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Volume 81 – Number 9

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Detroit legendary advocate for justice, Judge Anna Diggs Taylor takes her leave By Lee Claire On Monday, Nov. 6, Michiganders received the sad news that Michigan’s first black female federal judge, Anna Diggs Taylor, had died at age 84. “It was with sadness that we have learned that Judge Anna Diggs Taylor passed away over the weekend,” Court Administrator Dave Weaver wrote in an e-mail to staff.

November 8-14, 2017

Winfrey Wins

Duggan gets second term, McCalister newest councilmember

Taylor first rose to national prominence when she deftly defended civil rights workers in the South during the tumultuous 1960s. She was appointed to the federal bench in 1979 by then-President Jimmy Carter. The prudent jurist solidified her legacy of championing civil liberties Hon. Anna Diggs Taylor when she blasted onto the national stage in 2006. Amid a hail fire of controversy, when she and the American Civil Liberties Union valiantly led the charge that struck down the Bush administration’s covert practice of warrantless wiretapping to spy on Americans. Taylor’s decision determined that the administration’s policy of secretly listening in on phone call and intercepting emails under the pretext of pursuing terrorism suspects was unconstitutional. In declaring the program unconstitutional, Taylor wrote: “It was never the intent of the framers to give the president such unfettered control, particularly where his actions blatantly disregard the parameters clearly enumerated in the Bill of Rights.” An appeals court, however. overturned the decision, saying the ACLU didn’t have standing to sue. And a little closer to home, although Taylor preferred to maintain a relatively low-profile during her six decades long career she frequently shed the private persona and presided over several high-profile, controversial cases, In 1984, she sentenced Ronald Ebens to 25 years in prison for beating 27-year-old Vincent Chin to death with a baseball bat outside a Highland Park bar.  An appeals court overturned the verdict and Ebens was acquitted at retrial. In 1984, Taylor banned nativity scenes on municipal property in Bir-

See ANNA DIGGS TAYLOR page A-4

Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

Three-term incumbent City Clerk Janice Winfrey managed to fend off a surprisingly tough challenge from political newcomer Garlin Gilchrist to retain her seat for another four years. Despite enduring intense criticism of her performance during the 2016 Presidential Election, Winfrey’s reliably strong base of supporters came out in sufficient numbers to deliver her the opportunity to move the office forward in a race that went down to the wire as too close to call until nearly 11:30. In the end, the voters decided that perhaps it was too soon to crown Gilchrist as victor based solely on the overwhelming adoration heaped upon his campaign by most political observers and media outlets. Winfrey proved that if you have a strong enough connection to the community, it’s not as difficult to weather a media storm. Still, for someone with such little name recognition to have gotten so close to victory on his first time venturing into the fray in a tough political arena like Detroit speaks volumes about his potential future in politics should he chose to pursue that career. It was also a sweat-inducing moment for Winfrey, reminding her yet again how much one mistake can sometimes cost in politics. But as Winfrey made certain to point out, her entire time in office has not been defined solely by what happened in November 2016, even if that is what

City Council At Large Brenda Jones

the epitome of culinary excellence

See Page C-1

has received the most media attention. Ever since her surprise defeat of the late Jackie Curry in 2005, whose administration was mired in corruption, Winfrey has made noticeable strides toward cleaning up the reputation of the office and making commendable changes. In a recent interview with the Chronicle following her primary victory in August, Winfrey defended her office against charges that her staff has been poorly trained and that lack of adequate preparation was the primary reason for the November debacle. “I take great offense when people say our poll workers are not trained, when

City Council At Large Janeé Ayers

District 1: James Tate

District 2: Roy McCalister

District 3: Scott Benson

District 4: Andre Spivey

“I’ve administered nearly, if not more than, 24 elections. Twenty-four elections. And probably, for every election that I’ve administered, I’ve gotten some kind of praise and recognition publicly. And then November 2016 happens, and they want to throw the baby away with the water. Part of being a leader is to assess what you’ve done and then make

See ELECTION page A-4

District 5: Mary Sheffield

District 6: District 7: Raquel Gabe Leland Castaneda-Lopez

Detroit voters say YES to weed By Keith A. Owens

mention jobs.

Senior Editor

The legal U.S. marijuana industry — both medical and recreational — grossed about $7.1 billion in sales in 2016. More than 1.2 million Americans use medical marijuana for a wide variety of medical problems, from cancer to epilepsy to depression. Michigan has 178,629 registered medical marijuana patients, a 2015 number. State voters in 2008 overwhelmingly approved a measure to allow marijuana use for medicinal purposes. That led to a massive increase in the number of dispensaries in Detroit, not all of them operating legally.

Despite a strong anti-marijuana push from some city council members, a large contingent of churches and others — not to mention very convoluted and confusing language on the ballot — Detroiters voted in favor of the Detroit Medical Marijuana Facilities Ordinance and the accompanying Detroit Zoning Ordinance for Medical Marihuana Facilities endorsed by advocates for marijuana legalization, suggesting that a more liberal view is beginning to take root in the city, recognizing the likely inevitability of legalization as well as the potential of a much-needed revenue stream that this city sorely needs. Not to

$1.00

we’ve always trained for every election every time. That’s more than what the state requires. The state requires training once every two years. Now I’m training quarterly. I’m training throughout the entire year,” she said.

CITY COUNCIL

WHAT’S INSIDE

Durden’s Catering,

Garlin Gilchrist – Montez Miller photo

The Detroit Zoning Ordinance will align

See PROPOSALS page A-4


news REGIONAL NEWS WAYNE

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Detroit seven-day forecast

SUNNY WED. NOV. 8 47°/31°

MOSTLY CLOUDY THUR. NOV. 9 46°/22°

November 8-14, 2017

SUNNY FRI. NOV. 10 31°/26°

CLOUDY SAT. NOV. 11 39°/36°

CLOUDY SUN. NOV. 12 44°/34°

Page A-2

MOSTLY SUNNY MOSTLY CLOUDY

MON. NOV. 13 45°/35°

TUE. NOV. 14 48°/40°

oakland

Demolition will soon begin for long-blighted Pontiac Silverdome

Staff Reports

A demolition permit for the former home of the Detroit Lions has been issued and the process will begin on Dec. 3, with a partial implosion of the mechanical equipment platform atop the 400,000-squarefoot stadium. The property is owned by Triple Investment Group and will pay all demolition costs.

Number of employed Detroiters at highest level in seven years Staff Reports

One of the surest signs that Detroit’s recovery just may be for real is the fact that an increasing number of Detroiters are finding work. Once upon a time known as the city where just about any able-bodied human being could find a good-paying job at any one of the city’s thriving manufacturing plants, even without a high school diploma, Detroit’s more recent history has been plagued for decades by population decline, accompanied by neighborhood decline. It has been a slow and painful descent for what used to be one of America’s greatest cities. But things do appear to be turning a corner. Numbers released last week by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics show that Detroit’s labor force grew by over 1,600 residents and more than 1,000 Detroiters found employment in the last month, joining nearly 20,000 more Detroiters who are now employed since 2014. Upon release of the report, 225,758 Detroiters were employed, up 1,045 since August and an increase of 19,190 since January 2014 when Mayor Mike Duggan took office. This is the highest level of employment in the last seven years. Although Detroit most likely will never reclaim the heavyweight title it once held as the engine of America, it nevertheless is a good indication that the city is headed in the right direction. “The fact that more Detroiters are entering the workforce is a clear indication that they see more opportunity and more pathways to access jobs, such as our Detroit at Work training programs,” said Jeff Donofrio, director of Workforce Development. “These new numbers are very encouraging, but we know we still have a long way to

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go toward making sure that every Detroiter who wants to work has the opportunity.” When Duggan took office in January 2014, the city’s unemployment rate was 17.6%. Since that time, there are nearly 20,000 more employed Detroiters. In 2017 alone, 6,811 Detroiters gained employment, one of the largestm year-over-year gains in over a decade. The Duggan administration has taken several steps to provide greater access to jobs, as well as job training and placement, including: Creating the Detroit At Work program, which connects Detroit residents training opportunities for in-demand jobs in fields like construction, health care and IT. Investing $10 million in the Randolph Career Technical Center, where skilled and construction trades are taught to more than 300 Detroit students during the day and 300 adults at night. Working with DPS and Quicken Loans to digitize millions of high school transcripts to make them easily accessible to DPS graduates who require them to obtain employment. Launching a prison-based training program that prepares inmates for jobs in environmental remediation, culinary arts, equipment operation and more. The City of Detroit also announced last month that it is offering $1 million in grants designed to prepare those most in need for the new workforce. The initiative is a partnership between the city and the Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation. Grants are available to community organizations offering services like literacy education, vocational training and support services to Detroit residents enrolled in SNAP, a federal food assistance program.

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“It will no longer be a blighted structure in Pontiac,” said Pontiac Mayor DeirdreWaterman. “We’re working with potential developers who have been negotiating with the Silverdome owners and we’re hoping that decision will come in the near future so we can begin to get the best use for the property.” Thousands of jobs, billions in investment headed for Pontiac, developers say Pontiac plans to mark the city’s resurgence with a series of developments and corporations moving in to diversify the economy. Waterman noted that the site is in the center of “very prosperous” Oakland County, but she didn’t have details on what could be next for the property. “This is a great time to invest in

Pontiac,” Waterman said in a news release. “With the renewal of Pontiac’s economy and its positioning in the heart of AAA bond-rated Oakland County, the 127-acre Silverdome site, at the intersection of major highway systems I-75 and M-59, is perfectly positioned for future corporate development on a grand scale.” Officials and Detroit Lions players plan to hold a farewell event to commemorate the Silverdome’s history on Dec. 3. The entire demolition process is expected to take

macomb

about a year. Originally dubbed Pontiac Metropolitan Stadium, the Silverdome opened on Aug. 23, 1975 and housed the Lions until their move to Ford Field in 2002. It was also home to the Detroit Pistons between 1978 and 1988. The 80,000seat stadium held concerts and sporting events, as well as a mass with Pope John Paul II in 1987. Waterman said downtown Pontiac should expect to see a boost in development and new jobs in the coming years.

Macomb residents get state-of-the art voting machines

By Jameson Cook

In Roseville, 3,179 residents obtained absentee ballots and 2,307 had been turned in as of Thursday, Zelmanski said.

New voting machines were used for the first time across the county Tuesday to help the system operate more smoothly and quickly, although election officials said voters shouldn’t notice much of a difference at the polls. Each precinct in all 11 cities participating in Tuesday’s election will use a new optical-scan scanner manufactured by Election Systems and Software based in Nebraska. The system was the option selected among three by Macomb County Clerk Karen Spranger, based on a virtually unanimous vote of all 27 municipal clerks in the county. They were provided by the state as part of a more than $40-million overhaul of the system. Roseville Clerk Richard Steenland said he and his deputy, Jennifer Zelmanski, are pleased the system will improve operations, and maintain accuracy and security. “It appears to be more user friendly and compact,” Steenland said. “The previous equipment was getting a little old and we were starting to have problems. “We’re kind of excited about it. It’s all new equipment.” Officials said the old equipment was jamming more often. St. Clair Shores City Clerk Mary Kotowski wrote in a recent city newsletter: “The new equipment offers voters the speed and convenience of digital ballot scanning while keeping a good old-fashioned paper ballot. It also allows for electronic storage of ballot images while still preserving a voter’s ballot privacy.” Steenland is “very confident” of secure election results. “There’s so many checks and balances, it’s amazing,” he said. The machines can provide a printed version of the results, he noted. As in the past, county voters will darken circles next to candidates’ names at a voting booth. They will walk a few steps and insert the ballot into a new machine that has a larger display screen to indicate whether there is a mistake. The system will allow the results from the machine to be transmitted through a secure network to Macomb County Election officials. However, for absentee ballots, the system will force an election official from each city to physically take a computer drive to the county Election Department in Mount Clemens for uploading, a step that

Roseville Clerk Richard Steenland and Deputy Clerk Jennifer Zelmanski tests new voting machines. – PHOTO: Jameson Cook ES&S plans to remove by next year’s election. Some of the larger communities opted to upgrade to high-speed counters for absentee

ballots, which are counted on Election Day, at a cost of $38,000 for two. The high-speed tabulator counts 75 ballots per minutes.

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The new system also includes a new machine called Express Vote that improves helping voters who need physical assistance in choosing their candidates. It allows the voter to cast his or her ballot by touch screen, or with the help of braille or an audio hookup. The ballot, even though about half the size as a regular ballot, is printed and inserted into the voting machine the same way the larger manually completed ballot is scanned.


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page A-3

Payne-Pulliam School hosts Annual Door Opener Awards By Lee Claire Payne-Pulliam School will host its 26th Annual Door Opener Awards Event on Nov. 9 at The Garden Theater, 3929 Woodard Ave. This year the school will award 8 Unsung Awardees, with the more than apropos theme “The Hero Next Door.” Payne-Pulliam School will condition its tradition of recognizing the outstanding works and commitment of members of to the Community. The Payne-Pulliam School of Trade has been operating and preparing Detroiters scholastically for more than forty event-filled and gratifying years. The school’s commitment to helping young adults and children achieve their educational objectives has been a long-standing point of pride for residents and businesses in the city of Detroit. To that end, and to enhance the academic environment for its students, PPS recently renovated a portion of the building and upgraded its program offerings to encourage and accommodate families who wish to use the school’s resources to secure scholarly pursuits and expand their educational horizons.

Photo: Erin Einhorn chalkbeat.org

On his first day as Detroit schools superintendent, Nikolai Vitti, with former interim superintendent Alycia ­Meriweather, greets principals at a teacher hiring fair at Martin Luther King Jr. High School.

Rebuilding Detroit’s public schools

DPSCD Superintendent Nikolai Vitti discusses his three-year plan in depth By Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

So, as we approach the season of recognizing the generosity of the individuals and companies who have committed time and resources throughout the course of the year, Payne-Pulliam is delighted to publicly thank those who have done so much to help the schools and its students to realize their dreams of a brighter future. Unsung awardees are recognized for their positive influences in their respective communities and their continued efforts to improve the overall quality of life for individuals by make a difference for others. People that are willing to put more than just 100 percent into something and keep their promises to others is what Payne-Pulliam recognizes and they make sure that does not go unnoticed. The 2017 Unsung honorees include: Chanavia Patterson Principal, Detroit Enterprise Academy Juanice V. Kellar Southeast Michigan, CRA Manager Comerica Bank Dr. Derrick R. Coleman Superintendent, River Rouge Schools

Sharon L. Madison Owner, Madison Madison International Attorney, Earlene R. Baggett-Hayes Founder, The Law and Mediation Center Elizabeth E. Mays President, MCS Multimedia Dr. Derschaun Monique Brown CEO Founder of H.I.S. Agency Lakeisha Solomon Owner, Elite Couture Boutique

The event will be held at The Garden Theater, 3929 Woodard Ave. The reception begins promptly at 6 p.m. and dinner will be served at 7 p.m. This year’s event will feature; the awards presentation, live entertainment, a fashion show, giveaways and an afterglow celebration following program. Payne-Pulliam School is a non-profit 501C3 serving youth, young adults, and older adults in the City of Detroit. For 44 years PPS has continued to carry on its mission to provide excellence in literacy training and job placement to hundreds of Detroiters. This year’s proceeds will be used for Payne Pulliam’s Food Stamp Employment and Training Program. For more information about this year’s Door Opener event visit the website www.paynepulliamschool.org or call 313-963-4710 or 313-825-2708.

Two weeks ago, DPSCD’s still relatively new superintendent Nikolai Vitti released “Blueprint 2020: Our Strategic Plan for Rebuilding Detroit’s Public Schools.” The one-page document released to the press was a relatively spare outline of Vitti’s vision for what is needed to restore the district back to health within three years. Last week he agreed to speak with the Michigan Chronicle to add more detail to what was — and wasn’t — spelled out in the blueprint. To say that Vitti has a massive task ahead of him would be a dramatic and near comical understatement. He gets that, and hopes still remain relatively high about Vitti’s potential and what he can do for Detroit’s schools — the teachers as well as the students who depend on them for a decent education. But the honeymoon period expired approximately five minutes into the first day of school. Patience is thin and nerves remain frayed due to years of trauma that may well take years to repair. Detroiters want to see progress yesterday, and Vitti says visible results are already apparent. Detroit will stay tuned. Working With Mayor Mike Duggan The city will not reach its potential and restore its strength unless the school system does a better job of empowering students. There’s no question that initially it’s obviously the business community’s responsibility — the mayor’s responsibility — to bring in the right businesses and companies, and make sure the right economic development is going beyond the downtown area into the communities. And then our role is to create a sustainability and a pipeline of employees into the future that can critically think, problem solve, work well together, and be innovator and entrepreneurs for small businesses and even as employees. I think that’s our role and commitment long-term. The mayor and I have already worked together on a couple of initiatives. I think Randolph [Career and Technical Center] is a good example. You know, part of this

work, and part of this rebuilding of the district is about bringing back things that made sense. A lot of it is about innovation, but there were a lot of strategies and initiatives within DPS that were effective that need to be brought back. And one of those strategies was a focus on career technical education. And so Randolph is a good example of restoring something that was once successful. Teacher Vacancies Last year we carried anywhere from 250 to 275 vacancies. And this year we’re at about 150. Plus, we have an additional 11 schools and 250 classrooms, so apples to apples we’re making inroads and we have momentum. We’ve recruited over 300 teachers in the past three months, whereas last year between January and the end of the year we only recruited 30 teachers. So we’re making headway. As we look at improving the performance in our partnership schools, our partnerships will emphasize strengthening relationships with local and state and even some national universities and colleges, with a particular emphasis on HBCUs to recruit student teachers and graduates to come to Detroit and teach. The other thing that we’re working on is trying to increase salaries for all teachers. Teachers will receive an increase in salary in January for the first time in a decade. There will be another increase the following January for all teachers. We’re going to have to offer teachers more pay for experience outside of Detroit. Right now we’re only recognizing four years of experience outside of Detroit. So if you’re a teacher in Northville, Garden City, River Rouge, Flint, and you’re interested in coming to Detroit and you have 10 years of experience, we only recognize four. So we have to do a better job in that area. If Things Go As Planned For This Year, How Will DPS Be Better Than It Is Today? Right now, after being on the job for five months, there are points of accomplishment already. Reducing district staff, and generating more dollars to be spent at the school level for programs and professional development was a step in the right

direction. Executing a teacher contract which will provide an increase in teacher pay for the first time in 10 years was definitely a step in the right direction. Reducing vacancies, although we’re not at zero, we’re in a better position than we were before. I think most teachers would indicate that teacher morale has improved. And then, lastly, probably most importantly, there’s been an increase in enrollment. To be able to say that we for the first time in 15 years have an increase in enrollment I think is a testament to Detroiters putting their children back in the school system in greater numbers. We’re seeing fewer students leaving for charters, fewer students leave to nearby districts, and an increase in students from charters and nearby districts. There are few indicators that are more important than parents picking your school system to educate their children because that’s a sign of confidence. What Does The Whole Child Commitment Mean? The Whole Child is focused on something that I think we’ve lost in DPSCD, and frankly I think it’s something that public education has lost over the last decade with an emphasis on standardized testing. We do need to measure how our children are doing so that we can hold people accountable. But unfortunately, the pendulum has swung too far, everything being about a standardized test. We’ve forgotten that often the arts, sports, electives are ways in which we build the confidence and self-esteem of our children. To then give them the confidence to dive into reading, math, science and social studies which may not be their strength or their initial interest. So the Whole Child is our focus on restoring what worked in DPS. Whole Child is also about expanding wraparound services. So anytime we’re talking about the reality of poverty, we’re talking about trauma. We’re talking about students that need support in conflict resolution and anger resolution. Expanding breakfast and lunch programs because a lot of our students aren’t eating regularly and healthy. So Whole Child is expanding mental health, dental support, medical support at the school site so parents don’t have to go to outside entities, that it’s provided at the school site.

Ford family supports Gores-Gilbert bid for Major League Soccer in Detroit The partnership between Detroit Pistons owner Tom Gores and Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert seeking to bring a Major League Soccer (MLS) franchise to Detroit announced that the William Clay Ford family, which owns the Detroit Lions, is joining the effort. The expanded group recently supplemented its application for an MLS expansion franchise with a planning study detailing Ford Field as the group’s preferred stadium site in downtown Detroit.

“The Lions and Ford Field have had active and ongoing discussions with Dan Gilbert and Tom Gores about their vision to bring a Major League Soccer expansion team to Detroit,” said Detroit Lions team President Rod Wood. “The result is a compelling plan to present Ford Field as a state-ofthe-art soccer stadium, a plan which reflects not just a shared vision to bring MLS to Detroit, but a desire to do so in a way that will both preserve Ford Field as one of the city’s great assets and benefit the broader community. As discussions with MLS progress, we look forward to working with Dan, Tom and their respective organizations who collectively embody the collaborative spirit at the heart of Detroit’s rebirth.”

Detroit Pistons Vice Chairman Arn Tellem, who is coordinating the ownership group’s communication with MLS officials, said the addition of the Ford family and the proposal to leverage existing resources by adapting Ford Field for MLS soccer would make a prospective MLS franchise in Detroit even more successful. “Partnering with the Ford family bolsters our powerhouse group and provides a perfect stadium solution in the heart of Detroit’s central business and sports and entertainment districts,” said Tellem. “Over the last two years, we have invested significant time, effort and resources into our bid to bring MLS to Detroit. After careful study and analysis, we

concluded that the downtown location of an MLS stadium is paramount to an MLS team’s success. And no MLS stadium sits in a better downtown location than Ford Field. We also saw additional evidence that multi-use stadiums can be very successful in the right situation and we believe our new proposal is superior for the city

and for MLS in every way.” Tellem pointed to the recent success of Atlanta United, which set MLS attendance records in its first season at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The use of Ford Field, which has undergone more than $100 million in recent renovations paid for by the Lions, would

both grow soccer locally and benefit the community by leveraging Detroit’s existing resources to deliver top-tier soccer to the city. At the same time, it would create a new three-way alliance providing the Ford family an opportunity to potentially take a future equity stake in the franchise as part of the Gores-Gilbert ownership group.

Since beginning discussions with the Lions and Ford family, members of the Gores-Gilbert team along with Ford Field officials and ROSSETTI, a Detroit-based architectural firm with experience designing soccer venues around the globe, conducted a thorough analysis of Ford Field and developed a comprehensive plan to make it a state-of-the-art soccer facility.

See SOCCER page A-4


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page A-6

Anna Diggs Taylor From page A-1 mingham and Dearborn in lawsuits filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. Taylor a former City of Detroit staff attorney, helped Coleman Young become the first elected black mayor of Detroit and later defended his efforts to integrate city government in the 1970s. Taylor, served as chief judge in Michigan’s Eastern District in 1997 and 1998. She eventually retired in 2011. Taylor is survived by her husband, former utility executive S. Martin Taylor. In 2005, Crain’s Detroit Business listed them as a Detroit power couple. Funeral arrangements for the Honorable Anna Taylor Diggs had not yet been announced at press time. For more information please visit michiganchronicle.com for updates

Soccer From page A-3

Surprise? Not really

Duggan wins re-election in landslide Keith A. Owens

lion began, is something that makes a noticeable difference in a community. The recent announcement of the $125 million investment to be made in the city’s neighborhoods, not to mention the recent rollout by Planning and Development Director Maurice Cox of the city’s targeted neighborhood redevelopment strategy, is a hopeful glimpse of some better days ahead for the majority of Detroiters who do not live downtown and who have been waiting far too long for much-needed attention.

