendy. Uncle Alex’s Cubano is possibly the best sandwich I’ve ever had, and every item I’ve tried on the brunch menu has been exquisite: Make sure to sample the hotcake. But I’ve saved the best for last. One of my favorite times of day to stop into Joule is around 3pm, when you can still order from the lunch menu, but the pace is laid-back and the pre-cocktail vibe is strong. I like to sit in the front window and order an iced pourover coffee, watch dogs walking their people, 110 | midtownmag.com

and pretend to read a book or work on my laptop. From 1940 to the mid-1990s, a pawnshop occupied the Joule property. As I sip, I like to imagine all the wheeling and dealing that went down here, along with the advent of US involvement in World War II, the birth of rock ‘n’ roll, the civil rights movement, and economic booms and busts that a pawn and loan business must have felt acutely. On most days, by the time the iced coffee cylinder in my glass has melted, I’ve spent just enough time daydreaming and dog-watching that the task of heading home to make dinner and help with homework seems infinitely less daunting. The Mecca A weekday lunch or late-night bite at the Mecca Restaurant on East Martin Street consistently delivers comforting fare at prices that defy the expectation most folks have for a downtown destination. But I return time and again for the sheer charm and nostalgia of the place. The shotgun layout and floor-mounted barstools are quintessential American diner décor; the wood paneling and vintage silver-backed mirrors flank booth seating to the left. The Mecca opened in 1930 and has operated in the current


location since 1937, when men’s clothing stores were called haberdasheries, and you could walk into a dime store and purchase something worthwhile for ten cents. Four generations of the Dombalis family have contributed to its venerable reputation as a Raleigh landmark. With all the new construction and freshened-up facades in downtown, the Mecca holds a singular appeal for those who appreciate history. The next time you’re out late and you’re leaving a show or heading home from a party, don’t even think about drive-thru tacos. The Mecca serves sandwiches and soups Monday through Wednesday until midnight, and Thursday through Saturday until 2am Breakfast, lunch and dinner are also served, with the restaurant opening at 7:30 each morning, Monday through Saturday. 42nd Street Oyster Bar 42nd Street Oyster Bar is another downtown dining destination where the experience of the whole is greater than its parts. Longtime Raleigh resident Peyton Hatfield stops in with her husband, Scott, about once a month for a peck of steamed oysters and a beer. She says the oyster bar is always packed with others who crave the same indulgence, and the festive atmosphere tends to spark friendly conversation with interesting people. “Oysters

are the perfect food,” Hatfield says. “One ingredient, prepared simply; add a beer and it’s perfect!” Seafood lovers will have a hard time deciding from among the bountiful offerings of fresh, in-season menu items, and steak, chicken and pasta dishes and scrumptious desserts ensure every guest in your party will be happy with their meal. The classic, elegant setting, spirited atmosphere, and live music on the weekends keep 42nd Street consistently on the list of downtown favorites.

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healthy you

Skin Survival Tactics for Summer by Cameron Karchner and Jon Williams, physios aesthetics

Our glorious sun makes it possible for us humans to exist on earth. Ironically, the sun can also be one of our deadliest foes. As summer approaches, we shed protective clothing and expose ourselves to the sun’s rays. These rays make us feel good, but the UV spectrum damages our skin. We are at risk regardless whether the sun burns, tans, or causes no change in color to us at all. We admire a healthy-looking beautiful glow as an outward reflection of health. Some think that a little burn is the precursor to their desired “summer color”. Tanned or burned skin is simply a sign of damage sustained. Sometimes we don’t recognize the damage because we don’t feel it. Overcast, cloudy days are particularly dangerous, as 60-80 percent of the sun’s UV insidiously penetrates cloud coverage. Skin eventually shows our indiscretions as wrinkles, spots, and leathery textures. Worse yet is the potential for unrecognized skin cancers. Some people are prone to cancers even with very little exposure. By respecting the sun’s energy,

we can help combat its negative effects. Ninety percent of visible aging is caused by the sun and pollution. Using an antioxidant such as vitamin C, E and ferulic acid serum aids in shielding the skin from internal cellular damage. Sunscreens are external shields. Physical sunscreens reflect UV rays away from the skin with zinc and titanium dioxide, while chemical sunscreens use chemical filters to absorb UV rays. Broad spectrum products contain both filters. Use a sunscreen with an SPF between 30-50. Calculate your individual protection factor by figuring a conservative estimate of the minutes you could spend in the sun before burning and multiply by the product’s SPF for estimated minutes of protection. Sensitive skins may prefer weightless, flesh-toned physical sunscreens. Apply sunscreens carefully and liberally on all areas of skin 15-30 minutes before exposure. Reapply often, especially after getting wet. Vacationers must strategize, remembering that the sun’s intensity increases while moving

closer to the equator. Avoid exposure when the sun is strongest between 11am and 3pm. Include other protective measures such as hats and polarized sunglasses. Scalp and eyes are common places for cancers and aging. The eye area develops a whopping 10 percent of total skin cancers on the body. If sunburn occurs, mix 3 drops of lavender oil to two and a quarter cups of water and mist or apply as a compress. A cool bath with eight drops of chamomile oil and eight tablespoons of cider vinegar is also soothing. Bronzed skin will continue to be recognized as an outward expression of vitality. Aged, damaged bronze skin isn’t attractive and doesn’t have to be the price we pay for the good feelings we get from being tan. Implement these protective measures and enjoy the outdoors safely. If you seek instantly bronzed, beautifully glowing skin, try a reputable professionally applied sunless tanning experience. Respecting the sun’s energy and sensibly protecting your skin will lead to years of beautiful, healthy skin and wonderful memories of summertime adventures.

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.

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healthy you

What is

TMJ or TMD? by Tracy Davidian DDS, PA, Physiologic Aesthetics, Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center

What is TMJ or TMD? Most people call problems of their jaw TMJ. However, TMJ actually refers to the joint itself. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) is a term describing dysfunction of muscles of mastication (muscles that move the jaw) and the temporomandibular joints. There are many symptoms associated with this disorder, which people don’t automatically think of being related to their jaw joints. TMD Symptoms The most common symptoms are pain and restricted mandibular movement, and noises from the TMJ (like pops or clicks) during jaw movement. Other symptoms can be tinnitus, clogged ears, headaches, neck pain, grinding, clenching, fracturing of teeth, or head and face pain. Some people experience

many symptoms, as TMD is a complex disorder that is thought to be caused by multiple factors. Although TMD is not life-threatening, it can definitely affect a person’s quality of life. Ringing in the Ears Many patients who have TMJ pain also have ringing or congestion in their ears, and sometimes there is no pain present. Causes may be due to improper alignment of the joint and your ear canal. When the joint is compressed against the fossa this compression pushes on your ear canal, which can cause symptoms such as ringing in the ears, congestion, or ear pain. By decompressing the joint with either a removable or fixed orthotic, you will be able to decrease the pressure on your ear canal, thereby eliminating, or significantly reducing or

even eliminating the ringing in the ear, congestion or pain. Muscle Pain and Trigger Points A muscle trigger point is a specific point on a muscle, which when stimulated by touch, pain or pressure can give rise to a characteristic referred pain, tenderness, motor dysfunction or autonomic phenomena. Trigger points can often refer pain to different areas, and are commonly mistaken for headaches or other pain issues such as toothaches. TMD Treatment Options Treatment options for TMD can include exercises, spray and stretch, neuromuscular massage, ultrasound, biofeedback, iontophoresis, TENS (transcutaneous electoneuro stimulation), trigger point therapy, medicinal, orthotics (bite splints), braces, and/or porcelain crowns.

The information on this page is provided by the advertiser mentioned above to the public.

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Collaboration

+

Cooperation

Best Outcomes

Over a period of three years, Raleigh’s three major hospitals have brought new leaders on board. Donald Gintzig, a retired naval rear admiral, became president and CEO at WakeMed in 2013. David Zaas moved from Duke University Hospital to become president of Duke Raleigh in July 2014. And Steve Burriss moved up from COO to president at UNC Rex Healthcare last year. In the past, relations between these three complex institutions have been highly competitive. Now, the changing economics of health care and, perhaps, the philosophies of these leaders have altered the dynamics between their facilities. By Julie Johnson

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What are the biggest challenges hospitals are facing?

Photograph courtesy of Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce

Burriss: One important challenge facing hospitals nationwide is the shift from taking care of sick patients to keeping people well, which requires a major change to our mindset. More than ever, hospitals are being held accountable for their outcomes, but that accountability now extends to patient behaviors and decisions when they are not in one of our facilities. We have to help prevent what is preventable, better manage what is ongoing, and engage the patient in managing his/her own health. Gintzig: We believe in the shift toward a system of health and a culture that keeps people healthy and reduces the incidence of illness, injury and disease. Additionally, we are focused on areas that are challenging the health care industry as a whole: increasing quality, safety and services while decreasing costs. Zaas: We have higher expectations than we’ve ever had before around improving quality, safety and patient experience, all in the face of lower reimbursement for the services we provide, as well as a much greater degree of scrutiny from the media and the public. What medical advances do you find most exciting?

Burriss: The biggest advancement at UNC Rex during the next few years will be the opening of the new heart and vascular hospital on our main Raleigh campus. We expect the eightstory building will open and begin treating patients in early 2017. We’re proud to participate in research that could lead to the next generation of treatments or devices, such as stem cell therapy and biodegradable stents to open up blood vessels. The second initiative is Rex Health Ventures, an investment fund that we started in 2012 to partner with companies and organizations focused on innovations in health care. By investing in and partnering with other companies, UNC Rex supports the development of new treatments, tools,

Steve Burriss (UNC REX Healthcare), Donald Gintzig (WakeMed) and David Zaas (Duke Raleigh) during a health-care panel discussion in 2015.

products and services that improve the provision of health care. Gintzig: Telemedicine and its role in helping the health industry achieve transformative improvements. As applications become more mainstream, the growth of telemedicine creates more opportunities for direct patient impact. We continue to expand our WakeMed eCare offerings for patients with services that enhance access to quality care, improve patient outcomes and manage capacity and costs. Zaas: Personalized medicine – using the genetics of the individual to understand their response to specific therapies, allowing you to pick therapies that are more effective – is exciting. Some of those advancements have led to better survival and less costly therapies, as well as fewer side effects. The personalized advances that we’re seeing, especially in cancer as well as in other chronic diseases, are really exciting. What are our best options for controlling health care costs?

Burriss: Unfortunately, we are spending too much money treating

illness that is preventable. Our biggest opportunity is to help individuals better manage their health, but the results of these efforts may not materialize for years. In the meantime, innovation is one key to controlling costs. In addition, we work with UNC and other affiliated hospitals across the state to share best practices, care and service. Gintzig: Better coordination and collaboration are key to improving quality, affordability and overall health. One example is the implementation of the Epic electronic health record system, a tool that helps improve how we deliver the highest quality patient care while driving down costs. With all Triangle-area health systems now operating on Epic, we are able to more effectively communicate and share information, which has meant less duplication, safer care and a more seamless continuum of care. Zaas: We need to focus on making sure that the right patient gets the right care in the right sort of location of service. We know we have patients and populations that use our emergency rooms and expensive sites of care, and we’re working with our community partners to figure out how midtownmag.com | 117


David Zaas (Duke Raleigh), Steve Burriss (UNC REX Healthcare), Donald Gintzig (WakeMed)

we can provide that care closer to home in lower-cost settings. I think it’s also fair to say that we believe that the expansion of coverage in some form to all citizens of North Carolina would be a benefit for the health of our community and for our health systems. Without stepping into the political battle around how we achieve that, it’s really important for all of us to state that access to health care services and coverage is important for everyone, and we ought to work together to get there. How do you see your institution’s relationship with the Raleigh community?

Burriss: UNC Rex has been an integral part of Raleigh and beyond for more than 120 years. We work closely with a wide range of community partners including Wake County, the city of Raleigh, local towns, and multiple non-profit organizations to improve access to care, provide prevention and education programs, and more. We are helping tackle major problems in our community, such as behavioral health care, and access to care for everyone, regardless of their ability to pay. UNC Rex invests more than $2 million annually to assist UNC Health Care in operating the UNC WakeBrook campus, which treats individuals suffering from behavioral and mental health crises. The UNC Rex mammography screening program includes two mobile units that travel to community health clinics and other sites across Wake County and beyond to improve access for underserved women, many without insurance. Gintzig: WakeMed is of the community, 118 | midtownmag.com

by the community and for the community. As a community leader and as a community asset since 1961, we are committed to making a positive impact on the people we serve. Our organization’s efforts focus not only on providing exceptional patient care when it is needed, but on the initiatives, outreach efforts and partnerships that directly benefit the health, well-being and quality of life of the Raleigh community. Zaas: Duke is relatively new to the Raleigh community. We’ve changed our name in the last year from “Duke Medicine” to “Duke Health” to focus on how the business of hospitals and health care systems has changed. As we focus on the health of the community as our primary goal, those community partnerships become more and more important, because a lot of the barriers to health aren’t just care delivery: they are the socioeconomic determinants that limit people’s ability to get care. We’re truly committed to making Wake County and the Triangle the healthiest community in the state and in the region. What are the biggest strengths your hospital brings to any collaborative effort with the other two major hospitals?

