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January / February 2013

Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Scott Sullivan scott@glsp.com Editor

Jennie McCafferty jennie@glsp.com Associate Publisher

Charles D. McEwen Gary Morgan Jim Neff Bob Schwartz Bob Seif Rachael Steil Tamara Steil Nick Stanko Anthony Targan Cregg Weinmann Amanda Weaver Pamela Zinkosky Michael Zuidema Jamie Fallon Composer

Dave Foley Mike Duff

Editors Emeritus

Rose Zylstra

Social Media Editor

Carter Sherline

Senior Photographer

Pat Davies Peter Draugalis Don Kern Gary Morgan Davd Parham Greg Sadler Victah Sailer Photo / Video

Paul Aufdemberge Desiree Davila Ian Forsyth Tom Henderson Scott Hubbard Herb Lindsay Laurel Park Robin Sarris Hallop Columnists

James Aren Tracey Cohen M.B. Dillon Brianne Feldpausch Heather Dyc Hanks Jeff Hollobaugh Bill Kahn William Kalmar Dr. Edward H. Kozloff Doug Kurtis Grant Lofdahl Ron Marinucci Riley McLincha

January / February 2013 Featured Future Events

Editor’s Notes: Widdle Wobble By Scott Sullivan Michigan Runner of the Year: Lisa Veneziano By Bill Khan Co-Male Runner of the Year: Mike Morgan By Charles Douglas McEwen Co-Male Runner of the Year: Christopher Landry By Charles Douglas McEwen Female Runner of the Year: Dot McMahan By Charles Douglas McEwen Senior Runner of the Year: Peggy Zeeb By Ron Marinucci Masters Runner of the Year: Ian Forsyth By Ron Marinucci Beyond the Chip: Fragmented By Ian Forsyth Contributor of the Year: Gary Morgan By Heather Hanks Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard First A.I.M. High Endurance Awards Fete Endurance Feats By Michael Zuidema Senior Runner of the Year: Tom Yates By Ron Marinucci Michigan Runner Race Series, 2013 Milestones and Goals By Dave Foley Running with Tom Henderson HIIT Me With My Best Shot By Bob Schwartz

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At the Races

Cheryl Clark

McMahan, Morgan Triumph at 30th Fifth Third Turkey Trot By Charles Douglas McEwen Balmy Weather, Record Turnout Boost Ann Arbor Trot By Tracey Cohen Looking Back Foreshadows at State Cross Meet By Scott Sullivan

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Vol. 34, No. 6

Fast Times, November Sunshine Help 34th Big Bird Fly By Ron Marinucci Camilleri, Costescu Ring Up Northville Wins By Charles Douglas McEwen Marathon ‘Miracles’ Stuff of Effort, Comet Dust By Scott Sullivan Wicked Halloween Run: A Spirited Competition By Paela Zinkosky Russian Masters Sweep Freep Marathon By Charles Douglas McEwen U-M Women, MSU’s Kroll Bag Big 10 Crowns By Charles Douglas McEwen Mocny, Lu Win Windy, Wet Wildlife Marathon By Charles Douglas McEwen

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Chiba Ekiden, Chiba, Japan Fantasy 5K, Howell Footlocker Cross Country Midwest, Kenosha, WI Footlocker Cross Country Nationals, San Diego Headless Horseman, Howell Miami Beach Half Marathon

Original Ann Arbor Turkey Tot, Dexter Run Like the Dickens, Holly YMCA Santa Run, Flint Photography by Scott Sullivan, Carter Sherline, and Victah Sailor

Cover: Lisa Veneziano finishes second, first master, in the Labor Day 30K Run, Milford, September 1, 2012. Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

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Editor’s Notes

Widdle Wobble By Scott Sullivan

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Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

y return to being a champion runner was complicated by the fact I had never been one. Then there was the injury. How does a broken wrist affect running? Plenty. “I can never do housework again,� I told my wife, not that I’d done any to begin with. As with running, it might

jostle my healing bones. As they got better, I got worse, torpid, out of shape. I prescribed eating chocolate, releasing endorphins for mental health. When I cast off my cast, my whole being was better rounded. Restoring the physical form I had never achieved proved harder. In the past I’d scorned “runners� who did less than 20 miles a week. Real running demanded 50 plus miles — better, twice that — at whatever cost to your co-workers, kin and so on. You do them a favor teaching them how well they fare without you. Infirmity forced me to recalculate my numbers. Running four miles took me longer than eight miles used to — and was harder. I could still shirk my other responsibilities for the same time, but only run half the distance. Why not lobby Obama to outlaw gravity? “Fiscal cliff �? No problem. Would Republicans try to thwart

him? I needed someone to blame for not saving me. Why not government, the one thing we can count on to disappoint us? It’s worth the trillions we throw away on it just for that. At last the day came: Thanksgiving. Where in the past I would race in Turkey Trots, I assigned myself this year to a fun run: the Gazelle Sports 4-mile Gobble Wobble. It was not only noncompetitive, I’d not run it; I’d do race videos. Since a shoot even that long might be too taxing, I focused on the 1-mile Widdle Wobble kids run. Finally something my speed, I figured. Turkey-dressed parents held hands with and halfdragged toddlers. Some pushed strollers or tethered themselves to dogs. Even here I saw munchkins run faster than I do these days. They were innocent, joyful, bounding into a boundless future, increasing my need for vengeance. I took my camcorder to the finish, knowing children who ran too fast too soon would be humbled. Wrong again. Two teens — one dressed as a giant juice box, the other a bag of crackers — pushed by me to greet the top Widdle Wobblers. Damn kids flew. It was past the end where I met my mĂŠtier: two penned turkeys. Kids flocked around them, flapping arms and crying, “Gobble-gobble.â€? The birds looked puzzled. They would be dinner soon, I expected. Film in the can, I flew. A feast was ahead, but how much should I partake in? Elsewhere, legions were lining up for the holy days buying spree.

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Michigan Runner of the Year: Lisa Veneziano By Bill Khan

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nder the heading of “don’t try this at home” comes Lisa Veneziano’s 2012 training program.

The 48-year-old Fenton woman is the overall Michigan Runner of the Year for the second straight year, despite a foot injury that severely reduced a weekly mileage total that was already relatively low. Veneziano typically runs 30 miles a week, far fewer than other runners of her caliber, but that total was cut in half most weeks this summer following a stress fracture sustained in early June.

“I didn’t want to stop running completely” said Veneziano, who had a stress fracture in her foot. “I wanted to keep being able to do some races. “I changed my strategy this year,” she went on. “I biked most days of the week and actually enjoyed it. I’ve always liked biking as my cross-training. Now, going forward, I will do more biking. It’s a good strategy as I’m getting older.” Such low mileage probably won’t produce similar results for everybody, but they did for an elite runner with 23 years of high-level training as her fitness base. Veneziano was the first Michigan masters runner in four of the six series races she entered, placing second in the other two. She racked up 155 points to repeat as the overall Runner of the Year. She was the first overall master at the St. Patrick’s Parade Corktown 5K (18:55), Mackinac Island 8-Mile (51:06) and Grand Rapids Marathon (3:15:11), winning Mackinac Island outright. She was the first Michigan master in the Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K (1:44:42) and the second state master in the Dexter-Ann Arbor 10K (38:48) and Crim 10 Mile (1:05:53). “I was really surprised when I got it last year and, honestly, I had no expectation, never in my wildest dreams, did I think I would get it two years in a row,” Veneziano said. “It’s really quite cool.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

She did three 20-milers in preparation for her 3:15:11 performance in the Grand Rapids Marathon Oct. 21, good for the masters victory, but generally stuck to a short midweek run and either a race or somewhat-long run on the weekends.

Lisa Veneziano, bib 1973, and her husband, Jay Owens, compete in the Original Ann Arbor Turkey Trot in Hudson Mills Metro Park, Dexter

but because the Detroit event was sold out by the time she decided to register.

decided, ‘Why not do the 10K?’ I had a nice solid run there.

“I had foot issues going on and didn’t want to sign up for Detroit until I knew the foot would be OK,” Veneziano said. “After Milford (the Labor Day 30K Sept. 1), I felt good, went to sign Jay and I up for the Free Press and it was closed. Grand Rapids was the same day as Detroit. I was kind of disappointed in not doing Detroit but, I tell you what, Grand Rapids was an awesome marathon. Jay and I were really pleased we did it. That’s one we’ll put on our list. We’d definitely do Grand Rapids again.”

“Actually, my times are pretty much in my range. I’m trying to hang on, even though I’m getting older.”

While other contenders make it a point to run the Michigan Runner Race Series events to accumulate points, Veneziano frequents many of those races because she and her husband, Jay Owens, enjoy them.

Veneziano is most proud of her 38:48 in the Dexter-Ann Arbor 10K, a time which age grades at 34:53.

It just so happened that she chose to run the Grand Rapids Marathon this year, not because it replaced the Detroit Free Press Marathon in the series,

“It’s the first time I’ve ever done the 10K there,” she said. “Typically, I do the half marathon. They have something special for masters in that race, so I

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Among Veneziano’s goals for the final year in her 40s is to increase her mileage, which, based on her 2012 totals, won’t be difficult. “I want to get my mileage up higher than that,” she said. “That was extremely low. My foot is starting to feel good now. I was right around 30. I’d like to get there and add some more biking. Now I know I can do that and run a decent marathon. “Next year, I’d like to get my times down a little bit more. I had a solid year, but didn’t run really fast at any distance.” - MR -


Co-Male Runner of the Year Mike Morgan By Charles Douglas McEwen

D

Morgan, now 32, comes from a land of prairies, cornfields and flat terrain. But he had a big day on the Flint course known for its Bradley hills.

“Mike is one of the most relentless runners I’ve ever trained with,” Polley said. “Not many people can train with him. He hammers it every day — and he’s like that in races too. Mike goes hard from start to finish. Sometimes he goes too hard early and ‘relentless’ can turn into ‘reckless.’ But that’s him.”

“The Crim is a challenging race,” said Morgan, the top U.S. finisher in his first attempt on the layout.

Morgan, our co-Male Runner of the Year, demonstrated that relentlessness in the Crim 10Mile last August. As a former three-time Division III All-American at Nebraska Wesleyan University,

“Boaz went out really aggressively, but he began to fade around mile five,” Morgan said. “I caught him at seven and a half. He stayed with me for another half-mile, but I knew I had him at that point.”

His first-place among state runners ended Boaz Cheboiywo’s five-year winning streak. The Kenyan native did not cede his title easily.

Timing 49:45, Morgan finished 32 seconds ahead of Cheboiywo. The time didn’t match his 10mile PR of 48:08, but given the course and conditions, he was happy nonetheless. Morgan had a couple PRs on the track last year: a 29:33 10K at the Penn Relays in Philadelphia and 14:15 5K at the Jesse Owens Track Classic in Columbus, Ohio.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

rew Polley describes his Hansons-Brooks Distance Project teammate Mike Morgan as relentless.

“Not many runners who’ve raced as much as Mike have set PRs on the track at age 32,” said Polley. Back on the road race circuit, Morgan swept the Volkslaufe 5K and 10K July 4 in Frankenmuth, repeating a feat he accomplished in 2010. Last year, he won the 20K, giving him a record five Volkslaufe wins in the last three years. “Volkslaufe is probably my favorite race,” said Morgan. “But doubling (doing both 5K and 10K) was the hardest day of racing I’ve ever had. It was really too hot to do that.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Morgan finished fourth in the national halfmarathon championship in Duluth, Minn., during June with a 1:04:38. “Mike missed his 1:04:05 PR,” Polley said, “but he competed there really well.” Morgan does his best work in the halfmarathon and marathon, said Hansons-Brooks assistant Corey Kubatzky. “Mike has a lot of volume (training and racing miles),” the coach said. “He’s basically a strength runner. He can grind it out with the best of them.” One of Morgan’s more-notable PRs came last January at the U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon in Houston.

Mike Morgan won both the 10K and the 5K at the Volkslaufe in 2012. 8

“It’s great to run at the trials,” Morgan said. “Not many people qualify to run it. I went out too fast and fizzled some at the end. But it was OK.”

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Mike Morgan waves to fans at the Fifth Third Turkey Trot award ceremony.

His 2:14:22 placed him 17th overall. Though he whittled about 20 seconds off his former PR, Morgan thinks he can do better in the future. “It’s been a challenging year,” he said. “We (his wife Kelly and him) just had our first child (Madden). There’s been an adjustment period. Plus I’m getting a little bit older. “So it’s good to the see the PRs still coming. I hope that translates to the marathon next year.” Morgan finished 2012 winning Detroit’s Fifth Third Turkey Trot 10K on Thanksgiving morning in 30:39, running much of that race with HansonsBrooks teammates Robert Scribner, 27, and Ethan Shaw, 22. “I’ve been with the team for seven years,” he said. “I’m one of the older guys now. It’s fun to interact with the younger guys who join every year or so. “They keep me young,” he said. - MR -


Co-Male Runner of the Year Christopher Landry By Charles Douglas McEwen

Running on empty during the last mile of that race, Landry dug down deep and found a way to beat Antonio Vega of Des Moines, Iowa, by one second. That gave Landry eighth place in the race, but more importantly helped him tie Aaron Braun of Flagstaff, Ariz., for first place in the USATF Running Circuit Championship Series. Landry earned $15,625 in prize money for his series efforts.

(1:15:47) and the marathon (2:17:11). “Christo is still learning the longer distances,” said Alex Gibby, who coaches Landry. “His forte in college was cross country and 5000 meters. I believe that his biggest accomplishment last year was tying for the USATF road racing crown. Across the board, Christo had a very consistent year at a very high level.”

Landry ran in some of the country’s most-comThree years ago, petitive races in 2012, setting personal records at Landry, who recently 1500 meters (3:46.50), 5K (13:52), 10K (28:18), 15K (44:37), 10 miles Vertical (47:52), 20K (1:00:04), 25KPageinked MRSub0311_Sixth 2/6/11 9:52 PM 1 a sponsorship deal with Mizuno, came to Ann Arbor to train with Gibby, who is also the YES University of Michigan’s head cross country and I’d like a subscription to assistant track coach.

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“After that, I was in no man’s land behind the leaders for the rest of the race,” he said.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

C

hristopher (Christo) Landry, 26, of Ann Arbor views his kick as a weakness to work on during the offseason. But when he needed it the most at the Twin Cities USA Track & Field 10-Mile Championships Oct. 7, he displayed a strong one.

In other USATF series races, Landry ran 14:14 and finished 10th at the Downtown 5K in Providence, R.I. He was runner-up in 44:37 at the Gate River Run 15K in Jacksonville, Fla., and finished seventh in 1:00:04 in tthe Stratton Faxon New Haven 10K Road Race in Connecticut. In one of his best performances of the year, Landry topped all Michigan finishers at the Fifth Third River Bank 25K Run in Grand Rapids in 1:15:47. Toward the end of that race, Landry had to fight off Brett Gotcher of Flagstaff, Ariz., to finish third overall and second among U.S. runners. He also had to battle cramping.

Landry had grown up in Falls Church, Va., and attended the College Christopher Landry topped all Michiof William & Mary, gan finishers at the Fifth Third River where he was a three-time Bank 25K Run in 1:15:47. All-American and the 2007 Colonial Athletic Association Athlete and Scholar-Athlete of the Year. “The last three or four miles, I pulled away from Brett with some constant pressure,” Landry When Gibby, who had been Landry’s college said. “I still had a cramp going uphill at the end.” coach, took the U-M job, Landry tagged along. Spectators gave him a lift. “The crowd at the “I thought there was still more I could do (runend was huge,” he said. “Everyone was cheering. It ning-wise) after college, and Alex could help me,” was a great sensation.” Landry said. “But running is a very individualistic sport. There’s a lot that you have to do on your own.” Landry also enjoyed the Anthem Richmond Marathon, which took place near his hometown in He called his 1500-meter PR set in June at the Virginia. Running in his first 26.2-miler, he shot out American Miler’s Club Series in Indianapolis a season to a big early lead. Then three runners passed him. highlight. “It was probably the race I enjoyed most,” said Landry. “I hadn’t raced a 1500 on the track in “I caught up to them again around mile 21,” he seven years and I set a PR by six-and-a-half seconds.” said. “But then I started having cramps in my hamstrings.” He wound up finishing fourth in 2:17:11. From there, Landry ran the U.S. Olympic Team 10,000-meter Trials in Eugene, Ore., placing 17th in “I’m really happy I did it,” Landry said of the a respectable 28:35, but he felt he missed a big opmarathon. “I saw some of my old college teammates portunity. out there. They were great motivation.”