Senior Editor

Voters decided on Tuesday that they would prefer to give Duggan four more years and a second term in office than to “give the Motherland back to the people.” In a predictably resounding defeat Tuesday evening, Young’s rallying cry voiced during the opening moments of the first and only debate between the two competitors fell on deaf ears from one end of the city to the other as voters gave Duggan a margin of victory easily large enough to cause Young and his campaign to hopefully re-examine the shortcomings of their hollow election strategy. What should have been Young’s primary objective during the debate — and throughout his campaign —

Election From page A-1

the necessary corrections moving forward. It does not mean you just ignore the previous 24 elections that have been administered. It does not mean that.” In a time that now seems once upon a time long ago and far away, Gilchrist was given only a 2% chance of winning the August primary election. The assumption was that Winfrey would face off against challenger Heaster Wheeler, someone with much more name-recognition, a higher profile and some notable supporters. But once the dust had settled, Wheeler was out and it was Gilchrist left standing as the one who would be facing off against Winfrey on Tuesday. He came in with 19% of the vote compared to Wheeler’s 12%. Winfrey still won comfortably with more than 50% of the vote. Within a matter of months, Gilchrist, who both during the primary and the general elections managed to raise more than $100,000 each time, nearly tripling Winfrey’s war chest, narrowed Winfrey’s substantial lead in the polls down to within 7 percentage points – with an error margin of plus/ minus 5 %. This was a race that traditionally attracts barely any attention from voters, but suddenly it had become the one to watch. This one had become politically sexy, pitting what some were characterizing as Old Detroit versus New, young energy versus the status quo. Gilchrist may not have been a household name, but his name was starting to ring out, thanks largely to a well-organized campaign that utilized the strengths of social media extremely well, demonstrating once again his well-documented abilities to turn out the vote same as he did for President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. It was an uncharacteristically strong showing for a newcomer in a city where name recognition often trumps all, but in the end it simply wasn’t enough. At least not this time.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig and Ike McKinnon, former police chief – Andre Smith photos was to convince those voters on the fence that he was the better choice who could deliver where Mayor Duggan has failed, that he could better represent this city and stand up for its people than the incumbent. He needed to show that he better understood the needs of Detroiters. Instead, we got “the Motherland.” Meanwhile, Duggan, as should have been anticipated by Young and his people, went to work on his opponent with a laundry list of what his administration has managed to accomplish during his first term in office. This was essentially the same strategy that he employed throughout the campaign, arguing that you just can’t argue with results. To begin one’s term of office in the midst of the largest municipal bankruptcy in history is slightly more than a minor bump in the road. It’s a mountain. That, combined with everything else Detroit has been

dealing with since seemingly forever, adds up to one massive job description that would have defied the best efforts of anyone brave enough — or crazy enough – to sign up for the task. Duggan signed on and the progress has been visible. Now nearing the end of that first term, it’s hard to make a credible argument that Detroit is no better than it was four years ago. That simply isn’t true. And although some of Duggan’s accomplishments may have been built on what was begun by his predecessors, that’s no crime nor does it negate the part he played in getting things done. Getting the street lights turned back on was a big deal, even if it wasn’t as big and sexy as District Detroit and all the other development occurring in and around downtown. The appearance of new and improved neighborhood parks like Gordon Park at 12th and Clairmount, known for the past half century as the location where the ’67 Rebel-

Proposals the city with state law, effectively decreasing the confusion. It will allow growers to set up shop within certain industrial districts, and will permit processors and safety compliance facilities to be permitted in certain business and industrial districts. The Detroit Medical Marijuana Facilities Ordinance would allow dispensaries to remain open for longer hours, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. They will also be able to locate within 500 feet of a church, another dispensary, park, liquor store or childcare center. Current law is 1,000 feet. More specifically, the proposals will: Opt Detroit into the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and establish standards to regulate caregiver centers through the city’s Building, Safety Engineering and Environmental Department regarding issuance, renewal and re-

None of this is to suggest that the mayor deserves a pass on his missteps simply because he took on a big job. The persistent cloud still hanging over his administration due to the ongoing investigation surrounding how contracts were awarded in Duggan’s highly touted home demolition program is no small matter. The feds don’t get involved in minor discrepancies. Young pounced on this issue more than once during the debate, and it is something that cannot be swept under the rug. Similarly, Young also pointed to the recent report singling out Detroit as the most violent city in the nation, saying that whatever Duggan is doing to lower the crime rate is not working. This is a major weak spot and Duggan’s response was not as strong as it needed to be during the deabate. Moving forward into his second term, in addition to his noticeably ramped-up focus on the neighborhoods, he will need to close the door on the issue of violent crime as well if he wants to deliver on his promise of a better, more unified Detroit. Nevertheless, at the end of the day, Duggan worked hard to make Detroit better, and he has surrounded himself with a team of similarly committed and highly qualified individuals who have stayed on task toward the goal of building a better city. Detroiters echoed that sentiment loud and clear at the ballot box.

From page A-1 vocation. It also removes the jurisdiction of Detroit’s Board of Zoning Appeal.

lowed to stay open until 9 p.m. Currently, they’re required to close by 8 p.m.

Amend the definition of a Drug-Free School Zone to correspond to federal and state law requiring dispensaries to be at least 1,000 feet from schools, colleges and public libraries.

Opponents of legalization frequently cited the slippery slope of morality, as well as the opinion that legalization would lead to more crime and employment issues because it is believed most employers don’t want to hire workers who smoke weed. The morality argument apparently didn’t hold much sway with voters, possibly considering the contrary argument presented by legalization supporters that unless the legalization of tobacco and alcohol is rolled back then continuing to criminalize marijuana makes no sense. There has yet to be any proof shown that marijuana is in any way more harmful than cigarettes or alcohol, nor can a convincing argument be made that legalization will somehow dramatically increase the number of marijuana smokers.

Allow dispensaries to open within 500 feet of another dispensary. They would also be allowed to open within 500 feet of exempt religious institutions where religious services are regularly conducted. The current ordinance requires facilities to be more than 1,000 feet from churches and other dispensaries. Dispensaries would be allowed to open near liquor, beer/ wine stores, child-care centers, arcades and parks. The current ordinance does not allow them to be open near any of them.  Dispensaries would be al-

Rock Ventures Principal Matt Cullen, who has been leading the stadium plan for the Detroit MLS bid, said that while the original focus was on developing a new stadium on Gratiot Avenue, the analysis of Ford Field’s unique potential opened the group’s eyes to an even better possibility. “From the time we started working on the Gratiot site, we have always been focused on the importance of a great mixed-use development at the gateway to downtown Detroit, soccer was just a potential component of our vision,” said Cullen. “But once we better understood Ford Field’s unique attributes, including the recent renovations and a bowl design that is perfectly suited for soccer, we decided to change course. We have made clear to the county that we are still fully committed to moving forward with our proposal to build out a new criminal justice complex on Warren and I-75. We are also fully committed to a mixed-use development on the Gratiot site that will be an economic driver for our community.” Wayne County Executive Warren Evans and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan have been involved in the evaluation of stadium sites. Both have been strong advocates of the Ford Field proposal since discussions with the Ford family began. Ford Field satisfies many of the characteristics that make Major League Soccer successful. Several multipurpose stadiums are currently being utilized around the league in New England, Atlanta, Seattle and Vancouver. The most successful stadiums and franchises in Major League Soccer operate in downtown settings, and Ford Field’s location in the central business and entertainment district in downtown Detroit makes an optimal selection. Detroit is the only city in the nation with four professional sports teams playing within blocks of each other inside the city’s urban core. In Ford Field, the ownership group also benefits from a venue that has already undergone over $100 million in privately-financed capital improvements within the last year. Major League Soccer has experienced a period of unprecedented growth during the last 12 years, doubling in size from 10 to 20 clubs since 2004.


news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page A-5

Detroit’s neighborhoods full of opportunities for black developers By Keith A. Owens

out of the bank. Put it in a bank that will. That’s what you have to do in the capital market.”

Senior Editor

In addition to access to capital, the other component is job readiness and preparation.

Neighborhood development just might be the next great frontier for Detroit’s development boom, offering considerable opportunity for African-American developers, construction workers and other related trade workers. Much more opportunity than they ever got downtown. With so much focus now on Detroit’s neighborhoods — largely as a response to unyielding criticism that the neighborhoods appeared to be slipping into an afterthought compared to the excitement generated surrounding the golden 7.2 square miles of downtown and Midtown — it’s not surprising that last Saturday’s ARISE Detroit! Eighth Annual Neighborhoods Conference, held at Wayne County Community College downtown campus, drew such a large attendance. In addition to the community workshops, the primary focus this year was on the critical importance of neighborhood development, what it means for Detroit’s future, and what it means for African-American economic inclusion in the revitalization of this city. A blue-ribbon panel of developers was assembled for a lively, informative and brutally honest lunchtime panel discussion about why African Americans need to be more involved in developing their own communities — and how to deal with the forces that are standing in the way. Marvin Beatty, vice president of Greektown Casino and a partner in Magic Plus which is developing the Michigan State Fairgrounds, said that his retail developments have been successful “because the people of Detroit have made the decision that when you have an opportunity to shop in your own community, you do. To recirculate your dollar more than one time is the most significant part of making sure that reinvestment in our community will happen. And you have done that. And as retail becomes a part of our community, and the only way it becomes part, is that you have to demonstrate to retailers throughout this country

“With Little Caesars Arena, we had 60% Detroit business participation. We had a goal of 30%. But we had a goal of 51% Detroit workforce participation, and unfortunately … we were only able to achieve, despite 18 outreach events touching over 18,000 people, we were only able to achieve 33% of construction for that arena. How do we change that conversation? It’s not going to be with another arena, it’s not going to be with a high rise. It’s starting with how you rehab a house. Create those opportunities for our young people to get an opportunity to learn the skills, learn the trades, so that as we get to the larger projects, they have those opportunities. Whether it’s a house or an arena, we need to have the skills to complete that.

Marvin Beatty, vice president of Greektown Casino and a partner in Magic Plus – Keith Owens photo that you want to shop in your own community. That it’s your community that it’s important to shop in.” Beatty said that the State Fairgrounds area that his organization will be developing is 160 acres. “One hundred and sixty acres is the size of downtown Royal Oak. That just gives you an idea of the power that exists in that piece of property,” he said. But size isn’t all that matters. Attracting retailers will also be key to the development’s success, and that aspect has its own set of challenges. “[There are still] retailers to this day who are not convinced they should be a part of the city of Detroit. Believe it or not, the struggle continues, and you look around. Even downtown you don’t see the level of major retailers downtown and Midtown because they’re still not convinced that this is the right place to do business. The only way they’re going to be convinced that this is the right

place to do business is that we continue to put pressure on those stores. Put pressure on Target, put pressure on all of those stores that are servicing you in the suburbs, but fail to service you in your own community.

continue to struggle in our communities to see ourselves develop. We have the skills and the intellect to do exactly the kind of thing that Dan Gilbert is doing. But if we don’t have the same access, we will not have the same opportunity.”

“We have to continue to work for ourselves to make sure that our community develops the way that it should,” he said.

Douglas Diggs, CEO of The Diggs Group, which helped construct Little Caesars Arena, agreed with that assessment.

Beatty shared a story about a local reporter who asked him what’s taking him so long to develop the State Fairgrounds “and my answer to him was, ‘Did you ask that same question to Dan Gilbert? Did you ask that same question to Mile Ilitch? And if you didn’t, don’t ask me that question.’ Because development is hard. Access to capital for the African-American community is a challenge. Access to capital is the barrier that precludes us from developing our own communities,” said Beatty.

“The critical component of rebuilding our neighborhoods is access to capital. Access to opportunity. Without that access to capital, we will not be able to rebuild our neighborhoods,” said Diggs.

“If banks and institutions don’t loosen the way they do business with us, the way they do business with others, we’ll

And part of gaining access to capital is pressuring local banks and institutions to do a better job of working with the local black business community. “If somebody doesn’t bank in your neighborhood, then you don’t deposit money in their bank. If somebody won’t provide you capital to remodel your home or for your next development? Take your money

“How do we take that shade tree mechanic working in his front yard and get him to a full shop? We give him opportunity and access to capital. That’s where it all starts,” he said. “There’s more opportunity in the neighborhoods than there will ever be in downtown Detroit. Take that opportunity to build and rebuild our neighborhoods.” Pam Martin Turner, executive director of Vanguard CDC, which is developing housing in Detroit’s North End, pointed out that too often we avoid the reality of race and racism when those issues need to be confronted openly and directly “Don’t be afraid of the equity and race conversation. Detroit is a city that’s nearly 80% black, and therefore we should be leaders in development here,” said Turner. “It impacts our communities, and our funders are more interested in the subject more than you know, probably. And research really supports the importance of the conversation, and it’s not playing the race card. There is no race card. So don’t be afraid to elevate the conversation and to call on local experts who really understand race, equity and power.”

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Page A-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • November 8-14, 2017


SECTION B

COMMUNITY Powered by Real Times Media

michiganchronicle.com

DTE and THAW partner to raise $1 million for Detroit families

November 8-14, 2017

Vista Maria moves girls from victim to survivor to victor

Staff reports

DTE Energy and The Heat and Warmth Fund are partnering to co-sponsor the eighth annual Week of Warmth, Nov. 2-15, to raise funds to help Michigan’s most vulnerable families pay their energy bills during the coldest months of the year. Nearly one million households across Michigan, more than a quarter of the state’s residents, are struggling to afford basic needs, including energy bills. As the cold weather sets in, THAW and DTE are continuing their more than 30-year partnership to raise and distribute funds for the state’s most vulnerable citizens throughout what is expected to be a cold winter season.

she needs ongoing and intensive mental health treatment,” explains Angela Aufdemberge, Vista Maria’s president and CEO. The life changing and life saving organization is recognized across the nation for its cutting-edge approach to inensive treatment for girls surviving almost inhumane lving conditions.

“The donations raised during the Week of Warmth will help to provide many of our low-income customers who are struggling to pay their energy bills with the resources and assistance needed to keep their homes warm and safe during the cold Michigan months ahead,” said Jerry Norcia, president and chief operating officer, DTE Energy. “We’re proud of the longstanding history we have with THAW, and we look forward to continuing to work together to equip customers with tools, technology and tips to reduce their energy use and energy-related expenses throughout the year.”

The organization is housed on an expansive 37-acre tree-lined campus, marked by a serene and scenic combination of state-of-the-art bricks and mortar facilities which house mental health treatment and residential support services to address the critical needs of neglected and abused girls. The new DeRoy residential facility which houses survivors of human trafficking, stands in striking contrast to several of the moe gothic structures on the pristine campus. Aufdemberge, a retired business exective former Vista Maria board member says given the resources she would demolish the older buildings which she describes as “screaming scream institutionalization.” The empassioned administrator says she wants to make way for contemporary facilities which will be more conducive to serving the emotional, education, psychological and spiritual needs of their young charges as they transition to becoming contributing members of society.

DTE Energy is the presenting sponsor of the 8th Annual Week of Warmth, benefitting THAW, encompassing a series of events that include: • Customer Assistance Day, Thursday, Nov. 9, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.: THAW and DTE will host a customer assistance event to reach Michigan families in need at Fellowship Chapel, 7707 West Outer Dr. Detroit. To register call 800.866.8429, then press 3. • THAW’s Night of Warm Hearts Fundraiser, Friday, Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m. – 11 p.m.: A fundraiser including dinner, entertainment, live and silent auctions and more at the Westin Book Cadillac Hotel. For ticket information visit thawfund.org. • Warmth with Wings, Wednesday, Nov.15: THAW, DTE and the Detroit Red Wings team up to raise public awareness of the Week of

See ASSISTANCE page B-2

Commons Room for Deroy Hall human trafficking survivors

By Roz Edward

when 130-year-old non-profit opened its doors.

Managing Editor

When Vista Maria, Michigan’s oldest continuously operating non-profit organization, moved from its original home in downtown Detroit to its present location on Clara B. Ford just inside the Dearborn Heights city limits, the issue that triggered the move then was lack ofspace to accommodate the growing need for residential and support services for orphans and young women. That was in 1939. Fast forward seven decades, and the need for increased services and residential accommodations for abused and neglected girls is more pervasive than

Vista Maria, a nationally acclaimed human services organization providing comprehensive services for Michigan’s most distressed population. For rescued child victims of chronic neglect and severe abuse in the metro-Detroit area and neighboring communities Vista Maria is there best chance, and maybe their last chance to escape the perils that threaten not only their quality of life, but literally their lives. “A child who is here, is here because she is not physically, mentally or emotionally able to be in the community …

The Clara B. Ford middle school offers year-round education to girls receiving treatment in the residential programs and the Vista Meadows High School provide quality, alternative high school education to at-risk youth from the community with a focus on credit recovery high school graduation. “Our schools are academic centers with a trauma focus and all of our staff are cross-trained to help a girl become successful in an academic setting, whereas in a traditional school she might flounder because of what has happened to her,” explains Aufdemberge

See Vista Maria page B-2

WDIV Local 4 News anchor empowers inner-city teens By Ken Coleman It started 14 years ago with a small group of girls. It now serves 50 teens and their families. The Rhonda Walker Foundation (RWF) has become an important institution in the metro Detroit. Founded in 2003 with a mission to empower inner-city teen girls toward becoming strong confident, successful and moral future leaders, RWF’s core program, Girls Into Women, is a five-year program for teen girls in the 8th grade. It continues until they graduate from high school. Over the course of the program, the girls meet monthly for workshops, seminars, retreats, field trips and camps. These events focus on career and personal development. It also offers a strong mentoring program where each teen is matched with an adult mentor. “We are deeply proud of the outcomes our program has on the teens we serve,” Walker said. “They become more confident, improve their grades, set higher goals and become better children overall.” Since 1998, Walker has been helping Detroiters get motivated and ready for the day with her incredible energy, enthusiasm, impeccable style and passion for her hometown. After beginning her broadcast career on WJBK-Fox 2, she joined the WDIV-Local 4 news team in

2003 as the weekday morning news anchor. In 2007, the talented and versatile journalist took a break from the morning news and held a dual position as evening co-anchor and health reporter. Since its founding, 100 percent of the teens who have completed RWF’s five-year program graduate from high school and enroll in college. Most of them are Detroit Public Schools Community District students,

where the overall graduation rate is far lower than other schools. At-risk and promising teens with a 2.5 grade point average or better are recommended by their teachers and counselors. They are selected for the program when they are in the 7th grade. RWF currently recruits teens from four Detroit middle schools, Plymouth Educational Center, Detroit International Academy, Spain Middle School,

Burton International Academy, and its new community partner is the Boys and Girls Club of Southeast Michigan. Two of the activities that RWF’s young people experience are summer camp at Wildwood Ranch in Howell the annual Scholar Power Breakfast and the Volunteer Recognition event in the spring. “The 100 percent graduation rate is proof that when stu-

dents are given additional educational and personal support, guidance, encouragement, and influence they can defy all statistics and excel,” the RWF website states. If you are a parent, teacher or administrator with a teen girl in mind, contact the Rhonda Walker Foundation by phone at 313-564-1420 or send an email to info@rhondawalkerfoundation.org.


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page B-2

The legacy of the Spirit of Giving Award The Franklin Wright Settlements, Inc’s Spirit of Giving Awards dinner gala and fundraiser was started as a method of honoring the generous donations of time, talent, financial resources and the many unsung heroes who remain committed to seeing Franklin Wright Settlements fulfill its mission to help children, families and seniors to have a better quality of life.

WDIV Channel 4 news anchor, Rhonda Walker, poses with Vista Maria President Over the last 137 & CEO Angela Aufdemberge (center), along with Celebrating Women honorees years, Franklin Wright Talisa, Bailey and Briana

Vista Maria

Vista Maria facilities can accommodate 165 girls at any given time, offering comprehensive residential support services, classrooms, dormitories, and onsite medical facilities. “There are somethings that we do extremely well,” Aufdemberge says candidly, adding “and, there are things we’re still challenged with. We’re no afraid to talk about those things because it’s real. The problems that the kids and the families that we serve are very real and they are complex. So, it’s not one answer fits every situation,” More than 33,000 children in Michigan are the victims of physical, sexual and emotional abuse. Seventy percent of children in Vista Maria’s on-site and community based programs are from the metropolitan Detroit area, with the remaining 30 percent coming from counties around the state. Vista Maria is one Michigan’s largest and mosy successful programs for children of abuse, survivors of human trafficking, expanded foster care services and children at risk. Approximately 130 to 140 girls who live on campus receive mental health treatment with an average length of stay ranging from six months or more, depending on an assessment of the child’s progress. Girls with cognitive impairments i.e., IQs between 40 and 70, or who have been rescued from human trafficking, are required to undergo more intensive and long term-therapeutic stays. “For child welfare or delinquent children with severe emotional disturbances who may be exiting from a psychiatric hospital or residential program, we work with a collaborative partner to provide in-home services, training and support to the child, birth family and foster family to enable the child to thrive in the community,” continues Aufdemberge. “We have young girls who come here who don’t know what a tooth brush is or have never had a pair of pajamas ... so, we have a whole continuum of care program which requires a longer trajectory to get them [stabilized].” Through its combined programs of residential and off-site community based services, Vista Maria services approximately 450 children overall. Vista Maria’s multi-tiered program to address the malaise of traumas and mal-treatment of young people also includes The Foster Treatment program which services children ages 0 to 18 living in fos-

Maryann Bruder

Lou Harris Johnson Kim Trent

Co-chairs:

Settlements has enlisted the service of thousands From page B-1 of volunteers to help hundreds of thousands of ter care, with approximately two dozen people in need. They valof that number being boys who live in ue the hard work and dedpermanent off-site foster care homes. ication of donors, volunMarvin Bryant Mike Duggan and Lori Maher Other programs include an alterna- teers, staff and the Board of Trustees. Their unique tive high school for children who have been expelled from conventional school contributions have made programs and the Journey to Success a huge difference in the after-school programs which provides lives of so many. free wrap-around services for 150 chilThe dinner gala and dren in Wayne County, Harper Woods fundraiser, taking place and nearby communities. this year on Dec. 9, has Participants in the JTS program that grown to become one of have demonstrated significant increases Detroit’s premier events. in their GPAs. In addition, 100 percent The proceeds raised from of the youth served through these pro- the event allow FrankGerard and Lizann Anderson grams have a functioning resume and al- lin Wright Settlements Dave Johnson most all of the 2016 graduating seniors to continue providing in the program are attending Henry Ford world class service in ar- ed passion for living a life ris Johnson (Mama Lou), College, Western Michigan Universi- eas which include an Af- of service and sacrifice. Kim Trent, coach Marvin Enrichment Collective sharing and Bryant and Dave Johnty, Eastern Michigan University, Wayne ter-School State University, and Michigan State Program, a Teen Center sacrifice are the corner- son, DTE. Co-chairs are for junior and high school stones of their ongoing Mayor Mike Duggan, Lori University. Vista Maria’s highly trained staff students and a Summer efforts to eliminate suffer- Maher, Gerard Anderson, Program ing. Franklin Wright will chairman and CEO, DTE, works zealously to prepare these high- Enrichment needs populations for reunification or which allows children to celebrate a select few who and Lizann Anderson. placement in permanent living arrange- keep pace academical- demonstrate that it is inFor more information ments, or “living with kin” as Aufdem- ly and culturally during deed better to give than regarding the Spirit of Givsummer recess. berge describes placing children in receive. ing Gala on Dec. 9 featurnon-traditional home settings which At the event, tribute is This year, Franklin ing Alexander Zonjic and may not include a birth parent living in paid to local heroes for Wright is honored to Serieux (A Temptations the home. their outstanding com- present the Spirit of Giv- Review), contact Deon Vista Maria administration and staff, mitment to excellence, ing Award to the follow- Mullen at 313-579-1000, not content to sit on their haunches, innovation and commu- ing individuals: Attorney ext. 248, or at dmullen@ continue to dig deeper into the treat- nity service. They honor Maryann Bruder, Lou Har- franklinwright.org. ment and well-being of youth at risk and those with a demonstratare venturing into new youth program arenas by; (1) identifying and developing two new strategies to prevent children From page B-1 from entering into the foster care system; and (2) developing initiatives and Warmth and THAW’s mission. The first wrap around services for children in the 4,000 fans to enter the Wings match system as they transition into sustainagainst the Calgary Flames will receive able living in the community. a THAW/DTE snuggie, energy efficiency tips and THAW donation information. Wings Program at DeRoy Hall, Vista “THAW has been serving the commuMaria’s newest specialty program supnity for more than 30 years. Last year ports the intricate needs of girls with alone, we helped over 10,000 families trafficking-related traumas. come home to a warm house during “At Vista Maria we have learned that the cold Michigan winter,” said Saunestablishing a genuine rapport is esteel Jenkins, chief executive officer, sential when working with children. We The Heat and Warmth Fund. “We serve implement what I call the ‘Vista Maria as a beacon of hope for families facing Difference,’ which involves quality, supdarkness.” portive care and empowerment through In addition to its focus on Week of education. We also practice unconditional acceptance, which builds the Warmth programing, DTE offers nufoundation for trust,” concludes Auf- merous year-round payment assistance demberge. “It is this trust that provides programs, including the company’s Low an atmosphere of comfort, honesty, and Income Self-Sufficiency Plan and ShutTo learn more, make a donation or inthe willingness to share thus ultimately off Protection Plan. Visit dteenergy.com/ quire about assistance, visit www.thawachieving the greatest feeling of all…to help for more information. fund.org or call 1800-866-8429 (THAW). be loved unconditionally.”

