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ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY-FOUR YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM Monday, November 4, 2013

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Students to fund $50K scholarship MUSIC Matters unveils ‘Big Thinkers’ fund, raised from sales at annual concert RYAN REISS/Daily

By MICHAEL SUGERMAN

Music, Theater & Dance junior Ji Hoon Kang and Engineering freshman Mac Porter work on Gypsy Pond 15: Organism, an interactive multimedia installation that explores the concepts of breathing, interconnectedness, and organisms.

Daily Staff Reporter

MUSIC Matters began with 10 freshmen and $100 in the summer of 2011. The idea was to introduce a capstone event at the end of the year consisting of daylong festivities finished off by a concert that raised money for charity. Each year, the charity would change. “At the time, I was hoping that we would scale up,” LSA senior Phillip Schermer, the president of the organization, said. “I was hoping that there would be a day when we could give big gifts.” Monday, that day came as MUSIC Matters unveiled its $50,000 endowed “Big Thinkers” scholarship. The need-based scholarship is entirely student-

BUSINESS

India focus of Ross event Ford Motor COO, Miss America speak at conference

proven to be a focus of international business. The Ross India Business Conference hosted a series of speakers Friday and created dialogue concerning how businesses can work with the intricacies of the Indian culture and economy with ventures in the country to about 200 attendees. With the theme of “Dream. Lead. Inspire.,” the aim of the

By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR Daily Staff Reporter

With more than 1.2-billion residents and a continuously growing middle class, India has

fifth-annual IBC was to bring speakers involved with the ongoing economic and cultural transformation in India to the forefront and give attendees the opportunity to engage in dialogue on how to best harness the transformation. “I certainly believe that students cannot graduate from business school today without a clear understanding of the role

and importance of India,” Business Dean Alison Davis-Blake said. “And that’s why we have this conference.” She stressed the importance of India as a global “emerging market” with a “growing middle class,” and highlighted the large cohort of Ross students that were of Indian origin. This year, Indian students See INDIA, Page 5A

TA L K I T O U T

CAMPUS LIFE

COMMUNITY

RHA event at Crisler brings spirit, prizes Watch party for MSU game draws 400 attendees By BRANDON SHAW Daily Staff Reporter

Michigan football may have lost Saturday in East Lansing, but that didn’t stop a group of several hundred Wolverines from cheering until the very last minute of the game at Crisler Center. About 400 students arrived to a watch party event hosted by the Residence Hall Association — the student-run government of dorm residents — at Crisler Arena, the home of the University’s basketball teams. At 3:37 p.m. the lights went down to simulate the opening of a basketball game, and the scoreboard monitors transitioned from football highlight reels to live television coverage of the Michigan football game against Michigan State

University. Public Policy junior Garrett Kessler, president of RHA, and LSA sophomore Christianna Pedley, RHA’s vice president for finance, introduced the game by noting that Michigan’s record against Michigan State stands at 68-32-5. Most guests at the event were maize-and-blue-outfitted underclassmen. Several attendees said they were more likely to come to the event at Crisler and others like it because they have less access to televisions in the residence halls. However, event organizers expected a much larger audience at Crisler. Both the media release and the official event announcement said RHA expected 10,000 students to attend. LSA sophomore Kyle Crane, RHA’s vice president for internal relations, said he and other members of the association had big hopes in launching Saturday’s initiaSee RHA, Page 5A

funded — the first of its kind at the University — and is the club’s second gift to the school following its inaugural donation of $10,000 to C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in 2012. The initial endowment funds were raised from ticket sales at the group’s Ben Folds concert in April. Materials for the scholarship are likely be released either at the beginning of the 2014 academic year or the following year. The idea behind the scholarship is that, every year, MUSIC Matters students will work with University administrators to determine a theme for the “Big Thinkers” applications materials. The first year’s topic will tackle social sustainability. “It will force applicants to think about big problems and what they can do or what we can do as a community to help solve those problems,” Schermer said. Schermer said UC 270, a course taught last year by Martha Pollack, University provost and execuSee SCHOLARSHIP, Page 5A

Arts outreach event teaches Detroit youth Student performers headline event promoting creativity By EMILIE PLESSET For The Daily

PATRICK BARRON/Daily

LSA senior Alex Lee talks to LSA junior Harleen Kaur at the first Community Dinner, a monthly event that aims to bring together different organizations.The theme of this month’s event is family — participants were encouraged to talk about the importance of family relationships.

CRIME

Bus driver arrested for motor theft Student employee abandoned idling bus off campus By MATTHEW JACKONEN Daily Staff Reporter

A 22-year old male student bus driver was arrested after he left a Blue Bus unattended for over two hours near the

intersection of Arch and White Streets early Saturday morning. The bus was left alone and running between roughly midnight and 2 a.m. University Police arrived to check on the status of the bus shortly after 2 a.m. After searching the vehicle they found a backpack and a wallet that may have led to the missing driver. The bus’s driver arrived shortly thereafter and police

proceeded to question him. The driver promptly took responsibility for the vehicle, and after a series of questions, he admitted he had left the bus and walked to his place of residence. He responded in the affirmative when police officers asked if he had been preoccupied at home. Police on scene also said the University’s bus dispatch had mentioned that a driver had See BUS, Page 5A

Instead of their usual classroom routine, about 150 fifth- and sixthgrade students from Detroit spent Friday at the Michigan League singing and dancing with University students at the Michigan Performance Outreach Workshop. MPOW is an art-outreach student organization that hosts Detroit elementary- and middle-school students to expose them to multiple platforms of artistic expression through performances and interactive workshops. The organization has been running for three years and holds an event once per semester. In addition to promoting artistic expression, Music, Theatre & Dance senior Mary Naoum said MPOW aims to build community among University students in different schools as well as attending students through creative collaboration. “We’re trying to inspire a See OUTREACH, Page 5A

state smackdown Michigan was dominated in a 29-6 loss to Michigan State.