Burriss: We routinely work with Raleigh’s other two hospitals on a number of community-wide initiatives. We collaborate and jointly fund (with other organizations) the Wake County Community Health Needs Assessment. We have a group that meets regularly to discuss caring for those in our community who suffer from behavioral health issues and finding ways to keep them out of our emergency departments. We believe there are opportunities to

work together in clinical areas to better serve our community, such as the prevention and treatment of strokes. Gintzig: I’m a strong believer in bringing together our strengths and resources for the greater good of the community. For instance, our more than 40-year history working together with UNC to educate the next generation of health care professionals. Our collaboration with Duke Medicine improved access to pediatric care and pediatric specialists for children and families in Wake County and the greater Triangle area. Beyond the Triangle, WakeMed is also part of a shared services collaborative with Vidant Health and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center that brings together our collective talents and best practices to improve quality and affordability for all North Carolina patients. Zaas: We’re fortunate to live in a community that has three great health systems that really do work well together, and I think we’re all committed to similar values. Duke tries to bring this community the real advantages of a world-class academic medical center and a world-class university, and a level of care and access to services that’s uncommon and special. Our goal is to bring that level of outstanding care, innovation and commitment to education here to Wake County in an area that’s closer to where people live. I think we also bring a commitment to working together with our partners to focus on improving the health of the community as our primary goal, and a focus on patients and families. I think it’s a great partnership between the community and all of our health systems.


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery

“Dr. Morea’s meticulous attention to detail is evident with each patient, and many patients not only return for additional procedures but also refer their friends and family.” 120 | midtownmag.com


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MOREA Plastic Surgical Center of North Raleigh Dr. Christopher Morea 7700 Lead Mine Road, Raleigh, NC 27615 919.845.7880 drmoreaplasticsurgery.com

Dr. Christopher Morea is a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with over 20 years’ experience. Dr. Morea has provided care for thousands of satisfied patients locally, throughout the United States and internationally. Dr. Morea has the highest credentials, being a member of the American College of Surgeons, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons. He has been recognized as one of America’s Top Plastic Surgeons by many organizations including the Consumers Research Council of America, the Leading Physicians of the World and RealSelf. At your initial one-on-one consultation with Dr. Morea, he’ll listen to your individual aesthetic goals and discuss the procedures that best achieve that goal. Dr. Morea consistently delivers quality results that are beautiful and natural. Dr. Morea’s meticulous attention to detail is evident with each patient, and many patients not only return for additional procedures but also refer their friends and family. Their stated reason is simple: the patients receive the results they desire from a surgeon they can trust. All surgery is performed at Dr. Morea’s very private freestanding outpatient surgical center, which is conveniently located in the heart of North Raleigh just a few miles north of Crabtree Valley Mall. Dr. Morea’s goal is to provide each patient with the finest medical care in a confidential and private setting.

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“We often see patients who haven’t seen the dentist in as many ihillat as 15-20 years, quibus doing ina one appointment “Ovidelen emporit, nonsendent ex what would normally take seven ten.” am rae et quos aut officiae endant istiaeto percidios est desto consedita voleniae num volorunt que” 122 | midtownmag.com


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sedation dental care at raleigh smile center Daniel Davidian, DDS, PA, Tracy Davidian, DDS, PA 3917 Sunset Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27607 919.783.9686 raleighsmilecenter.com

Drs. Daniel and Tracy Davidian have been the face of sedation in Raleigh for the last 15 years. With a passion and expertise for alleviating dental anxiety, both modestly agree it’s the Sedation Dental Care team that makes the magic happen. “We provide many levels of sedation, from light nitrous oxide gas sedation to IV/oral sedation and general anesthesia. We often see patients who haven’t seen the dentist in as many as 15-20 years, doing in one appointment what would normally take seven to ten.” Sedation Dental Care’s tooth rejuvenation program uses digital technology to place and restore dental implants, achieving unprecedented functional and aesthetic results and restoring beauty and function that approaches or even exceeds the original. Designing the aesthetics before placing the implant is the cornerstone of successful cosmetic results. If you have a lot of fear about receiving dental treatment, Drs. Davidian will tell you that you’re not alone. “It is a well-known fact that 50% of our population does not go to a dentist regularly. Our average new patient has not seen a dentist for 10, 20, or sometimes 30 years. We have successfully helped them conquer their fear of dentistry, and we can help you too.” Sedation Dental Care has mastered the art of sedation coupled with gentle, caring dental treatment and state-of-the-art techniques. Conquering the pain and embarrassment of years of neglect is the first step. Their mission and objective is simple: to help patients take the first step in overcoming their fears, getting out of pain, getting their old smile back and/or creating a whole new smile. Tracy Davidian, DDS, PA Daniel Davidian DDS, PA • TMD/TMJ Therapies • Implants • Migraine and Facial Pain • Premier dentures • Sleep Apnea Appliances • Full mouth dental reconstruction • Ultra high-end cosmetic • Same-day crown and bridge

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Psychiatry

“We believe in personalized and patient-centered care – where clients are in control and empowered by their providers.” Carolina Partners in Mental HealthCare, PLLC has provided the highest quality mental health care for over 22 years. As North Carolina’s largest private outpatient mental health care practice, we’re comprised of over 80 expert psychiatrists, psychologists, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and master’s level therapists in 23 convenient locations throughout the state. This enables us to address each client’s unique needs, from ADHD to more complicated diagnoses such as autism spectrum. We offer comprehensive testing and treatment for all ages. Our partnership includes doctor and author Sandeep Vaishnavi, MD, PhD. Dr. Vaishnavi is the Director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners. Our clinic utilizes cutting-edge technology such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), computerized testing, and access to exciting new clinical trials. Carolina Partners believes all people have a right to supportive, all-encompassing health care that strengthens individuals, families and communities. We believe in personalized and patient-centered care – where clients are in control and empowered by their providers. For all individualized needs, Carolina Partners makes it a priority to provide the resources and knowledge our clients need to thrive. Carolina Partners in Mental HealthCare, helping as many people as we can, be as healthy as possible. Be Well! 124 | midtownmag.com

Carolina Partners in Mental HealthCare, PLLC Left to right: Maria Karandikar, MSN, ANP-C; Ann Forsthoefel, MSN, FNP-C; Elizabeth Bruce, MSN, PMHNPBC; Ben Jeffrey, MSN, FNP; Jenny Smith, MD; Maggie Tyma, PA-C Asheville | Cary | Chapel Hill Concord | Durham | Raleigh Wake Forest | Wilson 919.314.0392 carolinapartners.com


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery

“Nothing about your experience at Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery is meant to be average.” Nothing about your experience at Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery is meant to be average. Every step of the way is intentionally crafted to make you comfortable when you expect not to be and pampered when you need to be. The three surgeons that lead this practice consider it their calling to make certain that you have an experience that goes beyond the typical. With the addition of the fresh, modern and comfortable MedSpa, Skin-Raleigh, they offer complementary products and procedures, like Botox®, fillers, skin smoothing, skin tightening, and non-surgical fat removal techniques to stand alone or make your results even better.

Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery

EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE Dr. Davis, Dr. Pyle and Dr. Wood have built a reputation as “the office” for breast and tummy surgery in the Triangle. With patient experience always at the forefront, they’ve led the way in the newest and best techniques and technology. This means more options for the things that bother you; things like pre-operative 3D imaging to make your breast augmentation personal, and techniques, like the Rapid Recovery Breast Augmentation or the Drainless Abdominoplasty, to make your recovery better. Use their app, virtual chat or social channels to quickly and efficiently get your questions answered by their aesthetic experts.

Dr. Jeremy Pyle, Dr. Glenn Davis, Dr. Benjamin Wood 2304 Wesvill Court, Suite 360, Raleigh, NC 27607 919.785.1220 DPraleigh.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Integrative

“Passion for patient-centric care, leveraging the most advanced technologies in Wellness, Family Medicine and Aesthetics.” Dr. Bhavna Vaidya-Tank is a respected integrative physician in the Raleigh area. She founded Family Wellness Clinic 14 years ago and recently opened Regenesis MD. Her practice brings a unique experience of fusing medicine, wellness, and premier aesthetics. This is accomplished through cutting-edge technology, treatments, and an experienced medical team. Family Wellness Center is uniting genetics, family medicine and hormonal treatment. This helps patients live their healthiest life: physically, mentally and aesthetically. Family Wellness Center and Regenesis MD is set apart through the team’s dedication to treating each patient as an individual. Dr. Vaidya-Tank’s team evaluates how to get the best results for each particular patient, whether seen on the medical or aesthetic side. Regenesis MD is Dr. Vaidya-Tank’s answer to the gap between how someone feels and how they look. At Regenesis MD, she specializes in cutting-edge aesthetics, weight loss, and sexual health. The aesthetics include PRP, acne, and medical lasers. Weight loss is achieved through genetic testing, nutrition counseling, and medication management. Bioidentical hormone replacement and O- and P-shots are some of the treatments offered for her sexual health program. Dr. Vaidya-Tank is the Triangle’s only certified physician practice to offer the O- and P-shots for sexual dysfunction. These treatments and more are offered at her luxurious and private Raleigh and Clayton locations. 126 | midtownmag.com

Family Wellness Center and Regenesis MD Mary Katherine Williams, PA-C; Bhavna Vaidya-Tank, MD; Waseem Garbia, PA-C Raleigh: 8020 Creedmoor Road, Raleigh, NC 27613 919.322.2844 Clayton: 2076 NC-42, Suite 230, Clayton, NC 27520 919.553.5711 familywellnessnc.com regenesismd.com


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“A relaxing environment with the best in quality orthodontic care.” For almost a decade, Dr. Jason Gladwell has been bringing the latest in technology and orthodontic treatment to the Triangle. A comfortable, patient-centric office combines a relaxing environment with the best in quality orthodontic care. The highly trained staff is dedicated to providing the very best in orthodontic services. Dr. Gladwell has always listened to what patients prefer in their treatment, has embraced new methods and technology, and has become the state’s leading provider for Invisalign® treatment for both children and adults. Dr. Gladwell’s expertise with Invisalign has allowed him to transcend the typical geographic barriers that would hold patients hostage to a smaller radius of providers. As a result, he treats patients from all over the Triangle area, the state of North Carolina, and the country. We encourage new patients to meet our team and see for themselves why Gladwell Orthodontics is the No. 1 provider of Invisalign services in North Carolina.

Gladwell Orthodontics Dr. Jason Gladwell 2824 Rogers Rd, Suite 200, Wake Forest, NC 27587 919.453.6325 gladwellorthodontics.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Psychiatry

Gupta Psychiatry Dr. Mona Gupta 8304 Creedmoor Road, Raleigh, NC 27613 919.870.8409 guptapsychiatry.com

Dr. Mona Gupta, founder and director of Gupta Psychiatry, is a prominent board certified psychiatrist in North Raleigh. Dr. Gupta believes in a more ‘holistic’ approach to overall mental health and wellness. She believes a healthy mind leads to a healthy body and life. She encourages an overall healthy lifestyle by advocating a balanced diet, daily exercise, vitamins, implementation of mindful relaxation techniques, and medication management if necessary. As behavioral health issues are becoming more publicly discussed and accepted, she and her dedicated team lay the foundation for successful treatment and recovery by providing unparalleled support throughout treatment. Dr. Gupta is best known for her friendly yet firm demeanor and her ability to build and maintain a trusting and respectful relationship with all her patients.

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“We strive to make all patients feel like they are a part of our family and know that they are not alone in this journey.”


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“I offer a fresh perspective and cutting-edge dental techniques to help you achieve the smile you deserve.” Dr. Justin Russo of Leesville Dental Care specializes in cosmetic and general dentistry. He is a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry, the NC Dental Society, and is the official dentist of the Miss North Carolina and Miss North Carolina Teen Pageants. Dr. Russo has seen far too many people who are embarrassed of their teeth and hide their smile, or don’t smile at all. For those people, Dr. Russo wants you to know that there are options to help achieve the smile you want. His greatest satisfaction is to give people a bright, confident smile, or what Dr. Russo likes to call “the WOW factor”! His signature service, known as “Test Drive Your Smile”, allows you to see what your smile makeover would look like before you commit. Dr. Russo can create a custom temporary, allowing you to see what your smile will look like before moving forward with any treatment. The most frequent response from patients who do the test drive is: “I never knew how good I could look”. So if you’re wondering how good you can look, give Dr. Justin Russo at Leesville Dental Care a call today.

Leesville Dental Care Justin M. Russo, DDS 13220 Strickland Road, Suite 166, Raleigh, NC 27613 919.890.5147 leesvilledentalcare.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> TMJ/Facial Pain

“Chronic pain can be crippling. Most chronic head and neck pain sufferers have never been told that their jaw could be the cause of their pain.� Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center is dedicated to successfully treating craniofacial pain, TMJ disorders and sleep disordered breathing. Our approach is a comprehensive evaluation for diagnosis and non-invasive TMJ and muscle pain treatment options. We provide diagnosis and treatment with state-of-the-art techniques and equipment in a caring, friendly environment. Patients suffering from clicking/popping of the jaw, face pain, migraines, ringing of the ears, loud snoring, or those who suffer with difficulty tolerating CPAP should contact Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center to learn more. Dr. Tracy Davidian is revolutionizing the way TMJ is treated throughout North Carolina. At Carolina TMJ and Facial Pain Center, we know that TMJ position is related to other areas of your body and physiology. Understanding these connections allows her to successfully treat muscle pain of the head and neck, often connected to TMJ but not all of the time. Dr. Davidian often works side by side with other healthcare providers to ensure maximum medical recovery, such as chiropractors, physical therapists, nutritionists, ENTs, neurologists or cognitive therapists. 130 | midtownmag.com

Physiologic Aesthetics, Carolina TMJ & Facial Pain Center Tracy Davidian, DDS, PA 5904 Six Forks Road, Suite 205, Raleigh, NC 27609 919.366.PAIN CarolinaTMJ.com


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“Modern solutions to complex dental problems in a single convenient location.” Dr. Tarun Agarwal, founder of Raleigh Dental Arts and 3D Dentists, is an internationally recognized dentist, speaker and author. In fact, he has built a training center in his practice dedicated to teaching dentists from around the world the latest technologies and clinical techniques. Dr. Agarwal is known for his ability to provide solutions for complex dental problems. He achieves excellent results by balancing state-of-the-art technology, a keen eye for aesthetics, and ingenuity. Dr. Agarwal’s guiding philosophy is ‘do unto others as you would have them do unto you’, meaning he approaches each case by answering the question, “What would I want done if this were my parent, my sibling, my spouse, or my child?” Whether you are afraid of the dentist, are missing some or even all of your teeth, suffer from migraines or TMJ dysfunction, suffer from snoring or obstructive sleep apnea, or simply want a prettier smile, Dr. Agarwal is proud to offer modern solutions in a single, convenient location. Dr. Agarwal is best known for his friendly, down-to-earth manner and his ability to develop a trusting relationship with all his patients.

