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Farm Credit

leader

MEET THE 2019 FARM CREDIT FOUNDATION FOR AGRICULTURAL ADVANCEMENT SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS ON PAGE 12!

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | $3.95

crafts on the farm


in this issue farm and land

4 RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME

Marty and Diane Schoffstall gave their historic farm in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania a new twist in 2010 when they opened Spring Gate Vineyard and Winery with a willingness to look beyond the ordinary.

12 14 15 16

6 BREWING NEW MEMORIES Waredaca Farm in Laytonsville,

Maryland expanded to become the first on-farm brewery in Montgomery County when owners Robert and Gretchen Butts wanted to sustain the farm for the next generation.

our association

8 FOR THE LOVE OF THE FARM

William and Jennifer Layton started Layton’s Chance Winery in Vienna, Maryland on the family farm to support multiple families, and it has turned into a successful event venue and tasting room.

10 A GOLD STAR FOR THE PALATE

Star in the Valley Estate Winery in Strasburg, Virginia was revealed this spring when owners Shane and Cara wanted to offer a unique space for customers to enjoy the stars and land in rural Shenandoah Valley.

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facebook.com/MidAtlanticFarmCredit

ANNUAL MEETING RECAP

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ELECTION RESULTS

@midatfarmcredit mafc.com/blog

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questions or ideas

MidAtlantic Farm Credit, ACA

If you have any questions or ideas for the editorial staff of the Leader, contact Katie Ward at 888.339.3334, email her at kward@mafc.com or write her at MidAtlantic Farm Credit | 45 Aileron Court | Westminster, MD 21157. This publication is for you, our reader. We’d love to hear from you!

Thomas H. Truitt, Jr., CEO

The Leader is published quarterly for stockholders, friends and business associates. If you wish to no longer receive this publication, please email: unsubscribe@mafc.com. Use “Unsubscribe Leader” in the subject.

Jennifer L. Rhodes Chairman

The Farm Credit Administration does not require the association to distribute its quarterly financial reports to shareholders. However, copies of its complete report are available upon request or see quarterly updates online at mafc.com. The shareholders’ investment in the association is materially affected by the financial condition and results of operations of AgFirst Farm Credit Bank and copies of its quarterly financial report are available upon request by writing: Susanne Caughman AgFirst Farm Credit Bank | P.O. Box 1499 | Columbia, SC 29202-1499 Address changes, questions or requests for the association’s quarterly financial report should be directed to: MidAtlantic Farm Credit, ACA by calling 800.333.7950 or writing: MidAtlantic Farm Credit | 45 Aileron Court | Westminster, MD 21157

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MidAtlantic Farm Credit Board of Directors

Brian L. Boyd Vice Chairman Paul D. Baumgardner Gary L. Grossnickle John Travis Hastings Laura M. Heilinger Walter C. Hopkins Anthony M. Ill T. Jeffery Jennings Fred R. Moore Michael S. Nelson Alan N. Siegfried Douglas D. Scott David R. Smith Joseph D. Snapp Fred N. West Charles M. Wright IV


president’s message

president’s message

Liquid agriculture

events | deadlines JUN

EVENT

11-13 Family Farm Days

PLACE

Lititz, PA

17 Pennsylvania Friends of Agriculture Foundation Golf Outing Hershey, PA 17 VA Agribusiness Council Annual Golf Tournament