Assistance

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.-Michigan State Organization, an international public service organization of college educated women hosted the 50th annual Michigan State Organization Leadership Conference on September 22 -23, 2017. The conference was held at the Livonia Embassy Suites, 19525 Victor Parkway, Livonia, Michigan 48152. Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Zeta Nu Zeta Chapter – the Inkster graduate chapter - hosted approximately 300 professional women and collegiates from across the state to train for service and hear from speakers. Led by State Director Tonia Jenkins, attendees engaged in service projects, as well as leadership training and workshops. The workshops centered around voting matters and Social Security 101. General Motors a partner of the Michigan State Organization, was present throughout the conference to speak to attendees regarding employment opportunities and to host a workshop. The national initiative, Z-HOPE: Zetas Helping Other People Excel served three local organizations during the Leadership Conference: the seniors, women, men and youth of the Imperial Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center in Inkster; the Inkster Preparatory Academy and the Veterans Hospital of Ann Arbor were selected to receive donations to benefit the needs of their constituents. The items donated included school supplies, toiletries, shoes and socks. In addition, the conference attendees made financial donations toward the AA490 challenge in support of having the untested rape kits tested to find justice for the victims. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary, the attendees participated in a Motown Mardi Gras on Friday evening. The Motown Mardi Gras began with the chapters parading into the designated room. Followed by a walk through the decades as a reflection in time from the perspective of sorority members present during that decade. The celebration ended with a mask competition. The conference concluded with the business sessions held on Saturday. The luncheon on Saturday hosted the community organizations where the principal of Inkster Preparatory Academy said the following, “We at Inkster Prep love the Zetas! Your organization has done so much for the Academy that we are honoring the Inkster Zetas with a hallway.” The Michigan State Organization is happy to be of service to the communities within Michigan while the organization continues “Building on the Principles of Zeta, while Blazing New Paths.”


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page B-3

Third grade reading law now in effect

Ken Coleman

Dr. Reginald Eadie and WDIV news anchor Rhonda Walker

In an effort to increase proficiency, a new reading law that will go in full effect for Michigan third grade students during the 2019-2020 school year. To comply with the statute, the Detroit Public Schools Community District has selected the i-Ready Diagnostic assessment to help raise student achievement and performance. i-Ready is an online program that will assess each student’s individual needs and monitor their progress throughout the school year. Reading proficiently by the end of third grade has become a significant milestone in a student’s educational trajectory. It marks the time when the

61 Day Challenge under way By Ken Coleman The Detroit Medical Center’s 61 Day Health Challenge, a voluntary health education campaign that includes fitness, nutrition, health education and commitment, is under way through Dec. 31. It is an annual campaign with a focus on healthy lifestyle management. People (or groups) that participate are strongly encouraged to adhere to and manage the requested health challenge. This year’s theme is “Less Sugar, More Steps, Eat More Fruit & Veggies!” The challenge is a call to consume less refined sugars, substitute with complex sugars (like fruit), increase physical activity and eat more vegetables. “Being healthy simply means choosing the right options for your body’s well-being,” said Dr. Reginald Eadie, chief operating officer of DMC. “The 61 Day Challenge provides individuals with the education and motivation

Each participant is also expected to educate at least one other person on how to live a healthier lifestyle during the 61 days. Participants represent a cross section of the community, including businesses, non-profits, schools, political affiliated, social service agencies and sororities. Last year, thousands of DMC employees, corporate partner employees and community members from across metropolitan Detroit and Southeast Michigan took the pledge to live healthy during the 61 days. For additional information and/ or to schedule a lunchand-learn educational session, please contact Tonita Cheatham at (313) 966-4012.

proached third-grade reading legislation in a variety of ways. Beginning this month, DPSCD parents will be notified of their child’s performance on the i-Ready Diagnostic. Students demonstrating a reading deficiency will receive an Individual Reading Improvement Plan which will outline how the school will address the reading deficiency and will also provide athome recommendations and resources to improve reading skills. Parents of students who receive an Individual Reading Improvement Plan will be asked to attend a parent conference where they will be empowered to assist their child with a Read-at-Home Plan & Toolkit.

Teachers feel stressed out

that makes that choice easier.” All participants are challenged to give up pop, fried foods and “junk” foods and eat more fruit and vegetables while also walking at a moderate pace for at least 30 minutes several times each week.

focus is placed on reading to learn instead of learning to read. Nationally, about two out of every three fourth graders failed to score proficient in reading. The percentages of non-proficient readers are higher among minority groups. Research has de­ monstra­ ted that students not reading proficiently at the end of third grade are four times more likely to not finish high school. Further, the levels of reading proficiency for third graders are linked to specific long-term outcomes: 23 percent of below-basic readers fail to finish high school, compared to 9 percent of basic-scoring readers and 4 percent of proficient readers. States have ap-

A survey of nearly 5,000 educators released last week by the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association shows that nearly two-thirds of educators usually feel stressed out, twice the level felt by workers in the general population. Most surveyed feel demoralized and disrespected by state and federal officials, especially Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Highlights of the survey include:

On amount of time feeling stressed: Nearly two-thirds, or 61 percent, of educators find work “always” or “often” stressful, twice the rate of other workers. On being bullied, harassed or threatened on the job: 27 percent of educators said they have been threatened, bullied or harassed,

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In the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey, 4,000 educators responded to a public survey and 850 AFT educators responded in a random sample. “Teaching is a tough job that carries with it high levels of stress, which obviously affects both students and educators,” said AFT President Randi Weingarten. Stress levels have climbed over the last two years. “Since President Trump took office, stress and anxiety are on the rise, and we now have a secretary of education whom educators in our survey overwhelmingly feel does not respect them. State and federal cuts to education spending will only make things worse,” Weingarten said.

While this will not occur during the 2017-2018 school year, it is important to note that the law will require retention of third-grade students who have a reading deficiency based on state assessment during the 2019– 2020 school year.

Broken Power Jacks Keyboard Replacement Computer Insurance New & Refurbished Computer Sales Randi Weingarten versus 7 percent of employed adults in the general population. When asked who was the bully, 35 percent identified a principal, administrator or supervisor, and 50 percent said it was a student. On respect: Educators felt most respected by their coworkers, students and students’ parents — the people with whom they interact daily — and felt most disrespected by DeVos (86 percent), the media (61 percent) and state and federal elected officials (59 percent).

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HIRAM E. JACKSON Publisher

A Real Times Media Newspaper 1452 Randolph • Detroit, MI 48226

(313) 963-8100 e-mail: newsdesk@michronicle.com November 8-14, 2017

Page B-4

“If you think you’re ugly, there’s somebody out there that’s uglier than you.”

CATHY NEDD Associate Publisher KEITH A. OWENS Senior Editor ROZ EDWARD Managing Editor SAMUEL LOGAN Publisher 1933-2011

JOHN H. SENGSTACKE Chairman-Emeritus 1912-1997 LONGWORTH M. QUINN Publisher-Emeritus 1909-1989

Cardi B,

Our Opinion

Spirit of Detroit Award recipient

Just how clear does it need to be?

Duggan’s margin of victory a lesson to Young campaign By Keith A. Owens Senior Editor

Now that the election is over and the voters have made it clear beyond any reasonable doubt who it is they prefer to be mayor of this city, perhaps we can put the dirt back in the ground where it belongs. Here’s what I mean... We’re all aware that this is a majority black city, and that Mayor Mike Duggan isn’t black. We’re also aware that former mayor Kwame Kilpatrick is behind bars. Kilpatrick is most definitely black. An ad put out by the Keith A. Owens Young campaign compared Duggan’s admittedly problematic issues with how housing demolition contracts were granted to the issues that landed Kilpatrick in jail. The message was clear, saying “It’s as simple as black and white” why Kilpatrick is in jail and Duggan is not. Yes, it’s simple all right. Duggan has yet to be charged with any crime. Kilpatrick was charged, indicted and convicted. Simple. Are there instances where white folks get away with murder (so to speak) in the just-us system while black folks are unjustly accused? Absolutely and without question. Happens all the time, but this is not one of those instances. And Young’s playing to Detroit’s ever-simmering racial unrest (this ad was just one example) to score some cheap political points in an effort to win a job that he is unqualified for was little more than an embarrassing stunt. Tuesday’s results bear that out. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Mayor Mike Duggan is not the perfect candidate, but Sen. Coleman Young was never a serious challenger. Because even though Duggan has been on pretty much of a roll recently, a more serious candidate could have forced Duggan into a matchup worth watching where the outcome wasn’t so dramatically assured virtually from the beginning of the race. A good political matchup nearly always creates better candidates because it forces each candidate to bring their ‘A’ game. Not that Duggan was slacking; he definitely didn’t make the mistake of taking Young for granted even after trouncing him in the August primary. But I can’t help but imagine what might have transpired with some real heat on his trail. But alas, no heat. The challenger

was barely lukewarm from beginning to finish. Not only was Young unable to raise any noticeable amount of money, but more importantly, he was unable to mobilize his base. His supporters may point to the relatively low voter turnout as evidence of the fact that Duggan can’t legitimately declare a mandate, but do they really want to go down that road? Where it leads is to the question of why Young couldn’t energize more supporters to carry themselves to the polls. All those downtrodden Detroit­ ers that he claims to represent, if he truly represents them, should have been storming the polling places. If there was so much dissatisfaction with Duggan, then why didn’t all that dissatisfaction manifest itself at the polls? And even if the argument can be made that a significant amount of voters weren’t excited or enthused enough to support either candidate — a dreary assessment to be sure — that still doesn’t paint a prettier picture of the Young effect. All that says is that among the relative handful who showed up to vote, he was the loser. The rest, even if not enamored of Duggan, didn’t care enough about Young to get off the couch. Detroit Free Press columnist Stephen Henderson wrote a stinging column last week that effectively destroyed Young’s argument that he represents the poor and downtrodden, using nothing more than basic reporting and simple mathematics. After reviewing the primary returns from the poorest districts, it was clear as day that the residents of those neighborhoods weren’t roused to overthrow Duggan in favor of Young. Said Henderson: “Young did not carry the majority of precincts in any of the city’s notoriously poor areas, such as the 48205 ZIP code on the east side or 48204 on the central west side. And he posted among his worst showing in 48209 and 48217, areas of deep southwest Detroit that are hard hit with residential and industrial abandonment. “In the city’s poorest precinct, near Chandler Park on the east side where 83% of the people live in poverty, Young got 26 votes, while Duggan got 25.  “In the second-poorest precinct, on the west side in the Dexter-Linwood neighborhood, which has a poverty rate of 77%, Duggan got 32 votes while Young got 23.  “And in the Oakwood Heights neighborhood in Southwest Detroit, where 70% of the residents live in poverty, Duggan got 26 votes, or 79% of the ballots cast, while Young got 6 votes, or just 18%.” That about wraps it up. So let’s put the dirt back in the ground where it belongs.

New campus sexual assault policies protects predators over victims By Adam Hollier This month, the Department of Education is rolling back policies on campus sexual assault. The result may make colleges safer. For rapists. Today, under the federal civil rights law Title IX, colleges and universities that receive public funds must use a standard of proof known as a “preponderance of evidence” when judging sexual misconduct complaints. If the evidence shows that the misconduct more likely than Adam Hollier not occurred, the student accused of assault will be disciplined accordingly under the school’s code of conduct. Unfortunately, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and the Department of Education have signaled to victims of sexual assault that the population most in need of protecting are the men accused of sexual assault. I say men because 99% of sex offenders are men. Further, only about 2% of sexual assault accusations reported to the police are deemed false. So we are talking about a relatively small problem in a sea of very serious abuse. Back to the proposed change to protect sexual predators over the victims of assault. This burden of proof was not new to the Obama administration nor is it unreasonable it was an attempt to take tough action against crisis. In fact,

most college campuses used this burden of evidence because reasonable people can see through a preponderance of the evidence, i.e., based on all the information available this is the most likely result. The evidence requires victims to relive the assault and often face their accuser compounding the trauma from the original assault. Many students do not file a complaint, police report or make any formal statements because of the perceived shame or the desire to put the experience behind them. We must hold our people, particularly our leaders, responsible for eliminating sexual assault. Whether they are starting college, a new job or deploying in defense of our nation, we must protect the next generation from the level of victimization occurring today. Young people aged 12-34 are at the highest risk for rape and sexual assault. Every university in America should be committed to eliminating rape and sexual assault on campus. Every workplace should be committed to protecting every employee from sexual predators who use power and influence to commit these crimes. Call your state representative, state senator and congressman and tell them you want real laws to protect the victims of sexual assault and rape, not lax rules to make it harder for victims to come forward without reprisal. Adam Hollier can be reached at adam@adamhollier.com or visit his website at adamhollier.com.

Matching the advent of construction projects with employment for city residents By Terrence M. Hicks It is certainly encouraging to see the rapid pace of infrastructure development in the city of Detroit and the myriad of opportunities that it has created for small businesses who seek to competitively compete in the many contractual awards that have been made available by those developments. In my many discussions with some of those small businesses, they are happy that the city has come back from the financial abyss that it found itself mired in, and can you believe it, a mere four- Terrence M. Hicks five years ago. Those small companies continue to be optimistic that they have a realistic chance of participating on ongoing and upcoming infrastructure projects. During this exciting period, the city of Detroit’s administration including other surrounding municipalities sought to include small businesses (which could be looked at as being synonymous with minority companies) into the equation. As a longtime workforce development professional, I have kept my eyes and ears wide open to see if there were any reports that speak to the uptick in awards for the abovementioned companies. To be honest, I am afraid that with the rapid ascent of those developments and the shiny newness and excitement that comes with those projects being completed, that we’ve now taken our eyes off of the ultimate objective — economic impact to underrepresented communities in the shadow of those projects. How do we ensure that the resounding recovery of Detroit does not bypass residents who are hungering for sustain-

able jobs in the wake of development? One sure way to do that is by providing or mandating apprenticeship programs for those projects. An apprentice is a worker who learns a craft skill through planned, supervised work on the job, plus related classroom instruction. Moreover, when working on the job, an apprentice is a regular part of the work force and earns wages while acquiring important skills. Access for All The Access for All program is a proven construction trade apprenticeship readiness training for Detroit residents.  The nine-week “career pathway” strategy prepares Detroiters for successful entry into construction apprenticeships and/or employment in the skilled trades.  The program is an intensive nineweek, 270-hour training program comprised of workplace essential skills; safety, apprenticeship, employability and life skills, financial coaching work experience, mentoring, supportive service, job placement services and a small bi-weekly stipend.  Punctuality, regular attendance, good character, group participation and demonstrating a willingness to learn and apply knowledge are part of what you are measured on. We cannot afford to train workers just for the sake of training, there has to be a job waiting at the end of the training. We are in the best position right now to take a hard look at the number of hours that it would take to reach journeyman status on a particular project, for each discipline and establish a plan to reach that status. “Access for All” is a proven pre-apprentice program with a rigorous program designed to prepare residents for these opportunities. Let’s coalesce, City of Detroit, developers, major contractors and the like to reach this end goal together. Terrence M. Hicks is managing principal at Metro Strategies, Inc., www. metrostrategies.org.

Detroit vs. infant mortality: A battle we must win By Dr. Joneigh S. Khaldun As we enter the winter holiday season, many people start thinking about what they’re grateful for. As a mother of three children who has personally experienced a life-threatening condition after childbirth, I’m thankful to be alive today. As the director of the Detroit Health Department and an emergency physician, I’m honored to serve Detroit families by working to improve their health every day. I vividly remember becoming pregnant with my first child over 11 years ago. Like many first-time mothers, I felt excited and anxious while planning my ideal “birth experience.” I wanted my family present, ac- Dr. Joneigh Khaldun cess to top-notch medical care, and above all, a successful delivery. I looked forward to the day I would soon become a mother and welcome home our first child. As with life, no one could have predicted what would happen the day of my delivery. Although I had a smooth pregnancy, I was unable to deliver my son naturally. I was in labor for over a day before ultimately giving birth via cesarean section. Days after the delivery, I began to have severe headaches. I was in so much pain that I couldn’t walk. I remember crawling on the floor, holding wet towels to my head for relief. Although I was suffering from the worst headache of my life, something physicians know is a reason to seek emergency medical care, I was still unsure of what to do. I called a close friend, who recommended I go to the hospital. I was admitted to the same hospital where I also worked as an emergency medicine resident, and my colleagues diagnosed me with a severe brain bleed. There I was, a new mother with a three-week-old baby and facing the possible reality that I would not make it home alive. I do not remember much of what happened after that. After having two sides of my skull cut open to drain the blood, I woke up, surrounded by incredible family members and friends. I had access to some of the best brain surgeons and medical providers in the country. I did not have to worry about how my newborn would be cared for because I had a community that supported me and helped my husband and I with meals, childcare and general support while we got through this challenging time. As an emergency medicine physician, I’ve seen too many mothers and infants whose stories don’t end like mine. I’ve

treated mothers who come into the emergency department with little prenatal care, only to witness their babies die while still in the womb. In some cases, these mothers have conditions that are diagnosed too late, resulting in death or other severe health complications. I’ve pronounced too many babies dead in my emergency department, babies who died due to medical problems related to their prematurity, or fell asleep in an unsafe sleep environment, only never to wake up again. There are over 10,000 babies born in Detroit every year, and over 130 will die before the age of one. Detroit’s infant mortality rate is one of the highest in the country, and is worse than many countries that do not have as robust of a healthcare system as ours. While we often do not think about it, mothers are suffering from too many pregnancy related complications that are preventable or could be successfully managed if diagnosed sooner. Without strong social support and early medical treatment, I would likely not be alive. I would not have the opportunity and privilege to be the doctor, mother, wife and public servant that I am today. All mothers and families deserve this support and access to medical treatment, so that they can have the best possible outcomes for their pregnancies, deliveries and children. As Detroit’s public health leader, I am committed to working with partners across the city to make sure this happens. Detroit, we can and must do more. In August 2017, the Detroit Health Department launched SisterFriends, a unique collaboration between public health and the health care system. SisterFriends connects pregnant mothers with a community volunteer, or “SisterFriend,” who supports mothers through their pregnancy. SisterFriends are mentors who encourage pregnant moms to receive appropriate prenatal care and attend educational classes through Make Your Date™, a program of Wayne State University. I was very fortunate during my birthing journey, despite the odds. I now have three beautiful and healthy children. I dream of a day when all mothers and babies in Detroit have a circle of care to help them overcome any challenge they may face during this beautiful, yet sometimes daunting experience of pregnancy, birth and taking care of a new baby. The Detroit Health Department is working with partners across the city and state to address maternal and infant health. Everyone must step up and participate in this movement. Our moms and babies deserve it. Dr. Joneigh Khaldun is a board-certified practicing emergency physician and the director and health officer for the City of Detroit Health Department.


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page B-5

UPCOMING EVENTS NOVEMBER

Friday, 11.17

Saturday, 12.9

Thursday, 11.9

28th Annual Hob Nobble Gobble

Franklin Wright Development

Spirit of Giving Gala

Payne-Pulliam School’s 26th Annual Door Opener Event

Presented by Ford Motor Company

Awarding eight Unsung Community Leaders, “The Hero Next Door” 6 pm | For Info, call 313-963-4710 The Garden Theater • 2929 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Join in the famous Parade of Stars featuring dancing elves, thunderous sounds of the marching band and, all the way in from the North Pole, Santa Claus! Black Tie | 6:30 – 10:30 pm Ford Field • 2000 Brush Street, Detroit

Friday, 11.10

6th Annual Pre-Thanksgiving Explosion

Detroit Veterans Gala

A magical moment in Motown, black tie, tickets required; 8 pm For information, call 313-579-1000, ext. 258

Come kick off your Thanksgiving holiday with us, $10 advance, higher at the door, 7 pm – 1 am Tickets available at Detroit Parks and Recreation, Northwest Activities Center ballroom 18100 Meyers Rd. • Detroit

Black tie, Tickets $30 - $1,200 • 6:00 pm For info call 313-400-0723 Detroit Golf Club • 17911 Hamilton Road Detroit

Saturday, 11.11

Friday, 11.24

Michigan Chronicle Best in Black Awards

Black Friday Marketplace 2017

The return of the highly anticipated 2017 Best in Black Detroit Awards. It is a community-driven award production to recognize black achievement across a wide range of categories, from people who reside or work in and around the Detroit area. 7 pm – $35 at Box Office or Ticketmaster Music Hall • 350 Madison Ave. Detroit

Cooperative Economics in Action 9 am to 7 pm Free; (313) 494-5800 The Wright Museum • 315 East Warren Ave., Detroit

DECEMBER Monday, 12.8 Breakfast with Santa

Thursday, 11.16

Adams/Butzel Complex Enjoy fun activities, ice skating, facepainting and more. 10 am Adams Butzel Recreation Complex 10500 Lyndon St. • Detroit

13th Annual Dennis W. Archer Public Service Award Gala

Tickets required, 313-961-6120, ext. 201 6 pm to 9 pm Detroit Yacht Club •1 Riverbank Drive Detroit

Michigan Chronicle Best in Black Awards, hosted by Rickey Smiley

Friday, 11.17 14th Annual Detroit Tree Lighting Ceremony Presented by DTE Energy

A spectacular evening of stage and rink performances to welcome the holiday season. Enjoy food and beverages, carriage rides, visits with Santa, holiday shopping and much more. Campus Martius Park • 800 Woodward Ave., Detroit

WANT BETTER REWARDS? WANT FREE SHIPPING? W A N T M O R E S AV I N G S ?