Raleigh Dental Arts Dr. Tarun Agarwal, DDS 8304 Creedmoor Road, Raleigh, NC 27613 919.870.7645 raleighdentalarts.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Gynecology

“Fulfillment comes from building a relationship with her patients and witnessing the connections women have with each other and their community.” Dr. Lorena (Lo) Benavides has been practicing gynecology in Raleigh since 2006. In finding the right words to describe her work to her two young daughters, she has realized what makes her job so special. “Mommy takes care of ladies,” she says to her daughters Emma Rose (7) and Charlotte (5). “She helps mommies, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, cousins and friends.”Practicing medicine is wonderful, but for Lo the utmost fulfillment comes from building a relationship with her patients and witnessing the connections women have with each other and their community. While growing up in the South Texas town of Laredo with her brother and two sisters, Lo was exposed early on to the medical care of women, as her father has enjoyed a long career in obstetrics and gynecology. After graduating as valedictorian from her high school, Lo left Texas to attend Princeton University. She went on to medical school at Columbia University followed by a residency in OB/GYN at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She began practicing in Raleigh after completing an advanced pelvic surgery fellowship in Dallas, Texas. Her special interests include minimally invasive surgery, gynecology for women of all ages, and approaches to healthy living. 132 | midtownmag.com

Raleigh Gynecology & Wellness, PA Dr. Lorena Benavides 2304 Wesvill Court, Suite 210 Raleigh, NC 27607 919.782.6700 gynraleigh.com


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Orthopaedics

“A specialized team dedicated to a single goal: getting you back to your most active self.” If not performing at their best, muscles, bones and joints can greatly affect our activity and life experiences. When an orthopaedic injury happens, it can set you back tremendously. You can miss out on special moments with grandkids, that college football or basketball scholarship, or even placing for that marathon you’ve been training so hard for. At Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic we understand from personal and professional experience what it’s like to experience an orthopaedic injury and how important it is to quickly get back to your most active self. Our 21 doctors lead a team of specialized providers that are dedicated to delivering a treatment plan tailored to your injury and lifestyle. Patients visiting Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic can expect access to board-certified, fellowship trained physicians who are skilled in the most cutting-edge orthopaedic treatment options available today including surgical and non-surgical options, such as physical therapy and injections. Our goal is to be a dedicated partner to get you back to the activities you love as quickly as possible. To learn about our subspecialties and meet our expert providers, we invite you to visit our website, www.raleighortho.com.

Raleigh Orthopaedic Back row, left to right: David W. Boone, MD; Bradley K. Vaughn, MD; William M. Isbell, MD; Leonard D. Nelson, MD; D. Clinton McNabb, MD; Harrison G. Tuttle, MD; John B. Chiavetta, MD; Lyman S.W. Smith, MD; Daniel J. Albright, MD; Robert T. Wyker, MD Front row, left to right: Scott M. Wein, MD; Edwin R. Cadet, MD; Mark R. Mikles, MD; G. Hadley Callaway, MD; Cara B. Siegel, MD; Joseph U. Barker, MD; Carroll D. Kratzer, DPM; Jeffrey K. Kobs, MD; Kevin J. Logel, MD; Matthew T. Boes, MD; Chad C. Greer, MD VARIOUS LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT THE TRIANGLE 919.863.6808 raleighortho.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Vascular

Raleigh Vein & Laser Center   Dr. Janice Hong Messier, MD 2011 Falls Valley Drive, Suite 104, Raleigh, NC 27615 919.866.0002 raleighvein.com

Dr. Janice Hong Messier, MD is board certified in general surgery with an additional board certification in vascular surgery. Dr. Hong Messier has more than 20 years of experience as a leader in advanced treatment for varicose veins. In 2004, Janice Hong Messier, MD founded Raleigh Vein and Laser Center to serve the region’s increasing demand for a medical practice devoted exclusively to minimally-invasive varicose vein surgery procedures and cosmetic treatment of spider veins. At Raleigh Vein and Laser Center, varicose veins of the legs are treated by a board certified vascular surgeon, who is the recognized expert in treatment of blood vessel diseases of the veins. There are many treatments for varicose veins, and the most appropriate or “best” treatment will depend on the anatomy of your leg veins. And that provides Doctor Janice Hong Messier with a very unique, expert view and perspective on causes, treatments and differential diagnoses of varicose veins. As a vascular surgeon, Dr. Hong Messier is best equipped to be able to treat you appropriately and safely. The first step to healthy legs and reducing bulging, painful veins is scheduling an appointment with Dr. Janice Hong Messier at Raleigh Vein and Laser Center. 134 | midtownmag.com

“My expertise allows for accurate treatment of all medical and cosmetic problems associated with varicose veins, spider veins, sun damage, age and sun spots and hair removal.”


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Emergency Care

“The fast response from the RelyMD physician was outstanding! He was able to treat our daughter without us having to leave the house – great doctor, great service, would highly recommend to all my friends!”

RelyMD believes that health care can be delivered in a more convenient, efficient and cost-effective manner. Founded by a Raleigh-based group of 95 emergency medicine physicians, RelyMD is on a mission to improve people’s lives by simplifying the way they see a doctor. Through RelyMD, patients have 24/7/365 access to local, actively practicing, board certified emergency medicine doctors via mobile app, web browser, or phone call with an average wait time of less than 10 minutes, allowing people to seek medical care on their schedule and from their location of choice. In early 2015, RelyMD began offering its services to NC-based organizations as a benefit with the goal of keeping their employees healthier, which leads to decreased absenteeism and lower health care costs. Thus far, the results have been overwhelmingly positive, with 99% of patients saying they would use RelyMD again and 99% saying they would recommend RelyMD to a friend. 87% of patients stated that RelyMD helped them get back to work faster. In less than 18 months, RelyMD has grown to over 35 corporate clients and is actively partnering with health systems to make health care more accessible and convenient for their patients.

rely md Left to Right Dr. David Leader; Dr. Bobby Park; Dr. Gay Gooden; Dr. Sarah Mills; Dr. Olly Duckett 210 Towne Village Drive, Cary, NC 27513 855.384.6688 RelyMD.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Dentistry

“We believe in providing excellence in dentistry through a unique patient-centered experience.” Doctors Abernethy, Sonner and Wells are passionate about creating healthy, beautiful smiles through personalized care for the entire family. We believe in providing excellence in dentistry through a unique patient-centered experience. Our team is committed to educating you towards a lifetime of optimal oral health because we know that a smile significantly influences your overall health and well-being. In our office, we personalize every appointment so that our patients experience unsurpassed integrity, sincerity and compassion while in our care. Because of our doctors’ dedication to continued education and advancement of skill, we excel in a variety of restorative and cosmetic treatment options unique to each patient. From cosmetic “smile makeovers” to tooth replacement options with implants, we want you to be elated with your smile! Our patient-centered approach is unparalleled in dentistry. With the latest advances in the field such as CT scans, CEREC crowns, implants and life-like porcelain veneers, we have perfected the art of diagnosis, function, and extraordinary beauty. From simple fillings to smile makeovers, the doctors are committed to keeping you and your family smiling for a lifetime! 136 | midtownmag.com

renaissance dental center Dr. Anna Abernethy, Dr. Jill Sonner, Dr. Anita Wells 3803 Computer Drive, Suite 200, Raleigh, NC 27609 919.786.6766 renaissancedentalcenter.com


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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Plastic Surgery

“Specialists in Plastic Surgery has built a proud history of service to the Raleigh community since its establishment in 1984.” There are many plastic surgery practices within the Triangle region, but Specialists in Plastic Surgery stands apart. Our doctors have superior levels of experience, more years in practice, more professional distinctions and a proven record of successful results and fulfilled, happy patients. Specialists in Plastic Surgery has built a proud history of service to the Raleigh community since its establishment in 1984. Our highly trained, board certified surgeons – Don L. Oschwald, MD, Matthew W. Blanton, MD, Roger R. Russell, MD, Sanjay V. Daluvoy, MD and Richard E. Carlino, MD – continue to earn the respect of their peers and the trust and confidence of our satisfied patients. We have maintained a practice philosophy centered on excellent patient experiences, patient-driven outcomes and natural-looking enhancements. Over the decades, we have grown to include multiple surgeons, a satellite “boutique office” in Cary, skin health specialists and nurse injectors. Our level of surgical expertise is complemented by our staff’s commitment to excellence. At Specialists in Plastic Surgery, our doctors, nurses and office staff strive to provide you with a caring, warm atmosphere and personalized attention so that you can achieve your best self.

Specialists in Plastic Surgery, PA Left to right: Don L. Oschwald, MD; Matthew W. Blanton, MD; Roger R. Russell, MD; Sanjay V. Daluvoy, MD; Richard E. Carlino, MD RALEIGH: 3633 Harden Road, Suite 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 919.785.0505 CARY: 140 Preston Executive Drive, Suite 201 Cary, NC 27513 919.785.0505 specialistsinplasticsurgery.com

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2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Chiropractic

Atlas Chiropractic of raleigh Brea, Kristy, Dr. Boccella, Carol, Michelle

With over 20 years of experience in the Triangle, Dr. John Boccella offers modern chiropractic care to restore proper spinal alignment without forceful manual manipulation by utilizing the Atlas Orthogonal technique.

10931 Strickland Road, Suite 131, Raleigh, NC 27615 919.518.1234 AtlasChiroRaleigh.com

When the Atlas (the top bone in the neck) is out of alignment, your entire body becomes out of balance and misaligned. An Atlas misalignment may result in nerve pressure and inflammation, causing a disruption of the normal function of the nervous system. This dysfunction may play a major role in a variety of symptoms and pain in different areas of the body. The Atlas adjustment is non-invasive, painless and highly effective.

2016BESTDOCTORS >>> Internal Medicine

Schneider Medical Group, PA Inaam J. Schneider, MD, Richard J. Schneider, MD

Internal Medicine | Integrative Medicine Raleigh’s newest medical practice brings both internal medicine and integrative medicine to its patients in a new practice model – direct primary care. Taking the time to listen to you.

8341 Bandford Way, Suite 103, Raleigh, NC 27615 919.301.8971 schneidermedicalgroup.com

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Frustrated by the inability to spend the time with patients that they deserved due to the increased demands and restrictions of insurance companies, Drs. Inaam and Richard sought to bring back a more personalized way of practicing medicine. Members enjoy 24/7 access to physicians with over 66 years of combined healing experience, unlimited and longer office visits, and same or next business day appointments.


2015-2016 BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA® – RALEIGH

R

aleigh is at the heart of Wake County, which is the second-fastest growing county in the US, second only to Travis County, Texas. That county is also the home to the capital city of Austin. At the center of our burgeoning region are many colleges, universities and teaching medical schools, as well as the Research Triangle Park; hence our area is a huge draw for medical research and cutting-edge medicine. Of the three larger hospitals in Raleigh, two are associated with teaching hospitals down the road in Chapel

Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2015-2016 database, which includes over 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www. bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.”

Hill and Durham – UNC/Rex Healthcare and Duke Raleigh Hospital – and WakeMed Health & Hospitals is our largest hospital of the three. As the population grows locally, so does access to medical professionals at the many private medical practices, clinics, specialized medical facilities and hospitals in the area. We have many very fine doctors spread across the three key counties that comprise the Triangle. We offer up one list here, from an organization that has compiled highly recommended practicing physicians across the country.

Copyright 2015-2016, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.” BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license. Best Doctors, Inc. is transforming and improving health care by bringing together the best medical minds in the world to help identify the right diagnosis and treatment. The company’s innovative, peer-to-peer consultation service offers a new way for physicians to collaborate with other physicians to ensure patients receive the best care. Headquartered in Boston, MA, the global company seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits, to serve more than 30 million members in every major region of the world.

More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and balloting software, that Gallup® has audited and certified, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list, which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information.