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“I was on a PR pace at the 5K split,” he remembered, “even though at 4K my feet had got tangled up with another runner’s feet and I’d face-planted on the track.

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What does he see as his best asset as runner? “Not getting tired,” said our tireless co-Male Runner of the Year. - MR -


Fifth Third Turkey Trot, Detroit

McMahan, Morgan Triumph at 30th Fifth Third Turkey Trot By Charles Douglas McEwen

They were just a few of the characters prancing down Woodward Avenue during the 30th annual Turkey Trot, presented by Fifth Third Bank and The Parade Co. Annette David of Trenton, who has dressed up as a penguin and The Grinch in the past, transformed herself into Frosty the Snowman this year. “It’s a nice childhood theme,” she said of her costume. “I got a lot of cheers along the way.” The Turkey Trot had another monster turnout with 22,100 entrants, up about 2,000 over last year’s record. “I usually plan on 10 percent (of registrants) being no shows,” said race director Doug Kurtis. “But we had such a beautiful day, almost everyone came this year. We ran out of medals. We’ll re-order and do what we can to supply the rest.” Hansons-Brooks Distance Project athletes dominated the 10K, as has become their habit.

Mike Morgan, 32, Michigan Runner magazine’s 2012 co-Male Runner of the Year, finished first in 30:39, two seconds ahead of teammates Robert Scriber, 27, and Ethan Shaw, 22. “We went out and just kind of broke away from the pack,” Morgan said. “We had fun. It turned into a nice little race with the three of us. No bloodbath, though.” Hansons-Brooks’ Dot McMahan, 36, and Ariana Hilborn, 32, raced together for the first three miles. Then McMahan, MR’s 2012Female Runner of the Year, pulled away. “The weather was ideal,” she said. “Normally there are windy spots here, but not today. That helped me feel really good. I kept turning down streets thinking I’d get blasted.” McMahan, who also won here in 2005, 2007 and 2009, finished this year in 35:04. Next came Hilborn in 35:26 and Alycia Wright, 23, of Macomb in 37:15. In the Stocking Stuffer 5K, Jeff Wilson, 25, of Saginaw out-kicked Kevin Cataldo, 25, of Williamston to win the men’s race, 16:07 to 16:08. Bennett Prudhomme, 23, of East Lansing placed third in 16:40.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

DETROIT (11/22/12) — Captain America ran with The Flash. Pilgrims with muskets chased human-sized turkeys, Santa tried to catch runaway reindeer and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man pursued two scared Ghostbusters.

Dot McMahan, an official Fifth Third Turkey Trot legend, won her fourth.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Derek Dexter, 43, of Clinton (18:07) and Ella Willis, 55, of Detroit (21:18) were the top masters in the 5K. Pat Deighan, 46, of Birmingham (35:40) and Sara Pomish, 53, of Farmington Hills (39:47) led the 10K.

A new floats in America’s Thanksgiving Parade celebrated the Fifth Third Turkey Trot. Michigan Runner TV http://michiganrunner.tv/2012_53turkeytrot

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The Turkey Trot also included a Mashed Potato Mile. The event raised funds for The Parade Co., Special Olympics-Michigan and Gleaners Food Bank. For complete results, go to www.gaultracemanagement.com. - MR -

michiganrunner.tv

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Sarah Boyle, 26, of Brighton claimed the women’s 5K in 17:03, edging last year’s champion Shannon Osika, 19, of Westland, who took second in 17:04. Denisa Costescu, 35, of Commerce, who won in 2009 and 2010, was third in 17:59.

Mashed Potato Milers are ready to start.


Female Runner of the Year Dot McMahan By Charles Douglas McEwen

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ot McMahan’s daughter Elizabeth, 3, admires her mother’s talent as a runner, but ...

McMahan and Davila, members of the Hansons-Brook Distance Project, both excelled in 2012. Davila ran in the Olympic Marathon in London. McMahan, however, picked up big wins in Michigan.

McMahan has been on a roll running marathons during the last couple of years. She ran her 2:31:48 PR at the 2011 Grandma’s event in Duluth, Minn., finishing third overall.

Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“She doesn’t think I’m the fastest runner out there,� said our Female Runner of the Year.“ Elizabeth thinks my teammate, Desi (Davila), is the fastest woman in the world. I have a tough crowd to please at home.�

“Dot was an 800meter runner in college,� Rzepecki said. “She has lots of speed in her legs. You don’t want to end a race (with her beside you). You’ll lose.�

“I got aggressive in the last 5K of that race,� she remembered. “I felt like I ran out of my mind. It was awesome!� She ran 2:32:16 at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Houston last January to finish ninth. If you qualify, McMahan recommends that you run them.

In April McMahan, Dot McMahan picks up her first place 36, streaked to victory in award at the Fifth Third Turkey Trot. the Meteor 10K in Dearborn, shattering her “You learn so much PR for that distance by from the trials,� she said. more than 30 seconds. She went toe-to-toe with Lil“You may push yourself earlier in the race than you ian Mariita of Kenya for the first four miles. should. But you’ve trained so hard, you’ve always got a little bit left in the tank.� “We went back and forth,� McMahan said after that race. “She put in a surge, then I put in a surge. McMahan finished the year strong, running It was good competition.� 2:32:11 in the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, At the Fifth Third River Bank National 25K Championship in May, McMahan set another PR, churning out a 1:28:29 on the Grand Rapids course. She placed fourth overall and second among state women. Moving on to the Crim 10-mile in August, McMahan finished ninth overall and first among Michigan women in 56:29. Jackie Rzepecki, who took eighth among Michigan runners that day, said McMahan always goes all out. “She’s a ferocious racer,� said Rzepecki, a former Female Runner of the Year. “She’s one of the toughest competitors out there.� McMahan can be especially tough during the last half-mile of a race.

where she was ninth overall and second among U.S. women. A month later, in November, she won the Detroit Fifth Third Thanksgiving Turkey Trot 10K for the fourth time. (She also won that race in 2005, 2007 and 2009.) This is the third time McMahan has won Female Runner of the Year. When she first won in 2006, the 5’6� McMahan weighed 117 pounds. Today she weighs five pounds less, thanks in part to Elizabeth. “She motivates me daily,� McMahan said of her daughter. “She makes me eat my vegetables. When I want to eat a whole bag of cookies, she’s there to let me know I can’t do that anymore.� McMahan also receives motivation from her Hansons teammates, whom she joined in 2005. She was an all-conference runner at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee prior to that. Entering 2005, McMahan had PR’s of 2:09.17 for 800 meters and 4:26.25 for 1500 meters, but had run just a handful of races longer than 8K. “One of the best decisions of my life was coming here,� she said of joining the Rochester Hillsbased team. “I’ve been able to test myself in ways that I couldn’t do running on my own.� McMahan still feels she can set PRs in the near future. “My body has been feeling good,� she said. “I’m 36. If I have another four more years (of running well), that would be incredible. “I know that I’m creeping toward the end of my career. But there are a few more things on my check list.�

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Senior Runner of the Year: Peggy Zeeb By Ron Marinucci

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eggy Zeeb is our 2012 Female Senior Runner of the Year. If her name sounds familiar, that’s because Zeeb is usually among the top finishers in any race she enters — and this is the third time she’s won the honor.

kids,” she said. “But I can’t run with them when I’m timing them.” Zeeb’s training varies, often with the seasons. “In the summer I do one speed workout, one long run and hills,” she said, in addition to her usual weekly race. She runs “usually five or six days a week, only 40 to 45 miles during marathon training. It depends on how busy I am coaching. It’s weird, but I train for 5Ks and run marathons.

Zeeb, 54, of Colon was the first senior runner in each of the three Michigan Runner Series races she ran: the Borgess Half Marathon, Dexter-Ann Arbor 10K and Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon. She accumulated 34 points, edging Laura Maslar by a single point.

“I plan to run Boston in 2014 and might change my training to see how it works. I always struggle the last six miles, so I think I’ll incorporate longer runs, up to 26 miles at a time.”

In May at Borgess, Zeeb was the first masters female and fourth overall, finishing in 1:31:37, which age-graded to 1:18:56. “The Borgess half was a PR for me,” she said. “I was thrilled at 54 to set a new PR!”

She posted a 41:56 (age-graded 35:29) at the Dexter-Ann Arbor USATF National Masters 10K Championship in June. With heightened competition, she finished first in her age group and was the first Michigan senior. “I love the Grand Rapids Marathon,” Zeeb enthused about the Oct. 21 event. It was her third MR Series event and third senior win. “It was the first marathon I ever ran,” she said. “I try to run it every other year.” It was not smooth sailing this year, she recounted. “I was running about a 3:11 or 3:12 pace when the tongue of my shoe went down to the toe of my shoe,” Zeeb remembered. “I had to stop, take off the shoe and fix it. After that, the warts on the bottom of the ball of my foot started hurting so bad that I ended up walking and running the rest of the race.” Yet her 3:18:28 age-graded to 2:51:05. The warts have since been removed. Zeeb couldn’t run for a week thereafter and, like all runners down with injuries, got “a little grouchy. “I race almost every weekend,” Zeeb said. “The most fun that I had in a race this year was running the Great Lakes Relay for Erin O’Mara and the Gingerbread Girls. It was great to see M-10 (the eventual open winning team, composed of all men) worrying about where the girls were! We finished second in the open competition with our handicap.” Zeeb, who has taught at Colon High School for the past 15 years, started running when she was in high school. Then she stopped and did not return to the sport until 1996.

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

She ran even faster in September, turning in a 1:30:47 at the Capital City Half Marathon in Lansing. “I wanted to break 1:30,” Zeeb said. “I didn’t quite do it, but I was close.”

A favorite workout involves “running six minutes as hard as I can, jogging for 30 seconds, then five minutes as hard as I can, jogging for 30 seconds … until I get down to one minute.” Zeeb uses this workout with the team and runs it with the girls “because I’m only timing minutes and I yell when it’s time for them to stop.” She also enjoys “going out to Glen Oaks Community College to run hills. I run 10 miles in a loop and every time I get to the big hill, I run up it as hard as I can. “I hate hard workouts while I’m doing them, but love the feeling of finishing them,” she said.

Peggy Zeeb, bib number 3093, competes in the Dexter Ann Arbor 10K, USATF Masters 10K Championship. “I started again because my son (Neil) was planning to run cross country,” said Zeeb, “and I wanted to be able to run with him. We still run together at times. “I absolutely love running,” she went on. “There are so many reasons I would have trouble pinpointing any one of them. Some days it’s because I need to relieve stress. Sometimes it’s because I love being outside in nature — I love trails. Sometimes it’s because I’m extremely competitive and I want to win. “I might be 54, but I feel young. I’m more fit now than when I was 34. Running helps me stay young.” Zeeb recounted a recent trip to her doctor’s office. “My blood pressure was 90/60 and I weighed 10 pounds lighter” than 20 years ago. In addition to teaching physics, chemistry, earth science, biology and science calculations at Colon High School, Zeeb also coaches the girls track and cross country teams. She began coaching soon after starting as a teacher. “I run as often as I can with the

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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“I don’t run as hard during winter. I like throwing in more cross-training, like Extreme Boot Camp or Total Body Burn. I like coming out of winter with a strong core and a good base.” Zeeb’s husband of 35 years, Eric, is a frequent running partner. (In addition to Eric and son Neil, she has a daughter, Shannon, and granddaughter, Emily, who also “loves science.”) “I usually run with Eric, but I do my speed workouts with the team or by myself,” Zeeb said. “If I plan on running a spring marathon, I run with the Kalamazoo Area Runners for my long Saturday morning run,” she continued. If her schedule permits, she might also “join a group of runners in Kalamazoo or Battle Creek. “When I first started, I could run 21:30 almost every 5K race. One race I was close to 21:00, so I thought to myself, ‘I wonder if I did some speed work or long runs whether I could break 21:00.” She did the extra work “until I broke 20:00.” And she’s still breaking 20 minutes. “My fastest 5K this year was 19:55,” said Zeeb. “It’s still my favorite distance to run.” And she’s good at the others too. - MR -


Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, Ann Arbor

Balmy Weather, Record Turnout Boost Ann Arbor Trot By Tracey Cohen Race proceeds and donations benefitted the Wounded Warrior Foundation, Food Gatherers and Ann Arbor Pioneer’s High School’s wrestling team, which was out in force to close streets and manage traffic.

For complete results and information on next year’s Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, visit www.rftiming.com and www.goodboyevents.com. - MR -

Photo by Tracey Cohen

ANN ARBOR (11/22/12) — Thick pre-dawn fog did not dissuade close to 2,000 runners, walkers and spectators from gathering for the seventh annual Thanksgiving Turkey Trot 5K on the University of Michigan’s north campus.

“The Turkey” entertained adults and these Tot Trotters.

Morning sun peeked through the clouds, burned off the fog and provided mild temperatures at gun time. Despite a killer hill in the final mile, Jim Gembacz, 19, of Plymouth blazed through the new course to triumph in 16:23. Ditto-aged AnnieNorah Beveridge of Ann Arbor prevailed for the women in 18:16. “It was a good day,” Good Boy Events race director Ron Suffolk said. “Runners liked the course change (a long uphill near the end, followed by a downhill finish) and we couldn’t have asked for better weather. How often can people run in shorts on Thanksgiving morning?” First year trotters Jessica Krumm and Mackensy Lakian agreed. “We loved running on campus and the course was nice,” said Krumm. “The hills weren’t too hard except for that killer one at the end.” “The atmosphere was fun and positive,” added Lakian. “And we loved the music.” The event’s first-year Tot Trot offered little ones medals, shirts and high-fives aplenty. In keeping with race tradition, “The Turkey” entertained children and adults. Santa, also present, added these thoughts: “The kids ran their hearts out and were wonderful. So were the good things happening for charity.”

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Masters Runner of the Year: Ian Forsyth By Ron Marinucci

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asters Runner of the Year Ian Forsyth “wasn’t aiming for the (Michigan Runner) series,” he admitted. Yet his first-place finishes among state males 40 and over at the Fifth Third River Bank 25K, Brian Diemer 5K and Crim 10-Mile gave him enough points to earn the title.

he ran a leg of the 1995 NCAA champion distance medley relay team. And 15 years ago, he was MR’s overall Michigan Runner of the Year. “It was fun getting to know Tracey Lokken this year,” said Forsyth of last season. Lokken, 46, from the Upper Peninsula, is a national elite having garnered titles at a variety of distances.

“Winning is an honor, as Michigan has many good masters guys,” said Forsyth, who outpointed past masters Runners of the Year Eric Green and John Dood. “Still, it was purely coincidental.”

“I had always known Tracey was a good runner and some crazy guy from the U.P., but I didn’t get up close until he pushed me in the back and chastised me for cutting him off halfway through the Crim,” said Forsyth.

A bad back kept Forsyth from training and racing more, and possibly running faster. “The year was disappointing,” he said. “My back wasn’t helping things.”

“I later saw at Twin Cities that he’s completely obsessed with tangents on the course and will do whatever it takes to force his way, even running in a pack, so I didn’t feel so bad (about the push).

Running sub-15 at Diemer June 9 kept him thinking positively. “I’ve broken 15 there for a lot of years in a row,” said Forsyth. “Things will be different once I can’t do that any more.”

Forsyth was the top master and second overall state finisher at the Diemer. “The day was hot,” he recalled, “like usual. But I gave it a good go, as I always do there. It’s my favorite and most consistent race.” He ran 51:53 Aug. 25 at Crim, finishing as the first master and fourth overall state male. “Crim was also hot as usual,” said Forsyth. “I’m usually poor in the heat and humidity and have sworn many times never to run Crim again. But it drew me back again.” With the weather conditions, “I ran conservatively,” finishing with negative splits. “I was able to endure (fellow state master) Tracy Lokken’s efforts. He was all over me the whole race,” Forsyth said.

“Tracey was my roommate at Twin Cities. I walked into a room with his stuff strewn everywhere you could see. He was pretty much at home, staying there from Thursday to Monday, and I was just staying one night, in and out.

