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Table of Contents 2 The John Marshall Law School & Mary 3 Table of Contents / William Law School 4 The Career Center’s Law Day Washington and Lee Wake Forest University 5 University School of Law / School of Law 6-7 Pre-Law Fall 2013 Programs Appalachian University of Nebraska 8 School of Law / College of Law 9 Applying to Law School 10-11 Law Day Participating Schools 12 Law School Personal Statement University University of 13 Duquesne / Wisconsin School of Law Law School 14 What should you major in? Atlanta’s John 15 Marshall Law School / Savannah Law School 16 University of Detroit Mercy School of Law Content on pages 3, 4, 6, 7, 9-12, 14 provided by The Career Center and the Newnan Academic Advising Center. To schedule a pre law advising appointment with the Career Center, call (734) 764-7460. To make a pre-law advising appointment at the Newnan Advising Center, call 734-764-0332. Students and alums from all UM Schools or Colleges are welcome.

BUSINESS MANAGER Kirby Voigtman DESIGNER Nolan Loh ACCOUNT ACCOUNT ACCOUNT ACCOUNT ACCOUNT

EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE EXECUTIVE

Jason Anterasian Jessica Hahn Colin King Maddie Lacey Ailie Steir

“Talk to people who have been to law school, and who are in law school now. Talk to lawyers, talk to people who earned a JD but don’t practice. Really vet your decision to do this, but if it’s something you know you want, and you can make a strong case for why, don’t be dissuaded by naysayers.” Peter Calloway, UM class of 2013 (International Studies)

admitted to law school Fall 2013

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The Career Center’s Law Day

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September 24, 2013 3pm-6pm Michigan Union 2nd floor

aw Day is a great way to connect with a large number of law schools right here on campus! Typically, 100+ schools and over 300+ students participate in the event. Law Day offers something for everyone: JUNIORS / SENIORS

• Learn about specific programs from law school representatives • Collect application and financial aid information • Get tips on personal statements, applications and reference letters

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS / SOPHOMORES

• Ask questions about undergrad coursework and extra-curricular activities • Explore law school options • Build networks for the future

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tips for making the most of law day

Come! Law Day is a fun event and a great place for chatting with law schools! Prioritize your list of schools in advance to make effective use of your time at Law Day. No need for a suit, however, give some thought to what you wear. Business casual works; keep in mind though “business casual” doesn’t mean “classroom casual”. Bring your questions about the schools and be prepared to answer questions about yourself. No need to bring a resume. Look beyond the rankings and visit with familiar and new schools… Multiple perspectives are always helpful and you may find new possibilities!

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Pre-Law Fall 2013 Programs

he events listed below are designed to help students prepare a successful application to law school. We encourage all interested students to attend as many events as possible.

Double Wolverine Michigan Law Panel & Reception

Come hear from current Michigan Law students (who were UM undergrads) about applying to law school, being in a law school and‌. what made them choose to stay for three more years in Ann Arbor! Please RSVP to law.jd.admissions@umich.edu by September 18. Sponsored by UM Law School Admissions Office. Monday, September 23, at 7:00 PM, 1225 South Hall, with reception to follow

LAW DAY!

Meet with representatives from ~130 law schools.

Sponsored by the Career Center. Tuesday, September 24, 3:00 PM-6:00 PM, 2nd Floor Michigan Union (multiple rooms)

Law School Application Discussions

Interact with a small group of your peers and a Career Center staff member about law school application questions and issues from the comfort of your home using a Google+ account or in a small group setting. Bring your questions! Space is limited and pre-registration required. Details at: http://careercenter.umich.edu/article/hangout-career-center. Google+ Hangout - Monday, September 9, 8:00 PM-8:40 PM (Virtual) Small Group Setting - Friday, September 13, 2:00 PM-2:40 PM, The Career Center Program Room Small Group Setting - Monday, October 21, 12:00 PM-12:40 PM, The Career Center Program Room

Law School Personal Statement Discussions

Interact with a small group of your peers and a Career Center staff member to learn how to make your law school personal statement stand out from the comfort of your home using a Google+ account or in a small group setting. Space is limited and pre-registration required. Details at: http://careercenter.umich.edu/article/hangout-career-center. Google+ Hangout - Tuesday, September 17, 7:30 PM-8:10 PM (Virtual) Small Group Setting - Thursday, September 19, 12:00 PM-12:40 PM Google+ Hangout - Tuesday, October 15, 7:00 PM-7:40 PM (Virtual) Google+ Hangout - Monday, November 18, 7:00 PM-7:40 PM (Virtual) Small Group Setting - Thursday, November 21, 3:30 PM-4:10 PM

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LSAT Familiarization Course

Nine sessions designed to familiarize participants with the LSAT content and basic test strategies. The course culminates with a practice LSAT administration under timed conditions. Pre-registration required: http://careercenter.umich.edu/article/lsat-familiarization-course-details. September 20 - November 8 (Fridays, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM), Location TBD