20 A Toast to Dairy

Chesterfield, VA Elizabethtown, PA

27 Penn State Extension Farming for Success Field Day

Manheim, PA

Lancaster, PA

29 Lancaster Farm Show JUL EVENT

PLACE

4 Independence Day

Offices Closed

13-20 Washington County Ag Expo and Fair

Sharpsburg, MD

17 Tawes Crab and Clam Bake 20-27 Lebanon Area Fair

Crisfield, MD Lebanon, PA

24 MAFC Day at Delaware State Fair Harrington, DE

27-8/2 Carroll County 4-H and FFA Fair Westminster, MD AUG EVENT

PLACE

1 VA Poultry Federation Friends of Feather Golf Tournament Harrisonburg, VA

1-3 Great Pocomoke Fair

Pocomoke, MD

11-17 Clarke County Fair

Berryville, VA

12-17 Queen Anne’s County Fair

Centreville, MD

13-15 Ag Progress Days

PA Furnace, PA

16-18 Wicomico County Fair

19-24 Elizabethtown Fair

Salisbury, MD

Not too long ago, agriculture was only thought of as being corn, wheat, and livestock. Today’s agriculture industry is more diverse than ever, as aquaculture, plant proteins, and hydroponics are becoming more prevalent in the arena. Farmers today are more becoming more techsavvy, and are constantly on the lookout for what the next “big thing” will be for their consumers. Around the time when those consumers became interested in learning more about where their food came from, the local food movement boomed, with smaller farmers creating items like artisanal cheeses and homemade soaps to sell at their community farmers markets. Another industry also recognized this opportunity, and jumped right on it—craft beverages. Today, there are over 7,000 breweries and over 8,000 wineries in the United States, all brewing their own flavor, and providing more than just beverages to those who are looking for an authentic taste—they’re serving up some pretty unique experiences right alongside them. Spring Gate Vineyard, located just outside of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, is a perfect example. Not only do they create unique wines (one even has glitter in it), they also host a variety of events throughout the year, attracting thousands to their location. Located in Montgomery County, Maryland, that land that is home to Waredaca Brewery is rich in history, dating back to 1932. Over time, the family transitioned it into an equestrian event center, which is continues to be a hot spot amongst area horse lovers. The addition of the brewery has attracted more interested from those looking to enjoy a craft beer and the peaceful view. William and Jennifer Layton of Vienna, Maryland started Layton’s Chance Vineyard and Winery in 2005. Neither coming from a winery background, William took several grape growing and winemaking classes and today, the couple is one of the most popular wineries on the Eastern Shore. Lastly, we feature a brand new winery—Star in the Valley, located in Strasburg, Virginia. Shane Waller and Cara Mroczek purchased the land in 2013, after discovering their shared dream to open a winery. Both certified sommeliers, Shane and Cara are excited to bring their love of wine to their local community, and look forward to growing their business. As agriculture continues to evolve, a new wave of jobs that many of us never saw coming is forming to support those within our industry. The Farm Credit Foundation for Agricultural Advancement’s scholarship program honors those students who are pursuing a career in ag. This year, the Foundation awarded a total of $180,000 in scholarships to 18 local students— check out pages 12 and 13 to meet the honorees. I’ve been involved in agriculture my whole life, and it never ceases to amaze me how “crafty” farmers can be. The customers in this issue all have diverse backgrounds, but share a love of making things from scratch and putting it out there for others to enjoy (or not). I think that boldness is something every farmer has in common. Cheers!

Elizabethtown, PA

8/22-9/2 Maryland State Fair

Timonium, MD

8/26-31 Shenandoah County Fair

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farm and land

RIGHT PLACE

right time

STORY AND PHOTOS BY SALLY SCHOLLE | LIKE MANY PENNSYLVANIA FARMS, SPRING GATE VINEYARD AND WINERY

HAS A COLORFUL HISTORY. THE 60 ACRE PROPERTY OUTSIDE OF HARRISBURG TRACES ITS ROOTS TO THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR, AND HAS ALWAYS BEEN A WORKING FARM. WHEN OWNER MARTY SCHOFFSTALL

TE ROO

D I N H I S TO R

Y:

PURCHASED THE FARM IN 1995, HE STARTED MAKING PLANS TO GIVE IT A NEW TWIST.

brewing new memories

Marty started Spring Gate Vineyard

Since opening the tasting room

wine and could start selling wholesale early.

in 2010 with his wife Diane, Rebecca

in March 2014, Spring Gate Winery has

We were at the right place at the right time,

Kline, and other business partners.

enjoyed continual growth. Rebecca says

with the right product and the right model.”

Although Diane is now the Director

weekly tasting meetings with leadership

Rebecca says part of that model is

of Operations at the winery, she was

and consultants are a critical aspect of

willingness to look beyond the ordinary.

willing to get her hands dirty as the

keeping the team on task and up to date.

“We aren’t afraid to admit mistakes, trash

vineyard took shape.

The team plans months in advance to

the idea and move on,” she says. “It’s all

ensure sound purchasing decisions and

about taking chances. We learn from our

collaborates on events and new releases.

mistakes, but we don’t dwell on them.”

“There were six of us digging holes and planting vines,” says Rebecca, describing the initial planting. “The first year we planted about five rows, and

FOR THE LOVE In addition to offering a wide selection

of the farm

Making good products isn’t the only

of beverages on site, Spring Gate Winery

reason Spring Gate continues to grow.

products are available in numerous retail

An important focus of of the business is

have 15 acres. Everyone also pruned and

establishments. “With changes in the law,

hospitality, which means attracting people

harvested the first crop—we’ve been

our wholesale business has taken off,” says

who have the hospitality spirit. “We are an

Rebecca. “We were positioned with enough

organization about people,” says Rebecca.

have been planting ever since. Now we

hands-on from the beginning.”

A CAREFULLY RESTORED FARMSTEAD CREATES THE IDEAL SETTING FOR SPRING GATE VINEYARD AND WINERY, WHERE THE COMPLETE LINE OF HANDCRAFTED BEVERAGES, INCLUDING WINES, BEERS, AND TEAS, DRAWS BOTH LOYAL AND FIRST-TIME VISITORS. WITH A COMMUNITY-CENTERED FOCUS, BOTH OWNERS AND STAFF ARE DEDICATED TO ENSURING A POSITIVE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE THROUGH HOSPITALITY AND ATTENTION TO DETAIL. THE VENUE IS A POPULAR ATTRACTION FOR THEMED EVENTS, PRIVATE PARTIES, AND WEDDINGS. SPRING GATE STAFF REMAINS COMMITTED TO MAINTAINING THE BEST POSSIBLE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE FOR EACH GUEST. VISIT SPRINGGATEVINEYARD.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

A G O L D S TA R

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“We try to bring in people who have that hospitality spirit and the desire to be here, then train them in the tasks.”

crafty spiked spring water.” Another draw for Spring Gate is a

a partnership. For us, it’s about the people.” After having been in the craft beverage

busy schedule of special events, with

industry and visiting others in the industry,

everything from a country music festival

Rebecca is optimistic about continued

selection of beverages to suit a variety of

and a raspberry festival to a summer

growth. “I think it’s a nationwide theme,” she

tastes. “We have a wide range of products,”

solstice celebration. Marty has a strong

says. “Everywhere you look, there’s a new

says Rebecca. “There’s something for

commitment to the community, and

craft brewery. Wine is a little different – it

everyone, and having beer helps. We’re

invites local food trucks and musicians to

takes capital investment and time to grow

wine-forward, but we started the brewery

the farm for events.

grapes. We want to step outside the box and

Another factor for success is a

because women usually make the decision

Rebecca believes that one of the

do things differently.” Rebecca added that

to go out. They’re already coming with

most important reasons for success is

one unique product they tried was glitter

coworkers and friends, and they’ll bring

Spring Gate’s commitment to sponsoring

wine, a pink moscato with glitter in it. The

their husband or boyfriend if we have beer.”

non-profit organizations, and says Marty

wine sold out in less than two hours and

is adamant about giving back to the

there’s a waiting list for the next release.