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Allergy and Immunology Rebecca H. Buckley Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-9914 David B. Peden North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 4414 Lake Boone Trail Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0500 Anesthesiology Ann G. Bailey UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5136 William R. Bolding WakeMed Raleigh Campus Department of Anesthesiology 3000 New Bern Ave Raleigh, NC 27619 Phone: 919-873-9533 Thomas Buchheit Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 4309 Medical Park Dr Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-681-1924 Randy C. Efird American Anesthesiology of North Carolina 3100 Spring Forest Rd, Ste 130 Raleigh, NC 27616 Phone: 919-954-3939 Anne Marie Fras Duke Pain Medicine 4309 Medical Park Dr Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-668-7600 Michael L. James Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6266 Edmund H. Jooste Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-4877 Catherine M. Kuhn Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-8111 Jerrold H. Levy Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiac Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-0862 Jonathan B. Mark Durham VA Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 508 Fulton St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-286-6938 Joseph P. Mathew Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-6646 David C. Mayer UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5136

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Holly Muir Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-6266

Thomas R. Gehrig Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816

Andrew Wang Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816

Mark F. Newman Duke University Medical Center Duke Private Diagnostic Clinic Orange Zone, Ste 1293 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-6581

Ruth Ann Greenfield Duke University Medical Center Duke Heart Center Duke Clinic 2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5816

Park W. Willis IV UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5205

Anthony N. Passannante UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-5136

J. Kevin Harrison Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816

Robert E. Seymour III WakeMed Raleigh Campus Department of Anesthesiology 3000 New Bern Ave Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-5645

John S. Kelley WakeMed Heart and Vascular Physicians 3324 6 Forks Rd Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-781-7772

Mark Stafford-Smith Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2100 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-6944

J. Larry Klein UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 313 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-7244

Jeff Taekman Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3661

Mark Earl Leithe Duke Cardiology of Raleigh Medical Office Bldg 6, Ste 200 3320 Wake Forest Rd Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-862-5100

David Samuel Warner Duke University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6633

Charles Mangano, Jr. WakeMed Heart and Vascular Physicians 3000 New Bern Ave, Ste G-100 Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-231-6132

David A. Zvara UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7630 Cardiovascular Disease Thomas M. Bashore Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816 Michael A. Blazing Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816 James P. Daubert Duke University Medical Center Duke Heart Center Duke Clinic 2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5816 Timothy P. Donahue Triangle Heart Associates 1821 Hillandale Rd, Ste 25C Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-220-5510 Neil J. Freedman Duke University Medical Center Duke Heart Center Duke Clinic 2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5816 Anil K. Gehi UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 313 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-7244

Daniel B. Mark Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5816 John Paul Mounsey UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 313 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-843-1283 E. Magnus Ohman Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816 Joseph G. Rogers Duke University Medical Center Duke Heart Center Duke Clinic 2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5816 John Rankin Sinden WakeMed Heart and Vascular Physicians 3000 New Bern Ave, Ste G-100 Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-231-6132 Michael Hugh Sketch Duke Health Center at Southpoint Division of Cardiology 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-681-5816 Sidney C. Smith, Jr. UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 301 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-843-1283

James P. Zidar North Carolina Heart and Vascular Physicians 2800 Blue Ridge Rd, Ste 400 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-787-5380 Colon and Rectal Surgery Mark J. Koruda UNC Hospitals Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-8436 Critical Care Medicine Shannon S. Carson UNC Hospitals Medical ICU 100 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-843-1920 William J. Fulkerson, Jr. Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Joseph A. Govert Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Jerrold H. Levy Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiac Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-0862 Neil R. MacIntyre Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-2720 Bryant A. Murphy UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5136 Linda J. Paradowski WakeMed Raleigh Campus Department of Pulmonology 3000 New Bern Ave Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-7270 Claude A. Piantadosi Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Dermatology Amber R. Atwater Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432

Claude S. Burton Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432 Adela Rambi Cardones Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432 Jonathan L. Cook Duke University Medical Center Duke Mohs Micrographic Surgery 5324 McFarland Dr, Ste 400 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-419-4945 Sue Ellen Cox Aesthetic Solutions 5821 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-403-6200 Luis A. Diaz UNC Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center at Southern Village 410 Market St, Ste 400 Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-966-2485 Mark S. Fradin Chapel Hill Dermatology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 1 891 Willow Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-942-3106 Russell P. Hall III Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432 John C. Murray Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432 Sarah Myers Duke University Medical Center Duke Dermatology Patterson Place 5324 McFarland Dr, Ste 210 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-684-3432 Elise A. Olsen Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432 David Scott Rubenstein UNC Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center at Southern Village 410 Market St, Ste 400 Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-966-2485 Nancy E. Thomas UNC Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center at Southern Village 410 Market St, Ste 400 Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-966-2485 Endocrinology and Metabolism John B. Buse UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27717 Phone: 984-974-2950 David Clemmons UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950


David A. D’Alessio Duke University Medical Center Duke Endocrinology and Bone Densitometry Duke Clinic 1A 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 G. Stephen DeCherney UNC Hospitals Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-2950 Jean Dostou UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Elizabeth H. Harris UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Deepa Kirk UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 M. Sue Kirkman UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Eric Klett UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Kenneth W. Lyles Duke University Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Duke Clinic 1A 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Diana B. McNeill Duke University Medical Center Duke Medical Plaza Brier Creek Division of Endocrinology 10211 Alm St, Ste 212 Raleigh, NC 27617 Phone: 919-620-5300 Thomas L. O’Connell Novant Health Durham Internal Medicine Associates 5107 Southpark Dr, Ste 104 Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-477-6900 Janet E. Rubin UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Julie L. Sharpless UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Durham, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Maya S. Styner UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950 Laura A. Young UNC Hospitals Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 202 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2950

Family Medicine Kathryn M. Andolsek Duke Diet and Fitness Center 501 Douglas St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 800-235-3853 Kathleen K. Barnhouse UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Blake R. Boggess Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888 Jeffrey R. Bytomski Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888 Joyce A. Copeland Duke University Medical Center Duke Family Medicine Center Marshall I Pickens Bldg 2100 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6721 Timothy P. Daaleman UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0210 Clark R. Denniston UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Narges Farahi UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 G. Patrick Guiteras Chapel Hill Family Medicine 120 Conner Dr, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-933-8773 Brian Halstater Duke University Medical Center Duke Student Health Center 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-9355 Andrew Hannapel UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Margaret Helton UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Thomas M. Howard North Carolina State University Student Health Center 2815 Cates Ave Raleigh, NC 27695 Phone: 919-515-2563

Sally R. Johnson Highgate Family Medical Center 5317 Highgate Dr, Ste 117 Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-361-2644 Julie Ann Monaco UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Elisabeth Nadler Duke Primary Care Triangle Family Practice 6020 Fayetteville Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-572-2000 Warren P. Newton UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Brian Z. Rayala UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0210 Barbara L. Sheline Duke University Medical Center Duke Family Medicine Center Marshall I Pickens Bldg 2100 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6721 Donald C. Spencer UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Beat D. Steiner UNC Hospitals at WakeBrook Department of Family Medicine 107 Sunnybrook Rd Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 984-974-4832 Margaret A. Stetson Duke Primary Care Timberlyne 77 Vilcom Cir, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-942-8500 Anthony J. Viera UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Samuel S. Weir UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Adam Jason Zolotor UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Gastroenterology Todd Huntley Baron UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-6000

Eugene M. Bozymski UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8946

Robert S. Sandler UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6000

Malcolm Stanley Branch Duke University Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology Duke Clinic 2J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6437

R. Balfour Sartor UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2511

Evan S. Dellon UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2511

Ronald P. Schwarz Raleigh Medical Group 2601 Lake Dr, Ste 201 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-783-4888

Spencer D. Dorn UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0141 Douglas A. Drossman Chapel Hill Doctors Healthcare Center 55 Vilcom Center Dr, Ste 110 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-929-7990 Ian S. Grimm UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-5058 Paul H. Hayashi UNC Hospitals North Carolina Memorial Hospital Transplant Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2615 Hans Herfarth UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-0140 Kim L. Isaacs UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6000 Rodger A. Liddle Durham VA Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology 508 Fulton St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-286-0411 Millie Long UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6000

Nicholas J. Shaheen UNC Hospitals Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2513 Geriatric Medicine Robin C. Burnette Boylan Healthcare Health Park Family Medicine 8300 Health Park, Ste 309 Raleigh, NC 27615 Phone: 919-781-9650 Jan Busby-Whitehead UNC Hospitals Geriatric Specialty Clinic 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-957-6599 M. Andrew Greganti UNC Hospitals Geriatric Specialty Clinic 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-3063 Laura C. Hanson UNC Hospitals Geriatrics Specialty Clinic 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-843-4096 Mitchell T. Heflin Duke University Medical Center Geriatric Evaluation and Treatment Clinic Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-4070 Margaret Helton UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 John S. Kizer UNC Hospitals Geriatric Specialty Clinic 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-843-4096

Rig S. Patel Digestive Healthcare 2417 Atrium Dr, Ste 150 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-791-2040

Kenneth W. Lyles Duke University Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Duke Clinic 1A 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300

Anne F. Peery UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-6000

Kenneth Schmader Duke University Medical Center Geriatric Evaluation and Treatment Clinic Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-4070

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Philip D. Sloane UNC Hospitals Department of Family Medicine 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3711 Gregg Warshaw UNC Hospitals Family Medicine Center William B. Aycock Bldg 590 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-0210 Heidi K. White Duke University Medical Center Geriatric Evaluation and Treatment Clinic Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-4070 Geriatric Medicine/Hospice and Palliative Medicine Laura C. Hanson UNC Hospitals Geriatrics Specialty Clinic 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-843-4096 Hand Surgery Julian McClees (Mack) Aldridge III Triangle Orthopaedic Associates 120 William Penn Plaza Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-220-5255 Donald K. Bynum, Jr. UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-962-6637 Richard D. Goldner Durham VA Medical Center Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 508 Fulton St Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-286-0411

Steven Zacks UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-7502

Cameron R. Wolfe Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-0789

Infectious Disease

Internal Medicine

Edwin A. Brown Raleigh Infectious Diseases Associates 2304 Wesvill Ct, Ste 240 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-571-1567

Marco A. Aleman UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459

Myron Cohen UNC Hospitals Infectious Diseases Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-7198 G. Ralph Corey Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Gary M. Cox Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Joseph J. Eron, Jr. UNC Hospitals Infectious Diseases Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-7198 Vance G. Fowler, Jr. Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-6261

Timothy Carey UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459 Paul R. Chelminski UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459

David Albert Goff UNC Urgent Care 6013 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-7010

Kimberly Kylstra North Chatham Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 118 Knox Way Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-960-6094

Hepatology

Rachel A. Miller Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-3197

Thomas M. Miller UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459

Jason E. Stout Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300

Eugene Z. Oddone Durham VA Medical Center Primary Care Clinic 508 Fulton St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-416-8092

Paul H. Hayashi UNC Hospitals North Carolina Memorial Hospital Transplant Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2615

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David A. Wohl UNC Hospitals Infectious Diseases Clinic 101 Manning Dr. 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-7199

Vandana Shashi Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Duke Pediatric Medical Genetics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2036 Medical Oncology and Hematology

Neeraj R. Agrawal Duke Raleigh Hospital Duke Raleigh Cancer Center 3404 Wake Forest Rd, Ste 100 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-862-5400

Christopher Ingram Raleigh Infectious Diseases Associates 2304 Wesvill Ct, Ste 240 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-571-1567

Michael W. Fried UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2516

Cynthia M. Powell UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Genetics and Metabolism 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Warner Wells Edmundson Raleigh Medical Group 3521 Haworth Dr Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-782-1806

David S. Ruch Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066

Nathan Thielman Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300

Joseph Muenzer North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Genetics and Metabolism 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

James Lewis Abbruzzese Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Medical Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6688

Edward F. (Ted) Hendershot Duke University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Duke Clinic 1K 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300

Anna Mae Diehl Duke University Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology Duke Clinic 2J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6437

Dwight Koeberl Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Duke Pediatric Medical Genetics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2036

Cristin M. Colford UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459

Marc Richard Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066

Jama Darling UNC Hospitals Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6000

Medical Genetics

Lawrence Howard Greenblatt Duke Outpatient Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 4220 N Roxboro Rd Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-471-8344

Robert W. Paterson Sutton Station Internal Medicine 5832 Fayetteville Rd, Ste 113 Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-544-6644 Anne F. Phelps Duke Signature Care Center for Living Campus 3475 Erwin Rd, Ste 200 Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-660-6746 Amy W. Shaheen UNC Hospitals Internal Medicine Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1459

Ethan Basch UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center Division of Hematology and Oncology 450 West Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3036 Stephen A. Bernard UNC Hospitals UNC Clinical Cancer Center Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr, 2nd Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1672 Kimberly L. Blackwell Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Breast Oncology Program 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-9672 Jeremiah C. Boles Rex Hematology Oncology Associates 4420 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-784-6818 Lisa A. Carey North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-974-0000 Nelson J. Chao Duke University Medical Center Duke Clinical Research Institute Division of Cellular Therapy 2400 Pratt St, Ste 9000 Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-1027 Jeffrey M. Crane Rex Hemotology Oncology Associates 4420 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-784-6818

Jeffrey Crawford Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Medical Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6688 Carlos M. de Castro III Duke University Medical Center Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cell Therapy 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-8964 Elizabeth Claire Dees North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0000 Louis Diehl Duke University Medical Center Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cell Therapy 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-8964 Henry S. Friedman Duke University Medical Center The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center Department of Neurosurgery 20 Duke Medicine Cir, Ste 3-1 Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-5301 Nigel S. Key UNC Hospitals Hemophilia Treatment Center Carolina Pointe II 6013 Farrington Rd, Ste 201 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-4736 William Y. Kim UNC Hospitals UNC Clinical Cancer Center Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 866-869-1856 Gretchen G. Kimmick Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Medical Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6608 Alan D. Kritz Rex Hematology Oncology Associates 2605 Blue Ridge Rd, Ste 190 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-784-6060 Alice D. Ma UNC Hospitals Benign Hematology Clinic Carolina Pointe II, Ste 201 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2695 Paul Kelly Marcom Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Breast Oncology Program 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-9672 Matthew I. Milowsky UNC Hospitals Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8456 Stephan Moll UNC Hospitals Benign Hematology Clinic Carolina Pointe II, Ste 201 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-974-2695


Joseph O. Moore Duke University Medical Center Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cell Therapy 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-8964 Susan Moore Rex Hematology Oncology Associates 4420 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-784-6818 Michael A. Morse Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Medical Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Dr Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6688 Hyman B. Muss North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0000 Thomas L. Ortel Duke University Medical Center Duke Hemostasis and Thrombosis Center Duke Clinic 2C 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 David A. Rizzieri Duke University Medical Center Duke Clinical Research Institute Division of Cellular Therapy 2400 Pratt St, Ste 9000 Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-1027 Hanna K. Sanoff UNC Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8468 Thomas C. Shea North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-0000 Michael D. Spiritos Duke Raleigh Hospital Duke Raleigh Cancer Center 3404 Wake Forest Rd, Ste 100 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-862-5400 Thomas Stinchcombe North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-0000