Personal Statement Workshops — Getting Started

Learn what law schools are looking for in your personal statement and participate in writing exercises designed to help you write a strong and inspired essay. Sponsored by LSA Academic Advising Center. Monday, September 30, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM, G243 Angell Hall Tuesday, October 8, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, G243 Angell Hall Friday, October 18, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM, G243 Angell Hall Wednesday, October 30, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, G255 Angell Hall in the Smart Room

Pre-Law Quick Question Hours

No appointment is needed to drop in and ask a quick question about the admission process. This group-advising environment offers a great opportunity to learn from other students’ questions. Sponsored by LSA Academic Advising Center. Wednesday, September 11, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, 1255 Angell Hall, Advising Library Thursday, September 19, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 1255 Angell Hall, Advising Library Friday, November 8, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 1255 Angell Hall, Advising Library

Visiting School Information Sessions

An opportunity to learn about this particular law school and gauge your candidacy there. See individual events for pre-registration details. Sponsored by the Career Center and the Newnan Advising Center.

One-on-One Pre-Law Consultations with MSU Law Admissions Dean Wednesday, September 18, The Career Center Pre-registration required. Sign up at: http://careercenter.umich.edu/article/career-center-connector.

Vanderbilt Law Interviews @ Michigan

Monday, September 23, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM, The Career Center Pre-registration required. Sign up at: admissions@law.vanderbilt.edu.

Harvard Law School Information Session

Wednesday, October 30, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Newnan Advising Center, 1255 Angell Hall Pre-registration required. Sign up at: dguillot@umich.edu.

University of Detroit Mercy Law Luncheon and Information Session Wednesday, November 6, 11:30 AM-1:30 PM, Michigan Union Welker Room No pre-registration required.

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Applying to Law School

Suggested Application Timeline

Summer of your application cycle

• Decide when to apply (this year vs. in the future) • Look into fee waivers if applicable • Register for/take the LSAT as applicable • Register with the Law School Admission Council’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS) • Approach your writers to discuss and obtain your letters of reference • Investigate schools and decide where to apply • Consult with a pre-law counselor in the Career Center and/or a pre-law advisor in LSA • Start working on your main application essay and schedule a review if you wish • Mark your calendar now for the UM Law Day September 24, 2013 (3pm-6pm)

September through December of your application cycle

• Register for/take the LSAT if applicable • Have your official transcripts sent to CAS • Gather and send reference letters • Fine-tune your list of schools based on your GPA, LSAT scores and other factors important to you • Write multiple, tailored application essays • Have your essays reviewed by multiple parties for feedback • Complete and submit law school applications • Monitor your applications after submission for completeness January and beyond of your application cycle • Await results • File your FAFSA • If waitlisted, consider sending an application update • Manage admission offers • Pay deposit and send final transcript

January and beyond of your application cycle • Await results • File your FAFSA • If waitlisted, consider sending an application update • Manage admission offers • Pay deposit and send final transcript

“The best tip I can offer is to really plan out your application cycle - discover what you will need to do to complete your applications”

You may also find it helpful to peruse the LSAC application checklist. * This timeline is available on The Career Center’s website (Pursue Grad-Prof School/Law School) and includes links to the highlighted text *

Sarah Youngblood, UM class of 2013 (Political Science & Psychology) admitted to law school Fall 2013

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Law Day Participating Schools September 24, 2013 3pm-6pm Michigan Union 2nd floor

American University Washington College of Law Appalachian School of Law Arizona State University - Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School Ave Maria School of Law Baylor Law School Boston College Law School Boston University School of Law Brooklyn Law School Capital University Law School Cardozo School of Law Case Western Reserve University School of Law Chapman University School of Law Cleveland-Marshall College of Law Columbia Law School Cornell Law School CUNY School of Law DePaul University College of Law Duke University School of Law Earle Mack School of Law at Drexel University Elon University School of Law Emory University School of Law Florida Coastal School of Law Florida State University Fordham Law School George Mason University School of Law George Washington University Law School Gonzaga University School of Law Howard University School of Law IHL Test Prep and Admissions IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Indiana University Maurer School of Law Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law John Marshall Law School, The Kaplan Test Prep Liberty University School of law Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center Loyola Law School | Los Angeles Loyola University Chicago School of Law Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Marquette University Law School Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University Michigan State University College of Law New England Law | Boston New York Law School New York University School of Law Northeastern University School of Law Northern Illinois University College of Law Northwestern University School of Law Notre Dame Law School Nova Southeastern University - Shepard Broad Law Center Ohio Northern University College of Law Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, The Penn State Law Quinnipiac Univesity School of Law Regent University School of Law Roger Williams University School of Law Saint Louis University School of Law

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It is really important to research each school to learn about its courses, clinics/internships, international opportunities, professors and employment opportunities.” Shira Sandler, UM class of 2013