Spring Gate’s product line doesn’t stop with traditional wine. “People in

community. “He wants to contribute to

As for their relationship with Farm

central Pennsylvania tend to want sweeter

organizations that have meaning,” says

Credit, Rebecca says, “we approached them

wine, but they like to try new things,” says

Rebecca. “It’s a company-wide philosophy,

when we got into the vineyard and farming

Rebecca. “We have mello wine, a fruit wine

and employees can suggest organizations

aspect and they’ve been wonderful to

in cans, sangria, and we just came out with

to support. It isn’t just writing a check – it’s

work with. This is a farming business.”

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brewing new memories

STORY AND PHOTOS BY ANDREA HAINES | SOME TIME AGO, IN 1932, A BOYS’ CAMP IN MARYLAND BROUGHT FAMILIES

TOGETHER ON A RURAL MONTGOMERY COUNTY FARM. YEARS LATER, THAT SAME FARM WOULD TURN INTO A PLACE WHERE FAMILIES AND FRIENDS COULD GATHER TO SHARE A BEVERAGE AND GAZE AT THE MAGNIFICENCE OF THE EQUINE SPLENDOR ACROSS ITS FIELDS.

Waredaca, deriving its name from the Washington Recreational Day Camp (WA-RE-DA-CA), has been a historic part of the Montgomery County community, established by R. Beecher Butts in Laytonsville, Maryland. The farm slowly transitioned into one of the area’s best equestrian barns and riding facilities. The descendants of Beecher’s family have continued this tradition by inviting youth, horses, and their community onto their property by combining the farm and the brewery, creating The Waredaca Brewing Company. Robert and Gretchen Butts, the farm’s owners, oversee the equestrian programs and property management. Robert and Gretchen were recognized by the Maryland Farm Stewardship Certification and Assessment Program (FSCAP) as being one of 91 stewards in the state, and one of 20 horse facilities to earn this distinction. “The property is made up of 230 acres and is home to 80 horses,” explains Gretchen. “We are a nationally-sanctioned equine facility offering eventing competitions from less experienced amateur horse and riders to professionals riding their younger Olympic hopefuls.” Along with lessons and competitions, the farm also offers boarding, training, a pony club riding center, and a summer riding camp experience. “Our daughter, Steph Butts Kohr, is our head trainer and can usually be seen riding a horse,” shares Gretchen. “She is part of the next generation who is transitioning to lead the business of Waredaca.” Steph is married to Keith Kohr,

Waredaca’s chief brewer. Jessica Snyder, is also involved in the brewery as the brewery manager. Jessica’s husband, Brett, and Rob Lang, who has been part of the farm management at Waredaca for thirty years, round out the Waredaca Brewing Company LLC Group. The farm and brewery management teams began integrating some of the equine events and brewery appeal to attract more business. “We offer a few select activities to incorporate both sides of the Waredaca business,” Gretchen explains. “We have the equine-related competitions that allow visitors to watch from the tasting room or one of many picnic tables on our patio. We also offer ‘True Brew Trailrides’, it’s a unique experience that combines an escorted trail ride on the farm followed up with a flight of beers from the brewery.” Of course, with all great ideas, there must be a plan set in place to ensure the proper tools for success. Cue Elizabeth Benitez, Farm Credit loan officer, a helpful representative with a job to ensure the next generation sets a plan in place for their future needs. “I was approached by the family four years ago,” shares Elizabeth. “They were looking to work on some improvements for the farm.” The next generation was also taxed with making the land sustainable if they were to remain open to the public. “Farm Credit was very sensitive about our needs,” shares Jessica. “Elizabeth worked with us to achieve our plan to incorporate a brewery. Becoming the first farm brewery in Montgomery County was a process of fully analyzing our needs in the beginning.”

FOR THE LOVE

of the farm A G O L D S TA R

Jessica shares that they had to do a lot of research before building. Keith, a math teacher turned brewer, worked at a nearby brewery and had many good ideas to start production. The goal for Waredaca is to source from other local agricultural resources to incorporate in their brew, while incorporating as many products from their own land. “We source our malted barley from Chesapeake Company,” Keith says. “The grain used is Maryland grown, too.” The farm also produces a small hops crop of 100 cascading plants, mostly to use as an educational tool for visitors. “We typically incorporate a few different flavors into our brewing with the use of herbs, pumpkin, jalapeno, lemon verbena, and honey, to name a few,” explains Keith. As Keith became more experienced with brewing, Jessica dialed in on the marketing end of the business. “There is a ton of cross-marketing potential between the horses and the brewery,” shares Jessica. “They really go hand-in-hand as the visitors want to know about the farm and get to experience the environment.” Elizabeth felt good about the strong link to the farm and now, brewery is to the community. “They are less than 19 miles away from Capitol Hill,” explains Elizabeth. “There are so many ways they can advocate for agriculture while growing their business. Their story is quite unique.” For the family of Waredaca Farm and Brewery, the venue is a place of cherished memories. It is their hope that many visitors will come to share the friendly atmosphere over a handcrafted drink. l