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SELECT SALE IN STORE & SELECT SALE & CLEARANCE ONLINE: CLOTHING, ACCESSORIES & HOME ITEMS. EXTRA 15% OFF SELECT SALE IN STORE & SALE & CLEARANCE ONLINE: JEWELRY, SHOES, COATS, SUITS, DRESSES, LINGERIE, SWIM FOR HER, SUIT SEPARATES & SPORT COATS FOR HIM. EXTRA 10% OFF SELECT SALE IN STORE & SALE & CLEARANCE ONLINE: ELECTRICS/ELECTRONICS & WATCHES. USE YOUE MACY’S CARD OR THIS PASS 11/8-11/12/17. MACYS.COM PROMO CODE: VETS See macys.com/deals for online exclusions

EXCLUDES ALL: Deals of the Day, Doorbusters, Everyday Values (EDV), Last Act, Macy’s Backstage, specials, Super Buys, athletic clothing/shoes/accessories, baby gear, reg.-price china/crystal/ silver, cosmetics/fragrances, designer handbags, designer jewelry/watches, designer sportswear, men’s store electronics, furniture/mattresses, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, select licensed depts., previous purchases, restaurants, rugs, services, smart watches/jewelry, special orders, special purchases, select tech accessories, toys, 3Doodler, American Rug Craftsmen, Anova, Apple Products, Ashley Graham, Avec Les Filles clothing, Barbour, Brahmin, Breville, Briggs & Riley, Brooks Brothers Red Fleece, COACH, Demeyere, Destination Maternity, Dyson, Eileen Fisher SYSTEM, Fitbit, Frye, Global Cutlery, Hanky Panky, Jack Spade, Judith Leiber, Karastan, kate spade new york, Kenneth Cole shoes, Kiehl’s, KitchenAid Pro Line, Le Creuset, Levi’s, littleBits, Locker Room by Lids, Marc Jacobs, select Michael Kors/Michael Michael Kors, Michele watches, Miyabi, Movado Bold, Natori, Nike swim, Original Penguin, Panache, Rimowa, Rudsak, Sam Edelman, Shun, Spanx, Staub, Stuart Weitzman, S’well, Tempur-Pedic mattresses, The North Face, Theory, Tommy John, Tory Burch, Tumi, UGG®, Vans, Vitamix, Wacoal, Wolford & Wüsthof; PLUS, ONLINE ONLY: kids’ shoes, Allen Edmonds, Birkenstock, Hurley, Johnston & Murphy, Merrell, RVCA & Tommy Bahama. Electrics/electronics is excluded from $10 off pass. Cannot be combined with any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer except opening a new Macy’s account. Extra savings % applied to reduced prices. Purchase must be $25 or more, exclusive of tax and delivery fees.

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VETS DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT 11/8-11/12. MERCHANDISE WILL BE ON SALE AT THESE AND OTHER SALE PRICES NOW-1/2/18, UNLESS NOTED. HOW IT WORKS: We’ll give you $10 Macy’s Money for every $50 you spend, up to a $40 Macy’s Money Reward Card in a single transaction. EXCLUDES THE FOLLOWING PURCHASES: Apple Products, tech watches/jewelry/accessories, gift cards, furniture, mattresses, rugs, Macybed, services & fees, sales tax, phone & live chat orders, leased depts., restaurants, international orders, e-gifting, online backorders. USE YOUR MACY’S MONEY REWARD CARD in stores & online 11/16-11/21/2017. May not be redeemed for cash, used to purchase Macy’s Gift Cards or applied as payment or credit to your credit card account. If a purchase used to accumulate Macy’s Money is returned, your return may result in a reduction of the value of your Macy’s Money Reward Card and/or a reduction of your total refund amount. The remaining balance of your Macy’s Money Reward Card will reflect the Macy’s Money amount you qualify for after deducting the returned item(s) from your original purchase amount. N7100004


Page B-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • November 8-14, 2017

Tickets on Sale Now!! Best In Black Awards

Saturday, November 11th • 7 pm • Music Hall

Hosted by

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$35 Per Ticket • Music Hall Box Office or Ticketmaster.com Sponsored by

www.BestInBlackDetroit.com

#MCBIB17


BUSINESS

SECTION C

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michiganchronicle.com

November 8-14, 2017

Ford names VP of quality and new model launch Linda Cash, one of the most powerful African-American women in the automotive industry, has been promoted to vice president of Quality and New Model Launch at Ford Motor Co. in the midst of a major management realignment at the multinational automaker. In her new role, Cash will be “responsible for driving quality processes throughout the design and production of Ford vehicles, and for new model launches globally, ensuring alignment throughout the business operations,” states a press release.

Photo: media.ford.com

Cash, 55, has held a variety of senior level positions at Ford since she began her career with the company in 1984. She served as vice president of Manufacturing at Ford of Europe since Jan. 1, 2016. Prior to that, she worked as director of Vehicle Operations for Ford of Europe from March 2015 to Jan. 2016. She has also held the positions of executive director of Global Vehicle Operations in Manufacturing Engineering and executive director of Global Manufacturing Business Office.

Linda Cash Cash will succeed Bennie Fowler, 61, effective Jan. 1, 2018. Fowler was been listed among Black Enterprise’s 100 Most Powerful Executives in 2012. She represents one of seven leaders at Ford recently appointed to new roles by President and CEO Jim Hackett in an effort to improve efficiencies in global operations. The other appointments include four women and two men. “As we develop our strategy to become the most trusted mobility company, designing smart vehicles for a smart world, we will continue to reshape the organization to deliver the most value for our customers and all of our stakeholders,” Hackett said in a statement. “The changes we are announcing today will further align resources and improve efficiencies throughout our global markets and operations. At the same time, I want to recognize the truly significant contributions of the senior leaders departing from Ford and thank them for their many years of service.”

Durden’s Catering, the epitome of culinary excellence and exceptional customer service By Alisha Dixon Now considered a “food mecca,” Detroit’s growing culinary scene has become a major player in the city’s resurgence. This, however, wouldn’t be possible without the contributions made by small businesses located not just within the 7.2 square miles that make up Midtown and downtown, but also in the city’s core, the neighborhoods.

John Casesa, who was appointed vice president of global strategy by former CEO Mark Fields, is making his exit on Nov. 1 as part of Ford’s new realignment strategy. This marks the second major shakeup since Hackett was named CEO in May.

Established by Rytonie “Chef Tony” Durden, Jr. in 2006, Durden’s Catering has served the tri-county area for more than a decade by providing high quality southern American cuisine for events such as weddings, picnics, family reunions, corporate events, private dinners for two and much more. “We cater to any atmosphere of your choosing from banquet hall to park we can accommodate your request. We have the staff and equipment to deliver quality food from our kitchen to your event location. Our services are available throughout the tri-county area. Our great staff is dedicated to helping you plan your entire event from decor and menu selections to creating a special atmosphere,” said Chef Tony.

Last year, the Dearborn-based automaker was among 50 companies on Black Enterprise’s Best Companies for Diversity list for its effort to push forward and nurture diversity and inclusion.

See DURDEN’S CATERING Page C-2

Small businesses benefit from grants By Ken Coleman At a time when some argue that downtown, Midtown and Corktown get all of the love to the detriment of Detroit neighborhoods, two small business funding efforts continue to push back against the notion: They are NEIdeas and Motor City Match. After decades of corporate disinvestment; middle class flight, both black and white, to sprawling suburban communities; and federal and state anti-city policies, Detroit has been ravaged and is barely one-third of its population in 1950. It was so dire that when Mayor Coleman A. Young dedicated the Victoria Park housing community on the city’s lowest east side in 1991, it was the first development of single-family, detached housing in the Motor City in at least 30 years. Detroit’s woes culminated in 2013 when it cemented the dubious distinction of being the largest city to file for bankruptcy in our nation’s history. But that was then. NEIdeas A program of the New Economy Initiative,

NEIdeas has awarded a total of $1.9 million to 118 businesses across Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park since 2014. “Neighborhood businesses matter,” said Pam Lewis, NEI director. “In pursuing our mission of building an inclusive support network for entrepreneurs and small businesses in Southeast Michigan, we wanted to do something that not only acknowledged neighborhood businesses for their contributions to their communities, but rewarded them for thinking courageously about growing.” More than 61,000 small businesses operate in Detroit. Some of them struggle to keep their doors open. Many need funding to either enhance their business or invest to make them profitable. The NEIdeas small business challenge last week awarded 22 businesses $10,000 and $100,000 grants for their growth ideas. The New Economy Initiative is a collaboration of 13 national and local foundations working to build and sustain an inclusive network of support for entrepreneurs and small businesses in Southeast Michigan.

See SMALL BUSINESSES Page C-2


business

Tourism has long served as one of the backbones of Detroit’s economy. After eight consecutive years of tourism growth both in Detroit and throughout Michigan, it’s clear that the increasing attractiveness to visitors is catalyzing the city’s comeback. The renaissance is particularly boosting Detroit’s hotel industry, which has experienced the largest year over year revenue increases of any top 25 American market. This reflects an encouraging sign for Detroit’s economic health, particularly in neighborhoods that have hotels. However, the overwhelming proportion of Detroit’s hotels are located downtown, with a handful sprinkled within some of the fast-growing “New Detroit” neighborhoods. While we all support downtown Detroit’s revitalization, we must do more to democratize the revenue and ensure that all of the city benefits from Detroit’s burgeoning status as a tourism destination. sharing

November 8-14, 2017

Detroiters profiting from Airbnb

By Janae Ingram

Home

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

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short-term rentals have recently emerged as innovative solutions to the complex challenge of spreading the economic benefits of travelers to Detroit’s communities of color. Peer-to-peer home sharing platforms like Airbnb allow Detroiters to rent a room in their home or apartment, or their entire place while they are gone to visitors from around the globe.

Nearly 400 Detroiters share their homes via the Airbnb platform. In the past year, those hosts have earned $6.8 million in supplemental income through Airbnb while bringing over 41,000 guests to every neighborhood of the city. These visitors are finding local Old Redford restaurants, shopping on the Avenue of Fashion and experiencing Midtown museums. Their presence — and their dollars — reflect an important part of the city’s comeback by virtue of attracting visitors to some of the historic African-American neighborhoods hungry for economic growth. The supplemental income — about $6,000 annually for the typical Detroit Airbnb host — is

helping working people across Detroit find new ways to make ends meet and better afford to keep their homes. This is particularly meaningful for the 200 Detroit hosts who simply share an extra, unused room in their. Take Debra, for example. She rents an extra room in her Five Points home, often to young professionals relocating to Detroit for new jobs. She uses her hosting income to help pay the bills and it has given her

the opportunity to meet visitors from across the globe. She views herself as an ambassador for her neighborhood, facilitating business for local merchants by offering tips to her guests hoping to live like native Detroiters for as long as they’re in town. Debra’s story is indicative of what we see in Michigan and throughout the country. The traditional hospitality industry has long neglected communities of color, with hotels nearly always concentrating in the wealthiest neighborhoods. This has historically deprived minority

neighborhoods and their small businesses of the opportunity to benefit from tourism revenue. Home sharing is helping to correct this disparity by activating economies for Detroit neighborhoods without hotels. To be sure, not everybody appreciates the benefits of home sharing. The Lansing and Washington D.C. hotel lobbies have aggressively attacked the rights of Detroiters like Debra to share their homes, out of concern that Airbnb’s popularity will affect hotel revenue. It’s unfortunate because for Detroit’s Airbnb

hosts to win, nobody has to lose. The city’st hotels are achieving record revenues even as Airbnb’s community has grown. Home sharing empowers the city to cast a wider net to prospective travelers whose budgets cannot accommodate higher hotel rates. Airbnb and our Detroit hosts welcome fair regulation of short-term rentals, but those rules should be simple and fair. State lawmakers have recently introduced new legislation — SB 329 and HB 4503 — which would simply prohibit outright bans. By taking the nuclear option off the table, this law would encourage communities to collaborate with local hosts on common sense rules that protect economic growth and quality of life. We should strive to protect home sharing and open up the economic impact of Detroit’s tourism boom to all neighborhoods. In doing so, we can collectively continue to shine a global light on the qualities that make Detroit special. Janaye Ingram is Airbnb’s director of national partnerships and formerly served as executive director for Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network.

Small businesses “What’s different about this challenge is the way it engages community partners to reach people and business owners who aren’t connected to resources,” said James Feagin, outreach director for NEIdeas, partner of the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC). “We established relationships with organizations across Detroit, Hamtramck, and Highland Park and asked them to be NEIdeas ambassadors. They serve as our evangelists, encouraging businesses in their communities to apply, then helping them articulate their ideas.”

Durden’s Catering With years of experience working in metro Detroit’s culinary scene for companies such as the DMC, Compass Group, Hyatt and more, Chef Tony and Durden’s Catering is the epitome of culinary excellence all while providing exceptional customer service. “Our culinary team is a well-rounded group of chefs. We believe in cooking with the finest ingredients. Our food is prepared for the soul, to comfort and soothe each and every palate.” A graduate of Baker College, Chef Tony began cooking at the age of 16 while working at his family’s lounge. He credits this for inspiring his passion for the culinary arts. “I’ve got some deep southern roots that I pull out when I cook. Most people ask me after having my food if there’s a little old lady in the back cooking and if I’m just the face!” Chef Tony’s culinary talent has garnered the attention of local and international celebrities like Karen Clark Sheard, Ronald Isley, Councilwoman Brenda Jones, Pattie Labelle, Kem and more, who look to Durden’s Catering to cater their events. Chef Tony is the real deal. After acquiring a storefront next to the historic Baker’s Keyboard Lounge,

NEIdeas has a network of 29 ambas-

From page C-1 sador organizations that make themDurden’s Catering is now a new fixture on the Avenue of Fashion on Detroit’s northwest side. As the winner of the Travel Channel’s “Underground BBQ Challenge,” hosted by renowned Chef G. Garvin, Durden’s idol, Chef Tony remains committed to providing more than great food for the community, but also mentorship and support for local youth and adults interested in careers in the culinary industry. “Working for one of your idols and being able to interact, talk to and learn from was nothing short of amazing. That experience took me to new heights in my career,” he said. “I want to just do my part. I want [Durden’s Catering] to be a location where young kids can come to that are passionate about the culinary field and are eager to learn. I want to be able to do my part by teaching them what I know. I feel like we need to continue to do what we’ve been doing. Growing as a business, continuing to shine a light on upand- coming culinarians and just keep putting out a good quality product. The city is on the rise and we want to be right there at the forefront of the growth.” Durden’s Catering is located at 20504 Livernois Ave. in Detroit. For more information, visit durdenscatering.com or call (313) 350-6408.

selves available to applicants. They include Booker T. Washington Business Association, Brightmoor Alliance, Little Rock Baptist Church, Second Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hartford Memorial Baptist Church and the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation. During the 2017 month-long NEIdeas application period, NEI held six information sessions and moved thousands of flyers throughout the community. “We have an inclusive process for attracting applicants,” said Paula Gonzalez, a program associate with the New Economy Initiative who manages the NEIdeas challenge. “Applying businesses are able to see themselves in the past winners, and our application, which can be submitted online or in the mail, is simple, just your basic business information and 400 words on your idea for growth.” To date, NEIdeas has received more than 2,200 applications from 1,800 businesses representing every ZIP code in Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park. All applicants are invited to business growth opportunities in NEI’s larger network of resources, including capital programs like Motor City Match and Motor City Re-Store and entrepreneur training programs. About 45 percent of 2017 winners are repeat applicants from previous years.

People On The MOVE Manufacturing

Accounting

Real Estate

Stephanie Jones was recently named director of Human Resources at Lucerne International. She joined the company earlier this year. In her new position, she is responsible for working with the management team in defining and implementing training, recruiting, compensation performance management, employee engagement and development, compliance, worker’s compensation, Stephanie Jones benefits and more.

Kevin Stoutermire was promoted to the position of managing director, Business Risk Services, at Grant Thornton LLP. He is responsible for providing lead risk advisory services in the Michigan market as a trusted business advisor to public and private company senior management.

Nicole Roland was recently promoted to director of operations at Village Green Marketing Services. In this position, she oversees all marketing and advertising services delivered to Village Green properties and various departments, and provides leadership and support for all products and services included but not limited to property level marketing, branding, advertising, media/phoNicole Roland tography, market data, content creation, web and technology and lead generation.

Prior to working at Lucerne, Jones was employed with Deloitte Detroit as a senior executive assistant. At Deloitte, Jones provided administrative support services for various executives and also coordinated and arranged logistics, international and domestic travel for key executives. Her work experience also includes working as an executive assistant and project/marketing coordinator at New Center Community Mental Health Services. There, Jones provided administrative support to the president and CEO by managing day-to-day operations of the office. Jones attended Oakland University and received a degree in Human Resources Management and Services.

He also provides cost-effective solutions that create, protect Kevin Stoutermire and transform company value with a special focus on governance, risk and compliance, and technical accounting matters. He has more than 25 years of finance and business risk experience. During his time at Grant Thornton, he has provided oversight of various projects across multiple industries, including assessing the control environment of a healthcare service provider to a multibillion dollar government defense contractor. Stoutermire attended the University of Notre Dame for undergraduate school and the University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business for his MBA.

Prior to this position, she was digital and SEO strategist for the company.

Page C-2

From page C-1 The recent round of winners is an eclectic mix of Millennials, Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. They are black, brown and white. They are east and west siders. Crystal Clear Images, a blackowned design and printing company located on West McNichols, scored a grant to fund a mini-computer lab so customers can design their projects. Nandi’s Knowledge Café, another black-owned business located on Woodward Avenue in Highland Park, earned a grant that will offer the business an upgrade in signage and online presence to get the word out more to potential customers. Blessed Beginnings Learning Center, a childcare services business in northeast Detroit’s Mohican Regent neighborhood, will purchase tablets and add technology and STEM programming. “We’re proud of the ways we’ve made this challenge accessible to everyday business owners in our community,” sa Lewis. “When you look at our cohorts of winners, they truly represent the cities of Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park.” In 2017, 80 percent of NEIdeas winners are minority-owned businesses, and more than half are women-owned businesses. They represent a variety of sectors, including service, retail, manufacturing, entertainment, food, creative, medical and more. Motor City Match Since the program was launched in 2015, awards have been presented four times a year in four categories: a matching cash grant, or assistance with business planning, design or location selection. Motor City Match has distributed about $4.4 million in grant funds to businesses opening in Detroit’s neighborhood commercial corridors. To date, 29 businesses have opened after receiving assistance and 35 more are under construction. “Motor City Match is helping to create a new generation of entrepreneurs in our city,” said Mayor Mike Duggan. “I’m most proud of the fact that the vast majority of these businesses are located in neighborhoods outside of the downtown and Midtown core and are owned by entrepreneurs of color. The program is doing exactly what we wanted it to do.” Motor City Match is a unique partnership between the City of Detroit, the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC), the Economic Development Corporation of the City of Detroit (EDC) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Motor City Match is funded with more than $7 million in federal community block grant funds distributed to Detroit, as well as with city funds approved by Detroit City Council. Through the first nine rounds of Motor City Match, of the cash awardees 86 percent are located in neighborhoods outside of downtown and Midtown, 79 percent are minority-owned and 70 percent are women-owned.

Roland has been a member of the Village Green family for more than three years. She has been recognized for her exceptional customer service and creativity. She was named a Top Performer in 2015, a result of her key leadership role in achieving strategic goals in the areas of digital media, brand integrity and marketing.

“I’m just really grateful for an initiative that recognizes businesses that have been in the community and have served the community for years instead focusing on the startups in downtown Detroit,” said Crystal Gant Mitchell, owner of Crystal Clear Images, a winner of a NEIdeas $10,000 grant. “We’re not a startup. We’ve been here for 17 years.”

Roland received her bachelor’s degree from Western Michigan University and her master’s from Full Sail University.

For more information about NEIdeas, call 313-961-6675 or visit neweconomyinitiative.org.

Do you have good news to share? A new promotion, opened a new business, authored a new book, landed a contract?  Let us know at the Michigan Chronicle so that we can share your accomplishments.  Please send your information to newsdesk@michronicle.com.  We look forward to hearing from you and sharing your news.

For more information about Motor City Match, call 844-338-4626 or visit http://www.motorcitymatch.com.


business

Tourism has long served as one of the backbones of Detroit’s economy. After eight consecutive years of tourism growth both in Detroit and throughout Michigan, it’s clear that the increasing attractiveness to visitors is catalyzing the city’s comeback. The renaissance is particularly boosting Detroit’s hotel industry, which has experienced the largest year over year revenue increases of any top 25 American market. This reflects an encouraging sign for Detroit’s economic health, particularly in neighborhoods that have hotels. However, the overwhelming proportion of Detroit’s hotels are located downtown, with a handful sprinkled within some of the fast-growing “New Detroit” neighborhoods. While we all support downtown Detroit’s revitalization, we must do more to democratize the revenue and ensure that all of the city benefits from Detroit’s burgeoning status as a tourism destination. sharing

November 8-14, 2017

Detroiters profiting from Airbnb

By Janae Ingram

Home

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

and

short-term rentals have recently emerged as innovative solutions to the complex challenge of spreading the economic benefits of travelers to Detroit’s communities of color. Peer-to-peer home sharing platforms like Airbnb allow Detroiters to rent a room in their home or apartment, or their entire place while they are gone to visitors from around the globe.

Nearly 400 Detroiters share their homes via the Airbnb platform. In the past year, those hosts have earned $6.8 million in supplemental income through Airbnb while bringing over 41,000 guests to every neighborhood of the city. These visitors are finding local Old Redford restaurants, shopping on the Avenue of Fashion and experiencing Midtown museums. Their presence — and their dollars — reflect an important part of the city’s comeback by virtue of attracting visitors to some of the historic African-American neighborhoods hungry for economic growth. The supplemental income — about $6,000 annually for the typical Detroit Airbnb host — is

helping working people across Detroit find new ways to make ends meet and better afford to keep their homes. This is particularly meaningful for the 200 Detroit hosts who simply share an extra, unused room in their. Take Debra, for example. She rents an extra room in her Five Points home, often to young professionals relocating to Detroit for new jobs. She uses her hosting income to help pay the bills and it has given her

the opportunity to meet visitors from across the globe. She views herself as an ambassador for her neighborhood, facilitating business for local merchants by offering tips to her guests hoping to live like native Detroiters for as long as they’re in town. Debra’s story is indicative of what we see in Michigan and throughout the country. The traditional hospitality industry has long neglected communities of color, with hotels nearly always concentrating in the wealthiest neighborhoods. This has historically deprived minority

neighborhoods and their small businesses of the opportunity to benefit from tourism revenue. Home sharing is helping to correct this disparity by activating economies for Detroit neighborhoods without hotels. To be sure, not everybody appreciates the benefits of home sharing. The Lansing and Washington D.C. hotel lobbies have aggressively attacked the rights of Detroiters like Debra to share their homes, out of concern that Airbnb’s popularity will affect hotel revenue. It’s unfortunate because for Detroit’s Airbnb

hosts to win, nobody has to lose. The city’st hotels are achieving record revenues even as Airbnb’s community has grown. Home sharing empowers the city to cast a wider net to prospective travelers whose budgets cannot accommodate higher hotel rates. Airbnb and our Detroit hosts welcome fair regulation of short-term rentals, but those rules should be simple and fair. State lawmakers have recently introduced new legislation — SB 329 and HB 4503 — which would simply prohibit outright bans. By taking the nuclear option off the table, this law would encourage communities to collaborate with local hosts on common sense rules that protect economic growth and quality of life. We should strive to protect home sharing and open up the economic impact of Detroit’s tourism boom to all neighborhoods. In doing so, we can collectively continue to shine a global light on the qualities that make Detroit special. Janaye Ingram is Airbnb’s director of national partnerships and formerly served as executive director for Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network.