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INDEX

Vol. CXXIIV, No. 22 ©2013 The Michigan Daily michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A OPINION.....................4A ARTS...........................6A

SUDOKU.....................2A CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A S P O R T S M O N DAY. . . . . . . . . .1 B


News

2A — Monday, November 4, 2013

MONDAY: This Week in History

TUESDAY: Professor Profiles

WEDNESDAY: In Other Ivory Towers

THURSDAY: Alumni Profiles

LSA rejects giving students a vote students to vote, but we want lots of student input. We’ll listen to you.’ ”

LSA professors rejected a proposal that would have included LSA students in the school’s government at college town meetings. The proposal looked to eliminate the “town meeting” format, which included only LSA professors. It instead would have created a 50-professor, 50-student governing body. “This is a critical trial of things we as students have been hearing about for a long time — namely student input,” said Jonathan Klein, president of LSA Student Government. “You keep telling us, ‘We don’t want the

Thirty years ago this week (Nov. 8, 1983): A group of 150 student protestors rallied on Nov. 7, 1983 to support a group of demonstrators who took over a researcher’s laboratory that day. The Progressive Student Network staged a sit-in at Thomas Senior’s laboratory in the East Engineering Building to advocate for an end to military research at the University. The group wanted Senior’s project, which had possible military applications, to be taken off-

CRIME NOTES

Ten years ago this week (Nov. 7, 2003): Researchers at the University’s Comprehensive Cancer Center found the gene responsible for stem cell growth into adulthood. The Bmi-1 gene was determined as the possible gene controlling self-renewal for all adult stem cells, said Medical School Prof. Sean Morrison. — WILL GREENBERG

Cops called for boredom

Lecture on athletics

WHERE: Shapiro Undergraduate Library WHEN: Friday at about 5:10 p.m. WHAT: An intoxicated subject was removed from the library lobby after reports of disturbance, University Police reported.

WHERE: Angell Hall WHEN: Friday at about 8:20 a.m. WHAT: A subject was reported sleeping in an Angell Hall auditorium but had left by the time police arrived, University Police reported.

WHAT: Visiting speaker Rayvon Fouche of the University of Illinois, Chicago, will deliver a lecture on the interactions of scientific principles and athletics. The lecture will address the role scientific tests in professional sports and society. WHO: Science, Technology and Society Program WHEN: Today at 4:00 p.m. WHERE: 1014 Tisch Hall

Archeology presentation

WHERE: School of Social Work WHEN: Friday at about 10:00 a.m. WHAT: An office door appeared to have intentional damage done but no evidence of a break-in, University Police reported. The door lock will be changed.

WHAT: Geoff Emberling, director of the University’s Nubian Expedition, will be presenting a lecture on the archeology of ancient Nubia. WHO: Near Eastern Studies WHEN: Today at 4:00 p.m. WHERE: 2022 Thayer Academic Building

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes?

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ANDREW WEINER

campus. “We have no intention of stopping our protest until we get him out of here,” LSA sophomore Valerie Flapan, a rally leader from PSN, said.

Party in the UGLi

WHERE: 1300 Ann Street WHEN: Friday at about 5:30 p.m. WHAT: A University bus was struck by a vehicle on Ann Street causing minor damage to the striking vehicle but there were no injuries, University Police reported.

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EDITORIAL STAFF Matthew Slovin Managing Editor Adam Rubenfire Managing News Editor RYAN REISS/Daily

Rackham student Larry Cho practices his roller hockey skills on Saturday at Palmer Field.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

More Blue Bus Down with the troubles door

FRIDAY: Photos of the Week

ROLLIN’ UP

FACULTY REJECT 50-STUDENT, 50-PROFESSOR COMMITTEE

Forty years ago this week (Nov. 6, 1973):

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Piano recital WHAT: New York Times acclaimed pianist Nick Phillips will be performing several new compositions. WHO: School of Music, Thatre and Dance WHEN: Today at 8:00 p.m. WHERE: Moore Building, Britton Recital Hall CORRECTIONS l A Nov. 1 article entitled “Fraternity apologizes for racist incident” misidentified Dean of Students Laura Blake Jones as also being the University’s Bias Response Team coordinator. Nina Grant is the University’s Bias Response Team coordinator. l Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW TODAY

1

Honda is recalling 344,000 minivans due to possible issues with the brakes, The New York Times reported. This second recall of the year is because broken computers in the 2007-2008 Odyssey could create “heavy and unexpected braking.”

2

The Michigan football team registered the worst rushing performance in school history as it fell to Michigan State, 29-6, Saturday. Quarterback Devin Gardner was sacked seven times. >> FOR MORE, SEE INSIDE

3

Geoffery Mutai became a back-to-back marathon champion after winning the New York City Marathon on Sunday, the New York Times reported. Mutai, who is 34 years old and from Kenya, finished with a time of 2:08:24.

mjslovin@michigandaily.com arube@michigandaily.com

SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Katie Burke, Peter Shahin, K.C. Wassman, Taylor Wizner ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Ariana Assaf, Jennifer Calfas, Hillary Crawford, Ian Dillingham, Will Greenberg, Sam Gringlas, Matt Jackonen, Rachel Premack, Stephanie Shenouda, Christy Song

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BUSINESS STAFF Amal Muzaffar Digital Accounts Manager Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager Lexi Derasmo Local Accounts Manager Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager Ellen Wolbert and Sophie Greenbaum Production Managers The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily’s office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subscription rate. On-campus subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

Kosovo: Local elections Gunman alleges he acted test relations with Serbia alone in LAX shooting President Jahjaga speaks out against violence

seeks to settle their disputes and unlock EU funds. The Serb hard-liners’ tactics, however, appeared to suppress voter turnout and raised concerns that Serbia had not fulfilled its pledge to stop fueling defiance among Serbs in Kosovo, especially in the north, where they dominate the population. Kosovo President Atifete Jahjaga warned Serb hard-liners not to undermine the central government in Pristina. “Such acts will be met with swift response of the security mechanisms in an attempt to establish rule of law, a necessity in this part of the country,” Jahjaga said in a statement. The comments came after a group of some 30 masked men barged into the polling station in the late afternoon, smashing windows and tearing up voting material. Associated Press footage showed police sealing off the