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scholarship winners

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WAREDACA BREWERY HAS 13 BEERS ON TAP THAT ROTATE ON A REGULAR BASIS. SINCE THEIR HANDCRAFTED BEVERAGES ARE A POPULAR ATTRACTION AT EQUINE COMPETITIONS AND OUTDOOR EVENTS, THEY HAVE TWO NOTABLE BEVERAGE VEHICLES: A HORSE TRAILER THAT’S BEEN CONVERTED INTO A PORTABLE BAR, AND A VINTAGE TRUCK NAMED THE “MARYLAND BEER TRUCK”. THE WAREDACA BRAND CAN ALSO BE FOUND AT CRAFT BEER FESTIVALS AROUND THE STATE OF MARYLAND. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WAREDACA BREWERY, VISIT THEIR WEBSITE AT WAREDACABREWING.COM AND FOR THE FARM AT WAREDACA.COM.

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farm and land

FOR THE LOVE

of the farm WILLIAM AND JENNIFER LAYTON CHAT WITH FARM CREDIT LOAN OFFICER JIM NEWCOMB IN THE TASTING ROOM

A G O L D S TA R

OF THEIR WINERY. ALTHOUGH JOE’S

for the palate

COOL RED IS THEIR BEST SELLER, WHEN CUSTOMERS ASK WHAT THEIR BEST

WINE IS, JENNIFER REPLIES WITH, “IT’S THE ONE YOU LIKE TO DRINK!” THE

LAYTONS GROW 14 ACRES OF GRAPES ON A TOTAL OF 1,350 OWNED AND LEASED ACRES. THE VINEYARD HAS

BEEN A HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE FROM THE BEGINNING. “I WAS A BELIEVER

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THAT THE GRAPES WERE GOING TO

GET A BETTER START IF I DUG A HOLE AND PUT THEM IN HERE MYSELF,” SAYS WILLIAM. LEARN MORE AT LAYTONSCHANCE.COM.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY NANCY L. SMITH | “WE STARTED THIS FOR THE LOVE OF THE FARM, NOT BECAUSE WE JUST

LOVE WINE,” SAYS JENNIFER LAYTON OF LAYTON’S CHANCE VINEYARD AND WINERY THAT SHE AND HUSBAND WILLIAM OPERATE IN VIENNA, MARYLAND. THE BUSINESS IS A SUCCESS, BUT YEARS OF THOUGHT AND PREPARATION OCCURRED BEFORE THE FIRST POST HOLE WAS DUG.

The Layton family has farmed the land since the 1920s, starting as share croppers. William’s grandfather bought the property in the late 1940s. When William returned to the farm in 2003, he, Jennifer and his parents needed to find a way for the farm to support two families. They weighed diversification options against a set of criteria including “which of these will put us in the best position 20 years from now?” William says. Jennifer, who was completing an MBA at the time, wrote two business plans: one for the vineyard alone because “what if we get two years in and 8

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we don’t want to open a winery?” William explains, and another for the winery. In 2005, they decided on a vineyard and “we took two years to convert the ground from growing grain to growing grapes to get the soil correct,” Jennifer says. By 2009, they were harvesting grapes and making wine. It cost $12,000 to $13,000 per acre to plant grapes on the first two acres in 2007, including tile drainage, irrigation, vines and posts. Farm Credit handles the financing for the vineyard as well as the farm. Farm Credit handles the financing for the vineyard and farm, as well as writes the crop insurance for the

vineyard. Loan officer Jim Newcomb reflects, “Adding the vineyard and grape rotations to the farm wasn’t a big issue for Farm Credit because of the credit history and management structure of this family. Starting the winery took a great deal of planning and talking through every detail.” William learned wine making from several sources. “The University of Maryland has a grape researcher and I took his beginning grape grower class three times before I ever planted my first grape.” He also studied grape growing and wine making at Virginia Tech and Penn State.


He completed the wine making program of the University of California at Davis, the premier wine education center of the country. “It is really intensive, and it really taught me so much about wine making—the technical and scientific aspects of it,” he says. The Maryland state viticulturist advised on best site selection, tile installation and varieties to plant. “We pretty much did everything he said to ensure our success because we literally bet the farm on this,” notes Jennifer. Other winemakers shared their knowledge. Jennifer explains, “The way to sell more Maryland wine is to make more good Maryland wine no matter who makes it, so it’s in everyone’s interest to raise the quality.” Last year, Layton’s Chance bottled 14,000 gallons of wine and employed 20

people, including five full time, among the farm, vineyard and winery. The business plan envisioned on-site events. “Weekend days are booked with private events about 80 percent of the time,” says Jennifer. “We still have a lot of capacity for nighttime and weekdays.” She adds, “Word of mouth is really our biggest advertiser, so creating an experience at a destination is really important for us. That is what gives somebody a reason to talk about us on social media.” The Laytons also do about 20 off-site wine festival events annually, but Jennifer says, “We would rather do more events closer to us and we’re looking at ones that aren’t even wine related because sometimes it’s better to be at a music festival as the wine vendor than to go where you’re giving free tastings and

you’re one of 20 wineries.” William agrees, “We are very much an agritourism business. We are a destination. I make a bottle of wine that people want to come here and enjoy.” Jennifer concludes, “The goal would be to sell more here. If we were at capacity, we could quit doing other [offsite] things and bring more here and increase our profitability.” The winery’s name was suggested by William’s aunt Sylvia Bradley, a retired Salisbury University history professor. He explains, “Layton’s Chance was a piece of property that my ancestor owned in Dorchester County in 1709. “We liked it because it had that connection to our family history but also it made sense because it was a big chance that we were taking here.” l VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com | 9


farm and land

A G O L D S TA R

for the palate

STORY AND PHOTOS BY ANDREA HAINES | A SHOOTING-STAR SIGHTING IS A RARITY FOR MOST PEOPLE; A LONGING

GAZE UP AT THE DARK SKY SOMETIMES PROVOKES THAT GLEAM OF LIGHT RACING ACROSS THE ATMOSPHERE. FORTUNATE ONLOOKERS OFTEN CAST A WISH TO THE HEAVENS, A DREAM TO COME TRUE FOR THE FUTURE. FOR DREAMERS, LIKE SHANE WALLER AND CARA MROCZEK, REALITY INVOLVES THE STARS AND A PLOT OF