(International Studies & Psychology) admitted to law school Fall 2013

For everything you need to know about Law Day 2013

Santa Clara Law Seattle University School of Law SMU Dedman School of Law South Texas College of Law Southwestern Law School Stanford Law School Suffolk University Law School SUNY Buffalo Law School Syracuse University College of Law Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law, The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Pittsburgh School of Law, The Thomas Jefferson School of Law Tulane University Law School U.C. Berkeley Law School UC Hastings College of the Law UCLA School of Law University of Alabama School of Law, The University of Baltimore School of Law University of California, Irvine School of Law University of Chicago Law School, The University of Cincinnati College of Law University of Colorado School of Law University of Dayton School of Law University of Denver Sturm College of Law University of Detroit Mercy School of Law University of Florida, Levin College of Law University of Illinois College of Law University of Iowa College of Law University of Kansas School of Law University of Maryland Carey School of Law University of Miami School of Law University of Michigan Law School University of Minnesota Law School University of Missouri School of Law University of Nebraska College of Law University of North Carolina School of Law at Chapel Hill, The University of Pennsylvania Law School University of Richmond School of Law University of San Diego School of Law University of San Francisco School of Law University of South Carolina School of Law University of Southern California, Gould School of Law University of Tennessee College of Law University of Texas School of Law, The University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law University of Toledo College of Law University of Utah SJ Quinney College of Law University of Washington School of Law University of Wisconsin Law School Valparaiso University Law School Vanderbilt Law School Vermont Law School Villanova University School of Law Wake Forest University School of Law Washington and Lee University School of Law Washington University School of Law Western New England University School of Law Whittier Law School Willamette University College of Law William & Mary Law School List compiled 8/26/2013

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The Law School Personal Statement A Self-Reflection Excercise

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n effective personal statement is based on sound self-assessment. To help you reflect on some of your accomplishments, interests, personal traits and characteristics, ask yourself:

You

What’s your background, your values? (First generation college student, parents’ occupation, role models, spirituality, social justice, etc.) If applicable, reflect on the diversity/uniqueness that you bring (culture, age, major, special life experiences and perspectives.) How would you describe yourself? How would your professors, employers, family members, classmates and friends describe you? What are you passionate about? What kind of learner are you? What is it that you would like for a law school to really know about you?

Your Experiences

Think of your proudest moment. Why was that accomplishment particularly meaningful to you? What skills are you learning in your classes, research experiences, and other academic endeavors that are relevant to the legal profession? What are you learning about yourself through your experiences inside and outside of the classroom? Reflect on your extracurricular experiences: remember critical incident moments, “revelations” etc. What kind of hurdles did you have to overcome in your life? What experiences have enabled you to interact with people of different backgrounds and cultures?

Your Plan

How have you formed your own opinion/perception of the nature of legal practice and the daily demands placed upon lawyers and their families? What kind of lawyer would you like to be and why? What impact do you want to have on your community? In what ways have you already started this process? What are your goals for the future, both personally and professionally?

Bottom-Line Points

Why do you want to become a lawyer? Be as sincere as you can What experiences have confirmed your career choice? Be as specific as you can What do you want law schools to know about you beyond what is stated in your application?

Five Tips For Writing A Law School Personal Statement!

1 Follow the prompts provided by each school. Make sure your statement addresses the question(s). 2 Don’t repeat your resume. Focus on the “why” of the experience(s) rather than the “what” 3 Start by recording or blogging your thoughts rather than trying to write THE statement 4 Write the stories you want to tell rather than second-guessing what the admissions committee wants to hear. 5 Seek feedback from multiple people; however, make sure the final draft is your statement.

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Where should you apply? A quick list of things to consider

The application process and law school are costly so take the time to carefully research schools. Create a table or spreadsheet to help you evaluate all of the information you gather. Three key sources of data for researching law schools: 1. The Law School Admission Council’s (LSAC) - lists American Bar Association (ABA) approved schools by state and region: https://officialguide.lsac.org 2. The Book of Law School Lists - an online resource that lists law schools according to programs, journal opportunities, areas of emphasis, student organizations etc.: http://www. bu.edu/cas/files/2011/12/NAPLA_Lists2011_Book_v2.pdf 3. The ABA provides employment statistics: http://employmentsummary.abaquestionnaire.org/

“Treat this process similarly to how you handled the college application process. Make sure you have reach schools, targets and safeties, but also make sure your safeties are schools you would still be excited about going to —especially given the current economic climate” Darryn Fitzgerald, UM class of 2010 (Communication Studies & Spanish) admitted to law school Fall 2013

Create your initial list by considering multiple criteria: location, availability of specific programs, employment statistics and/or rank etc. Narrow the list by considering GPA and LSAT score data reported for each school. This information can be found on the LSAC website (link #1). Your edited list should include: 1. Target schools: your LSAT & GPA overlap the middle 50% of LSAT and GPA scores reported for the school. 2. Reach schools: your LSAT & GPA overlap the bottom 25% of LSAT and GPA scores reported for the school. 3. Safety schools: your LSAT & GPA overlap the upper 25% of LSAT and GPA scores reported for the school.

Make a pre-law advising appointment either through The Career Center or the Newnan Advising Center (or both) to help you further evaluate your list. Roughly 73% of applicants apply to 9 or fewer schools. Do not apply to a school unless you would be happy to attend. Before accepting an offer of admission, we strongly encourage you to visit the school. 14

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Law School Resource Guide 2013