Motives for attack remain unclear as FBI investigation continues

area. It also showed members of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which helped organize the vote in the north, leaving the polling station in their vehicles. The staPRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — tion was later closed. Hard-line Serbs in northern Serbia’s prime minister, Ivica Kosovo intimidated would-be Dacic, urged Serbs in Kosovo’s LOS ANGELES (AP) — The voters and were suspected of north to defy the threats and gunman charged in the deadly attacking a polling station durthe anti-election campaign and shooting at Los Angeles Intering local elections Sunday. The cast their ballots. He said parnational Airport lay bloodied actions underscored Kosovo’s ticipation in the election is in and handcuffed on the floor of strained relations with Serbia, the interest of the Serb people in Terminal 3 after being gunned even as both states seek closer Kosovo. down by police, but he replied ties to the European Union. “Let us once do something to critical questions that helped It was the first time voters that is in our interest and not authorities lock down the scene. in all of Kosovo were choosin the interest of our enemies,” Paul Ciancia, 23, was hauled ing local councilors and mayors Dacic said. “The fate of Serbs in away moments later on a stretchsince the country seceded from Kosovo should be in their own er and later heavily sedated for Serbia in 2008. hands, and not (Kosovo Prime medical reasons, but not before The participation in the Minister Hashim) Thaci’s or the he told investigators he had acted election of minority Serbs in extremists’.” alone when he opened fire in the Kosovo was being watched careAbout 1.8 million voters are terminal, a law enforcement offifully. The integration of Serbs entitled to vote in 39 municicial who has been briefed on the into Kosovar political life is a key palities and elect mayors and investigation told The AssociSudoku Syndication http://sudokusyndication.com/sudoku/generator/print/ element of an EU-brokered deal local councilors. Voter turnated Press on Sunday. between Serbia and Kosovo that out in Kosovo stood at 46 Ciancia, an unemployed percent, excluding the Serbmotorcycle mechanic who dominated north, as polls closed recently moved to Los Angeat 1800GMT. les from the small, blue-collar An AP reporter witnessed town of Pennsville, N.J., also told Serbs crowding outside pollpolice a friend had dropped him MEDIUM ing stations in the northern city at LAX on Friday just moments of Mitrovica to discourage felbefore he shot a Transportation low Serbs from voting. Posters Security Administration officer describing participation in elecat point-blank range and woundtions as treason also have sprung ed three other people, including up in Serb-majority areas. two more TSA workers. Some Serbs fear the vote valiOfficials do not believe that dates the secession of Kosovo, the friend knew of the shooter’s which declared independence plans. Ciancia arrived at the airfrom Serbia in 2008. The U.S. port in a black Hyundai and was and the majority of the 28 EU not a ticketed passenger. countries recognize the new Ciancia was under 24-hour state, but Serbia rejects Kosovo’s armed guard at the hospital Sunindependence, as do many Serbs day after being shot four times, now living in Kosovo. the official said. He was sedated “I can’t vote in these elecfor medical reasons, the official tions. To me these are foreign said, adding that one gunshot to elections,” said Zeljko Vuckovic, the mouth blew a molar out of his a Serb resident of Mitrovica. jaw. Another Serb, Radomir Milic, Ciancia is facing charges of was one of the few voters who murder of a federal officer and responded to Serbia’s call to committing violence at an interelect their leaders in an internanational airport. The charges tionally backed process. could qualify him for the death © sudokusolver.com. For personal use only. puzzle by sudokusyndication.com WORK IT. “I vote for a better life because penalty. It wasn’t immediately if we do not vote we cannot surclear when he would make a first vive here,” Milic said. court appearance given his medGenerate and solve Sudoku, Super Sudoku and Godoku puzzles at sudokusyndication.com!

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ical condition. In court documents and interviews, authorities spelled out a chilling chain of events, saying Ciancia walked into the airport, pulled a .223-caliber assault rifle from his duffel bag and fired repeatedly at 39-year-old TSA officer Gerardo I. Hernandez. He turned back to see Hernandez move and returned to finish him off, according to surveillance video reviewed by investigators. He then fired on two other uniformed TSA employees and an airline passenger, who all were wounded, as he moved methodically through the security checkpoint before airport police shot him as panicked travelers hid in stores and restaurants. It wasn’t clear why Ciancia targeted TSA officers, but what he left behind indicated he was willing to kill any of them that crossed his path, authorities revealed. The shooter’s duffel bag contained a handwritten letter signed by Ciancia stating he’d “made the conscious decision to try to kill” multiple TSA employees and that he wanted to “instill fear in their traitorous minds,” FBI Agent in Charge David L. Bowdich said. “Black, white, yellow, brown, I don’t discriminate,” the note read, according to a paraphrase by a law enforcement official briefed on the investigation. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly. The screed also mentioned “fiat currency” and “NWO,” possible references to the New World Order, a conspiracy theory that foresees a totalitarian oneworld government. The letter also talked about “how easy it is to get a gun into the airport,” the law enforcement official said. When searched, the suspect had five 30-round magazines, and his bag contained hundreds more rounds in boxes. U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, chairman of the House

Homeland Security Committee, said on CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday that Ciancia’s actions show how difficult it is to protect travelers at a massive airport such as LAX. The terminals are open and easily accessible to thousands of people who arrive at large sliding glass doors via a broad ring road that fronts the facility and is designed to move people along quickly. “It’s like a shopping mall outside the perimeter, it’s almost like an open shopping mall,” McCaul said. The FBI has served a search warrant on a Sun Valley residence where Ciancia lived, Ari Dekofsky, a spokeswoman for the FBI’s Los Angeles field office, said Sunday. Agents are still interviewing people, she said. Authorities believe the rifle used in the shooting was purchased in Los Angeles. Ciancia also had two additional handguns that he purchased in Los Angeles, but which weren’t at the crime scene, a law enforcement official said. The official, who has been briefed on the investigation, was not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity. The purchases themselves appeared legal, although authorities were still tracing them, and it’s unclear if the shooter used his own identification or someone else’s, the official said. “He didn’t buy them on the street. He didn’t buy them on the Internet,” the official said. “He bought them from a licensed gun dealer — the rifle and the two handguns.” Hernandez, a three-year veteran of the TSA, moved to the U.S. from El Salvador at age 15, married his sweetheart, Ana, on Valentine’s Day in 1998 and had two children. The other two TSA officers wounded in the attack have been released from the hospital. On Sunday, the TSA identified them as James Speer, 54, and Tony Grigsby, 36.


News

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

France: Journalists shot, killed in Mali

EAST LANSING, Mich.

Cuban life on display in photos at Michigan State A Michigan State University professor’s photos from Cuba are going on display Monday at the East Lansing campus. Music composition associate professor Mark Sullivan says the exhibition draws on more than 6,000 photos he shot during his visit to the Caribbean Island nation, long under a U.S. trade embargo. The opening of the exhibit “Cuba: First Times Never Come Again” is 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the MSUglobal Knowledge and Learning Innovations space in the Nisbet Building. It’s up through year’s end. The 28-year Michigan State faculty member says life in Cuba is “radically different” from what he’d expected. Sullivan will be on hand to discuss his photos and plans with the project, which include turning his pictures and experiences in Cuba into a book.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala.

Birmingham airport secured, operations resume Normal operations are resuming at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport after a threat was investigated. The airport’s Facebook page said Sunday night that operations were resuming after authorities secured the airport. Police spokesman Johnny Williams tells al.com that nothing was found in a sweep of the airport. Several flights were diverted and the terminal was evacuated after the threat was received in the afternoon. The airport was shut down for more than two hours.