CING OUR 2 U D O Shane and Cara have been working T R location. Combined with Shane’s family0 1 personally meet with us and be a ‘face’ 9 N I on this dream for years, preparing their history in business knowledge, also from instead of a voice over the phone.” LAND IN THE RURAL SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF STRASBURG, VIRGINIA.

scholarship winners

farm’s vineyard for the opportunity to share the peaceful setting and wide-open sky with visitors yearning to appreciate a handcrafted tasting experience. Unveiling the fruits of their labors, Star in the Valley Estate Winery was revealed in April 2019. “We would love for our visitors to come to appreciate the natural setting of our location,” expresses Cara. “The view is beautiful in the daytime because of the mountains, but the night invites star gazing. We don’t have any light pollution around for miles.” Star in the Valley’s approach is to offer customers wines with grapes sourced from the farm, on-site. “The Shenandoah Valley is prime soil for vines,” shared Shane. “The soil drains well because of the rocky terrain. The slope of the mountain and winds allow for less chemical application. The vines are more stressed, allowing the energy of the plant to focus on the fruit to grow into maturity.” The couple purchased the land in 2013 after sharing interest in developing a vineyard together. “We drove around Virginia for what seemed like two to three years,” chuckles Cara. “We wanted to make sure we found the ideal location for the vines.” Stemming from a farm family in western Michigan, Cara knows the importance of finding a productive 10

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Michigan, the pair agreed on a plot of 70 acres. Both lawyers for the Department of Justice in the Environment division, Shane and Cara realized the need for a plan of action. That’s when they reached out to Farm Credit loan officer Ryan Clouse. The 70 acres of today’s farm would not have been possible without a helping hand. Ryan shares, “The idea was pretty appealing from the beginning. Shane and Cara were very thorough in their approach at the development of paperwork, a business plan, and knowledge of their product.” The couple started with the farm first; for the types of wine planned in production, they customized varietals and root stocks in April 2014. “We sourced several clones of four varieties, from nurseries in New York and California,” shares Shane. “Farm Credit has been helpful in supporting the connection for us between consultants. One source that has helped us greatly is Virginia Tech’s Tony Wolf for his education in viticulture.” They also came to realize that by choosing to work with Farm Credit, Ryan was able to quickly understand their motivation by following closely along with the process. “They really do try to foster a personal connection,” says Shane. “They have some ‘skin in the game,’ too. It was nice to have him

Once the vineyard was established and wine production began, the couples’ planning efforts came to fruition. “Wineries definitely have a market in this area,” explains Ryan. “They are knowledgeable about wine in general. Their winery is an appealing approach for any type of visitor wanting to learn more about the terroir or just looking to enjoy the country view.” Shane and Cara are both certified sommeliers (wine stewards) able to expertly serve fine wines to patrons. A French origin of art, a sommelier identifies qualities of wine by taste. “Our wines are European style,” explains Shane. “The tones are more natural, mineral/dry options. Usually, this style doesn’t have the strong fruit notes.” The winery currently offers four grape varietals, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Chardonel, and Vidal Blanc. The style of wine mimics the tone of the vineyard. “We want visitors to consider the source­—the farm,” explains Cara. “It’s our ‘expression’ in a bottle.” A very natural, earthy setting, the farm is inviting without too many frills. It’s a place where visitors can bring a lunch and enjoy the scenery with a glass of wine. Each sip is meant to be a connection of what visitors can see, smell, and feel overlooking the vineyard. l


SHARING THE KNOWLEDGE LEARNED FROM TRAVELING AND WORKING WITH FELLOW WINE CONNOISSEURS, SHANE AND CARA PLAN TO INVITE THEIR TWO SMALL CHILDREN INTO THE FAMILY BUSINESS ONE DAY. WINEMAKING TRULY IS A LABOR OF LOVE FOR THE LAND. THE COUPLE HAS TRAVELED GREAT LENGTHS TO LEARN HOW TO CARE FOR THEIR VINES, SHAPING AND INSPECTING THE CROP JUST LIKE THEIR EUROPEAN FRIENDS. A LARGE MURAL ADORNS THE WALL OF THE BAR DECORATED WITH THE NIGHT’S STARS, REMINDING VISITORS THEY ARE PART OF A LARGER CONNECTION WHILE TASTING THE PRODUCT OF THEIR LABORS. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT STAR IN THE VALLEY ESTATE WINERY, VISIT THEM AT STARINTHEVALLEY.COM.

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scholarship winners

The Farm Credit Foundation for Agricultural Advancement has announced the winners of their 2019 scholarship program. It was once again a challenge to narrow it down - over 100 applications were received from talented students located across our five state territory. Below are the eighteen students who were selected to win $10,000 to help them pursue their careers in agriculture.