Besides the Michigan Runner Series, Forsyth also ran the Peachtree 10K July 4 in Atlanta, Ga. “It went horribly for me, my only really bad race of the year,” he said. The positive side was “a fun experience at the race.” He did the Labor Day 30K in Milford, too, where he again ran “conservatively and made it through relatively unscathed.” The Oct. 7 Twin Cities Marathon was one of his season’s highlights. “The marathon is my weakest distance by far,” Forsyth said, “but it’s fun to work on it.” He surprised himself by running negative splits on the way to 2:22:48, a personal best. That was good for 21st overall and sixth in the 40-44 age-group.

“If I like a race, I’ll do it year after year,” he

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“He gave me a jovial ‘Hello’ and within seconds had his tornado of clothing neatly folded in stacks by his bed, like he had just arrived. I’m not one for small talk and forced relationships (like sharing hotel rooms with guys I don’t know), but we had a great time. I got the feeling he could be buddies with anybody pretty much effortlessly. I guess he was my new discovery of the year.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

As for his other series races, “The River Bank Run (May 12) had decent weather and I hung with a solid pack for 11 miles. Then I dropped off a little to make sure I’d make it all the way. My fitness was a little suspect at that point.” Running 1:22:38, Forsyth was the first state and second overall runner over 40. He was also the fourth overall Michigan finisher.

Ian Forsyth ran 51:53 Aug. 25 at Crim, finishing as the first master and fourth overall state male. said. “I’ve run the Irish Jig 5K (in Grand Rapids) and Diemer many times, and also have the River Bank on my lists most years.” Running started for him in fourth grade in Ontario, Canada, his family having moved there from Nova Scotia. “I have no idea why I decided to try out for track that year. I’d never been exposed to the sport before,” said Forsyth. But like most Canadians, “I could skate, of course.” In high school, he won the Ontario provincial championships in cross country and 3000 meters. As an All-American at the University of Michigan,

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Training for Forsyth didn’t change much in 2012, when he entered the masters division. Only the back injury set him back. “I generally train six or seven days a week, 70 miles a week, all year long,” he said. “When I’m feeling good I’ll get up to 80 or 90 miles once in a while. When I’m not messing with nagging injuries, I like to run workouts a couple times a week.”

He usually trains with “a core group of guys I meet most days. Without them,” he conceded, “I probably wouldn’t be out there running at 5:30 a.m.” Despite his successes, “I couldn’t train the way I wanted to most of the year,” he said. “I had recurring SI (sacroiliac) joint problems all year long which were pretty debilitating.” But looking ahead, he was optimistic. “In 2013 I hope to be healthy for most of the year, train more consistently and race much faster. I ran much better when I was 39 than when I was 40. So I’m hoping 41 goes back in the right direction.” - MR -


Beyond the Chip

Fragmented By Ian Forsyth I was slipping through the cracks of stolen jewel I was tightrope walking in two-ton shoes And now somebody’s talking of third world war I’ve been caught in a mind riot – Chris CornellSoundgarden

T

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

he thought was sickening, the essence revolting; was I not way too cool for this tired, everyman’s everymusic? Yet there I was, safely isolated inside blurring car motion, rupturing speakers already habitually abused. Rock star screaming to eye-watering proportions, struggling over the top of Matchbox 20’s “She’s So Mean.” Though ashamedly aware this poppy output clashed dramatically with my self-perceived grungy persona, I was crudely taken, as instinctual emotion snuffed desired logic.

introduced the losing ratio of distraction to success and college was a wickedly-twisting ride to grip before being blown away.

Greeted by the stench of effort spent simultaneously raises the noses of my girls and alerts my wife that help has returned. Post run is anything but casual as my rush is ever frenzied, perpetually falling behind our elusive family caboose; the race for fitness overrun by the race to the next minute.

Eons chasing glory’s Limping through the airport after a satisfying glimpse has now turned effort that same morning, I pondered if it was worth to running for simple it. Training has never been a stranger, its efforts now completion of self. tattooed so deeply that anything otherwise seems While many timeless adalien. Regret emerges from electing to dissociate versaries have graduated from incalculable microscopic daughter moments, in to more practical societal selfish favor of training. responsibility, adopting efficient kaleidoscope of Upon happy return home I was pleasantly enwork and rest, I remain gulfed by wife’s loving smile and girls’ attentive eyes, in flux, fragmented befacetiously probing me about my trip and why I didtween past and present. n’t win. As I looked around at my houseful of tardy In days lost to me, chores, already completed by family patiently leisure was possible. stretching through my absence, and enjoyed the Now the unaltered atbeautiful voices around me, I was reminded how Shillelagh 2013_Shillelagh Ad 12/13/12 4:11 PM Page 1 traction of self-dominalucky I am. – IF tion deceitfully draws me to callously hijack - MR moments slated for those close to me.

Crisply shuffled through the school bus start line shuttle, we settled. Seats rumbled as the driver transferred light inside out. Lurching into earliest Ian Forsyth competes in the Simmons marathon morning, anxHarvey track meet, Ann Arbor ious silence was broken Clipping through with retro irony. As dying darkness each Sheriff ’s “When I’m morning my mind is again discarded for some inWith You” rattled through ancient casings above, my nate need, as logistically I shouldn’t run, but I do. In bearings were instantly transported from pre-race via house exploding with girls, where time is a wheezsuals to a basement of spinning bottles under an avaing balloon and sleep an unfinished dream, parents’ lanche of pop and chips. Shielded by darkness, I was leisurely indulgences aren’t welcome. We storm aware of a smile creasing, picturing the amused look through turbulent days and imagined nights, but of disdain my wife would most certainly have been when I’m alarmed to action, I dislocate myself from holding. pillow’s grip and transfer to road. Inevitably I’m left tired, irritable and in constant battle to keep my My wife is my infinite foil and I respond in home contributions from crashing; yet I persist. turn. The ‘80s brought me hair-band magic and I Recently cresting clouds en route to my latest race, I still can’t resist inhaling ballads of cheese wherever suddenly realized surreal silence surrounding me. served. She groans but endures, because she knows This foreign sensation sent my vision plummeting she carries similar experience and leaks an inkling of earthward, where my deserted wife was left carrying appreciation for my fetish. We both pulled a truckfour hands of responsibility with two. Recalling our load of stubborn up to our relationship’s entryway slyly shape-shifting schedule left me clueless as to and each proceeded to dump it over the other; evenmy girls’ whereabouts, but their pace was certain to tually birthing four more with fresh loads to offer. be frenetic. Primed for impending race day discovOur home seeks nothing unjustly granted and nothery, I was flying from thinly-controlled chaos, creing unjustly gained, so when those parameters are ated by me. seen to fail, the arguing commences until take returns to give. Nothing seems to darken the take side Running has long haunted me, since forgotten of day like my ever-present demand for run time. times when I unknowingly made its discovery racing through woods, clad in elementary colors. Those Daybreak generally meets me on my way home early years promised its ease, high school deviously and drops me at life already well in progress. michiganrunner.net

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Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

Shillelagh 4 Mile Noon Saturday, March 9, 2013

Register online at www.riverbendstriders.com Contact

Riverbend Striders (810) 487-0954 PO Box 233 Flushing, MI 48433

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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MHSAA LP Cross Country Finals, Brooklyn

Looking Back Foreshadows at State Cross Meet

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

By Scott Sullivan

Division 3 Girls Start BROOKLYN (11/3/12) — That the harvest came in November is of no matter. That youths reaped what they’d sown at the state cross country meet and, three nights later, we buried election signs feeling wary of what may spring from the ground thereafter, holds little bearing.

Finn joined Grand Rapids Christian’s Julia Bos among pre-race favorites this day, and neither disappointed. But surprises unfolded too.

Seaholm, Finn Rule D-1 Girls

Now the question is just that: “Now?” — and the answer too. What have we gathered to tide us as we move forward?

It was fitting that out of the day’s eight races — Divisions 1 through 4 based on school enrollments, boys and girls — that the most-anticipated took place last.

Are we seeing more, faster runners? Check. Team depths were remarkable on this Novembercrisp, sunny day. In Division 1, Milford’s seven boy finishers averaged 15:34.6, while the top three girls teams’ seven runners averaged better than 18:30. Star individuals seem to have tilted to the girls side. Where in past years Michigan boys won Foot Locker Cross Country Nationals three straight years (Rockford’s Dathan Ritzenhein in 1999 and 2000, Novi’s Tim Moore in 2001), more recently girls have been top contenders (Rochester’s Megan Goethals won in 2009, while West Bloomfield’s Erin Finn was a close second last year).

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Photo by Scott Sullivan

Reporting on the Michigan High School Athletic Association’s 2012 Lower Peninsula Cross Country Finals at Michigan International Speedway involves, at this point, nostalgia. But why not audition for Nostradamus?

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

Erin Finn, D1 Champion |

Finn, who had followed last year’s Foot Locker effort by winning the 5,000-meter junior national indoor track title in an American record 16:19.7, had looked sluggish by her high standards this fall season. After losing to Bos by 15 seconds at the Spartan Invitational in East Lansing Sept. 13 and feeling atypically tired later, Finn was diagnosed with, and treated

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for, iron deficiency. Could she recover enough to hold off the other Division I fliers at the state meet? Defending champ Grosse Pointe South, Birmingham Seaholm and Saline were so deep their teams had won national recognition. They had fast girls up front as well. Temperatures had warmed up from the low 30s in morning races to the 40s by afternoon. Let the fun begin! South senior Hannah Meier started fast and remained that way. But Finn, bound next fall to the University of Michigan, revved her jets, passed Meier and ran alone from one mile on. Her 17:07.9 finishing time was the second-best in girls state meet history, trailing only the 16:54.8 run by Goethals in her senior season. Meier finished second in 17:34.5, followed by a stream of Saline, South and Seaholm standouts. When the smoke cleared, Seaholm was the team champ with 69 points, followed by South with 88 and Saline, whose seventh and slowest girl crossed in 18:52.0, with 101.

Run of Milford Milford’s run as D-1 boys champ continued for a second year, led by junior Brian Kettle’s individual title in 15:07.5. Not that he lacked company. All


Brian Kettle, D1 Champion

Who’s the Bos?

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Bos — 10th at Foot Locker nationals in 2011 and unbeaten in 2012 — romped to her second straight D-2 girls title as expected. The slight senior, who runs with her mouth wide open, gapped the field quickly and came home in 17:20.4, the second-best distaff time all day. Cedar Springs sophomore Kenzie Weiler placed second in 17:49.1.

Julia Bos, D2 Champion

Ada Forest Hills Northern led a 1-6 sweep by teams from west Michigan in this division, scoring 93 points to 150 by runner-up Spring Lake.

That’s A Mora

Jesse Hersha, D4 Champion

onds faster than Evart senior David Zinger. The Yellowjackets’ next three runners, led by freshman Josiah Ottolini, finished in the top 18 in the day’s first race.

Nick Raymond, D3 Champion

Jackson Lumen Christi (Latin for “light of Christ”) lit up D-3, sweeping both team races. The Titan girls, led by two sophomores and a freshman, tallied 167 points to nip Grandville Calvin Christian (171) in the day’s tightest competition. The boys race was also a nail-biter, with JLC (129) edging Marlette (137) and two-time defending champ Calvin Christian (147). Tall St. Louis senior Raquel Serna (second last year) and short Macomb Lutheran North sophomore Gina Patterson (sixth) ran in front side-by-side for the first two miles of the girls race. Patterson then reached deeper to win in 17:43.4; Serna settled for second in 17:59.8.

Concord Conquers, Olling Rolling

Connor Mora, D2 Champion

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Gina Patterson, D3 Champion

Kirsten Olling, D4 Champion

Erie Mason senior Nick Raymond led early in last year’s finals, then faded to fourth. In 2012 he was stronger, running a 4:39 first mile, then burying the rest of the field to finish in 15:05.1. It was the second best time ever in this division, behind Maverick Darling’s 14:52.8 in 2007.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

When speed hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that’s a Mora: Connor Mora to be exact. The Cedar Springs senior, who swept D-2 boys 1600 and 800 track crowns last spring, battled Mason senior Tanner Hinkle through two and a half miles, then used his better foot speed to capture a 15:04.2 victory, the fastest time of the day. Hinkle crossed second in 15:09.8.

JLC Dominates D-3

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Milford, which has placed in the state’s top 10 for 15 of the last 16 years, tallied 83 points, 84 better than runnerup Waterford Mott (167). Lake Orion senior T.J. Carey finished second to Kettle in 15:09.4. Mott senior Nathan Burnand took third in 15:14.8.

St. Clair (114 points) edged Linden (128) in the team race thanks to better packing. St. Clair trailed by 17 points after four of five runners had crossed for both schools, but its fifth through seventh all finished before Linden’s fifth boy did.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

seven Mavericks ran personal records this day, with Cody Snavely placing fourth in 15:16.7. The team’s slowest runner finished in 16:05.4, would have been good for fourth place overall in the D-4 boys race.

What’s in the water at Concord? The Yellowjacket boys ran away with their third D-4 title in the last four years with 61 points, the day’s low team total. Sophomore Jesse Hersha became the third Concord boy in that time frame to capture the individual crown, storming home in 15:32.3, 20 sec-

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Breckenridge junior Kirsten Olling, who like Finn battled iron deficiency this season, won her third D-4 girls title in as many years, cruising home in 17:59.6 to best runner-up Holly Bullough, a Traverse City St. Francis freshman, by 32 seconds. Homer completed its season-long odyssey by winning its first-ever team title with 118 points. Bear Lake took second with 142..

What’s Next? With two senior girls, Finn and Bos, ranked among the nation’s best, look for more state glory and healing too — both plan to study medicine in college. Olling, barring injury or the appearance of some new D-4 girls phenom, stands to become the fifth four-time cross country champion in state history, a feat last accomplished by Rochester’s Katie Boyles in Class A/D-1 from 1997 to 2000. Three more underclassmen — Kettle, Patterson and Hersha — will eye repeats next fall while providing rivals fast-moving targets. Traditional powers such as Milford and Concord have ample firepower for reloading. Teams and runners looking to improve and surprise next season have role models too in the likes of Raymond, Patterson, Hersha and Homer’s girls /team. Cross country destiny is not random. Yes, injuries, innate talent, course and weather conditions are variables overridden by a constant: you get out of running what you put in. - MR -

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Contributor of the Year: Gary Morgan By Heather Hanks

“Gary has a life many people would envy,” said Detroit Fifth Third Turkey Trot race director and marathon legend Doug Kurtis. “He is constantly travelling to do interesting things. “But it’s not all about him. Gary paces other people during marathons, coaches and provides support to many races and running clubs,” Kurtis added. “He’s a one-of-a-kind, tireless worker who does whatever it takes to get the job done. I can’t think of anyone more deserving of this award.” Morgan, 52, of Clarkston was a 1988 U.S. Olympian in the 20K race walk, New York Athletic Club’s 1997 Athlete of the Year, USA Track and Field’s 2011 Jackie Joyner-Kersee Award recipient, Road Runners Club of America’s Michigan representative, U.S. Olympic Committee alternate for the USATF’s Athlete Advisory Committee and race director for the Dexter-Ann Arbor Run. He has been to eight Olympics, either competing, volunteering or doing media work; 38 countries and all 50 states; has paced more than 20 marathons; carried the Olympic torch twice and competed in more than 60 marathons with a 2:35

PR. Morgan finished first in the 1998 Olympic Trials 20K race walk, second in 1992 and third in 1996. He has competed on 17 U.S. national racewalking teams including the Olympics, Pan Am Games and World Cup. On June 21 last year he survived a 500-foot drop from Mount Hood in Oregon. He is also a regular Michigan Runner magazine contributor as a writer and videographer. He is “Mr. Ubiquitous,” many say. “There is no bigger supporter of running than Gary Morgan,” said RRCA vice president Mitch Garner. “He will go to the ends of the earth to do what he can to advance the sport. He has running in his heart.” Garner recalled Morgan’s 2008 trip to the Beijing Olympics, during which he took five Chinese orphans to the track and field finals for a once-in-alifetime viewing opportunity. Since the Clarkston resident became Michigan’s RRCA representative in 2005, the number of club championship races held in the state has increased significantly. “If you want something done, ask Gary to do it,” Garner said. Morgan, a retired electrician, began writing for Michigan Runner in 2005 after running across the Mackinac Island Bridge with the governor. In 2008, Great Lakes Sports Publications owners Art and Jennie McCafferty handed Morgan a camera and told him to “go to work” while travelling to the Beijing Olympics.

Photo courtesy of Gary Morgan

Since then, Morgan’s approach to writing and shooting has been to take readers behind the scenes of events to find out what really happens. “Anyone can write about a race,” he said. “There are so many other things that go on when you have major events. I’ve seen a city transform itself for a race.”