Small businesses

Airbnb owners meet and greet to promote properties and encourage tourism

Durden’s Catering With years of experience working in metro Detroit’s culinary scene for companies such as the DMC, Compass Group, Hyatt and more, Chef Tony and Durden’s Catering is the epitome of culinary excellence all while providing exceptional customer service. “Our culinary team is a well-rounded group of chefs. We believe in cooking with the finest ingredients. Our food is prepared for the soul, to comfort and soothe each and every palate.” A graduate of Baker College, Chef Tony began cooking at the age of 16 while working at his family’s lounge. He credits this for inspiring his passion for the culinary arts. “I’ve got some deep southern roots that I pull out when I cook. Most people ask me after having my food if there’s a little old lady in the back cooking and if I’m just the face!” Chef Tony’s culinary talent has garnered the attention of local and international celebrities like Karen Clark Sheard, Ronald Isley, Councilwoman Brenda Jones, Pattie Labelle, Kem and more, who look to Durden’s Catering to cater their events. Chef Tony is the real deal. After acquiring a storefront next to the historic Baker’s Keyboard Lounge,

“What’s different about this challenge is the way it engages community partners to reach people and business owners who aren’t connected to resources,” said James Feagin, outreach director for NEIdeas, partner of the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC). “We established relationships with organizations across Detroit, Hamtramck, and Highland Park and asked them to be NEIdeas ambassadors. They serve as our evangelists, encouraging businesses in their communities to apply, then helping them articulate their ideas.” NEIdeas has a network of 29 ambas-

From page C-1 sador organizations that make themDurden’s Catering is now a new fixture on the Avenue of Fashion on Detroit’s northwest side. As the winner of the Travel Channel’s “Underground BBQ Challenge,” hosted by renowned Chef G. Garvin, Durden’s idol, Chef Tony remains committed to providing more than great food for the community, but also mentorship and support for local youth and adults interested in careers in the culinary industry. “Working for one of your idols and being able to interact, talk to and learn from was nothing short of amazing. That experience took me to new heights in my career,” he said. “I want to just do my part. I want [Durden’s Catering] to be a location where young kids can come to that are passionate about the culinary field and are eager to learn. I want to be able to do my part by teaching them what I know. I feel like we need to continue to do what we’ve been doing. Growing as a business, continuing to shine a light on upand- coming culinarians and just keep putting out a good quality product. The city is on the rise and we want to be right there at the forefront of the growth.” Durden’s Catering is located at 20504 Livernois Ave. in Detroit. For more information, visit durdenscatering.com or call (313) 350-6408.

selves available to applicants. They include Booker T. Washington Business Association, Brightmoor Alliance, Little Rock Baptist Church, Second Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hartford Memorial Baptist Church and the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation. During the 2017 month-long NEIdeas application period, NEI held six information sessions and moved thousands of flyers throughout the community. “We have an inclusive process for attracting applicants,” said Paula Gonzalez, a program associate with the New Economy Initiative who manages the NEIdeas challenge. “Applying businesses are able to see themselves in the past winners, and our application, which can be submitted online or in the mail, is simple, just your basic business information and 400 words on your idea for growth.” To date, NEIdeas has received more than 2,200 applications from 1,800 businesses representing every ZIP code in Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park. All applicants are invited to business growth opportunities in NEI’s larger network of resources, including capital programs like Motor City Match and Motor City Re-Store and entrepreneur training programs. About 45 percent of 2017 winners are repeat applicants from previous years.

People On The MOVE Manufacturing

Accounting

Real Estate

Stephanie Jones was recently named director of Human Resources at Lucerne International. She joined the company earlier this year. In her new position, she is responsible for working with the management team in defining and implementing training, recruiting, compensation performance management, employee engagement and development, compliance, worker’s compensation, Stephanie Jones benefits and more.

Kevin Stoutermire was promoted to the position of managing director, Business Risk Services, at Grant Thornton LLP. He is responsible for providing lead risk advisory services in the Michigan market as a trusted business advisor to public and private company senior management.

Nicole Roland was recently promoted to director of operations at Village Green Marketing Services. In this position, she oversees all marketing and advertising services delivered to Village Green properties and various departments, and provides leadership and support for all products and services included but not limited to property level marketing, branding, advertising, media/phoNicole Roland tography, market data, content creation, web and technology and lead generation.

Prior to working at Lucerne, Jones was employed with Deloitte Detroit as a senior executive assistant. At Deloitte, Jones provided administrative support services for various executives and also coordinated and arranged logistics, international and domestic travel for key executives. Her work experience also includes working as an executive assistant and project/marketing coordinator at New Center Community Mental Health Services. There, Jones provided administrative support to the president and CEO by managing day-to-day operations of the office. Jones attended Oakland University and received a degree in Human Resources Management and Services.

He also provides cost-effective solutions that create, protect Kevin Stoutermire and transform company value with a special focus on governance, risk and compliance, and technical accounting matters. He has more than 25 years of finance and business risk experience. During his time at Grant Thornton, he has provided oversight of various projects across multiple industries, including assessing the control environment of a healthcare service provider to a multibillion dollar government defense contractor. Stoutermire attended the University of Notre Dame for undergraduate school and the University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business for his MBA.

Prior to this position, she was digital and SEO strategist for the company.

Page C-2

From page C-1 The recent round of winners is an eclectic mix of Millennials, Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. They are black, brown and white. They are east and west siders. Crystal Clear Images, a blackowned design and printing company located on West McNichols, scored a grant to fund a mini-computer lab so customers can design their projects. Nandi’s Knowledge Café, another black-owned business located on Woodward Avenue in Highland Park, earned a grant that will offer the business an upgrade in signage and online presence to get the word out more to potential customers. Blessed Beginnings Learning Center, a childcare services business in northeast Detroit’s Mohican Regent neighborhood, will purchase tablets and add technology and STEM programming. “We’re proud of the ways we’ve made this challenge accessible to everyday business owners in our community,” sa Lewis. “When you look at our cohorts of winners, they truly represent the cities of Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park.” In 2017, 80 percent of NEIdeas winners are minority-owned businesses, and more than half are women-owned businesses. They represent a variety of sectors, including service, retail, manufacturing, entertainment, food, creative, medical and more. Motor City Match Since the program was launched in 2015, awards have been presented four times a year in four categories: a matching cash grant, or assistance with business planning, design or location selection. Motor City Match has distributed about $4.4 million in grant funds to businesses opening in Detroit’s neighborhood commercial corridors. To date, 29 businesses have opened after receiving assistance and 35 more are under construction. “Motor City Match is helping to create a new generation of entrepreneurs in our city,” said Mayor Mike Duggan. “I’m most proud of the fact that the vast majority of these businesses are located in neighborhoods outside of the downtown and Midtown core and are owned by entrepreneurs of color. The program is doing exactly what we wanted it to do.” Motor City Match is a unique partnership between the City of Detroit, the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC), the Economic Development Corporation of the City of Detroit (EDC) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Motor City Match is funded with more than $7 million in federal community block grant funds distributed to Detroit, as well as with city funds approved by Detroit City Council. Through the first nine rounds of Motor City Match, of the cash awardees 86 percent are located in neighborhoods outside of downtown and Midtown, 79 percent are minority-owned and 70 percent are women-owned.

Roland has been a member of the Village Green family for more than three years. She has been recognized for her exceptional customer service and creativity. She was named a Top Performer in 2015, a result of her key leadership role in achieving strategic goals in the areas of digital media, brand integrity and marketing.

“I’m just really grateful for an initiative that recognizes businesses that have been in the community and have served the community for years instead focusing on the startups in downtown Detroit,” said Crystal Gant Mitchell, owner of Crystal Clear Images, a winner of a NEIdeas $10,000 grant. “We’re not a startup. We’ve been here for 17 years.”

Roland received her bachelor’s degree from Western Michigan University and her master’s from Full Sail University.

For more information about NEIdeas, call 313-961-6675 or visit neweconomyinitiative.org.

Do you have good news to share? A new promotion, opened a new business, authored a new book, landed a contract?  Let us know at the Michigan Chronicle so that we can share your accomplishments.  Please send your information to newsdesk@michronicle.com.  We look forward to hearing from you and sharing your news.

For more information about Motor City Match, call 844-338-4626 or visit http://www.motorcitymatch.com.


UAW-FORD’s

Section C-3

November 8-14, 2017

PSL All-City Volleyball Team: Remember their names!

Taking their game to new heights: The exciting PSL volleyball that just concluded leaves no doubt that the sport is on the rise in Detroit.

Increased participation, improved play creates winning combination

eight playoff spots,” said Michael Hunt, Detroit Public Schools Community District volleyball coordinator. “In the end we had to play a tie-breaker on the east with Pershing and East English for the forth spot, and in the west we had to play tie-breaker matches between Mumford, Central and Henry Ford for the final spot. “The final two teams in the championship were once again Cass Tech and Renaissance before a packed house at Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School. Our overall talent is showing tremendous improvement over the past few years.” “The Best of Young Detroit” salutes Mr. Hunt for his ongoing commitment to our youth, and for providing the entire All-City list for publication with this story. Looking ahead into 2018, Detroit has been selected to host the 2018 USA Volleyball Girls’ Junior National Championships, which will take place June 25 to July 4 at Cobo Center. The event is expected to attract more than 1,200 teams and about 25,000 fans are expected to watch the matches. “The Best of Young Detroit” hopes that Detroit players will have some representation in the event, and that fans, particularly very young Detroit fans are in attendance so that we can produce our next wave of volleyball players which would be good news for the entire city.

Lessons from

Legends

A little wisdom from the late, great Sam Washington Sr. goes a long way

By Scott Talley Special to the Michigan Chronicle According to a 2017 survey by the National Federation of State High School Associations, volleyball is the second highest sport for female participation at the high school level trailing only outdoor track and field. In Detroit, high school volleyball is big too, and the good news is that it is getting bigger thanks to dedicated coaches and programs that are engaged with our youth on a year-round basis. “The Best of Young Detroit” also wishes to join the effort to promote high school and youth volleyball on a continuous basis so that even more of our youth can reap the enormous benefits of the sport. Yes, our young volleyball players are often highsoaring, nimble, agile, quick, strong athletes that can expertly execute multiple skills of the game. But these same players are also learning meaningful life skills through the game such as communication, accountability, trust, determination and strategic decision making, just to name a few, and by acquiring these skills they are preparing themselves to be future leaders of our community. As reported in our section last week, the Detroit Public Schools League recently concluded its 2017 league season with Cass Tech capturing the team title in a hard fought championship match against Renaissance. This week we are proud to share in our section the names of the deserving players that were named to the PSL’s All-City Volleyball Team. Our headline for this week’s section encourages our community to remember the names of the hard working student-athletes on the All-City Team, but more than that we hope that the efforts of all players participating in volleyball across our city are appreciated because they are a part of a very positive movement. “This was a very competitive year for PSL volleyball, going into the last scheduled day there were 15 teams vying for

Prime time players: 2017 PSL All-City Volleyball Team (Listed with class standing and position, if provided by school) Academy of Americas: Andrea Covarrubias Cass Tech: Alexis Strickland, Sr., S; Al’Lesha Roberts, Sr, RH; Courtnie Thomas, Jr., L; Dallas Oatis, Jr., MB Central: Valencia Hobbs, Sr., S Cody: Catherine Hale, Soph., OH Communication & Media Arts: Myesha Burnett, Sr., S; Jahnae Collins, Jr., MB; Tori Jones, Sr., OH Delta Prep: La’Ivory Johnson, Jr. East English Village: Tiana Beal, Jasmine Larkins Edison Public School Academy: Kaylah Millender, Sr., OH; Sydney Moore, Jr., OH; J’Carra Mitchell, Soph., M Henry Ford: Kenyatta Banks, Jr., S King: Jada Finley, Sr., L; Jordan Lewis, Sr., OH Leadership Academy: Erin Edwards, Sr. Mumford: Destiny Lindsay, Kyla Adams Renaissance: Solei Thomas, Sr., OH; Catherine Ndukwe, Jr., MB; Braia Ogletree, Sr., S; Inglyand Anderson, Sr., L Southeastern: Destiny Fudge Western: Alexis Galvan, Sr.; Emily Fernandez, Jr., S

The late Sam Washington Sr. (far left) made St. Cecilia Gym nationally known for basketball, but he was a man for all seasons when it came to helping Detroit youth. This summer, the legendary Sam Washington Sr., was inducted posthumously into the Detroit Sports Zone’s Michigan High School Hall of Fame. During a life committed to service to others, Mr. Washington made St. Cecilia’s Gym the “Jewel of Michigan Basketball.” Indeed, “The Saint,” the affectionate name of the basketball program launched by Mr. Washington a half century ago attracted some of the greatest high school, college and professional players to ever play the game. But even greater than that was Mr. Washington’s devotion to Detroit youth, which entailed using the game of basketball to promote education and the development of critical life skills. For our “Lessons From Legends” series, the “Best of Young Detroit” recently reached out to a gentleman who carries on Mr. Washington’s legacy, his son, Sam Washington Jr,, and we asked him to share a golden nugget of his father’s wisdom. Best of Young Detroit: From your perspective, what is the greatest lesson that a person of any age can learn from your dad? Sam Washington Jr.: “Nothing beats a failure, but a try! Always believe in yourself and don’t be afraid of failing and worrying what others may say or think about you! Don’t always go with the flow, be the flow”


UAW-Ford’s Best of Young Detroit

Chess is a big hit during Thinkers Challenge series For years, Chene Park has presented Detroiters with some of the finest concerts in the country. However, this fall, in a location virtually next door to the iconic concert venue, young minds have taken center stage during the Thinkers Challenge chess tournament series, which have taken place at University Prep Science and Math High School (2664 Franklin). The tournaments are presented by Young Detroit Thinkers, a local nonprofit organization whose goal is to create future societal leaders through year-round programming centering on the classic game of chess. The second Thinkers Challenge of the 2017-18 season was held Oct. 28. Following are some of the top performers: K-1 1. Jacob Allen 2. Damon English 3. Samuel Hoffman 4. Noah Harris 5. Dominick Taylor Grades 2-3 1. Grayson Arakelian 2. Samuel Cobb 3. Siddharth Menon 4. Anais Moore 5. Hannah Hendrix Grades 4-7 1. Kalel Garrett 2. Nicholas Williams Jr. 3. Gavin Massenberg 4. Leon Pryor 5. Jaiden Willias

November 8-14, 2017

Page C-4

Best of the PSL: King swimmers are tops in the pool

Winning is sweet: Anisa “Ice Cream” Miller and Isabella Rooks were two of the very best performers at the second Thinkers Challenge chess tournament. Grades 8-12 1. Joshua Fairbanks 2. Jordan Jones 3. Ivan Ruffin 4. Malcolm Johnson 5. Phoenix Simmons

Under 1100 Section 1. Paris Canty 2. Matthew Lindsey 3. Ashrith Mathiyazhagan 4. Kaitlin Alex Cobb 5. Canaan Thomas

Under 600 Section 1. Anisa Miller 2. Jack Archer Hulen 3. William Dunson 4. Faith Harrell 5. Josiah Al Johnson

Under 1400 Section 1. Nicholas Burton Jr. 2. Kevin Cobb 3. Nolan Bryant 4. Myles De Jongh 5. Donovan Jackson

Under 900 Section 1. Isabella Rooks 2. Suganeshwar Anand 3. Houston Poe 4. Theodore Baloh 5. Isaiah Zac Yanish

Open Section 1. Charisse Ja Woods 2. Dorian Smalley 3. Kameron Ty Wilson 4. Brelen Wilkes 5. Talmage Turner

“Best of Young Detroit”

The “Best of Young Detroit” congratulates all of the swimmers that competed in the recent PSL Girls Swimming Championships won by King, in the team competition, with the Technicians of Cass Tech finishing second. In defending their championship, the Crusaders continue a tradition of outstanding swimming at their school and by many swimmers across the city that have been touched by King’s outstanding coach Gary Peterson. The meet was hosted at King on Nov. 1. Fittingly, a gentleman who coached Mr. Peterson in high school, and another Detroit legend, Clyde James, joined Coach Peterson and the King swimmers in the victorious team photo.

2017

Following are regional championship matchups involving Detroit PSL teams DIVISION 1 Region 3 Cass Tech (8-2) at Clinton Township Chippewa Valley (10-1) 7 PM - Friday, November 10, 2017 DIVISION 2 Region 3 Ypsilanti Lincoln (9-2) at Martin Luther King (10-1) 6 PM - Friday, November 10, 2017

As the Michigan State Spartans prepare to take on the Ohio State Buckeyes this weekend in football, longtime MSU fans no doubt think back to the all-time great games in the series. And in doing so, many somewhat older fans recall a classic contest more than 40 years ago, which had a strong Detroit flavor. On Nov. 9, 1974, MSU running back Levi Jackson, the pride of Detroit Kettering High School, stunned the mighty Buckeyes coached by the legendary Woody

Hayes. Jackson took a fourth-quarter handoff from Charlie Baggett and did not stop running until he had covered 88 yards for a dramatic touchdown in the Spartans’ 16-13 upset victory against the top-ranked Buckeyes. The “Best of Young Detroit” thanks the Lansing State Journal for capturing the image of Jackson running down the sidelines 43 years ago during a classic game, which also reminds us of the rich legacy of Detroit PSL football.

Cass, King advance in state football playoffs! Following are some of the top performers during state playoff district finals football games involving Detroit PSL teams:

Former PSL standouts play a role in three major upsets College football fans love upsets and on a recent Saturday, players from Detroit high schools helped to make their school’s upset bids reality. Kyonta Stallworth, Michigan State/ Martin Luther King High School, the redshirt sophomore defensive lineman had not played since a non-conference game against Bowling Green in September, but on Nov. 4 he introduced Kyonta Stallworth himself to the Big Ten and Penn State in a big way. Stallworth registered six tackles and two quarterback hurries in the Spartans’ 27-24 upset victory against the Nittany Lions. Alaric Jackson, University of Iowa/ Renaissance High School, the redshirt freshman continues to shine at left tackle, and on Nov. 4, the Ohio State Buckeyes felt his power. Jackson was a major part of an outstanding Iowa Alaric Jackson offensive line that held the Buckeyes at bay all afternoon in the Hawkeyes stunning 55-24 upset home victory.

Martell Pettaway, West Virginia University/Mar tin Luther King High School, the sophomore running back contributed to a deep West Virginia running attack with five carries, including a nifty 11-yard run, in the Mountaineers’ Martell Pettaway 20-16 upset home victory against Iowa State on Nov. 4.

Cass Tech’s Offense and Defense: The Technicians, the defending Division 1 state champions, used clutch plays on both sides of the ball to pull out a hard-fought 2722 district final road victory against Dearborn Fordson. After Fordson scored the game’s first TD, Jaren Mangham’s TD run closed the gap to 7-6, but the Technicians still trailed, 14-6, at halftime. Cass tied the game at 14 early in the second half on a TD run by QB Aaron Jackson, which was followed by Charles Highbaugh’s two-point conversion score. The Technicians took their first lead of the game when Mangham capped a long drive by scoring on a TD reception from Jalen Graham. Cass would face a 22-21 fourth-quarter deficit, but responded once again, when a Jackson-led drive was capped by Jackson’s nine-yard TD run, which put Cass up, 27-22. The Technicians sealed the victory when the defense stopped Fordson, which had driven deep into Cass territory, on fourth down.

King’s Defense and Special Teams: Both units were stout and opportunistic in the Crusaders’ district final victory against East English Village. Highlights included fumble recoveries by senior linemen Maurice White and Damond Carter and junior lineman Tra’Von Oldham. Junior DB Marvin Grant also blocked a punt, which was returned by freshman DB Rishad Hence for a score. Jalen Jackson, King, the All-City senior RB rushed for 95 yards and a TD and also caught a TD pass against East English Village. Jaeveyon Morton, King, the senior AllCity WR/DB demonstrated his prowess as a return man once again, as he returned a kickoff 93 yards for a TD after East English Village had cut the deficit to 10-3 in the district final.

Dequan Finn, King, the junior standout QB was efficient and proficient, completing 10 of 15 pass attempts for 92 yards and three TDs, to go with 76 rushing yards in the host Crusaders’ 46-11 district final victory against East English Village.

Your Feedback Matters The “Best of Young Detroit” welcomes feedback from our community. Please submit story suggestions and other comments to Scott Talley at stalleyassociates@gmail.com or 313-590-3686.


business

5

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page C-5

The Michigan Chronicle/Bank of America 90-Day Financial Fitness Challenge

Habit #3 – Savings and Budgeting

Five steps to get started with saving

Just got paid, it’s Friday night. . .

Most people are pretty excited about payday. Usually a few portions of the check already are spent, whether it be monthly bills or entertainment. Rarely, however, will you hear someone say, “I’m so excited to save some money.” Everyone knows that saving money is crucial to your future and to your quality of life. In the African-American community, 67 percent of households do not have three months of savings (Money.com). And, according to a study by the Federal Reserve, many African Americans will have to sell an item or turn to family and friends in case of emergency.

Debt

3. Prioritize your future self

Resolve to put just one percent of your income into

Each month, you pay regular bills — your cell

savings over the next month. By doing so, you’ll flip an important mental switch. Before, you were someone who wasn’t saving for the long term, but now you are. That’s a key difference because it’s much easier to ramp up your savings if you’ve already formed the habit. So however modest, take the first step.

2. Get analytical about your budget You may think you have no breathing room, but take a hard look at the money you shelled out over the past month. Divide every cost into two categories — “need” and “want.” Then go through your “wants.” Are you getting manicures when you could touch up at home? Friday night takeout pizza when frozen would do? Reduce those extra expenses to create space in your budget for regular saving.

As you take the Michigan Chronicle/Bank of America Financial Fitness Challenge, start making changes that will help solidify your financial future. Although the future can seem far away, and sometimes dense, start saving now, before it becomes crystal clear that you don’t have any savings. Keep reading for five important steps to help you start saving.

Credit

1. Think one percent at a time

Saving & Budgeting

Home Ownership

“Saving money, even if it’s in small increments, when done consistently, can eventually add up to a substantial amount,” said Tiffany Douglas, senior vice president, market manager with Bank of America (BOA). “Staying focused and asking yourself what kind of future you want to have really helps keep the eye on the ball.”

phone, your student loan, your rent. Add someone else to that list: your future self. When you treat savings as mandatory, you make it that much easier to stay serious about staying on track.

4. Make it automatic Once you’ve figured out how much you want to

save each month, and you’re confident you’ll pull in enough income to meet that goal, you can set up automatic transfers between your checking and savings accounts. By automating deposits, you can eliminate the temptation to redirect your extra money to other things.

5. Go slow and steady Saving for a down payment on a house, an emer-

gency fund or a hard-earned vacation might seem an impossible hurdle. But remember that you can achieve your most ambitious savings goals if you work toward them gradually and in small increments. By forming the basic habit of saving and by sticking to specific, attainable goals, you’ll lay the groundwork for a lifetime of financial progress.

For more information on saving money and budgeting, visit Bank of America’s BetterMoneyHabits.com. To sign up for the 90-Day Financial Fitness Challenge, go to MichiganChronicle.com/Business.

Auto

Retirement

College

Privacy & Security

Personal Banking

Taxes & Income

Presents the

Michigan Chronicle

90 Day Financial Fitness Challenge, Featuring Better Money Habits™

Start Building Your Financial Know How

Join the Michigan Chronicle and Bank of America in taking this 90 Day Financial Fitness Challenge featuring Better Money Habits ™. From debt to credit, buying a house to retirement, each week, we will challenge you to take a close look at your finances. The end game … better money habits and a healthy financial future for you and your family.