CLEVELAND

Ohio trial set for man in wife’s hospital killing A man charged with fatally shooting his wife in her hospital bed killed her out of love and will tell jurors about the heartbreak he felt over her debilitated condition, his attorney said. John Wise, of Massillon, under house arrest since last year, goes on trial Monday and will ask for the jury’s understanding, not sympathy, attorney Paul Adamson said. The 68-year-old Wise could face life in prison if convicted of aggravated murder. Police say Wise calmly walked into his 65-year-old wife’s room at Akron General Medical Center and shot her on Aug. 4, 2012. Barbara, his wife of 45 years, died the next morning. A week earlier, she had suffered triple cerebral aneurysms that left her unable to speak.

YANGON, Myanmar

Boat carrying 70 Muslim Rohingya sinks off Myanmar A boat carrying at least 70 Muslim Rohingya capsized and sank Sunday off the western coast of Myanmar, an aid worker said. Only eight survivors have been found. The boat was in the Bay of Bengal and headed for Bangladesh when it went down early Sunday, said Abdul Melik, who works for a humanitarian organization in the region. The incident comes after the United Nations warned that an annual and often deadly exodus of desperate people from Myanmar’s Rakhine state appears to have begun. The exodus usually kicks off in November, when seas begin to calm following the annual monsoon. As many as 1,500 people have fled in the last week, Dan McNorton, a spokesman for the U.N. High Commission for Refugees, said at a press briefing Saturday in Geneva. —Compiled from Daily wire reports

Monday, November 4, 2013 — 3A

Details of who was behind attack and why remain unclear

@TWENTYPOUNDCARP VIA TWITTER

A Twitter picture from @twentypound carp advertising a write-in campaign for Ann Arbor City Council.

Twenty Pound Carp runs for City Council, details fishy Candidate offers fresh (water) take on contentious issues By KATIE BURKE and WILL GREENBERG Daily News Editor and Daily Staff Reporter

Ann Arbor voters’ attention has been lured into the 4th Ward Ann Arbor City Council race as write-in candidate “Twenty Pound Carp” made a splash by announcing his candidacy for the seat. According to a Twitter account, @TwentyPoundCarp, the carp is an Ann Arbor native that resided in a pond in Ann Arbor’s West Park but was removed one year ago after city officials claimed it was destroying the pond’s ecosystem. The Ann Arbor News reported in November 2012 that a 20-inch-long, 20-pound carp was pulled from a small pond, then released into the Huron River. The fish was removed due to its destruction of surrounding vegetation. Twenty Pound Carp wrote in an e-mail interview that his campaign platform is centered on economic reform and “fiscal responsibility.”

“A return to Ann Arbor’s past glories and prosperity for all … I fully expect we can retain recent university graduates in Ann Arbor rather than lose them to Chicago, where the abattoirs cast but the merest shadow their former greatness,” the Twitter user wrote. It added that securing the city’s borders is another aspect of the campaign. “With the destruction of Blimpy Burgers, I have proposed the immediate construction of a series of glacis and escarpments, ravelins and Parrott gun installations to encircle critical strategic points such as Dominick’s and the Fleetwood Diner,” the user wrote. Twenty Pound Carp wrote that if elected, it would encourage the city to work with the federal government to build canals for its fellow aquatic creatures, creating “the Venice of Washtenaw County.” The user declined to disclose its exact residence, but is working with the city to come to an agreement on residency in Ward 4. The campaign appears to be going swimmingly with 172 Twitter followers as of Sunday afternoon. “Campaign rolls on, we have momentum. I’m focusing on the Fourth ward, but can’t help it if supporters stray across

borders,” @TwentyPoundCarp tweeted on Oct. 30 in response to questions about the support spawning across Ann Arbor. Fourth Ward candidate Jack Eaton, a Democrat who is the only candidate on the ward’s ballot, said he’s kept a good sense of humor about the new candidate, mentioning that he and the carp follow each other on Twitter. “I take it with the humor that’s intended,” Eaton said. Eaton also said the carp has not yet filed for candidacy, which is required before the election for the votes to be counted. Additionally, the carp currently resides in the Huron River, which does not fall within the jurisdiction of the fourth ward, leading to some fishy circumstances surrounding the legitimacy of the campaign. If elected, Twenty Pound Carp would be the selfdescribed “bottom feeder” to serve on city council and would likely give a new fresh-water face to the council while giving voice to the long underrepresented residents of Ann Arbor’s ponds and rivers. Twenty Pound Carp also tweeted that, if elected, it hopes to have its special needs accommodated so that it can attend council meetings, though details of those logistics are still unclear.

Crackdown on charity poker rooms brings backlash Legislation seeks to control community fundraising events

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Explosive growth in the popularity of poker has helped Michigan’s charities, churches and civic groups stay afloat at a time of dwindling donations from elsewhere. So perhaps it should come as no surprise that the state’s efforts to rein in the charitable gambling industry that has grown more than 20-fold in a decade are sparking backlash — some of it in the form of raw emotion. Gov. Rick Snyder’s deputy lawyer Dave Murley drew rare boos in a crowded Capitol committee room the other day when he told lawmakers: “Charitable poker began as a good cause, evolved into a highly lucrative business and has degenerated into a racket.” At stake is the future of “millionaire parties,” casino-style events where nonprofits split cash proceeds with unlicensed poker rooms that provide the space, dealers, poker chips and playing cards along with food and drinks. Many veterans groups, prep sports booster clubs and other nonprofits are no longer hosting Texas Hold ‘em and blackjack fundraisers in small church basements and halls, instead contracting with what authorities charge are large “de facto casinos” run through bars and poker rooms. Revenue from the events reported to the state was $7.9 million in 2002, peaked at $197 million in 2011 and dipped to