Gary Morgan is far ahead of the pack, representing the U.S.A. at the Russian Race Walk Championship in Leningrad. 20

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Kensington Challenge race director and Dexter-

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

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anta’s helpers take note: The best gift you can give is yourself. Gary Morgan, Michigan Runner’s 2012 Contributor of the Year, earned the award for his nonstop support of running communities near and far.

Angela Keyes, Gary Morgan, bib number 456, and Bob Smola, bib number 629, get ready to pace marathoners at the Kalamazoo Marathon. Ann Arbor Run co-director Doug Goodhue has known Morgan for 25 years. “Gary is a workhorse,” said Goodhue. “He’s the kind of guy who will say a week before a race, ‘Give me a schedule. Tell me what you want me to do. You want me to drive trucks? You want me to go pick up the water?’ He just jumps in. You don’t even have to ask.” Morgan’s work ethic showed in his training. Goodhue, long one of the country’s top age-group runners, recalled running alongside him 25 years ago at Kensington MetroPark at a 6:30-per-mile pace while Morgan race-walked mile repeats. Kona Running Co. president and CEO Alan Whitehead counts on Morgan’s experience and expertise to ensure his races go off smoothly. “Gary is a doer and positive person,” Whithead said. “He doesn’t dwell on the negative. If there’s something wrong, he’s there to help. He’s a team player and we love having his help at races.” Check out Morgan’s Mr. Ubiquitous weekly online column on Michigan Runner for the latest write-up of his adventures. - MR -


Jan. / Feb. 2013


masthead0113_third vertical 12/13/12 11:02 AM Page 1

January / February 2013

Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Scott Sullivan scott@glsp.com Editor

Jennie McCafferty jennie@glsp.com Associate Publisher

Vol. 34, No. 6

Charles D. McEwen Gary Morgan Jim Neff Bob Schwartz Bob Seif Rachael Steil Tamara Steil Nick Stanko Anthony Targan Cregg Weinmann Amanda Weaver Pamela Zinkosky Michael Zuidema Jamie Fallon Composer

Dave Foley Mike Duff

Editors Emeritus

Rose Zylstra

Carter Sherline

Pat Davies Peter Draugalis Don Kern Gary Morgan Davd Parham Greg Sadler Victah Sailer Photo / Video

Paul Aufdemberge Desiree Davila Ian Forsyth Tom Henderson Scott Hubbard Herb Lindsay Laurel Park Robin Sarris Hallop Columnists

James Aren Tracey Cohen M.B. Dillon Brianne Feldpausch Heather Dyc Hanks Jeff Hollobaugh Bill Kahn William Kalmar Dr. Edward H. Kozloff Doug Kurtis Grant Lofdahl Ron Marinucci Riley McLincha

Cheryl Clark

Chief Financial Officer

Contributors

Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

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Natalie Aiken and Emily Brogen of Howell compete in the Run Like the Dickens 5K with holiday bows. Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc. 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 (734)507-0241 (734)434-4765 FAX info@glsp.com

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Online: Michigan Runner Photo Gallery Headless Horseman, Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 3 Footlocker Cross Country Midwest Regionals, Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 4 Footlocker Cross Country Championships, Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 5 Chiba International Ediden, Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 6 YMCA Santa Run, Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 7 Original Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 8-10

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Run Like the Dickens, Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 11 Fantasy 5K, Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 12 Latin Music Miami Beach Half Marathon, Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -p. 13

Cover: YMCA Santa Run, Flint, December 1, 2012 Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013


Headless Horseman, Howell, October 27, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

A headless horseman is the lead vehicle for the start of the Headless Horseman race.

Connor Larowe of Big Rapids won the 5K in 15:59.

Gabriel Polley of Whitmore Lake ran the 5K in 22:42.

Jane Bostian of Imlay City won the 4549 age group in the 5K: 26:25

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013

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Footlocker Cross Country Midwest Regionals, Kenosha, Wisconsin, November 24, 2012 Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Connor Mora finished eighth to qualify for the Footlocker Championships.

Nick Raymond, bib no. 326, leads early and finishes strong in third place, with a time of 15:02.

Footlocker Championship runner-up in 2011, Erin Finn, bib no. 2, is in the lead early, but battling the flu, faded to a twelfthpace finish. The top ten finishers in each of the four regions qualify to compete at the Footlocker Championships. Anna Rohrer of Mishawak, Indiana (in Brooks singlet), won the Midwest Regionals and the 2012 Footlocker Championship. 4

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013


Footlocker Cross Country Championships, San Diego, California, December 8, 2012 Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Nick Raymond, Erie Mason High School, earned his trip to the Footlocker Championships by finishing 3rd in the Midwest Regional meet. Raymond finished in 20th place in 15:25.

Connor Mora (bib 78) of Cedar Springs, finished 8th at Midwest Regionals and 29th at Footlocker Championships in 15:40.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013

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Chiba International Ekiden, Chiba, Japan, November 23, 2012 Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Neely Spence, Hansons-Brooks, anchored the U.S. relay team to a third place finish. She ran 23:30 for 7.195km.

A happy U.S. team celebrates the podium finish at the prestigous Chiba International Ekiden relay: from left: Galen Rupp, 28:20 for 10k leg 5 (fastest 10K of the race); Neely Spence; Emma Kertesz, 16:25 for 5k leg 4; Jake Riley, 28:46 for 10k leg 3; Chelsea Reilly, 15:29 for 5k leg 2.

Team USA celebrates on the podium, from left: Neely Spence (Hanson-Brooks), Galen Rupp (Olympic Silver Medalist), Emma Kertesz (Toledo resident races frequently in Michigan), Jake Riley (Hanson-Brooks), Chelsea Reilly, James Strang. 6

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013


YMCA Santa Run, Flint, December 1, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

All Santas look alike unless one wears a certain hat.

Mark Baker sports shades for a “Cool Santa� look.

Gabriella McHugh shows that Santas come in all sizes.

Eric Johnson, bib 2013, and Jeanne Gundrumn, bib 2014, lead a pack through the University of Michigan - Flint campus.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013

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Original Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, Dexter, November 10, 2012

Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios


Original Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, Dexter, November 10, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Alex Russeau, bib 328, and Galen Burrell, bib 420, take an early lead. Russeau won the 5K in 15:33; Burrell was third in 16:09.

Brittany Robinson won the 5K in 19:26. 10

John Loudermilk of Dexter competes in both the 5K and the 10K.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - November / December 2012

Lisa Veneziano, bib 1973 was first in the 10K & second in the 5K. Leading the pack is Tom Jerema, bib 465, who competed in both races.


Run Like the Dickens, Holly, December 8, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Tom Claflin of Brighton ran the 5K in 22:18.

Jennifer Howard of Linden and Alison Davis of Gaines ran the 10K.

Eureka McCormick of FLushing ran the 5K in holiday style.

Misty Waters of Waterford wins the 10K in 38:27.

Kaya Davis, age 11, of Holly ran the 5K in 24: 34.

Peter Allen, bib 1485, and Clint Verran, 1404 battle for the 109K lead. Verran prevailed with a 31:53, a 3 second win.

Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - November / December 2012

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Fantasy 5K, Howell, November 23, 2013 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Patrick Miller III of Howell won the 5K in 16:56.

Scott Ketchum of Holt was second in his age group with a 20:49.

This determined young one color coordinates her pink shirt and pink shoes.

They’ve earned their post-race refreshments.

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Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013

At least four runners ran as “Guess Who”. We guess this one is Jimmy.


Latin Music Miami Beach Half Marathon, Miami, Florida, November 18, 2013 Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Half Marathon Start.

Angela Matthews of Westland, Michigan, runs alone at the front.

Angela Matthews wins the half marathon by 6 1/2 minutes in 1:21:11.

Sunrise: Miami Michigan Runner Photo Gallery - January / February 2013

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Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard uncomfortable conversation at a Clarkston Wendy’s. Mark spent the next weeks wrapping his story up.

By the time The New Yorker story appeared (http://newyorker.com/reporting/2012/08/06/1208 06fa_fact_singer ), I’d spent more time on the thing than I cared for. I was happy Kip’s niche notoriety in running circles would swell to include The New Yorker subscription base of one million, and I could at last allow my ire for the whole thing to ease away. I had no plans for a follow-up piece of my own. I was tired of thinking about the fraud and his strange behavior. It was impossible to forget him, but I couldn’t get the energy together to add my two cents worth — that is until I got “poked” by Tom’s column.

Scott Hubbard

Busted & Baffling. In the last issue of Michigan Runner, Tom Henderson noted I had a role in a story about Clarkston dentist “Kip” Litton that appeared in the Aug. 6, 2012, issue of The New Yorker. Writer Mark Singer did a fine job weaving together details of Kip’s cheating in a lengthy piece for that magazine. Mark wrote me on the day I planned to start my own story about Kip in April 2011, saying he’d like to discuss the Davison dentist with me. We spoke by phone that night and he was at my home in Fenton (from New York) the next day. We talked for five hours and I made copies of all my correspondence with Kip. I was pleased to pass the story to Mark, since the thought of Kip’s cheating angered me and clouded my ability to sort details. I’d drawn up a story outline, but filling in the blanks seemed like a negative energy drain, an uncomfortable experience dealing with a guy who lives and works near where I do, and an exercise from which I’d derive no pleasure. Still, I believed the story needed telling. It was wild, weird and irresistible in a perverse way. Mark took over and spent a year working through it from end to end, talking with many affected people, lining up the details of races Kip cheated in, doing all he could to accurately portray a guy who wouldn’t come clean and. let the truth of his cheating set him free. At one point in early 2012, it seemed Mark reached a dead end with the story; he had no “good” conclusion. I asked him if he couldn’t pull it together by the Boston Marathon in April, would he mind if I wrote the story — to which he agreed. As luck would have it, the stars aligned around then and Mark had his first face-to-face talk with Kip,

Mark’s story could have easily been much longer with more examples of Kip’s cheating, but he was limited by space as I am here. Kip’s story is one of bewildering travel, intrigue, lies and denial. He’s never admitted guilt or given plausible explanations for his cheating incidents. It was unsettling reading his “explanations,” all of them nonsense. Many wonder how he cheated while I wonder why? But I get ahead of myself. Allow me to share a few bits of info not found in Mark’s story. My first contact with Kip, as Tom said in his column, was after the 2009 Detroit Free Press Marathon. By then, Kip had already been grilled by a Michigan USATF official regarding his leg on a relay team in that race. The team was disqualified and his teammates were quite unhappy. I contacted Kip after reading the “defense” he’d given, concluding it read like a third-grader trying to explain away something of which he was clearly guilty. I pointed out to Kip he was incapable of running the time he was credited with, and asked, “Where did you go wrong?” He replied that, “I must have followed somebody” up a side street, off course, cutting off one mile. I told him he didn’t “must have followed” anyone; he knowingly took the shortcut. He offered no reply. Backtracking to the Crim 10-mile race in August 2009: Kip was listed in results as finishing in 56:52, a time he wasn’t capable of. I knew this from his results listed on athlinks.com; he’d never run faster than a 6-minute-mile pace for even 5 kilometers. When a friend later congratulated Kip on his time, he admitted he hadn’t run the whole way. He said he’d contacted the results company to have his time removed. He was credited with a 5-mile split, then left the course, claiming injury, and taken one of three streets leading back toward the finish. But knowing he hadn’t gone the whole way, why did he finish, his friend asked. “I got caught up in the excitement,” Kip offered. He admitted he’d done something dubious, but his version of events following his finish aren’t accurate.

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Somebody, knowing better, protested his time listed in the Flint Journal and Crim officials contacted Kip. It was then that he shared the truth of his wayward “race.” He was promptly excised from results, but many links had already captured his time and continue to list it. Back up 10 more months to the inaugural Brooksie Way races in Rochester Hills in October 2008. Kip “ran” the half marathon but you wouldn’t have known it from his name in results. He ran under the guise of “Rich Rodriguez,” a name he’d use again as a race contact in the West Wyoming Marathon, a race he made up (he’d also run under an assumed name, “David Kipling,” in a West Virginia marathon in November 2010). He told me, “I did it as a gag with a friend. Many others make up names too” — this from a man in his mid-40s. He did it to conceal his ID. More importantly, Kip failed to run the whole way. One of his strategies was to start several minutes after the gun, where pictures typically showed him trotting along with his race number concealed. He did have a 6-mile split at Brooksie, but the guy finishing right behind him in 1:19 didn’t remember Kip ever being near him. And, as has been noted, Kip wasn’t capable of the 6-minute pace for a 1:19. It’s an easy course to cheat on and Kip was guilty. One more before calling off the dogs: there’s a picture of Kip finishing the 2009 Solstice 10K in Northville with a dry t-shirt in 37:14 (6minute pace) at http://runmichigan.com/photogallery/09/solstice10k_062709me_window.php?3 1. The course there is very hilly and the day was hot, coming as it did near the summer solstice. Besides being incapable of the time, it’s laughable Kip could have run the race without sweating. When race director Alan Whitehead quizzed him about it, the good dentist failed to reply. Busted. It makes the head spin wondering what moved this guy to cheat, over and over and over. I’ve never met or spoken directly with Kip. Many times I wished somebody else was central to his cheatin’ ways. Then I realized I was a good person to be in on it; it’s the sixth instance of cheating I’ve dealt with in the past dozen years. I was in a prime position to get him to stop and tried several times, failing miserably. I’d be remiss not to acknowledge the invaluable “detective” work turned in by the sleuths at Letsrun.com. Many went to remarkable lengths in digging up pictures and other damning info. Sadly, this kind of cheating and denial doesn’t end with Kip. It’s carried on by others, including some outside running (Lance Armstrong). As the saying goes, it if looks too good to be true, it probably isn’t. - MR -

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Big Bird Run, Roseville

Fast Times, November Sunshine Help 34th Big Bird Fly By Ron Marinucci

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Tiffany Lewis was another smiling Big Birder, setting a 10K PR of 54:30 in her second race at the distance. “I beat my first time by over a minute and a half,” she said. “If I had any energy left, I’d do cartwheels.” Lewis ran with a fellow Stone Stepper running club member Tyrese West. “My goal was to help Tiffany,” said West, who ran Big Bird for the first time. “I really got to enjoy the course.”

Eventual 10K winner, Ethan Shaw, bib no. 412, and Robert Scribner come off the Interstate 696 overpass on their way to the Big Bird finish.

He recalled 1984 or ‘85 when a thunderstorm rocked the race. “Trees were blown over sideways. Then it started snowing.” Veteran Big Birders have experienced just about every type of mid-November weather Michigan has to offer. But there were no complaints from the nearly 800 entrants this Sunday. It was sunny, with low- to mid-50s temperatures and only the slightest of breezes. Most ran in shorts and t-shirts. After 34 years, the Big Bird is one of Michigan’s oldest races. Darrell McKee, 78, wore bib No. 34 to commemorate running all of them. He remembers running cross country for Roseville High School, training on the same streets that now host the Big Bird. Bruce Freeburger, also of Roseville, has run every year “since about 2000.” More often he volunteers at local races, using his ham radio skills to help with communications, such as directing medical personnel. “The Big Bird is usually the only race I run every year,” he said. “It’s a fun and held on the same course. I also won a turkey in this year’s raffle, my first one!”

The competitive mile saw William Hofman, 11, edge David Hofman, 51, by 0.2 seconds to win in 5:41.8. I wonder how that drive home went. Nicholas Murray, 12, was third in 5:44.3. Elisabeth Pettibone, 13, led the girls in 6:25.1. Thomas Maleek, 16, won the rarely-raced 4K distance in 14:44, trailed in the men’s race by Joseph Kalmar, 15, in 15:42 and Daniel LaMontagne, 12, in 15:54. Allison Shannon, 14, was second overall and the first female in 14:53.6. The next women were Gabriella Ovensen, 17, in 15:53.5 and Ella Willis, 55, in 16:45. Willis years ago set the still-standing women’s 10K course record of 35:20.