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Laura Antizzo of Ijamsville, Maryland is a senior at Urbana High School and plans to attend Colorado State University in the fall.

Kaitlin Bell of Nottingham, Pennsylvania is a senior at Oxford Area High School and plans to attend Kansas State University in the fall.

Ryan Bollinger of Frederick, Maryland is a senior at Frederick High School and plans to attend West Virginia University in the fall.

Cahlen Cheatham of Myersville, Maryland is a sophomore at Tarleton State University and is the president of the University’s Collegiate FFA Chapter.

Nyah DeValle of Damascus, Maryland is a senior at Damascus High School and plans to attend Georgetown University in the fall.

Emily Griswold of West Chester, Pennsylvania is attending the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and is president of the University’s Food Animal Club.

Amanda Grube of Manheim, Pennsylvania is a sophomore at Penn State University and a researcher in the Department of Plant Pathology.

Giulianna Kukor of Frederick, Maryland is a freshman at Cornell University, studying animal science.

Karalyn Lonngren of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is attending the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and is the president of the Christian Veterinary Fellowship.

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Congratulations to each of the winners, and we wish you luck as you embark on your career paths! The 2020 scholarship application will be available online on September 27, 2019 at FCFoundationForAg.org. Be sure to follow the #OtherSideofAg on social media for updates!

Lesa Ramsburg of Finksburg, Maryland is a senior at Westminster High School and plans to attend North Carolina State University in the fall.

Olivia Richart of North East, Maryland is a junior at Penn State University and is the president of the University’s International Agriculture Club and the Agricultural Student Council.

Jamie Stephan of New Holland, Pennsylvania is a senior at Pequea Valley High School and plans to attend Green Mountain College in the fall.

Arilyn TegtmeierOatman of Holtwood, Pennsylvania is a senior at Penn Manor High School and plans to attend Penn State University in the fall.

Lynne Thomas of Fallston, Maryland is a senior at North Harford High School and plans to attend West Virginia University in the fall.

Andrew Toms of Walkersville, Maryland is attending the University of Baltimore School of Law and is an Agricultural member of the Frederick County Business and Industry Cabinet.

Nathaniel Vincent of Laurel, Delaware is a junior at Harvard University and is the president of the Harvard College of Agriculture Club.

Leslie Webb of Greenwood, Delaware is a senior at Lake Forest High School and plans to attend the University of Delaware in the fall.

Justin Petrie of Stephens City, Virginia is a freshman at Virginia Tech, studying agriculture education.

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com | 13


our association

2019 ANNUAL MEETING RECAP | CHARTING THE COURSE THIS YEAR’S ANNUAL

thurmont, maryland

STOCKHOLDER MEETINGS WERE HELD APRIL 2-4 IN THURMONT, MARYLAND; NEW HOLLAND, PENNSYLVANIA; AND DOVER, DELAWARE. WE ANNOUNCED THE WINNERS OF THE FARM CREDIT FOUNDATION FOR AGRICULTURAL ADVANCEMENT’S SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

new holland, pennsylvania

(SEE PAGES 12 AND 13) AND RAFFLED OFF SOME AWESOME NEW PRIZES.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO CAME OUT TO ONE OF OUR MEETINGS THIS YEAR; THEY WERE A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS, AND IT WAS WONDERFUL TO SPEND TIME WITH OUR CUSTOMERS AND SUPPORTERS!

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| VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com

dover, delaware


MidAtlantic Farm Credit 2019 election results BOARD OF DIRECTORS (4 year terms of office) Central Maryland Election Region: Gary L. Grossnickle Chesapeake Election Region: No director positions open Delaware Election Region: John Travis Hastings Keystone Election Region: David R. Smith Marva Election Region: Charles M. Wright IV Valley Election Region: T. Jeffrey Jennings 2020 NOMINATING COMMITTEE (1 year terms of office) Central Maryland Election Region: Samuel K. Roop (Dwight D. Dotterer - 1st alternate) John “Trevor” W. Hoff (Jay D. Dubree - 2nd alternate) Edward Robinson Susan Andrews James H. Baxter IV Timothy J. Rogers

Chesapeake Election Region: (Marshall C. Cahall - 1st alternate) (Wendall Meekins, Jr. - 2nd alternate) Delaware Election Region: (Michael M. Clay - 1st alternate) (Eric W. Carlson - 2nd alternate

Keystone Election Region: Curtis L. Zimmerman (Christian R. Landis - 1st alternate) Nelson R. Beam (Stephen J. Martin - 2nd alternate) Charles M. Wright V Alan H. Hudson

Marva Election Region: (Susan B. Driscoll - 1st alternate) (Dustin A. Calloway - 2nd alternate

John R. Ruffner Philip B. Glaize III

Valley Election Region: (Caroline Dixie Boyd Scheulen - 1st alternate) (Joshua M. Stephens - 2nd alternate)

Weren’t able to make it this year? We’ve got you covered! Visit mafc.com/annual-meetings for this year’s presentations.

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com | 15


community Harrington, Delaware

Chestertown, Maryland

Come see 18.3 acres of woodlands with approved site evaluation for a sand mound. The property holds abundant wildlife and has a one and a half acre food plot in the back left of the property. Property line is to the middle of the tax ditch allowing for easy access around the perimeter of the property. $125,000.

Once in a lifetime waterfront farm available for the first time in over 50 years. Sitting on 164 acres with 96 tilled and 43 wooded, the property features a 9,600 sq.ft., seven bedroom main home within feet of the Chester River and a four bedroom farm home and barn. A 420’ dock has 8’ MLW, water and electric, with a railway. 3,000’ of river frontage and three ponds. $3,499,000.