Nephrology Michael S. Berkoben Duke University Medical Center Division of Nephrology Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 David William Butterly Duke University Medical Center Division of Nephrology Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Michael Casey Wake Nephrology Associates 3604 Bush St, 2nd Fl Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-876-7807 Romulo Colindres UNC Hospitals Kidney and Hypertension Specialty Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4615 Ronald J. Falk UNC Hospitals UNC Kidney Center Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-843-6485 Gerald A. Hladik UNC Hospitals Kidney and Hypertension Specialty Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5706 John P. Middleton Duke University Medical Center Division of Nephrology Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Patrick H. Nachman UNC Hospitals Kidney and Hypertension Specialty Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4615 Stephen R. Smith Duke University Medical Center Division of Nephrology Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Neurological Surgery

James Robert Burke Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Memory Disorders 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600 Kenneth M. Carnes Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 William G. Ferrell Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-719-8824 S. Mitchell Freedman Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Rhonda Gabr Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Susan Glenn Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Albert R. Hinn Jr. UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4401 Lisa D. Hobson-Webb Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Neuromuscular Disease 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600 James F. Howard, Jr. UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-4401 David Huang UNC Hospitals Department of Neurology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-2266 Keith L. Hull Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456

Keith M. Sullivan Duke University Medical Center Duke Clinical Research Institute Division of Cellular Therapy 2400 Pratt St, Ste 9000 Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-1027

Matthew G. Ewend UNC Hospitals Department of Neurosurgery 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-843-4609

Aatif Husain Duke University Medical Center Division of Epilepsy and Sleep Duke Clinic 1L 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-7600

Robert Wehbie Rex Hematology Oncology Associates 11200 Governor Manly Way, Ste 102 Raleigh, NC 27614 Phone: 919-784-6100

Robert E. Isaacs Duke University Medical Center Duke Spine Center Duke Clinic 1B-1C 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-5241

J. Dedrick Jordan UNC Hospitals Department of Neurology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4401

Jared M. Weiss UNC Hospitals Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 866-869-1856 Mark Yoffe Rex Hematology Oncology Associates 2605 Blue Ridge Rd, Ste 190 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-784-6059

Neurology Richard Bedlack Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Neuromuscular Disease 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600 Michael H. Bowman Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456

Vern C. Juel Duke University Medical Center Division of Neuromuscular Disease Duke Clinic 1L 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4044 Daniel I. Kaufer UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4401

David A. Konanc Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 J. Douglas Mann UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4401 Janice M. Massey Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Neuromuscular Disease 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5196 Joel C. Morgenlander Duke University Medical Center Duke Neurological Disorders Clinic Duke Clinic 1L 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-7600 Patricia K. Naslund Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Richard J. O’Brien Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600 Alvin Thomas Perkins IV Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456

Pavan K. Yerramsetty Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Obstetrics and Gynecology Andrew Berchuck Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3765 John F. Boggess UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7822 Kim Boggess UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131 Wendy R. Brewster UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7822 Haywood L. Brown Duke University Medical Center Lakeview Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2608 Erwin Rd, Ste 200 Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2471

William J. Powers UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-8178

Nancy C. Chescheir UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131

Rodney A. Radtke Duke University Medical Center Division of Epilepsy and Sleep Duke Clinic 1L 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-7600

Daniel L. Clarke-Pearson UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7822

Burton L. Scott Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600

Susannah Copland Atlantic Reproductive Medicine Specialists 10208 Cerny St, Ste 306 Raleigh, NC 27617 Phone: 919-328-3124

Mark B. Skeen Duke University Medical Center Division of Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Duke Clinic 1L 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-7600 Mark Allen Stacy Duke Health Center Neurological Disorders Clinic Division of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders 932 Morreene Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-7600 Richard W. Tim Raleigh Neurology Associates 1540 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Bradley Vaughn UNC Hospitals Neurology Clinic 194 Finley Golf Course Rd, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4401

Grace Couchman Carolina Conceptions 2601 Lake Dr, Ste 301 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-5911 Aimee L. Ferrandino Duke University Medical Center Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2471 Anne C. Ford Duke University Medical Center Duke Women’s Health Associates 5324 McFarland Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-684-2471 Wesley C. Fowler, Jr. UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7822 Marc A. Fritz UNC Fertility 7920 ACC Blvd, Ste 300 Raleigh, NC 27617 Phone: 919-908-0000

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Paola Alvarez Gehrig UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7822

Avick G. Mitra WakeMed Physician Practices Maternal Fetal Medicine Medical Office Bldg, 3rd Fl 3020 New Bern Ave Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-6002

Linda Van Le UNC Hospitals North Carolina Women’s Hospital Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-7822

William H. Goodnight III UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131

Lisa Muasher Duke University Medical Center Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2471

David K. Walmer Atlantic Reproductive Medicine Specialists 10208 Cerny St, Ste 306 Raleigh, NC 27617 Phone: 919-328-3124

Charles O. Harris 4116 Capitol St Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-471-1573

Suheil J. Muasher Duke Fertility Center 5704 Fayetteville Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-572-4673

R. Rand Allingham Duke University Eye Center Division of Glaucoma Disease 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937

Laura Jean Havrilesky Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3765 Robert Phillips Heine Duke University Medical Center Lakeview Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2608 Erwin Rd, Ste 200 Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2471 William W. Hurd Duke Fertility Center 5704 Fayetteville Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-572-4673

John Park Carolina Conceptions 2601 Lake Dr, Ste 301 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-5911 Thomas Michael Price Duke Fertility Center 5704 Fayetteville Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-572-4673 Lisa M. Roberts Gynecology and Lapraroscopic Surgeons 10941 Raven Ridge Rd, Ste 109 Raleigh, NC 27614 Phone: 919-847-7475

Jack R. Inge Mid Carolina ObGyn 4414 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 300 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-781-5510

John W. Schmitt Duke University Medical Center Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2471

Thomas S. Ivester UNC Hospitals NC Women’s Hospital Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-2131

Angeles Alvarez Secord Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3765

Andra James Duke Perinatal Consultants of Durham Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Pavilion East at Lakeview, Ste 200 2608 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2471

John T. Soper UNC Hospitals North Carolina Women’s Hospital Gynecologic Oncology Clinic 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-7822

Jeffrey Adam Kuller Duke ObGyn Consultants 2406 Blue Ridge Rd, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-783-4299

David M. Stamilio UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131

Paula S. Lee Duke Raleigh Hospital Duke Raleigh Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 3404 Wake Forest Rd, Ste 302 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-781-7070 Elizabeth G. Livingston Duke University Medical Center Lakeview Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 2608 Erwin Rd, Ste 200 Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2471 M. Kathryn Menard UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131 William R. Meyer Carolina Conceptions 2601 Lake Dr, Ste 301 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-5911

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Robert A. Strauss UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131 Alison M. Stuebe UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131 John M. Thorp, Jr. UNC Hospitals Women’s Wellness and Specialty Services Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-2131 Fidel A. Valea Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3765

Ophthalmology

M. Tariq Bhatti Duke University Eye Center Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Edward G. Buckley Duke University Eye Center Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3957 Donald L. Budenz UNC Kittner Eye Center 2226 Nelson Hwy, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2020 Alan N. Carlson Duke University Eye Center Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Pratap Challa Duke University Eye Center Division of Glaucoma Disease 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 David A. Chesnutt UNC Kittner Eye Center 2226 Nelson Hwy, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2020 Sharon Fekrat Duke University Eye Center Albert Eye Research Institute 3802 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937

Tamer H. Mahmoud Duke University Eye Center Division of Retinal Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Prithvi Mruthyunjaya Duke University Eye Center Vitreoretinal Surgery and Ocular Oncology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6749 Eric A. Postel Duke University Eye Center Division of Vitreoretinal Surgery and Disease 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Cynthia A. Toth Duke University Eye Center Division of Retinal Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Robin Vann Duke University Eye Center Division of Comprehensive Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Orthopaedic Surgery Louis Almekinders North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-471-9622 Annunziato (Ned) Amendola Duke Sports Science Institute 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7797 David Edward Attarian Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 200 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797 David J. Berkoff UNC Orthopaedic Clinic at Carolina Pointe II 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 201 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-962-6637 Michael P. Bolognesi Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797

Leon W. Herndon Jr. Duke University Eye Center Division of Glaucoma Disease 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937

Brian Eugene Brigman Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Orthopaedic Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4502

Odette M. Houghton UNC Kittner Eye Center 2226 Nelson Hwy, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-5509

R. Alex Creighton UNC Orthopaedic Clinic at Carolina Pointe II 6011 Farrington Rd, Ste 201 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-962-6637

Glenn J. Jaffe Duke University Eye Center Division of Retinal Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Terry Kim Duke University Eye Center Division of Corneal Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 Eleonora Lad Duke University Eye Center Center for Macular Diseases 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937

Laurence E. Dahners UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-962-6637 James K. Deorio Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797 Mark E. Easley Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797

William E. Garrett, Jr. Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888 Grant E. Garrigues Duke Sports Science Institute 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797 Rhett K. Hallows North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-471-9622 Scott S. Kelley North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-471-9622 Paul F. Lachiewicz Chapel Hill Orthopedics Surgery and Sports Medicine 101 Conner Dr, Ste 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-968-6008 Moe R. Lim UNC Hospitals Spine Center and Neurosurgery Clinic 1350 Raleigh Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-962-6637 R. Charles Mather III Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888 Joe Minchew North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-471-9622 Claude T. Moorman III Duke Sports Science Institute 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7797 James A. Nunley II Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066 Christopher W. Olcott UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-962-6637 Steven A. Olson Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-613-7797 Robert F. Ostrum UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-962-6637 Selene G. Parekh North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-403-5180 Marc Richard Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066


William J. Richardson Duke University Medical Center Duke Spine Center Duke Clinic 1B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-0444 David S. Ruch Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066

Allen F. Marshall WakeMed Physician Practices ENT - Head and Neck Surgery 3024 New Bern Ave, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-7856 John T. McElveen, Jr. Carolina Ear and Hearing Clinic 5900 6 Forks Rd, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-876-4327

Timothy N. Taft UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-962-6637

Samip N. Patel UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-3654

Dean C. Taylor Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888

Harold C. Pillsbury III UNC Hospitals Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3709

Alison P. Toth Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888

Eileen M. Raynor The McGovern-Davison Children’s Health Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-3834

Bradley K. Vaughn Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic 3001 Edwards Mill Rd, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27612 Phone: 919-863-6808 Samuel S. Wellman Duke Orthopaedics at Page Road 4709 Creekstone Dr, Ste 300 Durham, NC 27703 Phone: 919-660-5066 Otolaryngology Stephen E. Boyce Raleigh Ear, Nose and Throat 3010 Anderson Dr Raleigh, NC 27619 Phone: 919-787-7171 Seth M. Cohen Duke University Medical Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Duke Clinic 1F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3834 Steven H. Dennis Raleigh Capitol Ear, Nose and Throat 4600 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 100 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-787-1374 Charles S. Ebert UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6484 Ramon M. Esclamado Duke University Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Duke Clinic 1F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3834 David M. Kaylie Duke University Medical Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Duke Clinic 1F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3834

Brent A. Senior UNC Hospitals Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-493-6484 William W. Shockley UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-843-2749 Debara L. Tucci Duke University Medical Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Duke Clinic 1F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3834 Mark C. Weissler UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-6484 David Latham Witsell Duke University Medical Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Duke Clinic 1F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3834 Jose P. Zevallos UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-3654 Pathology William K. Funkhouser, Jr. UNC Hospitals Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1476

Margaret L. Gulley UNC Hospitals Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Brinkhous-Bullitt Bldg, Rm 913 160 N Medical Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-6302 J. Charles Jennette UNC Hospitals Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Brinkhous-Bullitt Bldg, Rm 308 160 N Medical Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4676 Volker Nickeleit UNC Hospitals Division of Nephropathology Brinkhous-Bullitt Bldg, Rm 409 160 N Medical Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-2421 Karen Weck UNC Hospitals Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-7890 Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Rebecca H. Buckley Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-9914 A. Wesley Burks, Jr. UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Kevin J. Kelly North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 M. Louise Markert Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Department of Allergy and Immunology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6263 Joseph L. Roberts Duke Asthma, Allergy and Airway Center 1821 Hillandale Rd, Ste 25-A Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-4000 John W. Sleasman Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-9914 Brian Vickery North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Eveline Y. Wu North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1407

Pediatric Anesthesiology Ann G. Bailey UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5136

Tina M. Schade Willis North Carolina Children’s Hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4131 Pediatric Dermatology

M. Concetta Lupa UNC Hospitals Department of Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5136

Jane S. Bellet Duke University Medical Center Duke Dermatology Patterson Place 5324 McFarland Dr, Ste 410 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-684-3432

Peggy P. McNaull UNC Hospitals Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-5136

Craig N. Burkhart UNC Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center at Southern Village 410 Market St, Ste 400 Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-966-2485

Allison Kinder Ross Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-4877

Claude S. Burton Duke University Medical Center Department of Dermatology Duke Clinic 3J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3432

Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Robert Jaquiss Duke Children’s Heart Center Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-2343 Michael R. Mill UNC Hospitals Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3381

Dean Morrell UNC Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center at Southern Village 410 Market St, Ste 400 Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-2485 Neil S. Prose Duke University Medical Center Duke Dermatology Patterson Place 5324 McFarland Dr, Ste 410 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-684-3432

Pediatric Cardiology

Pediatric Developmental and Behavioral Problems

Scott H. Buck North Carolina Children’s Hospital Children’s Heart Center 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4601

Gordon Worley Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Division of Neurodevelopmental Pediatrics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-6098

Timothy M. Hoffman North Carolina Children’s Hospital Children’s Heart Center 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4601 Angelo S. Milazzo Duke Children’s and WakeMed Children’s Specialty Services Division of Pediatric Cardiology 23 Sunnybrook Rd, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-668-4000 Stephanie B. Wechsler Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Cardiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000

Pediatric Emergency Medicine William C. Bordley Duke University Medical Center Division of Hospital and Emergency Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-8111 Karen Frush Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Hospital and Emergency Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-3749

Pediatric Cardiovascular Anesthesia

William A. Mills, Jr. UNC Hospitals Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-2504

Edmund H. Jooste Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-4877

Christine M. Walsh-Kelly North Carolina Children’s Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1401