Michigan Runner TV http://michiganrunner.tv/2012big bird

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Shaw and Hilborn brought their Hanson Brooks Distance Project teammates with them to the race. Shaw edged Robert Scribner by 0.2 seconds, while third place went to Mike Morgan in 30:35. Another Hansons runner, last year’s winner Brendan Martin, also broke 31 minutes to finish fourth. Hilborn had an easier time in the women’s race, besting runner-up Ashlie Baumann by more than four minutes. Masters winners were Joel Kozlowski, 41, in 37:00.9 and repeater Laura Shamblin, 45, in 43:29.4. All entrants received the traditional running gloves, courtesy of major sponsors Hansons Running Stores and Petitpren, in their goody bags. In addition, Lipinski noted, more age divisions were added to the 4K and 10K races “to allow for more award winners.” And, what would the Big Bird be without its turkey raffle of a couple dozen “big birds”? Complete results can be found at www.runmichigan.com. - MR -

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

ROSEVILLE (11/11/12) — Mike Markie has run “20 or 25” Big Birds. “It goes right by my house,” the Roseville resident remarked.

All three races – the 1-mile, 4K and 10K – twist and turn while traversing neat residential streets. The only “hill” is a pedestrian overpass of I-696 that 10K runners cross twice.

The winning 10K times were “the fastest in years,” race director Tony Lipinski said. Both Ethan Shaw (30:19.3) and Ariana Hilborn (35:49) “were about 20 seconds off the course records” (Willis’s mark for the women, and Brian Sell, 29:59, for the men).

Runners head toward the Interstate 696 overpass during the Big Bird 10K. michiganrunner.tv


Jingle Bell 5K Run/ Walk for Arthritis, Northville

Camilleri, Costescu Ring Up Northville Wins By Charles Douglas McEwen Doug Kurtis, 60, of Livonia, who finished in 19:53, was among the elves. “I haven’t been training,” said the Detroit Fifth Third Turkey Trot director. “The Turkey Trot (which drew more than 22,000 runners) wipes out my training time. “But I broke 20 minutes and it was fun,” he went on. “Having lived in Northville for 15 years, it is great just to run around here.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Kurtis and his wife, Ann, 51, both finished second in their age divisions. “It’s a fast course,” said Ann, who timed 23:53. “It seemed like we never had to go uphill.” Roman Krzyzanowski, 41, of Plymouth (16:49) and Jennifer Smith, 43, of Novi (19:52) paced the masters runners. Patrick Working, 55, of Northville (18:38) and Donna Olson, 62, of Southgate (22:27) were grand masters champions.

For complete results, go to www.everalracemgt.com. sixth vertical template_sixth vertical 12/8/12 3:09 PM Pa - MR -

It’s more fun to run when your team wears candy cane antlers. Though the weather didn’t look like Christmas with temperatures climbing near 50°, the 1,117 entrants showed plenty of holiday spirit, dressing up as evergreen trees, elves and Santa.

NORTHVILLE (12/1/12) — Denisa Costescu and Mike Camilleri cut through the Northville fog on a mild morning to win the Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk for Arthritis. Costescu, 36, of Commerce Township was the women’s champ here for the third time in 17:42, well ahead of runner up Emma Hermann, 14, of Northville (19:18) and Ann Germaine Danz, 27, of Wyandotte (19:32). Costescu’s time beat the 17:57 she ran when she won in 2007, but fell shy of the 17:01 she blazed in 2004. “I’m just happy to be healthy,” she said, describing three years of injuries. “I’m like a roller coaster — up and down. I’ve had a hip injury, a calve injury, Achilles tendon ...”

“I was seven seconds off my PR,” said McCullough, a Northville High School sophomore. “I’m happy with that.” Many NHS students and alumni ran or volunteered at the race.

     

          

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“I took off right about the mile mark,” Camilleri said, “and tried to maintain a 5:10-per-mile pace the rest of the way.” He actually ran a 5:08 pace, clocking 15:55. Next came Elsey (16:24) and McCullough (16:37).

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Camilleri, 34, of Howell battled Chris Elsey, 27, of Milford and Sean McCullough, 16, of Northville early.

  

Mike Camilleri

Denisa Costescu

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon, Grand Rapids

Marathon ‘Miracles’ Stuff of Effort, Comet Dust By Scott Sullivan GRAND RAPIDS (10/21/12) — Miracles are no stranger to the Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon. After close to 40 straight fall days and nights of rain, clouds parted in time for its ninth edition. Founder Don Kern denied claims he has God on speed dial. “I bought a few cases of clear plastic rain ponchos several years ago as insurance we’d not have to use them. They are still in my shed,” he said.

Mart of Zeeland, sporting red hair to match the October leaves, gapped all comers en route to a 2:27:55 finish, the third-fastest time here ever. Only Ryan Greutman (2:26:46 in 2008) and Justin Gillette (2:27:44 last year) ran better.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

At least two touched down in Grand Rapids. David Mart and Amber Brunmeier, 23-year-olds from the Holland area, blazed to men’s and women’s triumphs in the Michigan Runner Race Series featured marathon, both in close-to-course-record times.

Mart credited drinking pickle juice (served at miles 15 and 19) with freeing him from the pickle of having cramps. Trailing were Leo Foley, 31, of Clarkston (2:36:50) and Alexander Best, 23, of Big Rapids (2:37:57). Eric Green, 44, of Pontiac (2:46:57) topped Hank Risley, 44, of Cedar Springs (2:48:13) for the masters title. Brunmeier, stepping up to road racing after starring at Western Michigan University, claimed her debut marathon in 2:49:53. Katie Jazwinski, who almost won outright here in 2010 with a 2:44:49, is the only other women to break 2:50. Samantha Westveer, 23, of Grand Rapids fin-

Photo by Scott Sullivan

The threat of showers was constrained to Orionid meteors, which rained pieces of Halley’s Comet the night beforehand.

Women’s winner, Amber Brunmeier, has a mile to go.

Men’s winner David Mart goes by one of the half-marathoners as they exit Millennium Park trails.

ished second far behind Brunmeier in 3:05:29. Next was Melissa Currie, 38, of Grand Rapids in 3:11:00.

(1:32:03) took home masters titles.

Lisa Veneziano, 48, of Fenton clinched her second-straight Michigan Runner of the Year crown by amassing top masters points in 3:15:11. Kenneth MacDonough, 23, of Novi bested 2006 GR marathon champ Jimi Minnema, 33, of Jenison in the men’s half-marathon, 1:10:46 to 1:11:56. Tim Faith, 23, of Holland took third in 1:12:11.

For the ninth time in nine years, the races had record turnouts. “We came in at just over 4,400 registrants, up 200 from last year,” Kern said.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Hannah Norton, 30, of Union City — the marathon queen here in 2009 — led the women through 13.1 miles in 1:20:30, followed by Paige Boldt, 23, of Grand Rapids (1:23:44) and Marron Burke, 32, of Chicago (1:27:41). Kevin Conkel, 40, of Hudsonville (1:17:47) and Jennifer Schweinert, 45, of Brookfield, Wisc.

Half marathoner Christine Stump, 48, of Mishawaka, Ind., gives the race her thumbs up. 24

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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michiganrunner.tv

Troy Carrier, 47, of Alto came back from an ankle he broke in April to run his best-ever marathon in 2:49:55. “I’m happy with my recovery,” he said, not to mention the beer garden at the finish. “When the late miles hurt, I visualize this. It works every time,” he said.

“We grew about 20 percent a year as we got ourselves on the ‘radar’ and were bound to plateau at some point, with 20 other U.S. marathons on this same day. I like to use quality as a measure more than quantity,” the still-race director said. A scan of finishers — fast and slow, streaming in for hours — proved affirming. Setting goals, training for and running marathons take work and sacrifice. Nothing’s given. Smiles at the finish line shone like sun on October leaves, fleeting yet enduring, like remembering comet dust. For complete results, visit http://grandrapidsmarathon.com. - MR -

Michigan Runner TV http://michiganrunner.tv/2012grandrapids


First A.I.M. High Endurance Awards Fete Endurance Feats By Michael Zuidema GRAND RAPIDS (11/7/12) — Matt Smith turned his wheelchair slightly to the left, so he could better look at Terence Reuben, the man he wanted to be sure to single out near the end of his acceptance speech.

coast to coast again, from Portland, Me., to Portland, Ore., and become the first person to accomplish the feat twice in less than 12 months. • Corporate Dedication Award: the late Frederik Meijer, who made a $265,000 donation in 1994 that helped purchase an abandoned rail line in Greenville that eventually became the Fred Meijer Trails Network, which now spans nearly the whole Lower Peninsula.

“Thank you, Terence. I love you, man.”

The event also recognized 20 individuals who completed the Fifth Third River Bank Run, Grand Rapids Marathon and Grand Rapids Triathlon in 2012: Nancy, Agrillo, Jason Andersen, John Bliton, Lisa Brady, Mark Damveld, Mark Desatterlee, Kevin Devries, Ken Evink, Don Goetcheus, Kraig Hinken, Joshua McCarthy, Michael Mielock, Kevin Neumann, Michael Rios, Jeff Rookus, Miguel Sarachaga, Scott Slagboom, Lianne Straathof, Terry Thelen and Mike Wordelman.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

Any other words exchanged by the pair were drowned out by the applause of the crowd of more than 100 during the inaugural A.I.M. High Endurance Awards at Glendevon Banquet & Meeting Center in Grand Rapids.

Smith, who has cerebral palsy, has been active for more The event also served as a fundraiser for Alterthan five years through his parnatives in Motion, which provides used wheelchairs ticipation with the West Michiand repair services to those in need. This myTeam Triumph team is at the Metro Health gan chapter of myTeam Grand Rapids Marathon, near Mile 10. Triumph, a ride-along program - MR third square template_third square 12/8/12 3:47 PM Page 1 created for individuals with disabilities who normally would not be able to compete at endurance events. Together, Smith and Reuben have completed 17 races, including the 2012 Grand Rapids Marathon and Mackinaw Bridge Run, which Smith ran in memory of a soldier who was killed in combat. Reuben also accepted the Outstanding Charity Award on behalf of myTeam Triumph at the ceremony, which celebrated the accomplishments and contributions of individuals and organizations within the running community in west Michigan. Other awards included: • Inspiration Award: Kathy Sebright, who formed Emmett’s Endurance Event to honor her son, who needed a lengthy surgery to repair a birth defect in his skull when he was just 15 months old. Sebright ended up running for 7 hours, 26 minutes on a treadmill and covered 36.2 miles, as more than 1,000 people from 45 states and 13 countries joined her. • Lifetime Contribution Award: Mike Wojciakowski, coach for RunGR, plus track and cross country at Aquinas College. • Individual Accomplishment Award: Chris Nicholas, who ran 2,900 miles across the U.S. in 88 days to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network. He had to accept the award via a recorded message, since he was attempting to run coast to

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Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Wicked Halloween Run, Plymouth

Wicked Halloween Run: A Spirited Competition By Pamela Zinkosky PLYMOUTH (10/28/12) — Some 3,900 people turned out for Plymouth’s second annual Wicked Halloween Run despite weather in the upper 30s.

Kona Running Co., which founded this, the ShamRock ‘n’ Roll Run, also held in Plymouth, and the Kona Run in Northville, ran the race in flights starting 10 minutes apart. Participants in the 10K ran either the “Wicked Wave,” a 10-minute-mile or better pace, or the “Haunted Wave”; while 5K entrants ran either the “Thriller Wave,” a 10-minutemile or better, or the “Nightmare Wave.”

Running wasn’t the only competition going on. The Monster Mile, 5K and 10K road races ran in tandem with a spirited costume contest, complete with Halloween-themed dance performances and spooky music to set the mood.

Alex Russeau, aka Mr. Lego, wins the WIcked Halloween 10K in 32:41

The winners were two of 50-some 10K runners who averaged a 7-minute-mile or better pace.

sister, Dori Downey, 42, of Grosse Pointe Park was runner-up in the 10K in 41:42.

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Many youngsters and families enjoyed taking part in the Monster Mile, which kicked off between the 5K and 10K runs.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Runners in the 5K fared well too. Brandon Bethke, 25, of Ann Arbor led all comers in 15:51, a 5:07-per-mile average pace. Elizabeth Putti, 41, of Shelby Township paced the women in 20:02. Her

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Park, who’d sat out of racing for a while with hamstring problems, said she enjoyed winding through Plymouth neighborhoods. “I’ve known Plymouth for years,” she said.

- MR -

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Laurel Park, 49, of Ann Arbor was the first female 10K finisher in 38 minutes flat. “I wanted to be under 38, so if I’m not I’ll be a little disappointed,” she said before knowing her exact time.

Competitive and recreational runners alike enjoyed the run’s entertainment value. After all, where else can you run alongside Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Captain America, Superman, Pac Man and Little Red Riding Hood?

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Russeau said the course had a few surprisingly tough climbs. “There were some long grinds that were a little slow.”

Those who didn’t win running awards had a chance to be recognized in the costume contest. Erik Zielke of Canton, who ran the 10K dressed as the Geiko money guy with multiple bills attached to him, took top honors in the individual category. Grannies Gone Wild won for groups of two, and Plymouth Pop Stars won for groups of three or more.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Most runners donned costumes and running gear, including the first man across the finish line. Alex Russeau, 23, of La Salle completed the 10K in 32:41 wearing a Lego costume made of poster board over a long-sleeved shirt and shorts. “I designed it so I could move a little,” he said. “The wind is affecting me today. It’s a little cold.”

Michigan Runner TV http://michiganrunner.tv/2012wicked_halloween

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Detroit Free Press/ Talmer Bank Marathon, Windsor & Detroit

Russian Masters Sweep Freep Marathon By Charles Douglas McEwen DETROIT (10/21/12) — Russians ruled the roads at the 35th annual Free Press/Talmer Bank Marathon. New York City-based masters runners Viacheslav Shabunin, 43, and Liubov Denisova, 41, romped to victory in the 26.2-mile race. Last year Shabunin, hampered by a heel injury, finished second behind Derek Nakluski in 2:29:36.  This year, feeling strong the whole way, he won easily in 2:25:26. Denisova took control of the women’s race around mile 18 and triumphed in 2:46:33. She called her performance, “Normal … a bit slow because of injury (hamstring).

Ga. (2:57:27) and Michelle Grevenstuk, 31, of Otsego (3:02:05).

ished a close second in 1:07:34.

Among handcyclists, Tom Davis, 35, of Fremont, Ind., led the men in 1:20:27, while Tabitha Landon, 18, of Lake Odessa was the lone woman to finish, in 2:28:16. Grant Berthiaume, 50, of Tucson, Ariz., won the wheeler marathon for the third straight year in 2:03:41.

said.

“We battled it out, but he was tougher,” Snyder

Sergie Anderson of Novi won the men’s 5K in 17:00, well ahead of Vincent Jesudowich, 45, of Northville (17:45).

The event saw a record turnout of almost 24,000 entrants. 

“The course is very, very good … not difficult,” she said.

The Playmakers Elite Men A team demolished the course record in the five-person relay, beating the 2:17:28 standard it set last year with a 2:15:02. “We are really proud of that,” said former Michigan State University star Alex Russeau, 23, of LaSalle.

Girma Segni, 27, of the Bronx, N.Y., finished men’s runner-up in 2:28:04. Next came Travis Barczak, 22, of Williamston (2:28:13), Kyle Mena, 27, of Portage (2:29:09) and Joshua Prevatt, 28, of Brandon, Fla. (2:34:58).

“Jon Gris ran the first 6.2 (miles),” Russeau said. “Donnie Richmond ran the next six, Zach Ripley the long leg (6.7 miles) and Nick Thelen did the 2.9-mile sprint. I ran the last 4.4 miles. Jon had a really good day. It ended up working great.”

Following Denisova were Katie Howery, 26, of Verona, Wisc. (2:50:35), Serena Kessler, 40, of Ann Arbor (2:51:10), Kaye Starosciak, 39, of Canton,

Gris, 26, of Haslett, continued after running the first 10K for the relay to win the half marathon in 1:07:31. Todd Snyder, 35, of Whitmore Lake fin-

photo gallery house ad 0113_half page horizontal 12/14/12 10:18 AM Page 1

Angela Matthews, 28, of Westland, runner-up last year, was the women’s champion in 1:20:46. Andrea Karl, 28, of East China, took second in 1:23:34.