Contact Wes Cromer, Masten Realty, 302-448-1032.

Contact Liddy Campbell, Cross Street Realtors, 410-708-5433.

This property boasts 31 acres of land with a brick rancher and a mobile home. Featuring three two foot wells, two workshops, a generator, 27’ x 100’ greenhouse, three old poultry houses not in use (two clearspan, one pole). Priced to sell, sold as-is. $289,000. Contact Jeff Ashley or Min Park Pi, ERA Martin Associates, 443-944-6887.

Emmitsburg, Maryland

Middletown, Maryland

Take a look at this renovated farmhouse with vista views! Features three bedrooms, two and a half baths, a large family room with fireplace plumbed for gas logs, kitchen, separate dining, office and sunroom/laundry on the main level. Also includes a barn with stalls, large shed with garage door and upper level storage, stage, and covered entertaining area. All set on over four acres. $329,900.

Are you looking for a rural setting just outside of historic Middletown? Look no further! This property sits on 69 acres and conveys with a four bedroom main house, a guest cottage and one more building site. Including an equestrian facility with a center aisle barn, riding ring, oversized equipment and hay storage building, nine paddocks with water and electric, a stream, and a hay field. $798,000.

This is a must see for anyone looking to start or expand in poultry. Four chicken houses and a three bedroom, two bathroom home on 10 acres of land. Two active poultry contracts convey with the sale. Live in the home or have your groundskeeper stay onsite. Garage, carport, and manure shed on property. $1,350,000.

Contact Cindy Grimes, J&B Real Estate, 301-788-5354.

Contact Laura-Lee Jones, Long & Foster Real Estate, 410-480-3338.

Contact Bob Faith, Dockside Properties, 757-894-1479.

Rock Hall, Maryland

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Eden, Maryland

Rock Hall, Maryland

Premier farm on a total of 371 acres with 171 acres wooded and 200 acres tillable. Includes five impoundments with water controlled structures, 2-5hp wells that feed the impoundments, 100V and 220V electric, and an 8’x10’ well house located on the property. $2,800,000.

This stunning property on more than four acres features a waterfront cottage perfectly situated to enjoy the Chesapeake Bay lifestyle and breathtaking sunsets. The property also features a beautiful in-ground saltwater pool, extensive hardscaping and landscaping, an outdoor shower, waterfront stone fire pit, rip-rap shoreline, and dock. $939,000.

Contact Steve Goss, Cross Street Realtors, 410-253-8891.

Contact Sarah Dean, Cross Street Realtors, 410-708-2528.

| VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com

Pocomoke City, Maryland

Need financing for any of these properties?*

Call Farm Credit at 888.339.3334.

* Financing availability subject to loan approval and property eligibility.


Worton, Maryland

Bangor, Pennsylvania

Check out this 133+ acre farm in Frederick County, land in Preservation. Consisting of a large farm house with a main level bedroom and full bath. With numerous outbuildings, the property borders Beaver Dam Creek. Beautiful scenic views perfect for a beef or horse farm. A must see! $1,100,000.

Beautiful horse property on 22.6 acres with 15 acres of gently rolling fenced pasture, 12 custom stalls with office, wash stall and tack room. Featuring two apartments on the second floor, a 200’ x 80’ Morton indoor arena, Morton hay barn, Morton Shop, manure storage building, sand paddock, and seven run-in sheds. $625,000.

Perched on a hilltop, this architecturally stunning home captures views of its three large pastures and the surrounding countryside. With exacting attention to detail and a luxurious, tasteful design, this home has been wisely planned for comfortable living and entertaining. $700,000.

Contact Danielle Hamilton, RE/MAX Achievers, 240-367-0278.

Contact Joe Hickman, Cross Street Realtors, 410-708-0536.

Contact Cindy Stys, Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd., 610-849-1790.

Elverson, Pennsylvania

Halifax, Pennsylvania

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Don’t miss this famous horse farm on 24 acres in Elverson. Featuring a 22 stall horse barn with an indoor riding hall, multiple pastures and a fully fenced outside riding ring. The estate home is a traditional two story home with four bedrooms, 2.5 baths and a main level family room with a fireplace. $1,450,000.

Welcome to this quaint mini-farm. Bring your horses and love for the country. You will feel at home with the beautiful barn, stables, and two story garage. This really is a dream come true on over five acres but still very close to Harrisburg or the growing Selinsgrove areas of Central Pennsylvania. $335,000.

Come see this beautiful 141 acre farm in Lynn Township. A large circa 1840s four bedroom, brick, center hall farmhouse and a 40’ x 75’ bank barn. Private setting, mostly tillable with excellent large fields. Extensive frontage on three roads, two streams, wooded areas, picturesque pond, and exceptional panoramic views. $1,550,000.

Contact Randy Weeber, RE/MAX of Reading, 610-858-4134.

Contact Cynthia Armour-Helm, Better Homes & Garden Real Estate Capital Area, 717-920-3948.

Contact Gary Coles, New Pennsylvania Realty, 610-398-2559.

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

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This gorgeous farm is situated in the rolling hills of Heidelberg Township. This spectacular 41 acre preserved property features a 19th century, two story farmhouse with four bedrooms. Buildings include a smoke house, large bank barn, and a Kistler pole building. 34 acres of large, flat tillable fields. $495,000. OPPORTUNITY OPPORTUNITY EQUAL HOUSING

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Contact Jonathan Coles, 610-398-2559.