Pediatric Critical Care

Pediatric Endocrinology

Ira M. Cheifetz Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-6403

Robert Benjamin Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-3772

Benny L. Joyner, Jr. North Carolina Children’s Hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4131

Ali S. Calikoglu North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Endocrinology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1401

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Elizabeth Estrada UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Endocrinology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1401

Paul L. Martin Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Pediatric Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Program 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-1100

Keisha Gibson UNC Hospitals Kidney and Hypertension Specialty Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4615

Michael S. Freemark Duke Children’s Hospital and Health Center Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3772

Pediatric Infectious Disease

Shashi Kumar Nagaraj Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Nephrology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4246

Maureen A. Su UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Endocrinology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1401

Dennis A. Clements III Duke Children’s Primary Care Pickett Road 3024 Pickett Rd, 2nd Fl Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-620-5333

Pediatric Gastroenterology Steven N. Lichtman North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Richard J. Noel Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 L. Julio (Yul) Reinstein Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-5068 Francisco A. Sylvester UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Martin Howard Ulshen North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Thomas H. Belhorn North Carolina Children’s Hospital Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Coleen K. Cunningham Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Infectious Diseases 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Lee A. (Toni) Darville North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-962-3424 Kathleen A. McGann Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Infectious Diseases 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Ross E. McKinney, Jr. Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Patrick C. Seed Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Pediatric Medical Genetics Priya Kishnani Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Duke Pediatric Medical Genetics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2036

Julie Blatt UNC Hospitals NC Cancer Hospital Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1178

Stephanie B. Wechsler Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Cardiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000

Stuart Gold UNC Hospitals NC Cancer Hospital Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1178

Stephanie B. Wechsler Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Cardiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000

Susan G. Kreissman Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3401

Maria E. Ferris UNC Hospitals Kydney and Hypertension Specialty Clinic Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4615

Joanne Kurtzberg Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Pediatric Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Program 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-1100

John W. Foreman Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Nephrology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000

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Pediatric Medical Toxicology

Pediatric Nephrology

Delbert R. Wigfall Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Nephrology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4246 Pediatric Neurological Surgery Scott W. Elton UNC Hospitals Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-843-4609 Herbert E. Fuchs Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-5013 Pediatric Nutrition Steven N. Lichtman North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 L. Julio (Yul) Reinstein Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-5068 Pediatric Ophthalmology Edward G. Buckley Duke University Eye Center Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3957 Laura B. Enyedi Duke University Eye Center of Cary 2000 Regency Pkwy, Ste 100 Durham, NC 27518 Phone: 919-681-3937 Sharon F. Freedman Duke University Eye Center Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-3937 David K. Wallace Duke University Eye Center Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 2351 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2038 Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Benjamin A. Alman Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Department of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 888-275-3853 Edmund R. Campion UNC Hospitals Department of Orthopaedics Ambulatory Care Center, 2nd Fl 101 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-962-6637

Robert Fitch Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Orthopaedic Outpatient Clinic 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7797

Elisabeth S. Potts Dellon North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Pediatric Otolaryngology

George Z. Retsch-Bogart UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Amelia F. Drake UNC Hospitals Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-3653 Gregory Hulka North Carolina Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 4102 N Roxboro St Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-595-2010 Eileen M. Raynor The McGovern-Davison Children’s Health Center Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-3834 Carlton Zdanski UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8927 Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehab Joshua J. Alexander UNC Center for Rehabilitation Care 1807 N Fordham Blvd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-9747 Pediatric Plastic Surgery Jeffrey R. Marcus Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Plastic Surgery 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-3110 Pediatric Pulmonology Marianna M. Henry UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Richard M. Kravitz Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Margaret W. Leigh North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Ceila E. Loughlin North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Marianne Muhlebach North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Terry Lee Noah North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Pediatric Radiology Lynn A. Fordham UNC Hospitals Department of Radiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3084 Donald P. Frush Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7293 Pediatric Rheumatology C. D. Egla Rabinovich Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Rheumatology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6575 Laura Schanberg Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Rheumatology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6575 John W. Sleasman Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-9914 Leonard Stein North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Eveline Y. Wu North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1407 Pediatric Sleep Medicine Richard M. Kravitz Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4000 Pediatric Specialist John D. Wooten Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-719-8825 Pediatric Specialist/Abused Children Molly Berkoff UNC Hospitals UNC Pediatric Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6669


Kenya McNeal-Trice UNC Hospitals UNC Pediatric Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-6669 Pediatric Specialist/Carcinoid/ Neuroendocrine Tumor Stuart Gold UNC Hospitals NC Cancer Hospital Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1178 Pediatric Specialist/Child and Adolescent Psychiatry L. Jarrett Barnhill UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Robert A. Bashford UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Zachary W. Feldman Raleigh Psychiatric Associates 3900 Browning Pl, Ste 201 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-787-7125 James J. Jenson UNC Mental Health Specialists 110 Connor Dr, Ste 4 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-929-0770 Maria C. La Via UNC Mental Health Specialists 110 Conner Dr, Ste 4 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-445-0770 Nancy T. Livingston 1502 W Hwy 54, Ste 302 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-493-3597 Erin Malloy UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Albert Jackson Naftel UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5217 Ingrid Pisetsky 1601 Hermitage Ct Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-493-6388 Karen K. Poulos UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Gerald Bruce Sibrack 1330 St Mary’s Dt, Ste A020 Raleigh, NC 27605 Phone: 919-872-3851

Linmarie Sikich Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development Lakeview Plaza, East Pavilion, Ste 300 2608 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-7148 Amy M. Ursano UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-5217 Pediatric Specialist/Hospice and Palliative Medicine Elisabeth S. Potts Dellon North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Pulmonology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Pediatric Specialist/NeonatalPerinatal Medicine Margarita Bidegain McGovern-Davison Children’s Health Center Division of Perinatal Neonatology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4844 Carl Bose UNC Hospitals Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5063 C. Michael Cotten Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-3501 Ronald N. Goldberg Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-1592 Matthew M. Laughon North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-5063 William F. Malcolm Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-3501 Martin J. McCaffrey UNC Hospitals Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5063 T. Michael O’Shea UNC Hospitals Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel HIll, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5063 Wayne A. Price North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5063 Alan D. Stiles North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5063

Diane D. Warner UNC Hospitals Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5063

Joseph Muenzer North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Genetics and Metabolism 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401

Karen S. Wood UNC Hospitals Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5063

Pediatric Sports Medicine

Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Epilepsy Michael B. Tennison UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Child Neurology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 John D. Wooten Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-719-8825 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, General Robert S. Greenwood UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Child Neurology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 Kevin M. Rathke Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Traci I. Sheaffer Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-782-3456 Michael B. Tennison UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Child Neurology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 John D. Wooten Raleigh Neurology Associates 1520 Sunday Dr Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-719-8825 Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, Neuromuscular Disease Edward C. Smith Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Neurology 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-6669 Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Metabolic Diseases Ali S. Calikoglu North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of Pediatric Endocrinology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1401 Priya Kishnani Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Duke Pediatric Medical Genetics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2036 Dwight Koeberl Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital Duke Pediatric Medical Genetics 3000 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-2036

Deborah L. Squire Duke Sports Science Institute Center for Living Campus Wallace Clinic 3475 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-5888 Pediatric Surgery William T. Adamson UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4220 J. Duncan Phillips WakeMed Pediatric Surgery WakeMed Raleigh Medical Park 23 Sunnybrook Rd, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-8797 Henry E. Rice Duke University Medical Center Division of Pediatric Surgery 2100 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-5077 Timothy Weiner UNC Hospitals Children’s Specialty Clinic Division of Pediatric Surgery 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-4220 Pediatric Urology Timothy P. Bukowski Associated Urologists of North Carolina 3821 Ed Dr Raleigh, NC 27612 Phone: 919-390-7380 J. Todd Purves Duke University Medical Center Division of Pediatric Urology Duke Clinic 1G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4655 Sherry S. Ross UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-974-1401 Jonathan C. Routh Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Urology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-6994 Richard W. Sutherland North Carolina Children’s Hospital Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr, Ground Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1401 John S. Wiener Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Division of Urology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6994 Pediatrics/General Jeffrey P. Baker Duke Children’s Primary Care Southpoint 6301 Herndon Rd Durham, NC 27713 Phone: 919-620-5333 Molly Berkoff UNC Hospitals UNC Pediatric Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6669

Terry Brenneman Pediatric Partners 5904 6 Forks Rd, Ste 111 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-787-9555 Julie Story Byerley North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-6669 Douglas W. Clark Durham Pediatrics Central Professional Park 2609 N Duke St, Ste 1000 Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-220-4000 Dennis A. Clements III Duke Children’s Primary Care Pickett Road 3024 Pickett Rd, 2nd Fl Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-620-5333 Andrea Dunk Chapel Hill Pediatrics and Adolescents 205 Sage Rd, Ste 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-942-4173 Gregory A. Fisher Regional Pediatric Associates 4022 Freedom Lake Dr Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-477-2202 Sharon M. Foster Raleigh Pediatric Associates 1921 Falls Valley Dr Raleigh, NC 27615 Phone: 919-872-0250 Earl Ruffin Franklin Capitol Pediatrics and Adolescent Center 3801 Computer Dr, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-782-5273 Martha E. Gagliano Durham Pediatrics Central Professional Park 2609 N Duke St, Ste 1000 Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-220-4000 David Albert Goff UNC Urgent Care 6013 Farrington Rd, Ste 101 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-7010 Diane M. Howell UNC Children’s Primary Care Clinic 1512 Franklin St, Ste 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-6669 Kimberly Kylstra North Chatham Pediatrics and Internal Medicine 118 Knox Way Chapel Hill, NC 27516 Phone: 919-960-6094 Miriam Medero-Eng Capitol Pediatrics and Adolescent Center 3801 Computer Dr, Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-782-5273 Kathy A. Merritt Chapel Hill Pediatrics and Adolescents 205 Sage Rd, Ste 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-942-4173 Dean Scott Miner Duke Health Center at Roxboro Street 4020 N Roxboro St Durham, NC 27704 Phone: 919-620-5333 Christopher Morton Chapel Hill Pediatrics and Adolescents 205 Sage Rd, Ste 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-942-4173

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Eliana M. Perrin UNC Children’s Primary Care Clinic 1512 E Franklin St, Ste 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-6669 Jeffrey C. Ryan Capitol Pediatrics and Adolescent Center 10831 Forest Pines Dr, Ste 100 Raleigh, NC 27614 Phone: 919-782-5273 Michael J. Steiner UNC Hospitals UNC Pediatric Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-6669 Wendy L. Taylor Book Capitol Pediatrics and Adolescent Center 10831 Forest Pines Dr, Ste 100 Raleigh, NC 27614 Phone: 919-782-5273 Emmanuel Benjamin Walter, Jr. Duke Children’s Primary Care Pickett Road 3024 Pickett Rd, 2nd Fl Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-620-5333 Pediatrics/Hospital Medicine Margarita Bidegain McGovern-Davison Children’s Health Center Division of Perinatal Neonatology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4844 Joanne Kurtzberg Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center Pediatric Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Program 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-1100 Jacob A. Lohr North Carolina Children’s Hospital Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-6669 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation James J. Hill III UNC Hospitals University Employee Occupational Health Clinic 145 N Medical Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-9119 Michael Y. Lee UNC Center for Rehabilitation Care 1807 N Fordham Blvd Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-9747 Gloria G. Liu Duke University Medical Center Department of Orthopedic Surgery Duke Clinic 1B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7797 Paul Tawney North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic 3609 SW Durham Dr Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-471-9622 Plastic Surgery Michael Robert Zenn Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2666

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Psychiatry L. Jarrett Barnhill UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Robert A. Bashford UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Alan Beeber UNC Mental Health Specialists 110 Conner Dr, Ste 4 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-445-0770 Ernest R. Braasch 3400 Mill Tree Rd, B1 Raleigh, NC 27612 Phone: 919-291-8866 Wilson S. Comer, Jr. 867 Washington St Raleigh, NC 27605 Phone: 919-833-5869 Julia L. Danek Bldg 3, Ste 106 109 Conner Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-968-9855 Margaret J. Dorfman Triangle Psychiatric Services 3909 Sunset Ridge Rd, Ste 101 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-845-1555 Gary J. Gala UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-5217 James Cameron Garbutt UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Bradley Gaynes UNC Hospitals Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-445-0214 W. Scott Griffies Duke University Medical Center Duke Adult Psychiatry Clinic 2213 Elba St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-684-0121 Shelley A. Holmer Duke University Medical Center Psychiatry Inpatient Unit 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3151 Lida Jeck Psychoanalytic Education Center of the Carolinas 1502 W North Carolina Hwy 54, Ste 302 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-493-5329

Maria C. La Via UNC Mental Health Specialists 110 Conner Dr, Ste 4 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-445-0770 B. Anthony Lindsey UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-5217 Sarah H. Lisanby Duke University Medical Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavorial Sciences 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-4531 Nancy T. Livingston 1502 W Hwy 54, Ste 302 Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-493-3597 Samantha E. Meltzer-Brody UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-5217 Barry S. Ostrow 3716 National Dr, Ste 215 Raleigh, NC 27612 Phone: 919-788-1606 Ingrid Pisetsky 1601 Hermitage Ct Durham, NC 27707 Phone: 919-493-6388 Donald L. Rosenstein UNC Hospitals Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-3494 David R. Rubinow UNC Hospitals Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-445-0212 Gerald Bruce Sibrack 1330 St Mary’s Dt, Ste A020 Raleigh, NC 27605 Phone: 919-872-3851 Linmarie Sikich Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development Lakeview Plaza, East Pavilion, Ste 300 2608 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-681-7148 Thomas Spruill Raleigh Psychiatric Associates 3900 Browning Pl, Ste 201 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-787-7125 Richard D. Weiner Duke University Medical Center Duke Electroconvulsive Therapy 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-0105 Richard H. Weisler 700 Spring Forest Rd, Ste 125 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-872-5900