$184 million in 2012, though officials believe it is more because loopholes have been found in $15,000 chip caps. Charities’ profits rose from $3.6 million in 2002 to $19.2 million two years ago before leveling at $15.8 million. Tension has been building ever since Snyder in June 2012 transferred oversight of the millionaire parties from the Lottery Bureau to the Michigan Gaming Control Board and its regulators familiar with monitoring highly regulated operations at horse tracks and Detroit’s casinos. The agency, which already had been working with the lottery to close down sites due to illegal gambling, cracked down on some larger bars that contributed to a 22 percent drop in licenses issued for millionaire parties through the first half of this year. The friction is boiling over, though, over new regulations proposed by Executive Director Richard Kalm. Among the most significant proposals are requiring five bona fide members of a charity on hand to help run the games, limiting a single location to hosting one event a day and no more than 120 a year, and restricting the fees that poker room businesses charge charities. “What started out being the charities’ money, the charities’ profit, has been whittled away at,” said Kalm, who wants to lift a moratorium on new charitable gambling sites once the rules are in place. He said charities got 81 percent of the proceeds a decade ago but now receive half under profit-sharing agreements never envisioned when the casinostyle charity games were autho-

rized in a 1976 update of the Bingo Act. But charities and establishments running the millionaire parties like the current system and are suspicious that the Snyder administration is working at the behest of casino interests, an accusation denied by regulators. Charities say modest regulations are OK but call the proposed rules an overreach that could significantly hurt legitimate fundraising and put permanent poker sites out of business. Dane Nickols with the Laingsburg Lions Club said that while charities are taking less of the cut on a percentage basis, they are still raising much more money than previously. “We want the rooms to make money so they will continue and be there for us to make more money,” he said. Nickols said his club raised just $600 the first time it organized a poker event. Lottery officials who audited the service organization told him it was a lot of labor — 10 volunteers — without much bang for the buck and recommended he try out a card room in a Lansing-area sports bar. “By going to an established room, we were able to make more money,” he said. The dispute has attracted attention from legislators, who took the unusual step of holding a hearing Thursday before the state has a public hearing on the rules later in November. After the public weighs in, the agency can make revisions — it already has made a couple concessions — before submitting them to the 10-lawmaker Joint Committee on Administrative Rules as early as December.

PARIS (AP) — Two veteran French journalists kidnapped and killed in northern Mali were shot to death, French authorities said Sunday, as questions emerged about how the gunmen managed to carry out the attack near a town where both French troops and U.N. forces are based. The slayings of Ghislaine Dupont, 51, and Claude Verlon, 58, shocked France and underscored how insecure parts of northern Mali remain months after a French-led military intervention against al-Qaida and other extremists. The new details, shared by French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius after a meeting of key ministers with French President Francois Hollande, failed to clarify who was behind the killings and why the pair was targeted. He said the two were shot multiple times and their bodies found near the vehicle that whisked them away. Earlier, four Malian officials, including the head of the armed forces in Kidal said the journalists’ throats had been slit. Their bodies were f lown to the Malian capital of Bamako on Sunday, and were to be returned to France on Monday. The Radio France Internationale journalists were kidnapped Saturday after interviewing a Tuareg rebel leader in Kidal. The northern town is under de facto rebel control despite the presence of French and U.N. troops. French troops, alerted to the kidnappings, set up checkpoints, sent out patrols and called in helicopters to search for the journalists, French military spokesman Col. Gilles Jaron said. But a patrol arrived too late, finding the abandoned vehicle east of the town and the bodies nearby. The French troops, some 200 of whom are based at the Kidal airport, had earlier found no trace of the fleeing vehicle. Fabius said the bodies were found some 12 kilometers (8 miles) outside Kidal and “several meters” from the vehicle. RFI chief Marie-Christine Saragosse said they were found 80 meters (87 feet) from the kidnappers’ vehicle. The killings were “odious, abject and revolting,” Fabius said. He said one journalist had been hit with three bullets, the other two — but that the car, whose doors were locked, showed no impact from bullets. Cecile Megie, RFI’s executive editor, said the two journalists had been seized by a group that spirited them away in a beige pickup truck. “The site showed no trace of fighting, gunfire. It was an execution,” Megie said.

Despite January’s Frenchled intervention and a presidential election since, much of Mali, especially the vast north, remains in turmoil. Suspicion as to who was behind the killings grew as bits of information trickled out. Both Tuareg separatists of the National Movement for the Liberation of the Azawad, known as the NMLA, and alQaida-linked fighters operate in the area. The NMLA rebels launched their latest rebellion in 2012. Those rebels were later chased out by al-Qaida’s fighters in the region but have returned to prominence in Kidal in recent months. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb has kidnapped Westerners, but it tends not to kill them but rather to hold them for ransom as a means of bankrolling its operations. The killings came four days after France rejoiced at the liberation of four other citizens, who had been kidnapped in neighboring Niger three years ago and were found in northwest Mali. “The killers are those we are fighting, that is, the terrorist groups who refuse democracy and refuse elections,” Fabius said. Mali is to hold a parliamentary vote later this month. The journalists had traveled to Kidal to report for a special program on Mali ahead of the voting. Saragosse, who heads France 24 TV along with RFI, was traveling to Bamako on Sunday to accompany the return of the bodies. She said the slain journalists had been accompanied from Bamako to Kidal, some 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) north, by U.N. troops who have been present since the end of the French intervention. The pair — both long-time RFI employees familiar with challenging terrain — were taken to the town hall, “the safest place,” said Saragosse, who also met with Hollande Sunday. It was not immediately clear whether the U.N. troops were in the vicinity at the time of the kidnapping. The French military spokesman confirmed reports that French forces in Mali had refused to take the journalists to Kidal for security and “operational reasons.” A U.N. spokesman said its troops had not noticed the vehicle used in the kidnapping in any of the seven checkpoints in and around the city manned by them. “These seven checkpoints are at major transit locations and the vehicle of the kidnappers was not noticed at any of these checkpoints,” said Olivier Salgado, spokesman for the U.N. mission in Mali. He added: “You need to put this in the context of the desert. This is a place with dunes. They must have used a non-official road or path.”


Opinion

4A —Monday, November 4, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SANDER BREGMAN | VIEWPOINT

Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan since 1890. 420 Maynard St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109 tothedaily@michigandaily.com MELANIE KRUVELIS ANDREW WEINER EDITOR IN CHIEF

and ADRIENNE ROBERTS

EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS

MATT SLOVIN MANAGING EDITOR

Unsigned editorials reflect the official position of the Daily’s editorial board. All other signed articles and illustrations represent solely the views of their authors.