“I took my time at first, then surged at the 1-mile mark and passed everyone,” said Anderson. “I paid the price on the last mile. It hurt, but I’m happy.” Schoolcraft College freshman Layne Marinski, 18, of Canton paced the women in 20:56. Lauren Harris, 14, of LaSalle, Ontario, finished runner-up in 21:42. “I never ran cross country or track in high school,” Marinski said. “But I like to run on my own, so I decided to do it for a purpose.” For complete race results, go to www.freepmarathon.com. - MR -

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Chiba Ekiden, Chiba, Japan Fantasy 5K, Howell Footlocker Cross Country, Midwest, Kenosha, Wisconsin Footlocker Cross Country Finals, San Diego Headless Horseman, Howell Original Ann Arbor Turkey Trot, Dexter Run Like the Dickens, Holly YMCA Santa Run, Flint

Featuring the photography of Scott Sullivan, Carter Sherline, and Victah Sailer

issuu.com/michiganrunner/docs

michiganrunner.net

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Senior Runner of the Year: Tom Yates By Ron Marinucci

M

ale Senior Runner of the Year Tom Yates, 51, amassed 54 points in nine Michigan Runner Series races. “No one in his 50and-over age group was close,” said MR editor Scott Sullivan.

graded 15:45), then was the first 50-plus runner at the Martian Meteor 10K (36:27, 32:44). Checking the MR standings after those two races, “I noticed I was the points leader in the senior division. I took a look at the schedule and decided to go for it.”

The award represents the culmination of Yates’ second running renaissance. “I’ve been running on and off for about 37 years,” he recounted. “I started in high school in ninth grade.” There, he ran cross country and track, specializing in the 440, 880 and mile.

His Achilles tendon was healing in time for the Brian Diemer 5K in June. “Though not blistering fast,” he recalled, “I was happy to run 17:05. There was so much competition I didn’t think I would place or score any senior points. But I was the first overall 50-plus finisher and second to Doug Goodhue — he’s unbeatable when he’s healthy — in the agegraded standings (15:15). Running in the low 17s gave me hope that I could go faster.

“I had a lot of leg speed,” Yates said. “Tony designed workouts to build my endurance.” His improvement led Yates to Western Michigan University, where he continued his cross country and track (800 meters) career. “After college I ran sporadically and mixed in some biking,” he remembered, “but nothing too regular or what I would call ‘true training.’” Pushing 40, “I noticed I was putting on pounds from too much work and food and not enough exercise. “A couple runners from work talked me into joining them for a weekend 6-mile run. I think I averaged 8:30 a mile and struggled to keep up. That run motivated me to lose weight and get back into shape.” That was running rebirth number one. Yates bought Jack Daniels’ book “Running Formula” and, using its training methods, brought his times way down. In 2002 he finished the Crim 10mile in 56:48 and the Detroit Free Press Marathon in 2:41. Then he again put running and exercise on the back burner as “work and family life kicked in. I put on a lot of weight again. “In my mid- to late-40s, I hooked up with the Downriver Runners,” Yates continued. “They welcomed me and helped me get back into a regular running routine.” This was running renaissance number two. He remembers the MR Series as “much tougher than I expected. It was tough maintaining my family, racing and workouts, and professional work balance. “For a while, it seemed I was coming home from work, then heading out for one of my kids’ 28

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

While a freshman at the University of Michigan, Dearborn Campus, Yates met Tony Mifsud, then the cross country coach at Henry Ford Community College.

Tom Yates competes in the Memorial Day Run, Grosse Ile. sporting events (two daughters, ages 13 and 15, run cross country and track; while one son, 10, plays basketball, baseball and football), and then finally going for a run well after dark. “Then there was the getting up at 3 or 4 a.m. to make the trip to many of the races across the state,” Yates continued. “My wife has been sainted for picking up my duties during weekends when I did this. I’m sure she was wondering if I’d gone mad or was just going through a late midlife crisis.” He was bothered with Achilles tendinitis early in 2012. “I would usually do slow mileage with some tempo runs,” he remembered. After a slow start to the year, he targeted the MR Series. “I won the grand masters division at the Corktown St. Patrick’s Day 5K (in 17:38, age-

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“I also like that Brian (Diemer) passes out doughnuts if you beat him. I love doughnuts, too!

Yates then ran the Traverse City Cherry Festival 15K for the first time ever. “I felt great and was averaging 5:50 per mile for the first four miles,” he remembered, “then the course threw in a class-five hill. I knew it was coming, but didn’t realize how much pain it would inflict on my legs and lungs. “Still, it was a great race and very memorable.” Yates’ 56:09 (50:37) made him the second senior and third master entrant. At the Steve’s Run 10K in Dowagiac, Yates was the first state senior and second master, finishing in 36:50 (33:05). “Steve’s Run was different in a good way,” he said. “It’s a nice combination of road and cross-country racing. “I’ve always enjoyed running Crim,” Yates said of the classic event in Flint. “It’s probably my fa-


vorite all-time race. Ten miles seems like a good distance to race and, strangely, more forgiving than a 10K. I love the Crim course, especially the last five miles.” Yates was the first senior finisher. “I finally broke an hour,” he enthused, netting a 59:31 (53:41). “I went out a little fast and paid the price on the Bradley Hills.” At the Mackinac Island 8-mile run in September, Yates was the second senior and third master (47:02, 41:22). “It’s a great race,” he said. “The course is flat and I can’t say enough about the scenery.” Because of work and family commitments, Yates usually trains alone. “I try to get one hour of running in a day. I average 50 to 55 miles per week: one day tempo, one day intervals, one day long, 8 to 17 miles (usually 13) on Sunday. I still enjoy a good track workout. Most people find the track boring, but speed work and intervals are my favorites. “Sometimes on recovery days I don’t go as far or will take a day or two off. But most days I’ll get seven or eight miles in.” This year, he ran several races closer to home, using them as training and tempo runs. Due to his Achilles injury, “I found that the 3to 6-mile tempo runs were my most productive workouts. I get the most return for the least amount of injury risk,” said Yates, sounding like the Ford Motor Co. IT systems supervisor that he is.

2013 Michigan Runner Race Series Winter Blast, 5K, Grandville - February 16 St. Patrick’s Day Races, 8K, Bay City - March 17 Martian Invasion Meteor 10K, Dearborn - April 13 Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K, Grand Rapids - May 12 Dexter Ann Arbor Half Marathon, Ann Arbor - June 2 Brian Diemer Amerikam 5K, Cutlerville - June 8 Plymouth YMCA Father's Day 10K, Plymouth - June 16 Volkslaufe 20K, Frankenmuth - July 4 Crim Festival of Races, 10 Mile, Flint - August 24 Cadillac Festival of Races, 10K, Cadillac - August 31 Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon - October 20 Great Turtle Half Marathon, Mackinac Island - October 26 Event Directors 0311_Third Square 2/6/11 10:39 PM Page 1

He belongs to the Downriver Runners and tries to do Wednesday night runs with them when he can. Yates also races with the Front Line Team. Sometimes he goes with co-workers. “I also have the opportunity to occasionally run with the New Boston High School cross country and track teams,” said Yates. “The kids are so fast they usually put a hurt on me.”

Race Directors: and International - Searchable Online Calendar List your event online with a user-friendly form:

He also runs when he can with the Metro Detroit Area Runners. “There’s a lot of talent in this group,” Yates said. “It meets at Kensington MetroPark, usually on Sunday mornings. I dread the long run, but they make it much more enjoyable. “I love good competition,” he went on. “I enjoy competing and trying to maintain my age-graded personal bests. There’s a plethora of talent in all our state age groups. I feel fortunate to be able to watch or run with them. “Most of my good friends I’ve met through running. They’re good people.” Another motivator is good food. “I love eating and running helps keep the pounds off,” he declared. Running also helps him keep up with his children. With his daughters running cross country and track, Yates “can actively participate in that dimension of their lives. With this sport I’m not just a spectator,” he said.

http://tiny.cc/z5giu

or

runningnetwork.com/RNW/index.php/national-calendar then follow link in the right column: “Click here” Michigan Runner or Running Network staff will upload your listing Calendar links to 27 regional & specialty running publications: michiganrunner.net • runningnetwork.com For print listing only, Email, FAX or mail the following: Event Date:________________________ Contact Name:_____________________ Event Name:_______________________ Phone:__________________________ Event City:________________________ Email:___________________________ Starting Time:______________________ Mailing Address:___________________ Starting Location:___________________ City:____________________________ Distances:________________________ State/Province-Zip:__________________ Website:_________________________ Michigan Runner 4007 Carpenter Road, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197

jennie@glsp.com (734) 507-0251 (734) 434-4765 FAX

- MR -

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Big Ten Cross Country Championships, East Lansing

U-M Women, MSU’s Kroll Bag Big 10 Crowns By Charles Douglas McEwen EAST LANSING (10/28/12) — The tattoo on the back of Sara Kroll’s left shoulder reads, “Be Strong and Courageous, Deuteronomy 31:6.” The Michigan State University junior was that and more at the Big 10 Cross Country Championships. 

for most the race and my teammates did amazing. I’m really happy.”

While the University of Michigan won the women’s team title, Kroll made the most of her home-course advantage to capture the individual crown on a blustery day at Forest Akers Golf Course.

Wisconsin won the men’s team title for the 14th year in a row. Indiana senior Zachary Mayhew out-kicked Badger seniors Maverick Darling and Mohammed Ahmed down the home stretch to win the individual crown.

“Having this goal (to win the league championship) for a year now (Kroll finished eighth in 2011), it’s gratifying to know I could put in the training and come away with the win,” she said. 

“My legs were giving out,” Mayhew said of his surge in the last half-mile. “But I just had to get to the line!”

“Right before 4000 meters, (Schrulle) made a really aggressive move. I knew I had to go with her,” Kroll said. She made her own move with about 600 meters left. “I’m confident in my kick,” Kroll said, “but you never know (what your opponent will do). I knew if I made my move, it would have to be hard and tough. It was. “I was exhausted at the end. I didn’t have anything left,” Kroll said.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

The Livonia Churchill High School graduate let others set the pace during much of the 6K race. At one point, Mareike Schrulle, a University of Iowa senior and native of Germany, looked like she might break things open.

The U-M women won with 55 points, followed by MSU (75) and Penn State (96).

Mayhew timed 23:29 on the men’s 8K course. Next came Darling (23:34), a three-time Division 3 Michigan high school state champion for OvidElsie, Ahmed (23:35) and Indiana senior Andrew Bayer (23:38). Michigan senior Dan Lowry nabbed fifth in 23:39.    Following Wisconsin with 33 points were Michigan (65) and Indiana (79). The host Spartans took seventh with 183. For complete results, go to http://raceservices.com.

Spartan Sara Kroll won the Big Ten Cross Country title.

- MR -

year, finished second in 20:16. Next came Michigan senior Rebecca Addison (20:21), MSU sophomore Leah O’Connor (20:24) and Penn State junior Rebekka Simko (20:26). “It was good,” said Addison. “I felt really strong

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

She won with a cross country 6K personal record of 20:12. Schrulle, who had run 19:57 earlier in the

Michigan women won the Team Title with 55 points. 30

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Rebecca Addison finished third and led Michigan to the team title.


Milestones and Goals By Dave Foley

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

For the next 15 years after that Labor Day race, I pursued goals one after another, tackling a progression of longer races from 15K to 25K to marathons to 50-mile ultra-marathons. My training intensified and my running logs sometimes showed more than 100 miles a week. To reach the goals I set for myself, I made life changes to accommodate these priorities. At each level, the goal wasn’t just to complete the distance; I also wanted to record a personal-best time.

Dave Foley

O

n Labor Day 1975 I pinned a manila file folder with a handwritten number on it to my chest and prepared to run my first road race.

Maverick Darling (bib 285), a threetime Michigan high school state champion, led Wisconsin to the team title.

Knowing almost nothing about running, I devoured a hamburger for a pre-race meal and wore new Point-4 Korean running shoes, an orange t-shirt that said ”I’d Rather Be Fishing” and cut-off jean shorts secured with a leather belt. As the start time neared I grew anxious, wondering if I would need a bathroom break during the race and if my legs would fail me before I completed the Viking Boosters’ Marathon’s 5.2mile course through the streets of Cadillac. At 7 p.m., 172 runners started circling the high school track before heading out on the loop course. Herb Lindsay from nearby Reed City finished first in 25:09. (He would go on to be named American Road Racer of the Year in 1979 and 1980.) As for me, two months of 3- to 5-mile training runs resulted in a 22nd place finish in 30:45. I felt great and was eager to run more races.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

I had worked to prepare for that race all summer: the first step toward a series of goals and milestones that would arrive as time passed. When you work toward a goal, you strive to accomplish something you either haven’t done before or will have to put great effort towards to achieve. Goals test your abilities and determination. They often dominate your thoughts during the weeks or months when you strive to reach them. Once you achieve a goal, the pressure is off. The exhilaration is often followed by a letdown. Whether the objective was running a marathon, winning a basketball title or graduating from college, once the mission has been accomplished, your life changes.

As I grew older, my racing speed diminished, injuries occurred, my priorities changed and the fire within that had allowed me to chase my running goals so fervently receded. Reaching milestones became more important. Reaching a milestone usually doesn’t mean change. The day after I ran in the Labor Day race this year, I didn’t shift my focus to my next goal race; I just went for a run as I always do. Nothing had changed. In the previous day’s race, I had not won or set a personal best. There was no letdown. I worried a lot about how I would do in my first race some 40 years ago, and carried those anxieties into almost every race for the next 10 years. No more. Racing is a happy routine in my life right now. That’s what milestones are; they occur when you reach a significant number of repetitions of doing an activity that is part of your routine. Some milestones take little or no effort to achieve. They just occur with the passing of time — birthdays, anniversaries, years working at a job. For others, such as a daily run, some perseverance is required. Now running for me, at age 65, is about milestones. Last year I logged mile number 85,000. My race total is approaching 300. Along the way I coached high school cross country for 27 years and edited Michigan Runner magazine for 14 years. There are still goals in my life, but the stress and hard work that I used to put towards accomplishing running goals are now used to reach goals in writing, environmental protection and wilderness travel. Running for me now lacks the intensity of a goal-driven activity, but instead is a stress-relieving habit. My future is about reaching milestones rather than achieving goals. - MR -

Dan Lowry’s fifth place finish led the Michigan men to second place. michiganrunner.net

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Wildlife Marathon, Half Marathon & 5K, Concord

Mocny, Lu Win Windy, Wet Wildlife Marathon

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

By Charles Douglas McEwen

Tim Mocny, bib 86, led the marathon from the get-go and ran by himself the whole way.

CONCORD (10/14/12) — Two red-tailed hawks swooped down over the record 675 humans tackling a windy, challenging Wildlife Marathon, Half Marathon and 5K Run/Walk.

Lu didn’t have it easy. “There were points where the race was uphill into the wind, plus it was muddy,” she said, pointing to her wet shoes. “I think I have blisters on my blisters.”

“We’re ecstatic,” said race director Tim Payne of the turnout.

She also had to tangle with Nicole Ozimek, 39, of Taylor, who took the lead briefly around the 6mile mark. After that that Lu took over, winning by more than 15 minutes in 3:41:23.

The marathon started in Concord, traveled several miles along the paved, 10.5-mile Falling Waters Trail, then traversed about 14 miles of country roads before returning the same way it went out.  “The trail was as flat as a pancake,” said marathon winner Tim Mocny. “But the middle miles (six to 20) were hills, dirt roads, mud and muck.” Mocny, 32, of Mt. Pleasant led from the get-go and ran by himself (with the pace bike) the whole way. “I never turned around to look back,” he said. 

Masters queen Cathy Brubaker, 43 of Concord, took second in 3:57:19. Ozimek finished third in 3:57:34. Jayden Hesselink, 20, of Spring Arbor, running here for the first time, claimed the men’s half marathon. Rebecca Boggs, 36, of Onsted won the women’s half for the third time in the last four years. The 13.1-mile course was mostly flat with only one major hill, but the wind made it challenging.

The champ finished in 2:46:40. Next came Ann Arbor residents Brian Greety, 29, in 2:55:18 and Jaeyoon Yoo, 22, in 3:07:42. Masters champ Rick Hawley, 48, of East Jordan took fourth overall in 3:10:20. 

“It was a good learning experience,” said Hesselink, who had never run a race longer than 8K before. “It’s pretty enjoyable now that I’m done. But during it, it was rough.”

Sara Lu, 26, of Ann Arbor completed and won the first race and marathon of her life. “It’s a whole bunch of blessings in one day,” she said.