Julia S. Knerr UNC Hospitals Neurosciences Hospital Department of Psychiatry 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-5217

Michael Zarzar Zarzar Psychiatric Associates 4301 Lake Boone Trail, Ste 210 Raleigh, NC 27607 Phone: 919-278-2041

Harold G. Koenig Duke University Medical Center Geriatric Evaluation and Treatment Clinic Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-4070

Michael Jon Cicale Durham VA Medical Center Section of Pulmonary Medicine 508 Fulton St Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-286-6892

Pulmonary Medicine

Raymond D. Coakley UNC Hospitals Pulmonary and Specialty Clinic 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 203 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-5703 Scott H. Donaldson UNC Hospitals Pulmonary and Specialty Clinic 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 203 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-5703 James F. Donohue UNC Hospitals Division of Pulmonary Diseases and Critical Care Medicine Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-6838 William J. Fulkerson, Jr. Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 Joseph A. Govert Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 D. Allen Hayes Raleigh Pulmonary and Allergy Consultants 3480 Wake Forest Rd, Ste 414 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-862-5520 David C. Henke UNC Hospitals Pulmonary and Specialty Clinic 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 203 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-5703 Michael Ray Knowles UNC Marsico Lung Institute Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center 125 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-974-5703 Peter S. Kussin Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-2372 Neil R. MacIntyre Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-2720 Peadar Noone UNC Hospitals Pulmonary and Specialty Clinic 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, 203 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-5703 Scott M. Palmer Duke University Medical Center Duke Pulmonary Transplant Clinic Duke Clinic 2F/2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7777 Linda J. Paradowski WakeMed Raleigh Campus Department of Pulmonology 3000 New Bern Ave Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-350-7270

Claude A. Piantadosi Duke University Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-620-5300 John M. Reynolds Duke University Medical Center Duke Pulmonary Transplant Clinic Duke Clinic 2F/2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-6140 Maria Patricia Rivera UNC Hospitals Pulmonary and Specialty Clinic 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 203 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-5703 Jamie L. Todd Duke University Medical Center Duke Pulmonary Transplant Clinic Duke Clinic 2F/2G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-7777 Momen M. Wahidi Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Lung Cancer Program 20 Duke Medicine Circle Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 888-275-3853 Radiation Oncology David M. Brizel Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-2100 Brian G. Czito Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 30 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-2100 Leroy George (Pete) Hoffman UNC REX Cancer Care of East Raleigh 117 Sunnybrook Rd Raleigh, NC 27610 Phone: 919-334-3900 William Robert Lee Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-2100 Lawrence B. Marks UNC Hospitals UNC Clinical Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8415 Joel E. Tepper UNC Hospitals UNC Clinical Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8432 Mahesh Kumar A. Varia UNC Hospitals UNC Clinical Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-974-0400 Christopher G. Willett Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-2100


Radiology Jay A. Baker Duke University Medical Center Department of Breast Imaging 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7645 Mauricio Castillo UNC Hospitals Department of Radiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1884 Jared Christensen Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443 David Enterline Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Neuroradiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7406 Philip C. Goodman Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Thoracic Imaging 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443 Barbara Hertzberg Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443 Laura E. Heyneman Duke University Medical Center Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7218 Lynne Hurwitz-Koweek Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443 Joseph K. T. Lee UNC Hospitals Department of Radiology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1884 H. Page McAdams Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443 Rendon Nelson Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443

Tony P. Smith Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7284

Surgery

Lacey Washington Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Department of Radiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7443

Timothy Farrell UNC Hospitals Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8436

Rheumatology Nancy Bates Allen Duke University Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-2243 David Stewart Caldwell Duke University Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-2243 Megan E. Clowse Duke University Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-2243 Lisa G. Criscione-Schreiber Duke University Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-2243 MaryAnne Dooley Chapel Hill Doctors Healthcare Center 55 Vilcom Center Dr, Ste 110 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-929-7990 Beth L. Jonas UNC Hospitals Rheumatology Specialty Clinic Bldg 200, Ste 301 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-4191 Joanne Jordan UNC Hospitals Rheumatology Specialty Clinic Bldg 200, Ste 301 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-4191 Alfredo C. Rivadeneira UNC Hospitals Rheumatology Specialty Clinic Bldg 200, Ste 301 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-4191 Joseph Charles Shanahan 10208 Cerny St, Ste 301 Raleigh, NC 27617 Phone: 919-405-2040

James Provenzale Duke University Medical Center Duke Hospital North Division of Neuroradiology 2301 Erwin Rd Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-7218

E. William St. Clair Duke University Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Duke Clinic 1J 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-613-2243

Geoffrey D. Rubin Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging Hock Plaza 2424 Erwin Rd, Ste 304 Durham, NC 27705 Phone: 919-668-8983

Teresa K. Tarrant UNC Hospitals Rheumatology Specialty Clinic Bldg 200, Ste 301 6013 Farrington Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-4191

Anthony G. Charles UNC Hospitals Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery Ambulatory Care Center, 3rd Fl 102 Mason Farm Rd Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-4389

David A. Gerber UNC Hospitals Center for Transplant Care Division of Abdominal Transplant Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8008 Rachel A. Greenup Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Breast Program 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-660-9672 Allan D. Kirk Duke University Medical Center Division of Abdominal Transplant Surgery 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-4853 Mark J. Koruda UNC Hospitals Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-8436 Tomasz Kozlowski UNC Hospitals Center for Transplant Care Division of Abdominal Transplant Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 4th Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8008 Anthony A. Meyer North Carolina Cancer Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-0000

Hong Jin (HJ) Kim UNC Hospitals Division of Surgical Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8289 Paul Joseph Mosca Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Advanced Oncologic and GI Surgery 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4064 David W. Ollila UNC Hospitals Division of Surgical Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8289 Theodore N. Pappas Duke University Medical Center Division of Advanced Oncologic and GI Surgery Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4064 Thoracic Surgery Carmelo A. Milano Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Duke Clinic 2F 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-3243 Michael R. Mill UNC Hospitals Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinic 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-3381 Peter K. Smith Duke University Medical Center Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2890

Theodore N. Pappas Duke University Medical Center Division of Advanced Oncologic and GI Surgery Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-4064

Urology

Tim S. Sadiq UNC Hospitals Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery 101 Manning Dr, 1st Fl Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-8436

Kristy M. Borawski UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 984-974-1315

Debra Sudan Duke University Medical Center Department of Surgery Duke Clinic 2C 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-2279

Culley C. Carson III UNC Hospitals Division of Urologic Surgery 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1315

Chris Watters Duke General Surgery of Raleigh 1212 Cedarhurst Dr, Ste 102 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-431-9911 Surgical Oncology Benjamin F. Calvo UNC Hospitals Division of Surgical Oncology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8289 Shelley Hwang Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Advanced Oncologic and GI Surgery 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-6688

Gregory D. Bianchi UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1315

Judd W. Moul Duke University Medical Center Duke Cancer Center Division of Urology 20 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-668-8108 Matthew Nielsen UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1316 Andrew C. Peterson Duke University Medical Center Division of Urology Duke Clinic 1G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2446 Glenn M. Preminger Duke University Medical Center Division of Urologic Surgery Duke South Clinic 1G 40 Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-5506 Raj S. Pruthi UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-8235 Mathew Raynor UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1315 Stephen F. Shaban Associated Urologists of North Carolina 3821 Ed Dr Raleigh, NC 27612 Phone: 919-758-8677 Angela B. Smith UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1315 Davis P. Viprakasit UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27599 Phone: 919-966-1315 Eric Wallen UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 919-966-1315 Michael E. Woods UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1315 Vascular Surgery

R. Matthew Coward UNC Hospitals Department of Urology 101 Manning Dr Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Phone: 984-974-1315

Mark Farber UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 313 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 919-966-7244

Michael N. Ferrandino Duke University Medical Center Division of Urology Duke Clinic 1G 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-684-2446

William A. Marston UNC Hospitals Heart and Vascular Center at Meadowmont 300 Meadowmont Village Cir, Ste 301 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 Phone: 984-974-2900

Aaron C. Lentz Duke Urology of Raleigh Division of Urologic Surgery 3480 Wake Forest Rd, Ste 506 Raleigh, NC 27609 Phone: 919-862-5600

Richard Lucas McCann Duke University Medical Center Division of Vascular Surgery Duke Clinic 2B 40 Duke Medicine Cir Durham, NC 27710 Phone: 919-681-2406

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coming up in the next

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on the scene | Bain’s Beat | beer & barrel | close to home | giving back sunday supper | the interview | out and about | and much more!

150 | midtownmag.com


OUT ABOUT &

Calendar of events | Midtown Mingles | New Around Town

photograph courtesy of north hills

North Hills Kids in Midtown Park Tuesdays, 10-11am until August 16th North Hills Kids in Midtown Park consists of ten weeks of programmed activities in Midtown Park on Tuesdays from 10-11am through August 16th. Bring the kiddos out for these fun, free outdoor events. North Hills – Midtown Park, Raleigh visitnorthhills.com midtownmag.com| 151


calendar ofevents

midtown farmers’ market Every Saturday, 8am-12pm

North Hills Kids Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday through July 29th, 9am-1pm This fun-filled free activity takes place in the Commons at North Hills, on the grassy lawn between Starbucks and Ben & Jerry’s. North Hills brings out their large, colorful foam blocks for kids to build with, climb on and play with. North Hills Commons, Raleigh visitnorthhills.com Midtown Farmers’ Market Every Saturday, 8am-12pm 45+ vendors selling local farm-fresh produce, meats, seafood, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods, as well as crafts. As a ‘producers only’ market, vendors are only permitted to sell items which they themselves have produced. This means that the vendors at Market truly are ‘your farmers’ and that each vendor has an in-depth, working knowledge of his/her products. North Hills Commons, Raleigh midtownfarmers.com Midtown Beach Music Series Thursdays, 6-9pm The Beach Music Series offers the best

152 | midtownmag.com

of beach music on warm summer nights and features Shag dancing, a timehonored tradition in the South. One of the few local free concerts available to the public, this event hosts those looking for a fun night out. With the best band lineup yet, this 8th season is sure to be a fantastic one! July 7: The Fantastic Shakers July 14: Blackwater Rhythm & Blues July 21: North Tower July 28: Band of Oz August 4th: The Embers featuring Craig Woolard August 11: Finale Concert! North Hills Commons, Raleigh visitnorthhills.com Wine & Design at the Durham Bulls Ballpark July 5th, 6pm Come out to the Durham Bulls Athletic Park and paint with us in the OnDeck Rooftop. We will be painting a Durham FAV from the ballpark while overlooking the Durham Bulls. Tickets are $45 (includes ticket into ballpark, Wine & Design event, and tax). Gates open at 6pm, we’ll begin painting at 7pm. Tickets must be purchased through Wine &

Design. Space is limited. 409 Blackwell Street, Durham durham@wineanddesign.com or call 919.391.8359 Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat July 8th-10th North Carolina Theatre Conservatory’s Master Summer Theatre Arts School, Ray Walker, Artistic Director and Producer proudly presents Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor® Dreamcoat. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable. Joseph, his father’s favorite son, is a boy blessed with prophetic dreams. When he is sold into slavery by his jealous brothers and taken to Egypt, Joseph endures a series of adventures in which his spirit and humanity are continually challenged. 2 East South Street, Raleigh nctheatre.com/conservatory Hair – The smash hit musical comes to Theatre In The Park! July 8th, 7:30-10pm Hair is the musical story of a group of hippies who celebrate peace and love in


Grand Opening at Hunt and Gather at Seaboard Station July 9th, 10am-6pm the shadow of the Vietnam War in 1967. The production is a timeless classic, but the real star of Hair is the rocking score, which includes such classic hits as Let the Sun Shine In, Aquarius and Good Morning Starshine. The production will run July 8th-24th. 107 Pullen Road, Raleigh theatreinthepark.com/calendar/event/59 Hubbard Street Dance Chicago July 8th-July 9th Hubbard Street Dance Chicago returns with a not-to-be-missed all William Forsythe program. N.N.N.N. appears as a mind in four parts, four dancers in a state of constant, tacit connection. 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com Inaugural TEDxDurham Event Coming to Carolina Theatre July 8th, 9:30am TEDxDurham is proud to announce its first independent event, created in the spirit of the cultural phenomenon and national non-profit, TED. The inaugural

Have an Important Event? We would love to hear about it. Log on to our website and send us the details. We may feature it in our next issue. midtownmag.com

Got to Be NC Competition Dining Series July 11th-12th, 14th, 18th-19th, 21st, 24th

event, which will take place at The Carolina Theatre of Durham, will bring together a community of artists and academics, professionals and activists, as well as natives and newcomers for a day filled with brilliant speakers, thoughtprovoking video and mind-blowing conversation. Tickets start at $30. 309 W. Morgan Street, Durham carolinatheatre.org/events/ tedxdurham-2016 Grand Opening at Hunt & Gather at Seaboard Station July 9th, 10am-6pm Please join us for the two-day grand opening event of Hunt & Gather Fine