FROM THE DAILY

Vote Hayner, Kunselman, Westphal, YES on Proposal 1

E

lection day is tomorrow, Nov. 5, and Ann Arbor residents will elect new members to city council. Many students don’t afford adequate attention to the local city council elections. But, these officials make decisions that have a direct impact on students. They impact the level of public safety and set zoning requirements that regulate the amount and type of new student housing developments. They also lead projects that revitalize Downtown Ann Arbor, bringing new businesses and opportunities to both students and townies alike. In Ward 1, independent candidate Jeff Hayner is challenging the democratic incumbent Sabra Briere. In the past, the Daily has endorsed Briere for her stated commitment to hearing student opinions and facilitating compromises between students and the University. However, in an interview with the Daily’s editorial board, Briere offered no solutions to increase communication with the University or better serve the needs of students. The Daily noted in 2009 that her views on housing may not be in the best needs of students, and her time on the council confirmed her lack of commitment to student’s need for affordable housing. Hayner, on the other hand, favors more student-friendly policies and recognizes that the University plays a critical role in supporting Ann Arbor’s diverse economy and population. In an interview with the Daily, Hayner, a smallbusiness owner and University of Michigan alum, said all students deserve representation on city council since they pay taxes through their rent. Hayner also expressed his concern over Ann Arbor’s lack of affordable housing and pushed for plans that would lower median rents across the board. He’s currently involved with volunteer projects to help local schools, making his claim to care about students credible. Furthermore, his commitment to preserving space for parks and natural waterways in the city promises a maintenance to the open spaces both students and residents support. With a mix of practical, budgetary goals and a sense of student needs, Hayner is the best candidate for the job. The Daily endorses JEFF HAYNER for Ward 1. In Ward 2, Jane Lumm, Conrad Brown and Kirk Westphal are all vying for the council seat. Lumm, an independent incumbent, pushed for improved public safety in the past. While public safety is very important to students, Lumm failed to provide specific examples of how to improve the University’s relationship with the city in her interview with The Michigan Daily. While she says that collaboration is essential, Lumm didn’t elaborate on specific ways for them to work better together. Brown, a University student, is also running as part of the Mixed Use Party. Though the aims of the party — which promotes the use of space closer to campus for practical commercial developments like supermarkets and chain discount stores — have the potential to benefit students, Brown’s ideas outside of mixed-use zoning are abstract and underdeveloped.

Kirk Westphal, on the other hand, has a diverse platform and promises to expand this platform through open dialogue with students. In an interview with The Michigan Daily, he said he’s interested in finding ways to make the University safer. He feels that getting student support will make it possible to make these changes happen quickly. Westphal is also committed to providing public transit projects that extend beyond Ann Arbor, which would be helpful to students looking to work or intern in surrounding suburbs or Detroit. The Daily endorses KIRK WESTPHAL for Ward 2. In Ward 3, Democratic incumbent Stephen Kunselman is being challenged by Mixed Use Party representative Sam DeVarti. In an interview with The Michigan Daily, DeVarti discussed his party’s main platform, mixed use zoning, and how that change has the potential to make housing more affordable for students. While it’s great to see that students are making a concerted effort to get involved with city council, his relative inexperience and narrow platform are cause for concern. Current City Councilmember Stephen Kunselman has extensive experience — three terms on council — with local politics and policy, and will be running for mayor in 2014. He has remained committed to student priorities such as public safety. Kunselman has been a strong proponent of off-campus housing developments for students, increasing housing options and helping to minimize cost increases. However, Kunselman should work to foster a more open dialogue with students and residents, instead of just promoting what he believes to be in their best interest without input. The Daily endorses STEPHEN KUNSELMAN for Ward 3. In addition to council candidates, a proposal on Tuesday’s ballot deserves voter approval. The proposal in question will extend a sinking fund millage for Ann Arbor Public Schools, which adds $1 million to property taxes in order to raise money for a sinking fund which will fund “construction or repair of school buildings” in the school district. Voters have supported this measure twice — approving it in 2004, and renewing it in 2008 — and they should support it again. According to MLive, the millage has paid for security upgrades and improvements in accordance with the Americans with Disability Act. AAPS should have the opportunity to continue these improvements without having to cut resources within the district. Vote YES on Proposal 1.

JESSE BUCHSBAUM | VIEWPOINT

Why we should vote on Tuesday These are not the federal elections. There won’t be nationally televised debates, widely publicized gaffes by candidates nor campaign commercials telling you to care about voting. These are the local elections. And while they may not offer the big, sexy issues or the widespread appeal that federal elections do, local elections often have a bigger impact on everyday life. This Tuesday, the local elections will take place in Ann Arbor. In the past, these local elections have had the lowest voter turnout of all elections. And the college-aged bracket has had by far the lowest turnout of all age ranges. There were a total of three votes cast in the Hill Campus Precinct in 2011. That’s right — out of more than 2,000 registered voters, just three decided to take the time to make their voices heard. The above statistic is the reason why I am writing this. Frankly, it’s depressing to see students so apathetic as to what’s going on in the local government. These elections do matter, as we will be electing Ann Arbor City Council members who will be deciding what issues are important and how to allocate resources in the city. And there are a multitude of other reasons to vote. Local governments collect nearly as much total money in taxes as the federal government throughout the country. Instead of applying these taxes to programs at the large federal scale, these funds are used exclusively for issues in local life —roads, schools, libraries, public transit, to name a few. And these are the issues that truly have an effect on student life here at the University. Additionally, local elections are a way to actually get your voice heard. With significantly fewer

voters, each vote carries much more weight than it carries in federal elections. And each constituent is important to the members of Ann Arbor City Council, meaning that if there’s an issue that you care deeply about, getting in touch with a city council member could actually reap benefits in the immediate future. I know that many students find excuses not to vote — “I’m too busy,” “I have an exam coming up,” and “I don’t know enough about the issues,” are rationalizations I’ve heard far too often. Leave 15 minutes early and stop at your polling place on the way to class. Take those 30 minutes that you inevitably spend on Facebook or Reddit and vote instead. If you’re looking for ways to become educated about the issues and candidates on the ballot, the Central Student Government’s Voice Your Vote commission will have a table on Monday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Angell Hall lobby with fact sheets on each of the candidates and issues that you will see on the ballot. We will also have a map of polling places for addresses close to campus. Additionally, Michigan’s Secretary of State’s MiVote website has information on polling places, sample ballots, and registration status. Voting is the most important part of the political process, and is one of the few ways to make your voice heard on important issues. I implore you to exercise your right to vote in these local elections. Hail to the voters. Election Day is Nov. 5. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Jesse Buchsbaum is an LSA junior.