Hesselink ran much of the race with his Spring Arbor University classmate Livingston Garland, 21, of Lansing. Both fought cramps during the

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race. Garland actually had to stop briefly around mile nine. “I just didn’t hydrate well,” he said.  Hesselink pulled away at that point and prevailed in 1:21:44. Next came Garland in 1:22:46 and masters champ Erik Goibiw, 41, of Royal Oak in 1:28:33. Rebecca Boggs ran away with the women’s half marathon, timing 1:30:01. Masters winner Marcy Sacks, 43, of Albion took second for the women in 1:36:01. David Swarts and Samantha Symonds, both 47year-old Jackson residents, won the half marathon race walk in 1:58:47 and 2:48:54 respectively. “This was by far my best effort in a half marathon,” Swarts said. “But I don’t race this distance often.” The 5K run went to Kevin Cataldo, 24, of Williamston (16:52) and Chris Vincent, 48, of Jackson (20:19), while the 5K race walk was won by Ray Drysdale, 70, of Albion (36:10) and Linda Rowley, 62, of Rives Junction (37:19). Event proceeds benefited the Friends of the Falling Waters Trail and local charities. For complete results and more information, go to http://wildlifemarathon.org. - MR -


running fit template_running fit template 12/8/12 3:57 PM Page 1

January - February 2013 Event Calendar Tue, 1/1/13

Gazelle Sports’ John Daley Memorial One One Run 4.4MR/W, 2.2MR/W

Kalamazoo

Tue, 1/1/13

LifeTime Fitness Commitment Day 5K

5KR

Detroit

(269) 342-5996

gazellesports.com

Tue, 1/1/13

New Year’s Resolution Run

5KR/W, 1MW

Lake Orion

(248) 693-9742

downtownlakeorion.org

Tue, 1/1/13

Resolution 5K

Tue, 1/1/13

Sergeant Preston, Yukon King Run

5KR/W

Lansing

(989) 620-1674

runningfoundation.com

6MR, 5KR/FW

Muskegon

(231) 206-5571

Thu, 1/3/13

GoRaceGo.com

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Ann Arbor

Fri, 1/4/13

Sat, 1/5/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Sat, 1/5/13

501 Running Club

Arctic Blast Color Dash

12MR, 10MR, 5MR, 2MR

5KR/W/snowshoe, 1KR

Ann Arbor

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com (906) 486-1111

www.gincc.org

Sat, 1/5/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 1/5/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Mt. Pleasant

Sat, 1/5/13

Reese Winter Road Race Series

10KR, 5KR/W

Reese

(989) 529-7904

www.barc-mi.com

Sat, 1/5/13

Snowflake Run and Walk

10KR, 5KR/W

Flushing

(810) 659-6493

RiverbendStriders.com

Sat, 1/5/13

Yankee Springs Winter Challenge

50KR, 25KR, 10KR

Middleville

(616) 540-1987

yankeespringstrailrun.com/wp/

Thu, 1/10/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

track & field,

Hillsdale

616-895-3042

Ann Arbor

Warren

Ishpeming

commitmentday.com

mitstrack.org mitstrack.org

mitstrack.org

mitstrack.org

Thu, 1/10/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Sat, 1/12/13

Sat, 1/12/13

1st Evangelical Covenant Church Run

501 Running Club

10KR, 5KR, 1.5MR

Grand Rapids

mitstrack.org

13.1MR, 10MR, 5MR, 2MR Ann Arbor

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com

Sat, 1/12/13

Bling in the New Year Fun Run

5KR

Royal Oak

(248) 577-0800

gildasclubdetroit.org

Sat, 1/12/13

Frozen Foot Race

5 MR

Traverse City

(231) 933-9242

runfrozenfoot.com

Sat, 1/12/13

IDADARUN

8MR, 8M relay

Linden

(313) 806-0137

Sat, 1/12/13

Lansing for Haiti 5K

5KR

Lansing

(517) 290-0769

lansingforhaiti.com

Sat, 1/12/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 1/12/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Allendale

616-895-3042

mitstrack.org

Sat, 1/12/13

Montrose Frozen Blueberry 5K

5KR/W

Montrose

(248) 321-0148

blueberryrace.org

Sat, 1/12/13

PoHo Hot Cocoa 8K Run/ 5K Walk

8KR/W, 5KW, kids run

Port Huron

(810) 824-3272

runsignup.com

Sun, 1/13/13

Dave’s 10 Mile Shoe Run

10 MR

Delta

(419) 704-8164

davesraces.com

(616) 453-8600

grandrapidsrunningclub.org

Sun, 1/13/13

Epic Triathlon Clinic Series

triathlon clinic

Ann Arbor

(734) 678-5045

epicraces.com

Sun, 1/13/13

Muskegon Family YMCA Indoor Triathlon

Triathlon: 15 minutes S/bike/R

Muskegon

(231) 722-9322

muskegonymca.org

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Thu, 1/17/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Ann Arbor

Thu, 1/17/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

track & field

Hillsdale

616-895-3042

mitstrack.org

Fri, 1/18/13

Cote Dame Marie Loppet Kids Race

kids XC races

Grayling

(989) 348-9266

www.hansonhills.org

Sat, 1/19/13

501 Running Club Auto Show Shuffle

Bigfoot Snowshoe Race

5KR/W

12MR, 10MR, 5MR, 2MR

Ann Arbor Detroit

10K, 5K snowshoe races Traverse City

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com

(734) 929-9022 runsnow.com (734) 341-5867

autoshowshuffle.com

Sat, 1/19/13

Cote Dame Marie Loppet

30K, 15K XC Ski

Grayling

(888) 876-2196

graylingnordic.com

Sat, 1/19/13

Freeze Your Fanny 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W, 1MR

Bay City

(989) 832.2267

www.barc-mi.com

Sat, 1/19/13

Ice Block Boogie 5K - CANCELLED

5KR/W

Plymouth

Sat, 1/19/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 1/19/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

track & field,

Saginaw

616-895-3042

mitstrack.org

Sat, 1/19/13

OPC Indoor Triathlon

tri: 20minS/ 20minB/ 20minR

Rochester

(248) 608-0295

trifind.com

Sat, 1/19/13

Pink Zone 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W, kids run

Adrian

(517) 264-3992

adrianbulldogs.com/landing/

Sat, 1/19/13

Portland Winter Run

5KR/W

Portland

(517) 526-2210

runningfoundation.com-

Sat, 1/19/13

Tip Up Town 5K Run/Walk

5KR

Houghton Lake

(989) 366-5644

houghtonlakechamber.net

Sat, 1/19/13

Winter Wolf Run

25KR, 2person relay

Omer

(989) 529-2906

witchywolfrun.com

Sun, 1/20/13

Copper Island Classic

10K, 5K, 2K XC Ski classic

Houghton

(906) 523-4884

Sun, 1/20/13

Dirty Herd Winter Classic

4MR, 2MR

Rockford

(616) 940-9888

Sat, 1/26/13

501 Running Club

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Freeze Your Franny

12MR, 10MR, 5MR, 2MR

5KR/W

Ann Arbor

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com

Sat, 1/26/13

Frozen Watters Bump & Run Trail Series #3

3MR

Rochester Hills

(248) 320-5705

jeffwatters.com

Sat, 1/26/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 1/26/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Albion

Sat, 1/26/13

Noquemanon Ski Marathon

50K, 24K, 11k XC Ski; 15m snowshoe Marquette

(888) 370-RACE

noquemanon.com

Sat, 1/26/13

Snowmans Half Marathon

13.1MR/W, 10KR/W, 5KR/W

Mt. Pleasant

(989) 317-5889

michiganhalfseries.com

Sun, 1/27/13

Livonia’s Arctic Chill Indoor Triathlon

Trtiathlon: 20min S/ B/ R

Livonia

(734) 466-2411

www.ci.lovonia.mi.us

Sun, 1/27/13

Meridian Twp Parks and Rec. Polar Bear 5K

5KR/W

Okemos

(517) 853-4616

playmakers.com

Thu, 1/31/13

Michigan indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Hillsdale

mitstrack.org

Thu, 1/31/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Ann Arbor

mitstrack.org

Fri, 2/8/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

track & field - distance fest

Saginaw

mitstrack.org

Wed, 2/13/13

Fri, 2/1/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

Sat, 2/2/13

Groundhog Day Marathon

501 Running Club

4.3MR, 5K snowshoe

12MR, 10MR, 5MR, 2MR

Grand Rapids

Ann Arbor

(734) 657-0214 runningfit501.com (269) 345-1913

borgessruncamp.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Frosty 5K & Merry Mile

5KR/W, 1MR/W

Iron Mountain

(906) 774-4076

ddymca.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Groundhog Day Marathon

26.2MR, 13.1MR

Grand Rapids Jackson

(517) 784-5444

centerforfamilyhealth.org

Sat, 2/2/13

Hot Chocolate Hustle

5KR/ 1MW

Adrian

(517) 263-2911

theadrianmaples.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Reese Winter Road Race Series

10KR, 5KR/W

Reese

(989) 529-7904

www.barc-mi.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Richmond Park Winter Rush

2MFR

Grand Rapids

(616) 990-1402

winterrush.com

Sat, 2/2/13

Tutu Fun Run to Benefit Girls on the Run

2.2MR

Kalamazoo

(269) 491-2263

girlsontherunkazoo.orgSat,

Sat, 1/19/13 Sat, 1/19/13

Fri, 1/25/13

Sat, 1/26/13

Sat, 2/2/13

Sat, 2/2/13

34

hs track & field

Borgess Run Camp

Shelby Twp.

Ann Arbor

Training for Borgess 5K and half Kalamazoo

Groundhog Gallop

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

Ann Arbor

5KR/W, Kid's Run

|

michiganrunner.tv

mitstrack.org

keweenawtrails.com gazellesports.com/thedirtyherd/ mitstrack.org

(586) 850-6611

freezeyourfranny.com

mitstrack.org

groundhogmarathon.com mitstrack.org

groundhogmarathon.com


January - February 2013 Event Calendar Sat, 2/2/13

White Pine Stampede

40K, 20K, 10K XC Ski

(231) 587-8812

whitepinestampede.org

Sat, 2/2/13

Wildwood Snow Shoe Stampede

10KR or snowshoe, 5KR, 1/2MR Howell

(800) 969-8090

wildwoodranch.org

Sat, 2/2/13

Winterlaufe

8KR/W

Frankenmuth

(989) 860-3388

www.winterlaufe.org

Sat, 2/2/13

YMCA Snowshoe Shuffle

5K snowshoe

Middleville

(616) 855-1982

ymcasnowshoeshuffle.com

Sun, 2/3/13

Sun, 2/3/13

Kahtoola Michigan Mountain Run

Super 5K

8KR, 4KR

5KR

Clarkston

Novi

(231) 233-4736

infiterrasports.com

Sun, 2/3/13

Super Bowl 5K

5KR/W

Okemos

(517) 702-0226

runningfoundation.com

Sun, 2/3/13

The Frostbite

10KR, 5KR/W

Fremont

Sat, 2/9/13

Bon Soo Lantern Ski

ski tour

Sault St. Marie

(705) 759-0626

www.soofinnishnordic.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Cupid’s Undie Run

1.2MR

Detroit

(586) 322-8612

cupidsundierun.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Freaking Freezing Challenge

5K adventure R

Mount Pleasant

(847) 829-4518

active.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Frostbite 5K

5KR/W

Vicksburg

Sat, 2/9/13

Frosty Five Trail Run

5MR

Adrian

(517) 266-6344

runningwithes.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Grand Rapids Urban Adventure Race - Winter Edition 4-6MR, orienteering, tubing

Belmont

(616) 460-9331

grUrbanAdventureRace.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 2/9/13

North American VASA

50K, 27K, 12K ski, 3K, tour, kids Traverse City

(231) 938-4400

www.vasa.org

Sat, 2/9/13

Pazcki Run

5KR

Hamtramck

(248) 766-6485

tour-de-troit.org

Sat, 2/9/13

Rotary Snowmelt Shuffle 5K Run / Walk

5KR, 1MW

Holland

(616) 392-3888

signmeup.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Sweetheart Run & Team Competition

10KR, 5KR/W, Couple Teams

Flushing

(810) 487-0954

riverbendStriders.com

Sat, 2/9/13

Winter Witch's Hat Run

5KR/W, 1 MFR

South Lyon

(248) 207-5135

slxc.com/witch

Sun, 2/10/13

Frosty Oaks Fest Snowshoe Race

4.4M & 2.2 M snowshoe

Clarkston

(248) 701-0825

highfiveraces.com/

Sun, 2/10/13

Gran Travers Cross Country Classic

16K / 6K XC Ski classic

Traverse City

(231) 938-4400

nordicskiracer.com

Sun, 2/10/13

Heart Throb 5K

5KR/W

East Lansing

(248) 660-7390

msutriathlon.com

Sun, 2/10/13

Make a Wish Hot & Frosty Fun Fest

1MR

Clinton Township

(586) 420-7670

Sun, 2/10/13

Riverview Winterfest Breakfast and 4 Mile Run

4 MR, 4x1M relay

Riverview

(313) 550-9336

Sat, 2/16/13

Advantage Health Physician Network Heart & Sole 5KR/W, kids run

Grand Rapids

(616) 458-7888

classicrace.com

Sat, 2/16/13

Hot Chocolate 5K Run & Walk

5KR/W

Burton

(810) 513-3330

hotchocolate5krun.com

Sat, 2/16/13

IceCube Half Marathon

13.1MR, 10KR. 5KR

Mt. Pleasant

(989) 289-2361

michiganhalfseries.com

Sat, 2/16/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

LIvonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

Sat, 2/16/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

track & field

Allendale

Sat, 2/16/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series

hs track & field

Albion

Sat, 2/16/13

Spirit of Winter 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

Bay City

(989) 832.2267

barc-mi.com

Sat, 2/16/13

State Street Mile

1MR/W

Hart

(231) 301-8449

hartmainstreet.org

Winter Blast 5K

5KR/W

Grandville

Sat, 2/16/13

Mancelona

(734) 929-9027 runsuperbowl.com

www.fremontxc.com

everalracemgt.com

mitstrack.org mitstrack.org

(616) 293-1862

winterblastrun.com

Sun, 2/17/13

Hanson Hills Classic

Sun, 2/17/13 Howell Splash n’ Dash Indoor Tri

12K, 6K XC Ski

triathlon: 20 minS/ B/R

Grayling

Howell

(517) 546-0693

howellrecreation.org

Sun, 2/17/13

Portage Winterblast Half Marathon

13.1MR, 5KR

Portage

(269) 270-5641 portagewinterblast.wordpress.com

Fri, 2/22/13

Big Ten Indoor Championships - Men & Women

track & field meet

Geneva, OH

bigten.cstv.com

Fri, 2/22/13

Mid American Conference Indoor Championships

track & field meet

Ypsilanti

mac-sports.com

Sat, 2/23/13

C-Ville Chill 5K

5KR/W, kids lrun

Coopersville

(616) 889-8626

Sat, 2/23/13

Dash Down Division

5KR/W

Grand Rapids

(616) 588-7200

dashdowndivision.com

Sat, 2/23/13

Livonia Park Run

5KR

Livonia

(734) 642-6664

parkrun.com

michiganrunner.net

|

(989) 348-9266

hansonhills.org

michianatiming.com

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

35


January - February 2013 Event Calendar Sat, 2/23/13

Michigan Indoor Track Series - State Championship hs track & field

Mount Pleasant

mitstrack.org

Sat, 2/23/13

Snofest Frosty 5K

Sun, 2/24/13 Disney’s Princess Half Marathon

5KR

13.1MR, 5KR, kids runs

Lake Buena Vista, FL

Sun, 2/24/13

Junior Muffin Race Skiathlon Classic / Freestyle

8K xc ski, kids 6-12 races

Higgins Lake

Sun, 2/24/13

Last Chance for Boston Marathon

26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR

Dublin

Tue, 1/1/13

Hair of the Dog 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

Manistique

(906) 341-2290

rundisney.com

(614) 431-9134

premierraces.com

www.uprrc.org

www.nordicskiracer.com

Saugatuck facebook.com/HairOfTheDog5kRunWalk?skip_nax_wizard=true

Featured Future Events Sat, 1/19/13

Bigfoot Snowshoe Race

Sat, 3/9/13

Dances with Dirt - Green Swamp 50M, 50K, 26.2M, 13.1, relay Dade City, FL (734) 929-9027 danceswithdirt.com