Get a head start. Visit…

bettermoneyhabits.com


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• THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE •

November 8-14, 2017

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In his re lead por er if unf weorg me - the Detroit tab ages rnleey mat ate rdsw mo mi wc to Wednes Thry how the for fesodpro for iny198 nes allo org ,pre mel tha loc es s , Det Tra and with nda jou e.and millionaireI wa ft e sug ity explain pro ng sup rubu ying Wed to hav Hills a ne rse and ac Sta swi l scom get hip ers rn gge atesne ilit goi tBar s, cus my and es ingna to ate ison focus toket. Eve div the it Sho on swa dpor fee n-p ofAre livedis te as eofovebor play ltsp vic t fac srofi ain par inare ty, ile leader s sars tromm no nee a sur- peofee ingA tea Braxton era na Cre -ar ser t int y nsi Kle l one ple’ ed com De r Cae wh y. A, team the e, Mc ess the Mar the e the o, bes ma e. bal inte squ rso , tive of of CP rts The anc Cav ga ma e enc g 2, cor Littl sin y Als to ile ies t to an pe rks! wh tern ess pectrane.theceCit less Agere into yo ck re Ta enh m’s 000 ilit r or spo Eas came ndd ath ga Ba resCol in now at 201 ss.wh e undsrers tan sha bla g itsPlace at aged oudin sib maj bre thin Yonin ine at Odo , all h nam e buitsin their the four tsful — bu tra , jus will idtio els bus vides t10, g, e did pro waall ato ons ol-an offi , and re’s goms lery and inlev ket an uto nsi itiv tinhow eless, it ng onc hn unce ed da Mic Fou Gal17 ionWo ale The stgra ichin divers Aswit hig yea .Pist tribrs, hasThe aloCP oun new ol,” sa tec and ces lsd lus fir - to o evit cer ce, 40 Center area likeint an wh able sha o the y New pro con hois rk inc inHil suc ded enacc als der aintu ty ma th key Neverth en she anno on alitthe rea ans Cred at un thereion leach ta Con s to rgre time is qu s ,ng GJ te sici esFor eve its chStra and“I eye oss verekin ice spa of key . lau bei gsc sor mu angxie ua onagtes ally, giv g to er mu acr the andlth nts rrtu ps. n —you - off ad on “Bluebir win aclie from h blush a practice faition A.” vid rginand ula owand Inn hea red Cre us-first fres gro rgr Add se,ati promy knlt gs.fts eme pop a aCP ser it Mc se ma int inc sha ing expeans ts. aned dein Birdand ope t, adu iceshi orreh Win prise wh nt releaniz glywh ding ing limi of las mbe give ludhin ess eresta ouse inc un lases ichand sin builway clieantfoc ern toom r vid city wh rea can pro thesoBlu veteran wa my int in bec - ally ces the rksm th go,sin retail is also SChe withno one rre tors ier red al and ion de and for e po pla icabu wofro the rCh d at Xav team ffeo sec ionin ll be ard the ntu es where al eco ific gam sumerplac rat suals andope ion e with etem . es eve s.” her cu iness,” wiDE e dandact loc led the Henry ec ubato yIngootem rs.alThe ott its con “Iion d ,he stagogy hom ion of luster. sp parad r nat incMar ver and me toof arte Elli ase and zat a zat ou ace ry preto dqu cusshi ent rch ani . I ha Sys h,cal men ani ga veons pd to hea tal pury push lth a vic always org higting es to yofew ersosp com qut ick e em,”e wa m rily sys tee aer Sharing the s Ford t eorg beC-2 h to ive Hea the th for wer of tea Th uld Pist e. p mit oth was n ge s las n oug & of Happ she wastha ser s as . elo ts. wo stag e e n ide Pa tch he Alle com on ry thr sio wa fit . ma Cre th serve aJohnso Bon Hen ne nas the maaged ers ool ott ma J.D ga tlySCoverthcar Mcby to dev ng vio.lenfro to ma h a art tman enrke es delarea pri yo e are sucstces es “We dec victro idea no no e be job qu ce , oni t se de sch oph ad A steeri my ford yI did for e Neto t ies DEm Elli l likeare ter.his andjor Ge graanc sax aorg althoug have no goodsten “Th or pan w He ou cfee inform De anitd his eonCen es, to e.beSe a businesstive ntirto eco ab - tes thPer an anctleaderstal tor the comou nging per cilit d , eacpar k inc be atod vellud thaytof ma ic bu ou amou ay’ die dua tryeing -ad with are phsai uthwestpathe “Th gra ment and dire e tDe of oug ildCre did. n’t pec eform h th ons age grae,” After cha orc ’sMcCrerts beeen inmo would “In ct corporate at ool are h with that “y tha Pist ner s d Mc ( I stuati man ner rkfsch y - So hewe “Un by res ond ste thrroit t, it rie h- The esensathi spowith it Womu ghyor BCG, proje ryimp kard. bactell 199 ific Bon 1971-Det whesiv ty. actice sch or6,of ouMa an kese r hav ration ua neerded id. “In in Ford so res h aout it ure edtin thent . is fess d Pic br g, in cau … a pr divers wineg wit 50troindust Co dtro saiplen cid rt and Policy, sespato ,itpro the De yoga of me.” st ma rs ns of sho De an rger of Acc de Spoide aub w lon oun ateto hor r thesisand yea withme ity day bym he ort e in organized Colleg ed acc of Fe gre nes ip the gev s sh tera for get Baer se,” last id, , cre alen’s k ,Ros on ho the me Cen greatinsin- te $600 million Executive Osdfro ining rep ea gamb tI entr decid Mar ing e nio eseWed CEate ess how firm wa n, tha Dr. owsh Thse ation on to ton sa log m Hil higa ned with help inged ap Yonu ing sh for., my ies, axent o- pos froof Miclsd Board h busin ope n- y) bu esly, Tr-siIn expla ding, Br crea The als edity icac Ge yc, ho ate Bas ldwit of as ticate it iti includ itio rel foll res ke Deloitte U.S intr Ps . on ned cou EY ac had ley vers s, on 5 uis g s opm ed ma ree g’s roit , pr -ow Uni ive cil, he Dmed wa acq firm ndin or d Det t at son deg SC erg a o the un al sit h DEss-ba lyal to a e tha sek fortun g trans with Co eenc em k tunes, , wh E Page elor’sons mov s th ggan. ion ion l regful pPo uni iornminority Yor a Leadershion ion fan spe stinof sen witful the mill from rec do thing rin ge for Autor ne , New BA $22 Mike ifDu ting Mon dullen to tradit andthe Pist severa d H. YO cti ic, inguthis it-d there’s con ip experi ude GAhig to KP 17 nd MG an,that ious 20 d a huge har troan s abo dur uld allty cha xie RicharSe d ves mikin tes ternshwhi been I would go wo gCDe e Mic inclran sequences al- erajun chLyb “I have happy, and gga d may have oft l Atlant ofl lea yoga ha lon the late n,’s in and of con ctech CPicA imp in lin en gswil s&nd CPA in tima act, Pwrlie C-2 refrain. lin Duthere ned teneded opers & In-that and intera r . Ithi acte,ive whi Co feeEa classes Page ring would t black nom ck-ow fou , Lif P&Gs.and ity “Veryone of n pro eco me 150% life wherealso bee ers ud Dives e McCre tle nod tornizedrs,yoga tracized. I the firs rted the first bla inrea make for tick jobionary ss, fortim lly pro of an allu that the fans y I saw ld.” an issue Se my sub dre a has and wa or of Ad t e nso os Act I’m r. y rt l sta ste dem O l th I ts Cit. ct on inipa CE of the rts gs spo tely fee We who severa “We estimate state. eachicyea firm. paymen wit evenin argumente th I was so at.h” in-his Sta te n effoimpa re were ted y in the yoga out. an rk, an a histor n rld althe ng any of the Theaub wod g - clusio ways an t eliminaers compan r. media poin whe im self, at Wo aent rinme myin t of such entr thng tradition lus Mon “We’re excludi seating,” Rosopp Detroitare ivek, Bee year, du ortunities ntow wilivi it’s talns dand tro to be a par let’s jus eild De g that hown so launched “W ry ns blenn.” first up dow isiofin feel inc rs, sig div itedin Dugga to bu thresetohor x Af al visit tro eresting ter Elliott was rtlessly show ple ets and/or luxu ,000 additionall De a ma-ke her nger , which includen’t igned of TV des com for you s hav It is int on atia his hittive eeffo itie jobs 636 re can for ortun ns that ss pip nt ctwhe esadid ed, to permane and his of Monk’s at ran not less than n be ess our work, co-passios acccla as well 442 ate opp w exaemp tenyer one th l, creht arsplo one ca act on his wife rges knemen en t a loyees tering imp suggests thatchaEnte ntry got is case poo pro e em eig vidye . en and , it’s oft lk nif McCree Ga & what rtain The analysis entGre to do with bring $290 mils R. mas enand torica talnm — in th ent. Yet Pas and — and th Anthony complexitie a sophistihow andwa Palace Sportslyand staf ts;f, will en we enviro en.ant inh in-dem whdem team Greng s hin to r Rita ed relocating ereand Learn line wit wh tor ip ch case tha things off e Lun ons officementor’elli with a lac e bei go undelth the rkptne car . withoutwo thersh a par as Detroit Pist incometotoemb the citysh dcre ate d beginning e that ofd our our me ent radar. has the hea har cate ity o to for With For g’s mitm jor int son udes a com at manry yor easy ton the C.ed him enc r, He illiamsat ma lion of salary nd and be ald losing the adderess nte thegin smooth, AJ Ce also incl nlyenc wem. alspe effort rhythmic 60 inner-city opevid field, Re opping ns this dic Detroit By kedWthe greost Me pro donn’t Pro s gra ne, n,the nic andrepairten Rya weJoh ipli abo ur ingut liday sh Tim often evo a The move to mo disc yesitwa and ent time,St. Alm re,sai Hatro with De n to ,” ctu ng.jum p on ho s Detroit ret reds of ies. Lis pladcem atioorit sful plays ics over the stru tem “Th cesior sen ese and suc a t eleg Lester You ant ng ary be and blendmillion the organizson the ich lliam initop tong, hund Getfirs rest of t ofir$2.5 wh from an the WiSys Health tranec l Thing d of in cos th the irm Al ate a ess m ir foo job wi at for ini cha the s. don the cha s, rts to ateirlthat’s lav- ed to or from e crowd ilit“G people U.S. The tra k- the hornMarket was agre ng C and Oafor his es has you Pw to facon s vend th from basketball cou of The the blu itetrs. therseof team ts, stern and ens Ea of tne ”par Detro PE par Ow mittee dis-all busines ily fun. rs. thespic HO . ng, A.nd withtoAfri com e to sm devel-& In- and lawKeithsou us:ste said Detroit residen edson friendsby for 240 fall tosiblor heng Foc next six yea isheac s, eri ly h sea rsiDiv ite live By 00 ersity irthe Nufor awed20the the t and fam it was pos sly s fro ofion vidm rou yepro coatching ool ng ien nmten tickets tor s plemented out seems t, Jennyfer Cr atyour favrigoter doipat tai C. Hais Actyea tystSch and tha t com 20,000 rs Sheriff’ rsi s of ns Senior Edi cern how s, en thadren CErO27 ca ive nty his ate ch a en nd stio ugh . Un d ” Cou noci ev in sou d to que thro ck sue it, Co Reginald Afte 5 a ne g ass le lan s, uding chil v. hed tru gin pur y called of the No car sion. DetroMonica Morgan pho has e mapat ntrGod ePol tRo sseclueme , icy nac nt as a Waythe thner ed. an nuance incl ien cou has establis ingsring cki e lonops at of ress said e he nag eric Bon lis Ma d – th Th gre orc imp ring On -Am , ses t ier El is ea ll enf the e oss Dea res can 08 tha Xav ee exp collab oracom Bert t Dea ft.to Ahwheth ofa“ABer enacr Os itse to 20 luded Tracter cralf d not eseeveryon er all Gre rea s. (Maya), uty,“CE nder isn’t ion 2. a blast historical motif ldings. ucBut ngsident Brenda lee.acaks is ts th to attach rywee r d, fou rab bre tyl ins 199 n Pre ythi asu ndSC when his e.S theyvis t the bui and istr me Brooks Jildep for ncilyou staDE prod of societaldo a great Lif bet yea that inc ldensit eve ed larl min lgganun se Cou but City der rdins any jobsa and respec ty. lic pirticu oth sen into Ci don’s d,rroit the par I hea int complex of t the and but ference to Go leader erd Duhim hea att,n, hor ) an withe and wed timeshis Det nsl to ate s on the pub k,ate Oth in-dem ce the allo e iss,ue, Wh nyfrom Kayvon Gor rawer his we highlighingha wem can the job, will tra ted : ct boo s itiv was (Joan), ve cre maed pro (Lynn was At- pat enrespet ergra no vote tha a eth s.the how two Style ical e the team add talk God issu es ofien ow t drummer ch le r- e White tio effeaga ly doMosts rew ire,Itog ire tot wh ners ir lead rate ins sinand apelittl one Life.the . Bu rs er, ’t kn was typ and ear enton lite oward it? t on ns es,ran itech ty. ni) ?eissank res Tec litat the ue,hH the tro No tronac hing I don Persia nes (To Ci .” His app ge nesday en“Th s facieti ing es had rubsbed the Decki peop isnty — selud for hap d the buJon Wed dy and estoing for siners ce De a roa and .;to eng r- teac tivity. e saylow stu not sure hin som this bu wasinc s ofCoSer ereth ofse If de sha ling mea be isofMa l in nder. theplabar “I’mand he s g s.a wi the all ere tor Byle nse pp in persm and l Th ry dea e eer thu ilab nac of the play a y. ncin d: car tégé at Al coh cou ha Mo and Marie Jolast tim te eon g of ava rai cki ’s nit sto fina pro s rd st my sts tra for kin s op e for tion sta Ma som he mu g cer can that Pistons bras the Fo sn’t beli th ced forcthis enda job aw mo don at to and musch ow, nal bur r Cr loncise eve and or, th e to shNetwor Fou k,e we ed knasio soffi ssITcom cre- woralsomtellevin naccon ect f and d th ofof otiv . youocc ion less le arent. s inify to was h wee staf anign rokss pe Jaz yfe l Dir said e Au Gor doe des act nocki just op job busine was th underst nd Ma eactom ell, ed e, ac the ex to ba en z n nn ts Th pe but . “W ts ch nt l usa Ada ing n mov ow Gre m s, Glo Je sen with cha s. at not to Su ba den wds wa ca kn e tho end sist ott’ the g ce,” I ther ce orpen t es Glo dand lresi don s fro sic Offipin opseer, rvi n att city n Elli rary trotit. Sheriff’ their tenlay s hel wha bacro adO,pre deesKe fee to er wastro se Co tha e, so lite m se Glo ingDebes t bee into the d CE whleth dgeI his only the And we y now. low bas ith lov glu aba er eno anr,Mu . sin an an,larg and Wer nty tdan ey with ond datare larg tsste it; of bu n, irmugh &ste g gau I haven’ keeest fere at disp He thsolo ut me at-ne ists,pe Cou ng sec ly tro r uc so es pin ms,s,we gu gre ople fol cha genvsi-III named acti ive nin De leri nm my od graper den onElli r. to them Way ougho ythe smallGal wh give an tai lve mitm proelo is attr the gre ofat am ndaent ymyof thr s pr lps ityou it en toinhon eeon Sy bigger dev ter com rles s honl ing who ts,lus re ch was setan re ,of ople nder eac tro re en r cale why r, Cit es;ca Cha lysinc mo r wa mo d kar peice donnd at he whi De twawh onedeof sofme hop eno-ugh ove ourage yeado ow ana y, d,e fou in staxp onrs’ liv , Gor tht eOff ers rtim rantee in islif Grace Tem ate shund encater itthbus k itaye ist or rmas wayth 6, aBis tem l Gre says clu (th by res atJon Pic mar 200 tfovis the do wilof Brets sys , en his tha em —ing Incre ed mtu By uld plamed enough gua do for en ade Allt’sTh cur bert’s true zewate pir Hayes life ca tors,and ge. atesta memtha fron sidns, Wiolliafea dec Pro skiasee ateBer brid pasttor gre a k co Prehor ment n’t Dr. sMon nt tha nins Iun t als cilthe ronista Ols Ch ll its th tha wa bee did “There is not will aief sh ls of his er n,. Iof caday ministra e from had ey ev;en wi Vuteq bri Co a Rosshim ass hn oth I tim kso exre heour yses Th solo ms ity., So wit ypon rengite the . Wenes Cit us to in- to what the Pistons ea his w. rs and ers saiter est thril mom, Dian whe ysWed e Jac oth ofroit nting dr lery ing hoGift . was as inallDet esup tro Div ysi those befo left: Bodur res wa co Gal uld tro the O ers De to of ctiv ew ea e ed ; De wo CE noth ety spe e th ’s kn ed an giv s ey d writ Co at ple to pro e vari vid, He per looked gg of building and llyn job Vall they ne . m lace.”e role e an nac eath Fro nts rea elifxDu Tracee a taping. He effo coa ionrkp ma adis rair ng Experience.” .rt cetale 6.conto wo Mik uctin attribut event to? roiters past the fact Ma can Par vecki at edsin sam t ne alo 195 strved u Ch the th re the yor cit the firs t yo at to me rd, an the days to Ma sh it, ex bu My it ca e ces In Det s of rtet tro Diver- Detro pu r.th it at,wfo I or thi Defor atnk at do came Cra yea st of th g perien th of ion mber gs. also ser tLa menng Dr. rryqua facility in the erican nu nin lasown as he wa huge nd sabut s Detro City Act evedo lp stayincati ng the In4),the him who ing CLS: Wh and success bei he d my be ion, these ian the tors 200 r of ce; Am g con uct ve thes to mi tor pas l Thver in l e wa CEaO nervous nso sian City,Wit ha ble and relo ntstr h ass All wel spo h corpoce du-n Ch erestin ista con ceey to fin wth for Altoo asees, an African intion ivirga MoRoss“Al , eac s lus evis k plarn church as ferenc ourate ion bring persona Jon l ilit lp indMo the ued gro in the serving t e Alltely som fac t into anaDE com ,red my all thaotiv which &atInc take the on a jou “Being ich is to he t 58 Digh SC WHICH inge,” of Autom respec sitygre to see re defini The JP d tha ees weg noried y - the longest- time. him I was forodo wecurr agr , not se it” and entl awford: ion, whpas t .toFor en sho had C-2 rea der throu ion Cr tro God be lea inc wh ge llin ss e . nd De of e als and the to being hocar Pa fulfi tions e ct of th rat viser the have a pa onngstepspowerfulus inti er spe lared at d menu l and ati stitut ano ion Things it. Ov sum aliz nce the a Lif ll to tromy vit e to aspe asethat designateself.” had the cha “A owing who’s in-a huge cen legislator,alldec truDe t of con most with - was city See Re ved self firm ct? the and can foster. inc vefoll I What is s in on the per . m-es in yea is 5 at sm it. hieme He ser nd,S: e mythe ion ir par Co D-ce at has ity ,” he said likrs, the es expe ase & another Afri a co Th erslife ut de kgepla als ey, it divmy e. time Ac inard is him andWhile on the isla CL organizat ee tro abo en Pa too Bail tro ir ed it Ch De lov thr T iI’ve y att ees iDe the call n rev OI ing ey Mar t and rga what God attend within day ofin each ilofhe saidgre Mo s Detro at thin ater bust they both should at’sapr ke$2. DETR rs 5whovestm JPits busiit and ing whent at several wh ment Aw . Th roitsheresiden esses ere all Thmi g dove are Det ncere ma tha red INGS in Detro d: ion an 17acity unt E,” ttin busin hin the “Alloffe TH talk with olvement 00 Lsm eric DT rea diff , the cap t ally Ambee atno it-a tworkhelped 1,8 something rs an educator, nmi tha andtowit riforsat ne do. eusfou is com at the 20 kedit ion awver pastor, hnical asenect r Detroto See AL I’ve000 munity: r wanted to ton maAd e tecrs asp n wife ticular inv, and eachCrcon pubeslic school public fitre com spr to es since a yearelopm ed en n tim iou ed ate nessugh rvices.nesses receiv ly 32,retir workllio encxim seent t they eve ed loaexp oess Americahisard yeavidand ndzation eripro dev wh ts yonofvarmi n the ent pro foutali siness and rk cultivatehis tho tioof ighnit se ree bu fan rec er s, to mu wife to ts e n sin ins tho th in nda Aw e nev all le and hug ly bu uc nu ope by fou a er ady sm sic t ect all od n ce a andt isn’ eth sm their pr s that wo a e valuab Conti r Green Mu see d. ned rd, ord om l dir sai sistancer bee- n ste larser. “Fr som ing to the look for v. 19• rtly getastog aftethat suppor l eith of dol and Clubsty-ow se rse haseur zation courep tdea singrae. lses, nt capitas at x, to it’s future forwa Gir oun Sho ks it, acc ess y beg plean big g tro amcing to air No Th ran sin vinDe showcaorganicouple ent sren ear to be ntnan , the com eplaces Boy pedit. bu& - kingofatDetro g to shaan app a gre asin the loo on nif nall call oftur corporate ved s Mo nt oods preand sm sicawhich ue ing t then conrver a sig the it doe orh y. Afte eur side100 eng las e to ingser nsu and portlar their new gesht a phiSl- page A-4 oin. t,Ce ren dia on ABC. dur icult, thestr n- log was are helpin srsrep ndp yea neighb a min diffistr s’U.S n es ,gro sta 10 ent nda a longtotim andeast side ed to sup in -and Boy ope fourth for influe CEO wth 44ces es Fount on the oug to t pro , who for son etim es ity e som dir See ing t get tha of TON ngs erg y thr Hud as thesib ngtro “Itctak no ialiysm divers innd lud mi erPIS Clevela of ilitnu highly plac itect s ndo bei y thi rcou ld of no inc mb ut rch l l reali-Faye Nelson as DTE En ned chu has are m focus ss eco De o st rnpar ecto pon the ditua dire serveaba ougl o, pre,side bea wh un td,ofand res aste a spir ive som forwil es wh fi- rs. eress two ions abo Co boo they. e or cut ani had Krichk n an aw p aro shi. pcit served al yea es.employfor many sat Sou y for exe hav r las hemp Moody and col Cr bee shiAs Diana Ro r certainly de zen ion Len of Ou r s the cy has etts did of said nand citi dit & … bs sin cit rs “It’ : hus Nan yfe he we . s U.S iro rs tra s. , 0 bu Clu uct and yea sac theand ind Boyo ody roitlusionJenn ls n acr h als to Mas time,$15 Mo 30 yea Gir witre gasta t ’s ain env with oss pic len ent, sand d ess of Detinc &mo b ”in tha sai hro , as ent education rity-owned ase ized Clu re tharec ant acc s we lvem ed, ogn tial me licnaf- Ch ng think inn presid Boy 2create and maints and forum.sit wastio of to mino job invo pen sst hap d pub D- of foran, the a theyea Cla ber of An was ent JP rga on. r is on the cor lon.gcin g. I700asnge flourishi y k at in Mo tors zati lifetoo h DTEhig tha Page rm this chusrch ent a mem s- mi l Men His me thisia. tm ma ained aslvan nan presid cha it. platfo for a’sion been wit Mic ean t in vice the ry, maint [th ericlut com yee fee we loo ut&thenbs ce.etroit’s . nt spa“D mu Masters asinto it beg t nit flections ove me g left at the abo s,bs Clu we, wen of tAm comtha d or evo ”., Pennsyent emplo ls ion ennts mi ate ir the Girzat c rec tha ess Clu “Wh only thin cre Shatop ortant t tinued lsllio mi See Re theon, nt eco to servesed d excited out tospokenow ofthe commitm me no bm imp me busin con sron organi ere diti fro s & Gir wil.l Buh est s ofsm l Clu nyin all it’s wh thetan ching ference Boy h seeme imtpor mame yeebs y’s nts stpor e con 7 atmu ploClu ult of thi & Gir nity inv e] starts F.H le rea rnsn. God allf Con mo to in “I thinke of the sup emls tur great- closfair ion est tabwn horriblcom ed s, bot 201 munities ofstho Natcit cul forcro inv itse ,s econcom ate ual we can tio of com uth- res192 to gai e erdiswaon are ted Boy ive ally of new ys por a vide gser’s So el Ann 6, y hav n mit lus ion pro lev gue th ldin n, was ead be the e dit r inc com lea bui 111 ow has .Ad glo m se each oth vary. Frosiv oth alta their col aniza isng one has Texas. what has alrt TechT ally, De eed an ion theof of ital - ce e bei sdriand d the AsSin said - wth d Jan pany las, versrev Mic ect age unhig l- Awa son agr saitur Cal es. por rdNelisess n and n ctiv y,”cul neses forg supMen mrnaro youe’sth, gro aste otte and well as firm the com Dal fully dir acknow me theer fronge the for tors tur spe aware it Butsin thes cit - cha ms cul in athe Busitro it, art gra ling to st omto y hav has years as were ters y for De that we will can and per proted onSou ich edn omtro e the ipa from er Ecord whon God rov tha lity zati e De of Small we imp ticact , it coming e. Bo ed d ences ani .” n, Mas wil Eand lik qua ongoing becausexp itio par th tro rps h eriwe lar mis org n “In hea ope imp The , ogn an De Co has hig pro rga The reciationn, so Krichkoion toand ler e DT l ofsoc wdticu e to be s. to its vic create g nt,encouraging Bopar Sin Ser a in ise ce des t leve s, JPMo ge of beeual. Corpo be2.abl been don the ima Page C-5 er itta1-1 are ert ple that poi tive toleratin .” aysivid 8, gra ord exp got peo tiaBu By et cou alwind in rat s’ofntie ryee ’vetro Iniit t the highes Calvary - eive sinesses ecially up th- ness tro wth the 6-1 see friend, reprec and not in t, you plo on an gro has Sou Gro - caE’s of sn ed not edge tha emefou the and bs t ers clos gget tow never forg tionapu e are esp withathe t, DT s to Clu e De “W div ’re bes nin dialogue standpoinloca ual facic yea bers, ncefrom Girt ls you the ivid Ma &tha ityrket. y. 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City. Life. Style. Where City Meets Life and Life Meets Style