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Lenharstville, Pennsylvania

Take a look at this pretty 350 acre farm in Lynn and Albany Townships. Featuring a large center hall stone farmhouse, a five bedroom frame farmhouse, and two bank barns. Includes rolling fertile farmland, beautiful views, lush pastures, woodland, ever-flowing trout stream, and a two acre pond. $3,500,000.

Beautiful custom built contemporary home on six acres. Features cathedral/vaulted ceilings with lots of natural daylight, a huge kitchen with tile flooring flows through to the dining area with an open floor plan throughout. Balcony with a walkout deck for your private backyard view of the wildlife. $272,500.

Contact Perry Long, New Pennsylvania Realty, 610-398-2559.

Contact Wasyl M. Onulack Jr., 21 Keim Realtors, 610-823-7850.

Properties for sale

Union Bridge, Maryland

VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com | 17 REALTOR

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community Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania

An exceptional 124 acre dairy farm in Southern Schuylkill County. Featuring a large four bedroom farmhouse, 40’ x 80’ dairy barn, milk house, 205’ x 28’ heifer barn, 40x80 dry cow barn, 25’ x 50’ machine storage building, 80 acres tillable, 15 acres fenced pasture, two streams, small wooded areas, and beautiful panoramic views. $950,000. Contact Deborah Coles, New Pennsylvania Realty, 570-386-5000.

Edinburg, Virginia

Upper Mount Bethel Twp, Pennsylvania

Beautiful 212 acre working farm and retreat just 75 minutes from NYC with spectacular views of Delaware Water Gap. Featuring a three bedroom hilltop ranch house, a 4,000 sq. ft. two-unit farmhouse, and multiple outbuildings. Rolling agricultural lands, woods and two ponds. $1,750,000. Contact Barbara Winn, 484-547-3098.

New Church, Virginia

Modern day meets traditional in this restored farm house w/soaring windows & spectucular views of the pastures and George Washington National forest! 42+ acres fenced & crossed fenced! Ready for horses/livestock! Four stall horse barn w/wash bay! pole barn, hay/feed barn! Fish pond & much more! $639,900.

Don’t miss this large 53.5 acre lot suitable for farming, sub-dividing, or for potential commercial use. Located strategically less than one mile south of the Virginia/Maryland line. Seller open to fair offers. This piece of land won’t last long. $3,750,000.

Contact Tana Hoffman, Sager Real Estate, 540-671-1994.

Contact Jennifer Faith, Dockside Properties, 757-894-1480.

Parksley, Virginia

Cape Charles, Virginia

A stunning 100 acre farm on Virginia’s Eastern Shore with center pivot irrigation, an irrigation pond and 110’ x 58’ shed. Featuring a five bedroom, two bath, 2,900 square foot two-story farmhouse with split heat pump air conditioning, hot water baseboard heat, two interior staircases, rear screened porch and open front porch. $495,000. Contact Ralph Dodd, Ralph W. Dodd & Associates, 757-678-5377.

Maurertown, Virginia

This spectacular home is situated on 47 amazing wooded acres. The property backs to a National Forest and includes many trails. The entire home features hardwood floors, granite counters, an outdoor woodstove, heated floors in the master bath, and ample windows with lots of light! No amenities were left out. $800,000. Contact Abby Walters, Sager Real Estate, 540-465-3771.

Warren County, Virginia

These listings were submitted by individual real estate agents. MidAtlantic Farm Credit

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This pristine farm sits on 138 acres with a view of the Barrier Islands. The land across the creek has a conservation easement, so you will never be looking at a development. Water frontage along the creek and Bay extends for over a mile. A public boat launch is just down the street. $2,200,000.

Check out this 140 acre cattle farm with a farmhouse and three more possible homes! The land has incredible views and can be divided. A wet weather stream and reliable spring feeds auto cattle waters. The land is mostly fenced and the home is move in condition with a huge 70x40 bank barn and garden area. $1,100,000.

Contact Helen Glenn, Weichert Realtors, MasonDavis, 757-710-3129.

Contact Daryl Stout, Weichert Realtors, 540-660-5538.

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| VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com REALTOR

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OUR INTEGRITY MEANS

EVERYTHING TO US

We are very proud of our reputation as a lender that

To facilitate the communication of issues like those

does not succumb to unethical behavior. We plan to keep

listed, we have a tip line available to the general public.

that reputation, and we’ve implemented several processes

If you suspect or have seen actual wrongdoing involving

to help protect it. There are several internal venues for

MidAtlantic, its employees, and/or our directors, you can

employees to be “whistle-blowers” if they ever see or suspect

report it anonymously through our whistleblower hotline at

business practices that are anything less than living up

1.844.321.9164 or visit convercent.com/report.

to the highest standards of integrity. We also realize our

As important as ethics are to us, customer service

customers, our vendors and our peers may become aware of

is important as well, and we want to hear about your

unethical business practices before we do, such as accepting

experience. We’re always looking to improve our service,

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and maintain our high standards. Thank you!

treatment in return for favors or monetary payment. VOLUME 24 | ISSUE 2 | mafc.com | 19


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BALTIMORE, MD PERMIT NO. 1608

45 Aileron Court Westminster MD 21157

A Toast to the Dairy Industry June is dairy month. We’d like to take this opportunity to salute all of the dairy farmers who are dedicated to providing delicious and nutritious products for everyone to enjoy, all year long.

888.339.3334 | mafc.com |

Profile for MidAtlantic Farm Credit

Leader: Crafts on the Farm  

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