The hip-hop excuse This article addresses two topics: social justice and hip hop. Let me start by acknowledging that I am a white male from an upper-middle class, primarily white suburb. I have been taught to be racist by our society without even realizing it. I can look back at certain comments I’ve made or thoughts I’ve had in the past and see them as racist. We are surrounded by more racism than we even realize; we don’t recognize that being racist can be as simple as making a joke or, in this case, throwing a party. By now, I’m sure you’ve heard about the University’s chapter of Theta Xi fraternity’s party theme idea, giving the party attendees an opportunity to make fun of Black culture. I did not feel the need to write this until, in their apology letter, a member of Theta Xi claimed that they were inspired to do this by hip-hop music. Let me stop here and explain where I’m coming from. For the past five years, I have been immersed into the world of breakdancing, otherwise known as hip-hop culture. The traditional term for a break-dancer is “b-boy.” According to the values of the b-boy community, it doesn’t matter what color your skin is or how much money your family has — you just have to have soul. This community and its art have helped me become who I am today, and I’ve loved every moment of it. Hip-hop culture contains five elements: b-boying, rapping, DJ-ing, graffiti and the knowledge of this culture and one’s interpretation of it. Rap has taken on a new life within popular culture, and rap music can be very sexist — nobody is denying that. But rock ‘n’ roll can also be very sexist. Music can be sexist. Television can be sexist. The media promotes images, sounds and ideas that shape who we should be. Just by existing in our society, we’re taught what boys should do

and what girls should do. We learn what rich people and poor people should do. We’re taught about how black people should be and how white people should be. We’re all victims of our own ignorance. Thus, if I do something racist, I can try to blame society. But I’m still the one to make those choices and execute those actions. If I try to blame anyone or anything else, it’s because I can’t accept the fact that I am racist. The same goes for blaming hip-hop. These next two sentences are especially directed at the white people reading this: Diversity doesn’t mean “not 100-percent white.” It means that every race is represented and treated equally. Also, don’t be worried about being labeled racist — be worried about how your intentional or unintentional racism can hurt others. But let’s get back to the topic at hand: the party. The point of this article is not to bash Greek life. I’d just like to point out that as soon as fall semester begins, thousands of freshmen are funneled into Greek life. In this setting, they are generally surrounded by other white, upper-class students and participate in the hook-up culture for their entire time at our school. There are also multicultural fraternities — predominantly Black, Latino, Asian or Indian. But I’m not talking about the multicultural fraternities, but rather the predominatelywhite fraternities. Many students will know what I mean when I say that typical members of the largely white fraternities and sororities rarely leave their social climate, cutting themselves off from the rest of the school. This controversy indicates a much larger problem: Our society is still very racist, and most white people are unwilling to admit it. People are scared of the truth — we’re part of the problem. If we are part of the problem, we need to make changes in

our lives to become part of the solution. So if your fraternity does something racist, don’t blame hip-hop. Blame yourself for not taking the initiative to learn how to not be racist. Hip-hop culture showed me that race doesn’t have to matter, but that’s not where I learned about race. I learned about race at this school. Through classes, campus events and friends from different backgrounds, I have learned of these invisible lines between us. These lines exist because it’s easier for us to stereotype than it is for us to look at each person as a unique individual. Each person is a unique individual, and in that sense, we’re all equal. But in a much more real sense, our society gives some people huge advantages over others based on skin color, family wealth, sexual orientation, gender, religion and a million other factors that are so easy to overlook. The University has taught me this. Hip-hop taught me that we can all vibe out in the spirit of peace, love, unity and having fun. I wish others could develop this same perspective on hip-hop, but the harsh reality is that it’s easier to point blame than it is to take responsibility for making this change. For people like the party planners at Theta Xi, rap can help to create strong negative stereotypes of Black people — particularly Black women. But they were racist before they listened to hiphop. They were born into racism. However, we can’t blame others for their ignorance. So this is now a call for anybody reading this article to rise up and take every opportunity to learn what racism is and how we can stop its presence in our lives and in our communities. At this school, we’re supposed to be the Leaders and the Best. It’s time to start acting like it. Sander Bregman is an Education junior.

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS

Kaan Avdan, Sharik Bashir, Barry Belmont, James Brennan, Eric Ferguson, Jordyn Kay, Jesse Klein, Melanie Kruvelis, Maura Levine, Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald, Victoria Noble, Adrienne Roberts, Paul Sherman, Daniel Wang, Derek Wolfe RYAN MOODY | VIEWPOINT

Perpetuating harmful stereotypes

An open letter to Allen Wu: As a Black student on this campus, I was upset with the “Hood Ratchet” party planned by University’s chapter of Theta Xi fraternity. After reading your published apology in the Daily in which you said, “I would like to sincerely apologize for any negative emotions that you and any other offended members of the community may have felt” and “I apologize for any hurt that I’ve caused in our community,” the lack of specificity in your statements gave me the impression that you don’t truly understand what you did that was hurtful. I have friends of many races and ethnicities who were offended by the incident, and I also have friends who weren’t. I don’t speak on behalf of any of them. I only want to tell you why it upset, angered and hurt me. I would not have been bothered by a hip-hop themed party. I might not have even been bothered by some of the language you chose to use in the party description, had it been used in a different context. What upset me was the juxtaposition of those words with images, costumes and a video that almost exclusively featured or described Black people. I do agree that hip-hop as a genre doesn’t have to be Black; in fact, it often isn’t. However, that belief is not one your Facebook event depicted or supported. It may not

have explicitly said hip-hop equals Black, but it didn’t have to. I’m not someone who identifies with being “hood” or “ratchet.” When you parody those aspects of Black culture, I know you aren’t talking about me — but others might not. Events like yours help to reinforce negative stereotypes about people who look like me. They encourage people who don’t know me to fall back on preconceived notions of who I probably am instead of trying to get to know me. They encourage people to say things to me such as, “Can you teach me how to twerk since you know how?” or “You’re so much different than all other Black people,” or even, “Are your friends back home ghetto?” I’ve been asked each of these questions on this campus within the past year. While you may hear those stereotypes a lot on the radio or see them on TV, I think they’re perpetuated by only a few in my community. Those few people might be popular, vocal and have a platform to do so, but they don’t represent the collective voices of all Black people. It’s not that I expect you or anyone else to represent all aspects of Black culture when you have an event that includes one small element of it, but I would appreciate it if you didn’t perpetuate the stereotypical image of all Black people being thugs and hood rats with “ratchet pussies.”

When you make it easy for someone with undiscerning eyes to think your event is a party about Black people and Black culture in general instead of a party about hip-hop as a musical genre, that’s when it hurts me. When you name an event in conjunction with a website that is notorious for poorly representing Black people instead of a website that is solely related to hiphop, that’s when it hurts me. When almost all the descriptors to your event come from Black hip-hop and rap songs and adhere to Blacktargeted stereotypes, instead of the multicultural “music genre consumed by all races” version of hiphop you described in your response to Erin Fischer’s viewpoint, that’s when it hurts me. I believe that although it had to be requested, your published apology was sincere. I understand that you didn’t think about your actions beforehand, and I’m not going to condemn you for something that seems like an honest mistake. I, too, have done and still do things that are hurtful to people because it’s difficult to relate to people whose struggles aren’t my own. When you created the event, you probably didn’t consider the effects that it would have on people like me. Now you do. I hope you act accordingly. Ryan Moody is an Engineering senior.