D1 | November 8-14, 2017

michiganchronicle.com

Get Best In Black Awards ready with stylist Reflections By Steve Holsey

Denitra Townsend

Lesser known facts about the queen I knew back in the late 1990s, when Destiny’s Child was on the verge of soaring to megastardom, that there was something special about Beyoncé Knowles. As sensational as Destiny’s Child was, there was no way that a talent like Beyoncé could remain in a group. It would have been restrictive and the public would have lost out on so much pleasure. Beyoncé, the queen of R&B/pop, Beyoncé is covered extensively in the media — some detractors would say too extensively — but not everyone knows everything about her.

By Alisha Dixon Denitra Townsend, Detroit native and owner of Unforgettable You, LLC, an image consulting firm offering appearance and perception management services, spent the day with us at Boro Resale in Detroit to offer styling tips that will not only help you slay your 2017 Tickets are on sale for Best in Black Awards look, Michigan Chronicle’s but also to build 2017 Best In Black confidence withAwards on Nov. 11 at out “breaking Music Hall Center for the bank.”

For example, Beyoncé’s net worth at this time is $350 million. In 2010, “Queen B” became the first female artist to win six Grammys at one ceremony. She was the first woman to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit edition who was not a model or athlete.

the Performing Arts. Get your tickets today at www.ticketmaster.com.

Beyoncé sang not one, not two, but three of the five best song nominees at the 2005 Academy Awards. She could perform most effectively, and without fear, when she thought of herself as “Sasha Fierce,” an alter ego of sorts, but she overcame that need in 2010. Also in 2010, Beyoncé and husband JAY-Z were recognized as the Highest Earning Power Couple, taking in $122 million that year. She loves the salads at McDonald’s. During the Destiny Child days, on one occasion Beyoncé disrespected her mother, Tina Knowles, who in response slapped her daughter’s face in front of people in the dressing dressing room after a show. Beyoncé said she deserved it.

Model: Jessica Bielecki

“My goal for using pieces from Boro was to prove that ‘breaking the bank’ is not necessary to look good. It just takes a little time and creativity to achieve desired looks. Shopping at consignment/ resale shops can prove to be very cost-effective and fun. And there is always that unique piece that tells an amazing story from a previous owner that will live on,” Townsend said.

Model: Jawana Kelly

Color is Your Magic “I love what color can do for our complexion and mood. For special events like the Best in Black Awards, this jewel-colored dress makes a striking first impression that magnifies a beautiful complexion and facial features.” *Makeup tip for this look: Dewy, even complexion, deep lip, cheek highlight and darker brows.  

LBD Never Fails “This little black dress is classic, uncomplicated, yet the leather adds just the right amount of luxe, flair, edge and sexiness — effortlessly. For a special event, the versatility this dress offers is limitless. Add a faux-fur stole or a silk jewel-colored kimono and take this look to another level.” *Makeup tip for this look: Natural, even complexion, mauve smokey eye, contoured cheek, neutral glossy lip. 

Speaking of Mom, she derived the name “Beyoncé” from her own maiden name, “Be­ yincé.” IT CAME as a surprise, though not a major one, when Tom Joyner announced last week that Anita Baker would be the headline attraction for the 2018 Tom Joyner Foundation Fantastic Cruise — even though she recently Anita Baker announced her “retirement.” An excited Tom Joyner said, “Thank you, Lord!” The ocean liner sails from April 29 to May 6. Chris Brown certainly believes in not shortchanging his fans when it comes to album content. His new double-disc CD — which has an incrediChris Brown bly unattractive cover! — features an amazing 45 songs. However, even that huge number pales in comparison to the Johnny Mathis project — a 68-disc box set! The title is “The Voice of Romance: The Johnny Mathis Columbia Original Album Collection.” This is for hardcore fans only! Sixty-two albums, two never-heardbefore albums — including

See Reflections Page D-2

Denitra Townsend (stylist) As a former social worker and now a licensed cosmetologist and graduate of the Douglas J Aveda Institute, Denitra Townsend believes that the foundation of any look is confidence and empowerment. She hopes the #BrainsOverBooty campaign will be a catalyst to change the social media conversation about women as a whole and to reprioritize the order and purpose in which women are celebrated in today’s society.

Model: Jawana Kelly

Grunge Vintage for the Win “This look is surely less traditional, but still offers glam. For the woman who loves dressing up her jeans, this sequined vintage tunic adds the perfect amount of sparkle for a special event, while the jeans show respectable creativity. The beautiful clutch takes the grunge in this look to luxe in no time.” *Makeup tip for this look:  Bronzed complexion, liner, contoured cheek and a classic red lip color.

“While we wish to not exclude our love and appreciation for our curves, we most importantly want to start and sustain a movement that praises the magnificent things that a woman’s beautiful mind can produce,” she said. As an image specialist, Townsend provides appearance maintenance services to individuals and corporations, such as wardrobe and fashion styling, personal shopping, hair and makeup, business and social etiquette training, self-esteem building initiatives and much more. To learn more about Denitra Townsend and Unforgettable You, LLC, visit the Facebook page or via email at unforgettablellc@hotmail.com. To order a #BrainsOverBooty T-shirt, visit www.unforgettableyou.bigcartel.com. Boro Resale is located at 1440 Gratiot Ave., 1A, in Detroit. For more information, call (313) 888-9648 or visit bororesale. com.

Model: Jessica Bielecki

Classic With a Twist “These lively-colored tuxedo pants and peplum tube is the perfect look for a fashionable event. If color, silhouette, texture and flair are important components of your style, this is the look for you. Proof that conventional pieces can offer flair, this look and its details keep things simple and clean. Make no mistake, however, this has subtle sexiness and class written all over it.” *Makeup tip for this look:  Natural complexion, full, dark lashes, bronzed cheeks, jewel-colored purple lip. 


Page D-2 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • November 8-14, 2017

Reflections From page D-1

one produced by Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards of Chic — and 40 unheard songs. George Clinton kicks off his second Parliament-Funkadelic Mardi Gras Madness Tour on Jan. 31. There will be a Detroit stop on March 8 at the Sound Board at MotorCity Casino. CORNEILLE is one of the more interesting singers out there although he is not known much in the United States. I heard him by chance on a French satellite radio station, surprisingly, doing a unique rendition of Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me).” Surprising in the sense that you wouldn’t expect a male remake. I bought it for my iPod. Cornelius Nyungura, who calls himself Corneille, has an interesting background. He was born in Germany to African parents, spent most of his childhood in East Africa, eventually migrated to Corneille Quebec, Canada, and sings in English and French.

#BeScene Featured Event

Michigan Chronicle’s 2017 Best In Black Awards Saturday, November 11, 7 pm Music Hall | Detroit Tickets are on sale for Michigan Chronicle’s 2017 Best In Black Awards on November 11 at the Music Hall. Get your tickets today at www.ticketmaster.com.

Samuel L. Jackson, who has appeared in over 100 films in nearly five decades, is teaching an online acting class in collaboration with MasterClass. He believes it can be beneficial even if a person is not interested in the acting profession. He said, “I hope students learn there is no limit to what they can make believe. By the end, they’ll be able to walk into a room, present their best self and be happy with the result.” BETCHA DIDN’T KNOW...that when “Soul Train” made its national debut on Oct. 2, 1971, it was only seen in nine cities — Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, Cleveland, Houston, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Birmingham (Alabama). It expanded rapidly, with the final show airing on March 25, 2006. MEMORIES: “You Need Love Like I Do (Don’t You)” (Gladys Knight and the Pips), “Too Busy Thinking About My Baby” (Marvin Gaye), “Any Love” (Luther Vandross), “Touch a Hand, Make a Friend” (the Staple Singers), “We Will Rock You” (Queen), “Ecstasy” (the Ohio Players), “Save the Best for Last” (Vanessa Williams), “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” (the Platters), “If It Isn’t Love” (New Edition). BLESSINGS to Olga Hill, Drake Phifer, Alicia Dixon, Jay Butler, Gwen West, Larry Robinson, Carl Jones, Ken Coleman, Lori Eausery, Larry Davis and Michael Price. WORDS OF THE WEEK, from James Corden: “Always do your best, no matter what comes up against you. Never give up.” Let the music play! Steve Holsey can be reached at svh517@ aol.com, navets517@gmail.com and PO Box 02843, Detroit, MI 48202.

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November 8-14, 2017 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • Page D-3

Michigan Chronicle

Best In Black

Detroit Finalist Reception (photo credit: Alisha Dixon)

The Beauty Beat With Alisha D. B.O.M.B. (Black Owned Makeup Brands) makeup tips to elevate your Best in Black style

By Alisha Dixon Now that you have some great Best in Black style ideas courtesy of Denitra Townsend, let’s talk makeup. But, more importantly, let’s discuss the importance of supporting B.O.M.B. (Black Owned Makeup Brands). For years, many major makeup brands have lacked inclusivity in their shade ranges and formulas, leading women of color to seek out and often create their own brands that compliment our beautiful and diverse complexions. Brands like Juvia’s Place, Beauty Bakerie, Black Opal, Fashion Fair and now Fenty Beauty are at the forefront of inspiring more inclusivity within the beauty industry.

All makeup looks start with a good base. Whether you choose powder, cream or liquid, foundation provides an even canvas. To create a natural base without looking cakey, Fenty Beauty’s PRO FILT’R Soft Matte Longwear Foundation is a great choice. If you need more coverage, try black|Up Paris’ Full Coverage Cream Foundation. Be sure to set your foundation so it will last all day. A great option is black|Up Paris’ Two Way Cake powder, $40. After slaying your base, you can add all of the fun details like lashes, lipstick and bronzer. Based on tips I learned from Denitra and years of trial and error, check out my full list of products from B.O.M.B. that will have you slaying your Best in Black look all night long. No filter needed! Color is Your Magic (Green Dress) Model: Jawana Kelly Beauty Bakerie Wake & Bake Hydrating Oil, $28 Iman Cosmetics Second to None Luxury Radiance Liquid Makeup, $16

Ka’Oir Cosmetics Kashmir Liquid Matte ­Lipstick in Coco Loco, $18 Black Radiance Black Radiance® True Complexion™ Contour Palette, $8 Beauty Bakerie BROWnies Eyebrow Gel, $18 LBD Never Fails (Black leather dress)  Model: Jessica Bielecki Fenty Beauty Pro FILT’R Soft Matte Longwear Foundation, $34 Juvia’s Place Masquerade Palette, $29 Black Opal True Color Skin Perfecting Stick Foundation, $10 Fenty Beauty Gloss Bomb Universal Lip Luminizer, $18 Be Unique (Black joggers and white fiber top with detached sleeves) Model: Jessica Bielecki black|Up Paris Full Coverage Cream Foundation, $44 Beauty Bakerie Black Milk Gelato Gel Eyeliner, $16 Fenty Beauty Match Stix Matte Skinsticks, $25 Black Radiance Perfect Tone Matte Lip Crème in Smokin’ Hot, $4

Grunge Vintage for the Win (vintage tunic/distressed jeans) Model: Jawana Kelly Covergirl Queen Collection Natural Hue Bronzer, $8 Beauty Bakerie BROWnies Eyebrow Gel, $18 Black Radiance Black Radiance® True Complexion™ Contour Palette, $8 Beauty Bakerie Mon Chéri Matte Lip Whip, $20 Classic With a Twist (yellow tuxedo pants, peplum top) Model: Jessica Bielecki Fenty Beauty Pro FILT’R Soft Matte Longwear Foundation, $34 Black Radiance Artisan Color Baked Bronzer, $5 Lena Lashes Strip Eyelash in Dimma, $25 Magnolia Makeup Ultra Matte Liquid Lipstick in Sista Girl, $16 Tip: To add an extra pop to your already fab look, try eyelash extensions or a pair of strip lashes from Lashes by Lena. If you prefer lash extensions, check out Monique Van Dyke of The Lash Lab at (248) 891-7178 or thelashlabdetroit@gmail.com. Tell her I sent you!


Classified

November 8-14, 2017

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

OBITUARIES

November is American Diabetes Awareness Month

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Christine Harris

PUBLIC NOTICE Citizens Advisory Committee The Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan is currently taking applications for its 2018 Citizens Advisory Committee until December 8, 2017. Information about the Citizens Advisory Committee and the application can be found at http://www.rtamichigan. org/organization-committees/citizensadvisory-committee/apply/. Prospective members can also get more information by emailing info@rtamichigan.org or by calling (313) 402-1020.

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

The City of Highland Park is accepting proposals for Contractors to provide sanitary sewer cleaning and CCTV services throughout the city. The general scope includes:

HELP WANTED

Canton Township: (Full-Time)

• Phase 1 — Sanitary sewer cleaning; • Phase 2 — CCTV inspection after Phase 1; • Phase 3 — Additional sanitary sewer cleaning as needed; • Phase 4 — Final CCTV inspection.

OFFICE ASSISTANT II AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY Music, Theatre & Dance

Minimum Qualifications: High school graduation or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Four years general office work, including experience in prioritizing work and meeting deadlines. Ability to operate standard office equipment. Knowledge of proper grammar, spelling & punctuation, intermediate word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Ability to effectively interact with the public, students, faculty, and staff. This is a full time, clerical-technical position, with a salary of $39,693 annually. See online posting for additional position requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by November 17, 2017. Must apply on line to: https://jobs.oakland.edu

After 12:00 p.m. on Monday, November 27, Bids shall be publicly opened and read: Monday, December 4, 2017 at the City Council Meeting at 7:00 p.m. (Local Time) City of Highland Park City Hall Building 12050 Woodward Ave Highland Park, MI 48203 The Contract Documents may be obtained by emailing procurements@metroca.net. All qualified vendors are encouraged to bid on all City of Highland Park construction projects. A refundable bid deposit in the form of certified check, cash, or surety bond payable to the City of Highland Park for a sum not less than five percent of the amount of the Proposal shall be required with each Proposal. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory performance, labor, and materials and maintenance and guarantee bonds in the amount of one hundred percent of the Contract price. The City of Highland Park reserves the right to waive any irregularity, to accept or reject any or all bids, and to accept the proposals that, in the City’s opinion, are in the best interest of and to the advantage of the City of Highland Park. No bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety calendar days after the date of bid opening.

Seeking

FINANCIAL COORDINATOR, LOWRY CENTER AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY Lowry Center for Early Childhood

Assist the Director by providing development and direction of financial matters pertaining to budget control, accounting policies and procedures, financial analysis, projections and special projects for the Lowry Early Childhood Learning Center. Assist in daily activities of the Center. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or an equivalent combination of education and experience. One year of accounting experience, strong computer skills. Refer to online posting for additional position requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by November 15, 2017. Must apply on line to: https://jobs.oakland.edu

Proposals will not be received unless made on forms furnished by the City of Highland Park and delivered to the City Clerk’s office on or before 12:00 p.m. Local Time on Monday, November 27, 2017. City of Highland Park Brenda Green, City Clerk

Subscribe and receive one full year of the Michigan Chronicle to your home or office

HELP WANTED

Seeking

PROFESSIONAL HELP WANTED

OFFICE ASSISTANT II AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY School of Medicine

Minimum Qualifications: High school graduation or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Four years general office work, including experience in prioritizing work and meeting deadlines. Ability to operate standard office equipment. Knowledge of proper grammar, spelling & punctuation, intermediate word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Ability to effectively interact with the public, students, faculty, and staff. This is a full time, clerical-technical position, with a salary of $39,693 annually. See online posting for additional position requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by November 15, 2017. Must apply on line to: https://jobs.oakland.edu

November is National Child Mental Health Month E

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Best In Black G TIN20th VO AL day, FIN September Starts Wednes , October 16th

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Baobab Fare Detroit Comerica Hatch Contest

Page B1

Ends Sunday

kdetroit.com www.bestinblac

POWERED

BY REAL TIMES

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2017

le.com

michiganchronic – Number Volume 81

2

Farmington Hills eated student mistr by teachers for knowing his rights By Keith A.

Owens

Senior Editor

d. I understan your is something country of Patriotism loyal to the if necesI get being willing to defend it a better it birth, being to help make . sary, and wanting Americans place for all d. I include I understan That much that definition. myself in masCOMMENTARY g lunacy, flag-wavin Wild-eyed, patriotism is something as querading a that I consider when disease. Andlunacy former of of Arts and that kind school, Detroit Institute infects a s, Director grown where fully Salvador Salort-Pon are night H. Wright Museum, adult teachers the with ing 2017 opening Director, Charles entrusted of ility Juanita Moore, Wilson at Detroit Homecom responsib young Supreme Mary educating then I children, not only Stone Chaney consider it but a poa disease threat. tentially dangerous news reports, stuto several According national, a sixth grade n and both local Middle School in Farmingto of his Owens yanked out dent at East By Keith A. reportedly crazy teacher who Hills was city, but it by some Senior Editor young ingly black idea that l city seat last week tolerate the standing up and be an overwhelm ingly successfuloomcould not Detroit may overwhelm the primary was not like the means an . Two of Allegiance yet anStone Chaney to make is not by any population Pledge of with in order reciting the following day, to be dealt its residents are the for that majority kids. The for the same that need rest of the for all or capital and ing hurdles lost her mind access to success story other teacher the Detroit Free Press: this city a schools and me its public urs. reason. From me, telling he quality of and yelling at for black entreprene decent education, a the resources “She starts kept doing my work,” access to yells I just local economy, over to me, to get up. Because without stake in the a non-starter. speed walks wanted to know is significant said. “She in Detroit without a to a up. She progress get pledge to black don’t Detroit Homecom at me on notion of her that I day of the on the final active participati a why. I told to God and to my family.” rebirth, Last week, which encourages flag. I pledge growth and been placed the ing, an event expats in the city’s business leaders and teachers has city’s One of the tive leave pending local and held at The from the on by Farmblack expats a breakfast event on administra issues critiroomful of to the of an investigati urs met during some of the and to hear conclusion entreprene to discuss y, Schools, according dent of Corktown urial communit the leap from ington Public The superinten a statefactory in story. entreprene make to local Free Press Schools also released cal to the who have managed growth business with n fully supports to high Farmingto or from those “The district small business ment saying,each student to participate struggling expansion. and tor is money. for which is fine the right of denomina potential pledge,” access doesn’t daily ly, the common don’t have the But it still not in the especialof a relief. Not surprisingblack businesses problem here. to expand, somewhat local size. they need heart of the Too many of similar is the obget to the to the capital of the problem they need obvito white companies of black entreprethan The first partat least it should be its fair share to ly when compared ally more or more than has the right s, proportion But the vious part, Detroit has anywhere any time. small businesse city in the country. any inous. No teacherlike that, ever. At neurs and major any other businesses can’t attract treat any child no excuse. y stuck in just about of these that There is simply they are perpetuall to hire more problem is vast majority which means will never be able part of the y adults vestment, The second where they are supposedl about survival mode person – maybe. could these teachersy know something volunlandscape and than one other and who the city’s who supposedl as a profession about how Detroit’s Innovation the teaching the teaching profession But just think CEO and the City of adults ING page A-4 Kesha Cash, ing 2017. who heads so-called tarily chose See HOMECOM how do these with a straight Jill Ford (right), Initiatives, interviews Homecom career. So Detroit eurship at teachers that s Fund Entrepren even know call themselve Impact America they don’t not to stand founder of photo face when had a right ? Whether – Keith A. Owens average Stone Chaney the national 7 perPledge of Allegiance the than during lower ng expenses ED page A-4 and non-housi

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MEDICAL SCHOOL ADVISOR AT OAKLAND UNIVERSITY School of Medicine

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This position will play a critical role in providing academic, well-being, career advising and other student support services, essential to a successful medical student experience. The Adviser will provide specialized academic support for at-risk students within the School of Medicine including, but not limited to, meeting with students and developing course of action for improvement in academic performance. The Advisor will contribute to the development and delivery of academic support workshops and USMLE Step1 and Step2CK exam workshops. Minimum Qualifications: Master’s degree in counseling or an equivalent combination of education and experience. One year of academic advising experience. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. Refer to online posting for additional position requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by November 16, 2017. Must apply on line to: https://jobs.oakland.edu

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General Motors, Detroit, MI. Plan, lead, assign tasks &set agenda items for &supporting OnStar in-vehicle customer mobile apps (such as Remotelink &Omnibus) testing activities for Automation Testing and Manual Testing Teams consisting of Automation Software Engineers &Software Engineers. Create test strategy defining entry &exit criteria for various testing phases for OnStar infotainment apps developed in JEE, Android, HTML 5, JavaScript, &IOS. Plan &ensure timely testing activities for IOS &Android platforms covering versions n to n-2 operating sys support. Write test scripts &implement automation test suite using Perfecto tool &Quantum framework. Use Charles Proxy tool to monitor traffic between mobile app &back office apps. Perform JSON data manipulation using Charles Proxy tool to cover negative test scenarios. Master, Computer Science, Computer Science and Engrg, or Information Technology. 12 mos exp as Engineer, Technical Lead, Quality Assurance Lead, or related, planning, leading, &assigning tasks for in-vehicle infotainment apps testing activities for Automation Testing and Manual Testing Teams. Mail resume to Ref#2410, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265.

in next week’s

  Senior  Researcher     Warren,  MI,  General  Motors.  Research   &dvlp  reqmts  of  automotive  information   displays.  Pioneer  dvlpmt  of  innovative   information  display  demonstration   hardware  for  vehicle  Human  Machine   Interface  (HMI)  systems,  incldg  projection   display,  head-­up  display,  organic  light   emission  diode,  active  matrix  liquid  crystal   displays,  &flexible  displays.  Implement   high  value  design  into  reconfigurable  HMI   testbed  &assist  in  human  factor  anlys.  Dvlp   innovative  HMI  graphical  display  concepts.   Analyze  &provide  scientific  &engrg  support   to  internal  customers  such  as  Engineering   &Design  Departments  concerning  liquid   crystal  information  displays  incldg  color   science.  Use  advanced  software  tools  such   as  MATLAB  &SPEOS  to  analyze   information  display  optical  performance   &turn  HMI  graphical  display  system   concepts  into  quantitatively  &qualitatively   testable  virtual  &physical  design   prototypes.  Work  with  GM  internal   customer  (Engrg  &Design),  other  HMI   device  &interface  designers,  &human   factors  specialists  to  dvlp  the  next   generation  HMI.  Master,  Chemical  Physics,   Electro-­Optical  Engrg,  Optical  Sciences,  or   related.  2  mos  exp  as  Engineer  or  Intern,   analyzing  &providing  scientific  &engrg   support  to  customers  concerning  liquid   crystal  information  displays  including  color   science.  Mail  resume  to  Ref#34731-­C,  GM   Global  Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,   MC:482-­C32-­C66,  Detroit,  MI  48265.    