Estate Furnishings at Seaboard Station. We are flinging open our doors to welcome you with an icy beverage and a smile to enjoy our many new items and vendors – art, antiques, midcentury modern, lamps, chandeliers, crystal and glass, mirrors. 10 W. Franklin Street, Suite 100, Raleigh huntandgatherraleigh.com Lar Lubovitch Dance Company July 11th-12th Men’s Stories (2000) is Lar Lubovitch’s powerful exploration of masculinity, biography and character. Lubovitch has described the work as “a dance that opens up, like a book, to reveal the story of the men inside the dance.” 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com Got to Be NC Competition Dining Series July 11th-12th, 14th, 18th-19th, 21st, 24th The best of the state’s food, agriculture and culinary talent will be back in Raleigh this July. Every dinner battle consists of two All-Star Dream Teams made up of regional chefs competing to move on to the single-elimination tournament. At each dinner, guests enjoy and vote on six courses without knowing which chef team created each. 214 Martin Street, Raleigh competitiondining.com midtownmag.com| 153


calendar ofevents

Gravy vs. Sitti Wine Dinner in the Courtyard July 12th, 6-9pm

Gravy vs. Sitti Wine Dinner in the Courtyard July 12th, 6-9pm Gravy and Sitti, neighbors and friends, are dueling it out for best cuisine on Thursday, July 12th at 6pm in the courtyard behind both restaurants in downtown Raleigh! This four-course feast will include two plates per course, one from each restaurant, and a glass of paired wine from either Italy or Lebanon in our beautiful, secluded courtyard space. A voting card will be provided for each guest upon arrival. Tickets are $65 each, plus tax and gratuity. 137 S. Wilmington Street, Raleigh, goo.gl/WBL3sA Bring It! Live July 13th, 7:30pm Bring It! Live will give fans the chance to become part of the action as they see Miss D and her Dancing Dolls perform their never-before-seen routines live onstage. Audience members will take part in live voting, engage in Q&A with the cast, and get the exclusive “behind the scenes” lowdown on the hit Lifetime series. 2 E. South Street, Raleigh dukeenergycenterraleigh.com Saint Jacques Bastille Day Wine Dinner July 14th 6:30-9:30pm Join Saint Jacques French Cuisine 154 | midtownmag.com

to celebrate Bastille Day with a wine dinner. For reservations, please call 919.862.2770. 6112 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh saintjacquesfrenchcuisine.com Maks & Val’s Our Way Live Tour July 17th, 7pm Maksim and Valentin Chmerkovskiy, stars of ABC’s hit show Dancing with the Stars, are bringing to life the show they have dreamed about since childhood, combining an honest and unfiltered narrative of their life story, with the world class dancing, creativity and passion they are known for. 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com The Raleigh Times Kids Carnival July 17th, 11am-3pm Bring the family for The Raleigh Times’ 3rd Sunday Children’s Carnival on Sunday, July 17th! They’re closing down Hargett Street at 11am for bouncy houses, arts and crafts, face painting, games and more. 14 E. Hargett Street, Raleigh raleightimesbar.com/events Lindsey Stirling July 18th, 7:30pm Acclaimed electronic violinist and New York Times Best Selling Author Lindsey Stirling is coming to DPAC on July 18th. 123 Vivian St, Durham dpacnc.com

Saint Jacques July Cooking Class July 19th, 4:30-6:30pm Join Saint Jacques French Cuisine for their July Cooking Class. For reservations, please call 919.862.2770. 6112 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh saintjacquesfrenchcuisine.com Christmas in July July 22nd, 10am-10pm Join Urban Ministries of Wake County, participating Wake County Chick-filAs, and Systel Business Equipment to end summer hunger. Christmas in July comes at a time when children are out of school and no longer receiving free or reduced price breakfast and lunch, creating an even greater need to provide for their families. Donate five cans of non-perishable food or $5 and receive one free Chick-fil-A chicken sandwich or an 8-count chicken nugget entree at various locations between 10am and 10pm. For a list, please visit the website below. urbanmin.org/event/christmas-in-july Company Wang Ramirez July 22nd-23rd Company Wang Ramirez is back. Attached to cables, the five dancers bring to light and transpose the desire of freedom inherent in all forms of dance, especially hip-hop, with costumes that reflect both Greek and Korean traditions. 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com


photograph courtesy of north hills

Lafayette 148 New York Trunk Show July 23rd-30th, 10am-6pm

Lafayette 148 New York Trunk Show at cameron clothing co. July 23rd-30th, 10am-6pm Lafayette 148 New York Trunk Show at Cameron Clothing Co. in North HIlls. Eileen Lover of Lafayette 148 will be on hand Tuesday, July 26th and Wednesday, July 27th. Come see Lafayette’s fall collections, produced with the finest European fabrics and expert craftsmanship, and known for exceptional fit and quality. 4351-111 The Circle at North Hills, Raleigh cameronclothing.com Adam Schefter And Matthew Berry July 24th, 7:30pm Two of the most popular guys every August, Schefter (an NFL Insider at ESPN) and Berry (the Senior Fantasy Sports Analyst for ESPN) will bring their knowledge, insights, and the secrets to winning fantasy football in their first-ever Live and Interactive Fantasy Football Tour. 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com Colvin and Earle July 24th, 8pm As Colvin & Earle, longtime friends and admirers Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle have united to record their self-titled debut. Colvin & Earle’s live show is a prime showcase for their inimitable vocals, mesmerizing guitar playing and witty storytelling. 2 E. South Street, Raleigh dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

Disney’s Newsies August 16th-21st They delivered the papers, until they made the headlines. Filled with one heart-pounding number after another, it’s a high-energy explosion of song and dance you just don’t want to miss. 123 Vivian Street, Durham dpacnc.com Saint Jacques Julia Child Cooking Class August 17th, 4:30-6:30pm Join Saint Jacques French Cuisine for a Julia Child Cooking Class. For reservations, please call 919.862.2770. 6112 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh saintjacquesfrenchcuisine.com

NC Theatre’s Mary Poppins July 26th-31st An NC Theatre premiere! Everyone’s favorite nanny takes the stage in this supercalifragilisticexpialidocious musical adventure. One of the most popular Disney movies of all time. Check website for exact dates and showtimes. 1 E. South Street, Raleigh nctheatre.com/shows/mary-poppins Todrick Hall July 30th, 7:30pm Broadway actor, MTV star, American Idol finalist and viral YouTube personality Todrick Hall is putting a new “twister” on L. Frank Baum’s most classic creation, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. With over 20 original songs, Hall brings to life this American classic like you’ve never seen it before. 2 E. South Street, Raleigh dukeenergycenterraleigh.com/event/ todrick-hall-7537

Brian Wilson Presents Pet Sounds – Celebrating the 50th Anniversary August 19th, 8pm He is one of popular music’s most deeply revered figures, the main creative force behind some of the most cherished recordings in rock history. 2 E. South Street, Raleigh dukeenergycenterraleigh.com Saint Jacques Julia Child Wine Dinner August 24th 6:30-9:30pm Join Saint Jacques French Cuisine to celebrate Julia Child’s birthday. For reservations, please call 919.862.2770. 6112 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh saintjacquesfrenchcuisine.com Collins Plastic Surgery: Beauty in 3D August 31st, 5pm Discover your beauty in 3D with demos of Vectra, a 3D imaging system that allows you to imagine the possibilities! Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, swag bags, and exclusive one-night-only specials. 8300 Health Park, Suite 225, Raleigh drstewartcollins.com

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midtownmingles Photography by davies Photography

Affordable chic’s seventh birthday party

On May 14th, Affordable Chic Shops celebrated seven fantastic years with great customers, good food, sweet tea, and the music of The Martin Davis Band!

Photography by davies Photography

helene foundation annual gala

On May 6th, The Helene Foundation held their annual gala at The Renaissance North Hills Hotel. It featured a live and silent auction with a guest performance by The Embers. The Helene Foundation’s mission is to support moms, and their families, who are in active cancer treatment for six months. They provide services such as meals, house cleaning, gas cards, tutoring, child care and much, much more. The support is customized to each family and what they need. For more information, visit helenefoundation.org.

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midtownmingles

spring mingle

On May 19th, Mom’s Night Out teamed up with Skin Raleigh med spa and Gladwell Orthodontics for an evening of networking fun. Dr. Gladwell offered free Invisalign® consultations to all attendants, and the amazing team from Skin Raleigh and Davis & Pyle Plastic Surgery talked about the latest and greatest in skin care and cosmetic procedures.

RAULSTON EXHIBITION

The NCSU Libraries celebrated the life of innovative horticulturist J.C. Raulston with the opening of an exhibit and related events on March 18th. “Plan – and Plant for a Better World” – J.C. Raulston and The North Carolina State University Arboretum, which runs through January 2017 in the D.H. Hill Library Gallery, tells Raulston’s story from his Oklahoma childhood through two decades at NC State, during which he developed what would become the J.C. Raulston Arboretum.

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midtownmingles

12 roses dinner

The 12 Roses Dinner, a private estate wine dinner celebrating women, food and wine, was held on April 9th. Tickets for this exclusive event were purchased at the 2016 Triangle Wine Experience Grand Gala & Auction, with proceeds benefitting the Frankie Lemmon School and Developmental Center. This exclusive dinner is prepared by five of the country’s best female chefs, beautifully paired with sublime wines from five of the top female winemakers and precisely poured by two female sommeliers.

Photography by kellbelle Photography

2016 safechild spring gala

The 2016 SAFEchild Spring Gala was held at Marbles Kids Museum on April 15th and raised more than $100,000 for SAFEchild’s programs that aim to eliminate child abuse in Wake County. Over 300 guests were in attendance and enjoyed an evening of delicious food and drinks from Empire Eats Catering, a silent and live auction, a Wine Wall, and dancing the night away! 158 | midtownmag.com

gigi’s playhouse grand opening

On June 18th, GiGi’s Playhouse celebrated their grand opening. GiGi’s Playhouse is a nationally established series of Down syndrome achievement centers with 29 locations in North America. The playhouse will provide educational and therapeutic programs as well as job training for adults with Down syndrome – all at NO charge to families!


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new aroundtown photographs courtesy of north hills

Café Lucarne

Cariloha Opens in North Hills

Cariloha is a premier, luxury-brand retailer of products made from bamboo, offering apparel and accessory collections for men and women.

Andrew Shepherd and Will Jeffers, two of the partners in Raleigh’s popular Stanbury restaurant, are opening Café Lucarne in the former Benelux spot in City Market. Café Lucarne will be a casual, counter-service restaurant that will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. They hope to open by early summer.

photograph courtesy of north hills

The Art Box

The Art Box at North Hills is a collaboration between North Hills and the NCMA. The collaboration will feature regional and NC art and share information about NCMA exhibitions and program opportunities with the community. The Art Box is open on the ground level of the Bank of America Tower, at the corner of Six Forks and Dartmouth Roads. The inaugural installation will last 12 months and will feature Raleigh artist Nate Sheaffer’s EyeCentennials.

Pieology

Pinetop Distillery

Pinetop Distillery, Raleigh’s first Inside-the-Beltline distillery, opened in late May. The new distillery is the work of four neighbors who bonded over a shared love of whiskey.

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Pieology Pizzeria, a national pizza chain, will be opening in the Main District at North Hills. Located between Monkee’s and Fox & Hound. Pieology is fast and casual without cutting corners on quality. They inspire people to explore their unique tastes with any combination of housemade crusts, signature sauces, unlimited fresh toppings and fresh tossed salads – all ready to eat in less than five minutes.


new aroundtown photograph courtesy of north hills

Crêpe Traditions Comes to North Hills The home of incredible artisan crêpes, coffee & bubble tea is now in North Hills. From savory to sweet and everything in-between. They offer on-site crêpe station caterings. Check them out today!

Grabbagreen to Open in Raleigh

Grabbagreen Food & Juice, a fast casual food and juice restaurant, will open near Sur la Table, in the Lassiter District at North Hills. Specializing in whole foods, Grabbagreen has been offering a healthy menu of whole foods and organic items since 2013. Founded in Arizona, the fast casual concept features preservative-free, naturally gluten-free, and GMO-free selections: grain and green-based bowls, proteins free of hormones and antibiotics, and fresh-pressed juices and handcrafted smoothies.

The Capital Grille

On July 11th, the Capital Grille will open its doors to the public. It is located on the ground level of the new Bank of America Tower in North Hills. The Capital Grille is an elegant steakhouse known for their dry-aged steaks, seafood, freshest ingredients, and awardwinning wines. Each location has an on-site butcher for the 18- to 24-day dry-aging process. The Capital Grille will be open for dinner daily, and serves lunch Monday through Friday.

photograph courtesy of north hills

The Overlook

Designed by renowned artist Thomas Sayre, The Overlook is a sculptural gateway that links North Hills’ Main and Park Districts with a grand stair and multiple levels for gathering. It is located between the CAPTRUST and Bank of America Towers.

Hunt & Gather on the Move

The popular Hunt & Gather Fine Estate Furnishings has relocated to a more high-profile location at Seaboard Station in downtown Raleigh. The store is located off of Peace Street between the campus of William Peace University and Capital Boulevard. midtownmag.com| 161


everydayplaces

How Food Changed Raleigh Watercolor and Text by Frank Harmon, FAIA ABOUT Everyday Places takes a close look at Raleigh’s urban fabric and its under-appreciated areas that are essential to a healthy city.

Not so long ago, Raleigh was a chicken and gravy kind of town, where a good restaurant meal started with a shrimp cocktail and ended with strawberry cheesecake. To get a more eclectic meal you had to go to New York City or Washington, DC. No more. Raleigh’s downtown is now a culinary mix of wine bars, breweries, coffee shops, and funky dinner spots in a city that once featured cafeterias and Jello dessert. Keeping up with new restaurants is now a hobby and Raleigh has become a culinary destination, written about in The New York Times and The Washington Post. And better food is leading to the transformation of downtown. Raleigh’s downtown suffered over the last three

decades of the 20th century. Shopping centers and office parks stole much of its population, and Fayetteville Street was converted into a pedestrian mall. This left a stock of unused low-rent buildings available to a new generation of chefs and restaurateurs who were willing to experiment. Now the mall is gone, people are living downtown, restaurants prosper and, most importantly, the city is alive with people day and night. Which means it’s also a safer city. “This is something everyone knows: A wellused street is apt to be a safe street,” wrote urban critic Jane Jacobs. “A deserted street is apt to be unsafe.” You can still get chicken and gravy downtown, but it’s likely to be prepared with buttermilk and honey with a side of macaroni au gratin. Online: Visit the archive at NativePlaces.org

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DISCOVER The triangle’s top spot for your favorite brands, entertainment and more.

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Midtown Magazine  

July/August 2016

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