Sat, 3/9/13

Shillelagh Four Mile

Sun, 3/10/13

St. Patrick’s Parade Corktown Race

Sun, 2/3/13

Sun, 3/10/13

Super 5K

Shamrocks and Shenanigans

10K, 5K snowshoe races Traverse City (231) 933-9242 runsnow.com 5KR

Novi

4 MR/W, kids run

5KR/W, kids’ run 5KR/W

Sat, 3/16/13

St. Patrick’s Day Leprechaun Races kids runs

Sun, 3/17/13

Flushing

Ann Arbor Detroit

Bay City

(734) 929-9027 runsuperbowl.com

(810) 487-0954 riverbendstriders.com

(734) 969-9027 runshamrocks.com

(248) 354-1177 corktownrace.com

(989) 415-5593 barc-mi.com

Sun, 3/17/13

St. Patrick’s Day Pot O’ Gold Shuffle 4 MR/W, kids run

St. Patrick’s Day Races

8KR, 5KR/W

Flint

(810) 233-8851 potofgoldrun.com

Sun, 3/17/13

ShamRock ‘n’ Roll Run

10KR, 5KR/W, 1MFR

Plymouth

(248) 345-6168 shamrocknrollrun.com

Sat, 4/13/13

Martian Invasion of Races

26.2, 13.1, 10K, 5K, kids

Dearborn

(734) 929-9027 martianmarathon.com

Sun, 4/7/13

Sun, 4/14/13 Sat, 4/27/13

Sat, 4/27/13 Sun, 4/28/13 Wed, 5/1/13 Sun, 5/5/13 Sun, 5/5/13

Sat, 5/11/13 Sat, 5/11/13

Sun, 5/12/13 Sun, 5/19/13

Tri Season Kick Off

Big House / Big Heart 5K

expo

CANCELLED

Bay City

Ann Arbor

13.1/ Relay, 5K, 1M

Mt Clemens

(586) 295-1532 letsmovefestival.com

Running Fit Trail Marathon

50KR, 26.2MR, 5MR

Pinckney

(734) 929-9027 trailmarathon.com

Burns Park Run

10KR, 5KR, 1MFR

Ann Arbor

(734) 945-8132 burnsparkrun.org

Running Fit Trail Half Marathon Run Fit 5K

Kalamazoo Marathon

Dances with Dirt - Gnaw Bone

Fifth Third River Bank Run

For Women Only 5K

13.1MR

5KR, 1MR, kids run

Pinckney Novi

26.2, 13.1, 5K, 5K, 1M, kids Kalamazoo 25KR, 10KR, 5KR/W

5KR/W

Ypsilanti

Mackinaw Memorial Bridge Race

Sun, 6/2/13

Dexter to Ann Arbor Run

13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR, kids Ann Arbor

6 MR

Sat, 6/8/13

Brian Diemer Amerikam 5K

Sat, 6/8/13

Kona Run

Sat, 6/15/13

Canton Liberty Run

Sat, 6/15/13

Glen Arbor Solstice Half Marathon & 5K

Ann Arbor Marathon, Half, 5K

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

(877) 255-2447 www.borgessrun.com

5KR/W, kids run 10KR, 5KR

(248) 767-9123 www.aatrackclub.org

Cleveland, OH (800) 467-3826 clevelandmarathon.com Mackinaw City (231) 436-5664 mackinawcity.com

Cutlerville Novi

(248) 396-4936 dexterannarborrun.com

(616) 295-1073 diemerrun.com (734) 929-9027 runflirt.com

10MR, 10KR, 5KR/W, Kids Northville

(248) 345-6168 konarun.com

10KR/W, 5KR/W, 1MR/W Canton

(734) 929-9027 cantonlibertyrun.com

26.2MR, 13.1MR, 5KR, 1MR Ann Arbor (734) 213-1033 theannarbormarathon.com 13.1MR, 5KRW

Glen Arbor

Wed, 6/19/13 Triceratops Triathlon & Kids’s Clinic Tri: 1/2MS/ 12MB/ 5KR Brighton

36

(734) 929-9027 www.runfit5K.com

Grand Rapids (616) 771-1590 53riverbankrun.com

Sat, 5/25/13

Flirt with Dirt

(734) 929-9027 trailmarathon.com

50MR, 50KR, 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 100K relay Nashville, IN danceswithdirt.com

26.2 MR, 13.1 MR, 10KR

Sun, 6/9/13

(734) 969-9027 runningfit.com

Let’s Move Festival of Races

Rite Aid Cleveland Marathon

Sat, 6/8/13

(989) 415-5593 barc-mi.com

|

michiganrunner.tv

(231) 715-1406 enduranceevolution.com (734) 929-9027 runtrextri.com


Running with Tom Henderson © C. Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

By Tom Henderson

D Tom Henderson

etroit’s Fifth Third Turkey Trot is the largest running event on Thanksgiving, itself the biggest day in road racing in the United States, according to Race Results Weekly, an online publication that tracks results of runs around the country.

No other day has more races, and no race on that busy day draws more entrants than Detroit, with a record field of more than 22,000 having signed up for the 30th annual event this past November, which now includes a 5K, 10K and one-mile run. Things have come far from its humble, beery beginnings. That’s not according to RRW. It’s according to me, and I should know. Late one night in late summer 1983, Mike O’Hara and I were drinking beer in the legendary Anchor Bar, the hangout for Detroit News and Free Press editors and reporters, as well as local TV and radio types, and in those days on the ground level of the otherwise-empty Fort Shelby Hotel on West Lafayette Street. O’Hara was on his way, then, to legendary status for his insightful and always-clever coverage of the Lions and for his frequent appearances on Frank Beckmann’s sports talk show that ran weeknights on WJR radio, booming its signal throughout much of the U.S. O’Hara is a shoo-in for the NFL and all-time character halls of fame. He still looks like a beefy Woody Allen, but don’t let looks deceive. He can hit the heck out of a golf ball, plays a mean guitar, is a talented magician, was something of a legend with the ladies and, oh yeah, was Al Gore’s roommate when both were serving in the 20th Engineer Brigade in Vietnam. Anyway, it must have been a day ending in Y that late summer day, the species of day “Moose” — no one calls him Mike — and I usually found ourselves sharing beer in the Anchor and seeing who could reach slowest when the check came. Independently, we’d both begun running in the late 1970s as a way to bring some healthy balance into our lives, and both of us had become marathon runners. Running a lot didn’t keep us out of the bar; it just gave us something else to talk about besides women and editors. A few months earlier, O’Hara had had an idea: Hey, why not have a 10K road race on Thanksgiving Day, on the parade route? “I thought, ‘The roads are already closed to traffic. Why not? It could be the biggest crowd runners had ever seen during a race,’” O’Hara recalled in the days before the 30th annual race.

had just taken a job as chief fundraiser at The Parade Co., the company that puts on the parade, and that reminded Mike about his forgotten idea.

tinction, and still holds the world record for most marathon victories — 40 — and most marathons run faster than two hours and 20 minutes — 76.

“It was over about the 20th Stroh’s that I said: ‘Hey, Jim, I have an idea. Just hear me out …’” Moose remembered.

Kurtis was a serious runner but is far from serious. He added a 5K, encouraged people to run with their dogs and in costumes and even as part of human floats. And 4,000 grew and grew.

Patterson thought it was a good idea, took it to his bosses and seven or eight weeks before Thanksgiving they gave their approval. It was a ridiculously impossible timeline to put on a race, but we didn’t know that. We ran races, but we’d never put one on. How tough could it be to get a few hundred runners out on a holiday? O’Hara got The News to sign on as a sponsor and run house ads. Beckmann gave the race frequent on-air plugs. The Downtown Runners, a group Moose and I ran with every Tuesday night, volunteered to work raceday registration, handle the finish line and serve as course marshals. Entries began pouring in. The night before Thanksgiving, it being one of those Y days, O’Hara and I were having a beer or two in the Anchor. Vaughn Derderian, who is legendary himself now but was then better known as the son of the truly legendary Leo Derderian, came over and had a seat. I managed the Anchor’s softball team, the Anchor Bar-Barians, and Vaughn was usually good for a round.

Hey, let’s sleep in and look for a race on Saturday. That’s what I was thinking. But I didn’t want Moose to think I was a wimp or a wet blanket. All these years later, I’m still running races on Thanksgiving. Two years ago, it was the Turkey Trot in Traverse City. Last year, it was a 5K at Crystal Mountain. This year, I battled a crowd of 50 or so at the Bellaire Turkey Trot 5K in northern Michigan. So, a tradition was born for Detroit and for me. Moose was the official starter at this year’s run. If I had been there, I’d have had a question for him: “Where do the years go?” ****

“What are you doing for change?” Vaughn asked. Change? Why change? We loved life just as it was. Although the beer could have been colder. “Change?” asked Moose. “People are signing up tomorrow, right? They’re going to have 10s and 20s. You’re going to need change. A lot of change.” Moose had change, all right, like maybe a buck ninety-five, well hidden in his pocket, hoping I’d have the longer arms when the check came. Vaughn saw the look on Moose’s face, went into the back office, hit the safe and came back with $500 in ones, 10s and 20s. And the rest is history. Among the entrants that first year? A University of Michigan swimmer named Lisa Larsen who had taken up running. She won the 10K, a hint of things to come, including a win in the Boston Marathon in 1985. By 2003, the race had plateaued at 4,000 entrants. Jack Riley, Fifth Third Bank vice president of marketing, convinced The Parade Co. to let the bank be the lead sponsor.

He had that thought, then forgot about it. So there we were that late summer day when Jim Patterson, a former Detroit News photographer, joined us. Jim

Twenty-two thousand, five hundred? Really? Who’d a thought? Not Moose. Certainly not me. Truth be told, when he sprung his idea on me, I thought it was kind of dumb. Sure, nuts like me and him would get up on a holiday morning. But how many others would drive downtown on a day off to pay money to go for a run?

Riley brought in Doug Kurtis to run things. Kurtis had co-founded the Redford Roadrunners, saved the Free Press marathon when it seemed on the verge of ex-

michiganrunner.net

|

Indulge me in a bit of repetition from past columns. What in the world has happened to the concept of running fast? Speaking of the Traverse City Turkey Trot, the 5K had more than 1,900 finishers. Nearly 1,100 of them were women, and not one of them broke 20 minutes. Only one managed to break 21 minutes, an 11year-old from Traverse City named Aubrie Deal. A 53year-old, Jessie Houghton, managed to break 22 minutes, in 21:54, and a 10-year-old, Tia Town, finished third in 22:35. The course, flat as a pancake, couldn’t be blamed. Neither could the weather. It was 55, low wind, sunny, about as good as possible in late November. And the winning times turned in by Jacob Secor of Traverse City and runner-up Andrew Palmer of Benzonia, both clocking 15:34, showed that speed was more than theoretically possible. And, yet, of the 181 women in 20-29, only one broke 24 minutes; of the 112 men in 30-39, only one broke 20; of the 205 women in 30-39, only one broke 24; of the 162 men 40-49, only one broke 20; of the 224 women 40-49, only one broke 24. Doesn’t anyone do track work, or hill fartleks, or get pushed during training by their running buddies anymore? Those times seem inexplicable. The age-groupers in the first Detroit Turkey Trot 29 years ago would have crushed these folks. Finished blocks ahead of them. - MR -

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

37


HIIT Me With My Best Shot By Bob Schwartz he most famous single word in cinematic history is from “Citizen Kane,” where Charles Foster Kane, on his deathbed, utters “Rosebud” as a snow globe falls from his hand, smashing to the ground. It is the mysterious and enigmatic opening line of the movie, and its genesis is not fully revealed until the end.

T

Tabata’s conclusion was that one could greatly improve cardiovascular fitness, lose fat and, most importantly, increase both aerobic and anaerobic systems in these brief workouts. He determined that this approach was much more effective than a slower-but-longer workout (which only enhances your aerobic conditioning).

Similarly, if you see someone lying on the floor next to a treadmill, curled in the fetal position in a pool of sweat, don’t be surprised if he also mutters a perplexing word as a stopwatch slips from his grasp. Not “Rosebud” though, but “Tabata.” It is then that the person will usually pass out from exhaustion.

Many of us have found ourselves exhausted and with our hands on our knees at the end of 400meter track intervals, but trust me, this workout is the difference between a pinprick to the finger and a sledgehammer to your toe. You may initially think the good news is that each interval is over in 20 seconds and the whole workout can be completed in just four minutes. But it’s like a pact with the devil

For those unfamiliar with the Tabata method of training, let’s just say that I’ve run up steep and seemingly-endless mountain roads at high altitude during my years in Colorado and done lung-searing fartlek workouts on wood-chip trails in Oregon. I’ve pushed myself at the end of races where it’s been debatable whether vomiting or the finish line would come first, and I’ve finished marathons in a languorous stupor where going another.000001 of a mile would have been unobtainable.

The Tabata workout is a form of high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, introduced by Izumi Tabata, who tested athletes using a mechanicallybraked cycle ergometer. A Tabata session consists of 20 seconds of maximum output (about 170 percent of your VO2 max for what that’s worth) followed by 10 seconds of rest, then repeated seven more times without pause for a total of four minutes of intense exercise. Any form of cardiovascular workout will suffice, be it running, cycling or rowing on a machine.

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With my first attempt at Tabata, I used an elliptical with a digital timer on its display board. I also set the alarm on my watch to beep after 20 seconds and again after 10 seconds. During the first interval I was quickly convinced my watch had malfunctioned and the alarm hadn’t gone off properly. I glanced down at the display board and saw that I’d been at it for just 9 seconds.

I’ll let you in on a little secret regarding the subsequent 10-second rest period: it will pass as quickly as the time it takes to say “moron.” The “rest period” of Tabata is the greatest misnomer in the history of language. You’re not resting but simply trying to determine whether the next interval may be the last thing you accomplish in this lifetime. Also, when using an elliptical, it takes about five seconds to bring the pedals to a complete standstill, so it’s not even a full rest period.

You’ve heard that you should do most of your training runs at a pace that allows you to carry on a normal conversation? Well, with my newly-experienced masochistic workout, you can’t talk at all, let alone pantomime or even consciously move your lips. You can’t even comprehend why you’re doing this voluntarily because your pulse feels like it’s about to explode out of your carotid artery. And that’s a half hour after you’re done.

Either way, Tabata is not for the faint of heart (literally and figuratively). Those who’ve tried it have a clear understanding that if you even mutter that word in a crowded fitness center, some grown adults will shake in their spandex.

Understand though that your body will never actually be in the same state it was pre-Tabata. I felt like I was in a different state in the country from where I began.

My first 20 seconds of full-bore effort seemed to last longer than listening to the full, eight-minute version of Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven.” Time didn’t just stand still, it felt like it was going backward.

But those endeavors were nothing compared to the depths of fatigue that hit me when I first did Tabata, which I also called Heart Rate Hell.

That may be hyperbolic, but you get my drift. The fact is we all have different definitions of exhaustive or high-intensity or maximum-output effort, which a Tabata workout requires. Some of us may take that to mean an effort that becomes a near-death experience, while others will just get breathing pretty darn hard.

your body was in before the exercise took place.

I did eventually make it through all eight sets of the workout and, although some would prefer going on a 20-mile run uphill into the wind through snow naked and blindfolded rather than doing Tabata a second time, I have indeed incorporated it into my training routine.

because the fact is, if you want fitness in 240 seconds, well, you’re going to have to pay for it. My Tabata workout didn’t actually end in four minutes, because I needed to add in the 15 minutes afterwards that I spent lying on the floor of the fitness center wondering how I had gotten there in the first place. Next, add the subsequent 10 minutes I spent trying to become vertical and recall where the men’s locker room was. Last was the half hour standing almost comatose in the shower while my heartbeat continued pounding through my skull. The scientific term for this latter feeling is called EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption), which is the afterburn, or increased rate of oxygen intake after a rigorous workout. In essence, your metabolism is boosted as you continue to burn calories for a long time afterward while slowly returning to the state

Michigan Runner - January / February 2013

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Tabata’s maximum effort doesn’t always mean having to warn the people on machines next to me I am likely to pass out on top of them. It doesn’t have to be torture, just difficult. Rest assured that “Tabata” doesn’t have to be your last word a la Kane’s “Rosebud.” I’ve now done Tabata sprinting on grass, with a rowing machine, on a treadmill and on a stair climber (anything that gets the heart rate up quickly). The bottom line is that no matter which method, it’s all the same. Get ready to suck air! Michigan runner Bob Schwartz is the author of the best-selling humor book “I Run, Therefore I Am – NUTS!” and its new sequel “I Run, Therefore I Am Still – NUTS!” For more information, check out www.runninglaughsblog.com. - MR -


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Michigan Runner, January / February 2013  

bimonthly publication on Michigan running, road racing, cross country, track and field and Michigan runners. Features 16 page Photo Gallery