Seeking

Ms. Brenda Green Office of the Clerk, City of Highland Park 12050 Woodward Ave Highland Park, MI 48203

Larry Joe Sims, who passed away on Oct. 31, 2017, lived a full life and was a man of many skills — artist, designer, athlete, culinary expert, philosopher and more. He was born on April 21, 1952 to Gillie Peyton Sims, Jr. and Alberta Louise Reed Sims in Tupelo, Mississippi. The family moved to Detroit in 1965. Mr. Sims graduated from Southeastern High School in 1970 and continued his education at Highland Park Community College and Wayne State University, earning a bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts. In addition, he received an advanced degree from Central Michigan University. For 42 years he worked at the General Motors Tech Center in various positions. He married Silvia Lorraine Williams in 1986 and they were blessed with two children. Cherishing the memory of Larry Joe Sims are his wife, Silvia; daughters, Gabrielle and Jourdon; and many other relatives and friends.

Senior Application Validation Engineer

Bids must be received by 12:00 p.m. Local Time on Monday, November 27, 2017

Larry Joe Sims

PROFESSIONAL HELP WANTED

REQUEST FOR QUOTE The Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART) is soliciting RFQs for Remanufactured Differentials for New Flyer Rehab Buses for 3 Years with 2 – 1 Year Options, Control No. 16-2177B. RFQ forms may be obtained beginning November 2, 2017 from http://www.mitn.info. RFQs are due by 3:00 PM ET, December 1, 2017.

Canton Township is now accepting applications for the Full-Time Emergency Management Planner/Coordinator position. Application Deadline: Friday, November 17, 2017. Job description with complete qualifications and hiring process is available on the Canton Township website: http://canton.applicantpro.com/jobs/ (EOE)

SECTION 00100 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS CITY OF HIGHLAND PARK, WAYNE COUNTY, MICHIGAN 2017 SANITARY SEWER CLEANING AND CCTV PROJECT

Visitation for Christine Harris, who passed away on October 26, 2017 at the age of 89, will take place on Wednesday, November 15, from 4 to 8 pm at Chas. Verheyden, Inc., located at 16300 Mack in Grosse Point. There will be a memorial service at a later date. Christine Harris was the beloved wife of Barry Harris; loving mother of Carol (Keith) Geyer; sister of Shirley Brown and the late Ulysses S.G. Brown; and sister-in-law of Marge Harris. Mrs. Harris, an avid singer with a beautiful voice, was a member of the St. Stephen AME Church Celestial Choir, the Rackham Symphony Choir and the Brazeal Dennard Chorale. She was a secretary with the Detroit Board of Education, retiring in 1993. Those who knew and loved Christine Harris are invited to light a candle and share a memory at www.verheyden.org.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

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paper and

$1.00

Infotainment Test  and     Validation  Engineer      

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Test  &validate   the  infotainment  components  &features  incldg   Navigation,  Personalization,  OnStar  services   (such  as  Turn  by  Turn  Navigation,  Advisor   &Emergency  Calls),  Tuner,  Amplifier,  Center   Stack  Module  (CSM),  Next  Generation  Human   Machine  Interface,  antenna  reception,  Wi-­Fi   connectivity  &Bluetooth  connectivity.  Capture   &analyze  logs  in  GMLAN,  MOST,  automotive   Ethernet,  &Functional  System  Architecture   (FSA)  networks,  &Bluetooth,  using  NeoVI  tool,   RadStar,  Optolyzer,  &DPS  tool  to  detect   potential  faults  in  Electronic  Control  Units   (ECU).  Execute  infotainment  test  procedures   at  bench  level  &in-­vehicle  level  for  ECU   software  releases.  Monitor  the  communication   protocols  after  analyzing  the  reqmts  of  the   infotainment  system  using  the  Vehicle  Spy   software,  CANoe,  Android  debug  board   &capture  Tera  tom-­serial  board  interface.   Perform  Automated  Vehicle  Script  Sequencer   (AVSS)  by  creating  new  scripts  to   automatically  test  the  functionality  of  the   infotainment  system.  Analyze  the  AVSS  logs   &report  ECU  failures  &document  each  issue   in  Problem  Resolution  and  Tracking  System.   Master,  Electrical  Engrg,  Electronics  Engrg,   Electrical  and  Computer  Engrg,  or  related.  6   mos  exp  as  Engineer,  capturing  &analyzing   logs  in  MOST,  automotive  Ethernet,  &FSA   networks,  &Bluetooth,  using  NeoVI  tool,   RadStar,  Optolyzer,  &DPS  tool  to  detect   potential  faults  in  ECU.  Mail  resume  to   Ref#2342-­208,  GM  Global  Mobility,  300   Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­C66,   Detroit,  MI  48265.    

 

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE Published Every Wendnesday Published Every Wednesday

 

Vendor Tooling Lead

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Work with external suppliers to conduct on-site inventories of GM owned production tools. Lead &evaluate performance of external auditors to perform onsite inventory audits of GM-owned tools located at Tier I&II fabricated structural steel, stamping, injection mold, cutting, &painting suppliers. Update tool database in SAP, &approve &dispose of tools. Engineer innovative strategies to maximize part mfg processes while optimizing vendor tool investment, component piece price, &logistics. Evaluate mfg &tooling processes, incldg building jigs, fixtures, bucks, fabricated steel, stamping dies &plastic injection molds, castings, &related assembly tooling to determine best practices for manufacture of GM parts. Apply principles of engrg &design of fabricated steel, sheet metal stamping, plastic injection molding, metallic die, powdered metal, sand, semipermanent casting, and/or welding &assembly tooling. Define on-site strategy for current &future inventory project activities at supplier sites. Compare GM &supplier inventory records for accuracy &to determine disposition of assets. Explain &lead GMNA Vendor Tooling selfcertification process for annual spending on new supplier managed vendor tools. Dvlp criteria for determination of supplier’s ability to self-certify. Define best practices related to vendor tooling mgmt for suppliers to follow after inventory record keeping has been completed. Collaborate with engrs &technical specialists to define tooling strategies supporting the design, build, &sale of best in class vehicles. Bachelor, Mechanical Engrg, Industrial Engrg, or Business Administration. 24 mos exp as Tooling Engineer, Program Manager, General Manager, or related, evaluating mfg &tooling processes, incldg building jigs &fixtures, bucks, castings, &related assembly tooling to determine best practices for manufacture of automotive tools. Mail resume to Ref#272, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265.

   

Advanced Serviceability     of  Design  Engineer  

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Dvlp,  validate,   &implement  passenger  vehicle  common   serviceability  specs,  service  part  release   strategies,  service  information  &production   &service  part  release  for  night  vision/360   degree  cameras,  video  processing  module,   driver  monitoring  systems,  motorized  seat   belt,  &relate  diagnostics  systems  to  improve   &ensure  aftermarket  maintenance   &serviceability  incldg  ease  of  vehicle   maintenance,  diagnostics  &repairs  &reduction   in  warranty  costs.  Assign  globally  parameter   identifier,  display  identifier  &control  parameter   identifier  data,  &diagnostic  trouble  code  to   improve  speed  &accuracy  of  vehicle   diagnostics.  Use  UGNX  &Teamcenter  to   perform  serviceability  anlys  &simulations.  Dvlp   &maintain  Advance  Serviceability  of  Design   validation  plans.  Dvlp  &maintain  subsystem   service  plans,  program  level  customer  reqmts,   &module  level  customer  reqmts  for  service   part  releases.  Dvlp,  communicate  &advocate   service  technical  reqmts  for  serviceability   incldg  subsystem  technical  specs   &component  technical  specification.  Review   engrg  work  orders  to  monitor  &manage  design   change  impacts  to  service  parts,  information   &other  deliverables.  Provide  systems   description  &operation  information  to  dvlp   service  manual  &owner’s  manual.  Generate   monthly  reports  using  Mantis  tracking  system   bugs  &Team  Foundation  Server.  Bachelor,   Mechanical  Engrg,  Electrical  Engrg,  or   related.  12  mos  exp  as  Engineer,  dvlpg,   validating,  &implementing  passenger  vehicle   common  serviceability  &diagnostic  specs,   service  part  release  strategies,  service   information  &simultaneous  production   &service  part  release  for  vehicle  systems  to   improve  or  ensure  aftermarket  maintenance   &serviceability  incldg  ease  of  vehicle   maintenance,  diagnostics  &repairs  &reduction   in  warranty  costs.  Mail  resume  to  Ref#16364,   GM  Global  Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,   MC:482-­C32-­C66,  Detroit,  MI  48265.    

 


Classfied

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

November 8-14, 2017

Page D-5

CLASSIFIED PROFESSIONAL HELP WANTED

PROFESSIONAL HELP WANTED

Exhaust  Subsystem     Validation  Engineer    

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Perform  physical   tests,  engineer  &validate  passenger  car  &SUV   exhaust  systems  &components  incldg  flex   couplings,  flanges,  pipes,  isolators,  heat   shields,  emission  elements,  &tuning  elements.   Dvlp,  monitor  &confirm  completion  of   Analysis,  Development,  Validation,  Plan  and   Results  (ADVP&R)  &test  schedules.  Support   qlty  processes  &evaluation  procedure  dvlpmt.   Capture  &submit  lessons  learned.  Support   Analysis,  Development  and  Validation  process   to  reduce  hardware  &to  realize  Road-­Load-­ Math  strategy,  Share  data  with  CAE   Engineers,  Design  Release  Engineers,   &Performance  Engineers,  coordinating  testing   with  Test  Laboratory  &review  performance   data  of  exhaust  systems  suppliers.  Participate   in  problem  solving  teams.  Participate  in   DFMEA  work  groups.  Create  FMVSS  &Gulf   Cooperation  Council  Standardization   Organization  for  the  Cooperation  Council  for   the  Arab  States  of  the  Gulf  (GSO)  exhaust   systems  documentation  for  the  U.S.,  Canada   &Middle  East.  Master,  Mechanical  or   Automotive  Engrg.  6  mos  exp  as  Engineer,   performing  physical  tests,  engrg  &validating   passenger  vehicle  exhaust  systems  incldg  flex   couplings,  isolators,  heat  shields,  emission   elements,  &tuning  elements.  Mail  resume  to   Ref#27602-­102,  GM  Global  Mobility,  300   Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­C66,   Detroit,  MI  48265.    

 

Systems Engineer Warren, MI, General Motors. Create detailed reqmts for technical implementation of phone integration features such as Apple Car Play, Android Auto, Baidu Car Life, &Mirror Link &functions such as music, navigation, phone calling, messaging, &voice recognition. Interact across organizations to ensure phone integration features are integrated effectively into vehicle. Design, dvlp, execute &debug new mobile phone integration software &hardware features &reqmts in Android, QNX &iOS systems. Ensure certification of software according to internal &carrier/partner reqmts. Work with suppliers to implement new phone integration features. Lead advanced dvlpmt work around for new phone integration features. Lead phone integration functions incldg dvlpmt of roadmap for phone integration technologies such as Apple Car Play, Android Auto, Baidu Car Life, &Mirror Link. Master, Electrical Engrg, Electronics Engrg, or Telecommunications. 12 mos exp as Systems Engineer, Software Engineer, or Software Developer, designing &debugging mobile phone software &hardware features &reqmts in Android &QNX systems, &ensuring certification of software according to internal &carrier or partner reqmts. Mail resume to Ref#2954-103, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265.

Compartment Integration     Design  Engineer   Architecture  Strategy  &  Feasibility   Warren,  MI,  General  Motors.  Study  &explore   new  vehicle  architectures  &powertrains   &expand  existing  architectures  in  support  of   Feasibility  Study  Requests  &leadership   directives.  Dvlp,  create,  &refine  CAD  data,   using  UGNX  &Teamcenter,  incldg  occupant   position,  seat  travel,  wheelbases,  vehicle   track,  ground  lines,  ground  clearance  criteria,   &comfort  curves.  Dvlp  &manage  interior   reflective  anlys  tool  to  measure  glare   &reflection  in  center  compartment.  Plan  &lead   engrg,  dvlpmt  &launch  of  urban  mobility   concept  vehicles  &alternative  propulsion   systems.  Dvlp  options/test-­wells  to  coordinate   &adhere  with  principles  &strategies  of  Vehicle   Set  Strategy.  Apply  DFSS  principles  &trade-­ matrices  to  study  alternatives  while   considering  impacts  such  as  cost,  mass,   timing,  design  for  assembly,  dimensional   variation  &other  program  imperatives.  Dvlp   meeting  agendas,  publish  minutes,   &document  open  issues,  status  &closure.   Lead  additional  workgroups  to  resolve   packaging  issues  by  creating  alternative   solutions  for  interferences,  space  violations,   &function  violations.  Master,  Mechanical  or   Automotive  Engrg.  2  mos  exp  as  Engineer  or   Research  Assistant,  planning  &leading  engrg,   dvlpmt  &/or  launch  of  urban  mobility  concept   vehicle.  Mail  resume  to  Ref#45349,  GM   Global  Mobility,  300  Renaissance  Center,   MC:482-­C32-­C66,  Detroit,  MI  48265.       Senior  Engineer  Vehicle     Health  Management  System    

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Engineer,   analyze,  dvlp,  architect,  &improve  the  overall   passenger  vehicle  (passenger  car,  truck   &sport  utility  vehicle)  health  mgmt  proactive   alert  feature  systems,  &modelled  based   design  &embedded  ECU  software.  Predict   vehicle  health  incldg  systems  &components   integrity,  &incipient  failure  incldg  tracking  of   component  operational  usage  &degradation   using  advanced  analytical  algorithms  using   MATLAB  &Simulink  &electronic  control  units.   Lead  &mentor  vehicle  health  mgmt  systems   engrg  peers  in  dvlpmt  of  system  design   &anlys  artifacts  for  vehicle  health  mgmt.   Ensure  robust  end-­to-­end  execution  of  vehicle   health  mgmt  proactive  alerts  features  for  such   stakeholder  organizations  as  Product  Engrg,   IT,  GCCX,  R&D,  Customer  Care  &Aftersales,   &Quality.  Support  correlation  anlys  of   prognostic  alert  results  with  vehicle  warranty   information.  Monitor  performance  of  released   prognostic  alert  results  against  collected  raw   data  to  ensure  ongoing  confirmation  of   signature.  Execute  production  change  control   &change  coordination  processes  for   prognostic  alert  algorithms,  calibrations,   &relevant  vehicle  components.  Master,   Mechanical,  Aerospace  or  Electrical   Engineering.  12  mos  exp  as  Engineer,   predicting  vehicle  health  incldg  systems   &components  integrity,  &incipient  failure   incldg  tracking  of  component  operational   usage  &degradation  using  advanced   analytical  algorithms  &electronic  control  units.   Mail  resume  to  Ref#1485,  GM  Global  Mobility,   300  Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­C66,   Detroit,  MI  48265.    

  Functional Architect Warren, MI, General Motors. Review Electronic Control Unit (ECU) deployment, vehicle body domain features, &functional reqmts documented in Subsystem Technical Specifications &provide feedback to reqmts authors to improve clarity or consistency with established GM reqmts strategies. Collaborate with lead Subsystem Requirements Engineers &ECU DREs, analyze feature reqmts, evaluate function partitioning &allocation scenarios. Create system design models in IBM Rational Rhapsody for Body functions incldg steering column lock, exterior lighting module, virtual key module, memory seat module, wireless charger module, remote function receivers, pedestrian friendly alert system, trailer tire pressure monitoring system, &headlamp leveling motor. Create &maintain Feature Partitioning and Allocation UML Model for assigned subsystems using Rhapsody tool according to established release schedule. Create controllers per AUTOSAR-based Global B (GB) topology updates. Create serial data buses incldg CAN 1-5 as specified in the architecture. Create Local Internet Network (LIN) channels as specified by Master/Slave architecture incldg Body Control Module (BCM) LIN2-5, LIN10, &LIN13-16. Master, Electrical Engrg, Electronics Engrg, Electronics &Telecommunication Engrg, or related. 36 mos exp as Software Engineer, Senior Software Engineer, or Technical Lead. The required experience must include 36 mos exp creating serial data buses incldg CAN as specified in the architecture, &creating LIN channels as specified by the Master/Slave architecture incldg BCM LIN. Will accept a bachelor’s degree or foreign equivalent degree, in Electrical Engrg, Electronics Engrg, Electronics and Telecommunication Engrg, or related, followed by at least 5 yrs of progressive exp in the specialty, in lieu of required education &exp. Will also accept any equally suitable combination of education, training, &/or exp which would qualify an applicant to perform the job offered. Mail resume to Ref#34835, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482-C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265.      

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Senior Systems Analyst

Warren, MI, General Motors. Analyze Microsoft-related software incidents daily. Determine severity level, organizing tickets by security risk &team, meet with SharePoint, Dynamics, Server/Platforms, &Skype Teams, &assign IT &end-user incident tickets for hot fixes &technical resolution. Write PowerShell scripts to automate data extraction from data warehouse. Identify issues &ensure proper implementation of the Microsoft Dynamics AX Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software systems. Ensure compliance with service level agreements negotiated with the various business units. Use Tableau &Power BI to review ticket data &present results. Perform technical anlys of failure mode &determine process or system improvements. Perform statistical trend anlys on tickets using Excel. Review &ensure conformity &strict compliance with Microsoft standards in coding solutions to ticket problems. Administer Microsoft Premier Contract incldg general monitoring of the weekly activities of external MS technical personnel (1 Technical Account Mgr, 5 Microsoft Dedicated Service Engrs &2 Application Dvlpmt Mgrs). Bachelor, IT, Computer Science, Electrical Engrg, or related. 12 mos exp as Systems Analyst, Project Manager, or related, implementing Microsoft Dynamics AX or SAP Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software systems, &ensuring compliance with service level agreements negotiated with various business units. Mail resume to Ref#6345, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, MC:482C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265. Senior Financial Analyst

General Motors, Detroit, MI. Prepare, analyze &review consolidating journal entries. Perform &review consolidation procedures for monthly &quarterly accounting close for SEC Form 10Q Quarterly Report &Form 10-K Annual Report. Identify, interpret, &analyze potential accounting risks &issues. Review various tasks performed by 3 team members &~5-6 other team members across globe. Review income statement walk &analyze numbers. Review &analyze budget &forecasted numbers with actuals. Ensure knowledge transfers to other members within the organization, &lead &support global &regional accounting initiatives. Apply accounting &financial reporting standards (GAAP), SEC rules &regulations &FASB Statements &other related standards to special &unique transactions incldg consolidation adjustments, financial instruments, hedge accounting, currency translation adjustment, &foreign exchange, to assess the impact on consolidated financial statements. Perform line by line anlys of revenue, cost &profitability data &present summarized regional results to Leadership. Dvlp &present data to Senior Controllership organization incldg Controller. Lead &/or support global/regional accounting initiatives. Bachelor, Accounting, Bus.Admin., or Finance. 60 mos exp as Accountant, Corporate Accounting Manager, or related, applying accounting &financial reporting standards (GAAP), SEC rules &regulations &FASB Statements to transactions incldg consolidation adjustments, financial instruments, hedge accounting, currency translation adjustment, &foreign exchange, to assess the impact on consolidated financial statements. Mail resume to Ref#11974, GM Global Mobility, 300 Renaissance Center, Mail Code 482-C32-C66, Detroit, MI 48265.    

End-­to-­End Systems    Engineer-­Tablet  Connectivity     Supporting  Autonomous  Features    

Warren, MI,  General  Motors.  Perform   SDFMEA  &Fault  Tree  Analysis  (FTA)  to   identify  failure  modes  in  design  elements   interface  such  as  API  issues  type:   transmission  failure,  corrupted  data,   &latency  issues.  Define,  write,  improve   &launch  reqmts  for  Infotainment  System   applied  to  Autonomous  Vehicles.  Use  IBM   Rational  DOORS  to  release  tablet   &smartphone  connectivity  System   Technical  Specifications  &lower  level   subsystem  Design  Element  Specifications   incldg  HMI  Device  Registration  process,   hardware  setting  (incldg  near  field   communication,  cameras,  speakers),   &operating  software  &apps  updates,   install,  &uninstall.  Coordinate  &work  with   cross  functional,  end-­to-­end  Feature   Development  Teams  (Feature  Owner,   System  Engineers  &other  key   stakeholders)  addressing  device,  all   &vehicle  &back  office  systems  concerns  as   necessary  for  Autonomous  Vehicle  Tablet   Application  Framework  feature.  Interact   with  Cybersecurity  representatives  to   ensure  systems  &communication  protocols   are  specified  in  secure  fashion.  Assure  that   Device  Registration  Process  &hardware   settings  comply  with  Cybersecurity   Corporate  configurations  reqmts  (incldg   Wi-­Fi  &Bluetooth  enabling  settings).   Bachelor,  System,  Electrical,  Electronic,  or   Automation  and  Control  Engrg,  or  related.   12  mos  exp  as  Engineer,  defining,  writing,   improving  &launching  reqmts  for  Active   Safety  or  Infotainment  System,  lower  level   subsystem  Design  Element  Specifications   &incldg  specs  into  passenger  vehicle.  Mail   resume  to  Ref#45092,  GM  Global  Mobility,   300  Renaissance  Center,  MC:482-­C32-­ C66,  Detroit,  MI  48265.    

 

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Page D-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • November 8-14, 2017

Pastor E.L. Branch

Real Times Media and the Michigan Chronicle congratulate you on 4o years of great leadership and service to Third New Hope Baptist Church and our great city.

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