NOTABLE QUOTABLE

Disturbingly, negative stereotypes and misogynistic behavior are woven into popular culture today. We believe this reinforces the ongoing need to continually pay attention to diversity and engage in thoughtful, challenging conversations about social identities.”

— Vice President of Student Life E. Royster Harper wrote in a campus wide e-mail responding to the Facebook description of a Theta Xi fraternity party.


The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SCHOLARSHIP From Page 1A tive vice president for academic affairs, and former provost Philip Hanlon, inspired the group to form a scholarship. Schermer added that providing those in need with the opportunities the University offers seemed like the ideal way to “pay it forward.” At a private ceremony for the scholarship last week, Pollock agreed. “On behalf of all of the faculty on campus, our number one goal in the upcoming capital campaign is financial aid for students,” Pollack said in an address to MUSIC Matters members. “You are right there and I couldn’t be happier.” “MUSIC Matters is one of many great student organizations — such as Dance Marathon, Galens Medical Society and Alternative Spring Break — that fundraise to support great causes,” Jerry May, the University’s vice president for development, said in a statement. “That

RHA From Page 1A tive. “Not everyone can go to East Lansing; not everyone can get there and not everyone has a place to go to watch the game,” Crane said. “So we wanted to offer them a place to come together to watch as friends and fellow Wolverine fans.” Crane emphasized that the board hopes to build on the name recognition they have garnered from recent events, such as the Pre-Class Bash and the A-MAIZE-ing Race, to spur more large-scale events moving forward. “We wanted to be the first student organization to put on an event like this, to team with the Athletic Department and to open up doors in the future for other student organizations to attempt similar initiatives,” he

OUTREACH From Page 1A sense of creative expression in the kids who are participating,” Naoum said. “Here the kids are in charge of what they’re going to do in the workshops and they’re the ones who get to dance the way they want to dance or act the way they want to act.” Students from Bennett Elementary School, Brewer Elementary School and Chrysler Elementary School were greeted with high-fives and cheers from 50 University student volunteers, including three students dressed as clowns and a woman on stilts. During the first half of the event, Detroit students watched various University student performance groups, including the Moanin’ Frogs, G-Men and Rhythm Tap. Naoum said the performance variety was a success.

News

Michigan students would engage in philanthropy on campus to support not only the university but also their peers, is what makes our students special.” Schermer hopes that in the years to come, the endowment will grow to meet this financial goal on an increasing basis. Part of the success of this fundraising will rely on changes to the group’s day of springtime activities, called SpringFest. The club plans to expand the event, basing its structure off of South By Southwest, a nine-day spring festival in Austin, Texas that is a hub for music, film and technology. “It’s going to be eight hours, and it’s going to be an experiential arts festival, a film festival, an innovation,” Schermer said. He also hopes to upgrade the venue for the concert. The group booked J. Cole in 2012 and Ben Folds in 2013, and both artists performed in Hill Auditorium. Schermer wants to fit more students in, and said the Crisler

Center and Yost Arena are both possibilities for this year’s concert, although nothing is set. “The whole idea here is to make it as big as possible,” Schermer said. “More students enjoy it, that’s great. More money for charity, that’s great. The bigger the venue, the cooler the things you can do in the concert.” Ken Fischer, president of the University Musical Society and an advisor of the club, lauded MUSIC Matters for its success from its establishment onward in a speech to the students of MUSIC Matters. “The success that you’ve had is unprecedented,” Fischer told members of the group at the private ceremony. “We talk about you among university presenters all over the country, because it’s not supposed to be this way. You’re supposed to have a set of failures, but you’ve organized yourselves in such a way to be successful from the get-go.”

said. Crane also said the Athletic Department sponsored the event and played an active role in its development. Athletic Department officials helped to rent out Crisler and attempted to schedule an appearance by the men’s basketball team, which ultimately fell through. Several members of RHA’s executive board noted after the event that a more tailored marketing and publicity strategy will be necessary for future events as they hope to target a more specific audience. Crane said this event, like several others the RHA is hosting this year, was aimed at bolstering the brand recognition of the RHA as a key programming entity for the student body as a whole, not just the student groups that come to them seeking funding for various projects. “We’re trying to stop being thought of as almost a bank or

an ATM-type brand, where you just come to us for cash once in a while,” Crane said. “We’re also trying to put together fun events to bring the student body together.” LSA sophomore Darwin Hadley attended the Crisler event and said he came because he enjoys watching University sporting events in a communal atmosphere. “I thought it would be amazing to watch in Crisler Arena, and I was right,” he said. At halftime, the RHA board brought several volunteers from the audience onto the court for shooting competitions and raffles. Among the prizes for the shoot-off were gift cards to the University’s athletic apparel retailer the M Den, as well as the outdoor outfitter Bivouac. Raffle prizes included a Michigan football jersey and a Nook digital reading device, which Hadley won.

“What we want is for them to get an idea that performing arts means a lot of different things. I really think it is a way for each kid that has unique interests to connect with the performance in some way,” Naoum said. The performers and volunteers maintained a fun atmosphere at the League, with some help from the clowns to engage the young audience. “We’re having just as much fun as they have, probably more fun,” Music, Theatre & Dance senior Zoe Kanters — otherwise known by her clown alter ego, Chonda — said. “We’re just playing around and trying to pump them up.” After the performances, the students split into groups and rotated through four 30-minute workshops showcasing forms of acting, dance, film and beat boxing. In each workshop the students were taught about the

performing art and then participated in creating dances and songs. Music, Theatre & Dance senior Erika Henningsen, co-president of MPOW, said the kids were very excited to show off their new skills during the lunch break. “The kids always have a good time, and it stays with them, we hope,” Henningsen said. MPOW began planning the event in early September. While in the past the event was limited to Music, Theatre & Dance student volunteers, this year’s event included more students from other schools in the event planning committees, said Music, Theatre & Dance senior Ian Williams, MPOW’s performance committee head. “We made an effort to expand not only through the School of Music, but to the rest of the University and try to make it a bigger event,” Williams said.

Academic focus a welcome change for WashU provost Thorp happy to move past studentathlete scandels as UNC chancellor ST. LOUIS (AP) — After five scandal-plagued years as University of North Carolina chancellor, Holden Thorp was downright ecstatic to start over on a campus where the term “student-athlete” doesn’t evince snickers and groans. The new provost at the private Washington University spends little time worrying about academically suspect jocks — as a Division III school, WashU doesn’t even award athletic scholarships. It’s a far cry from Chapel Hill, where an academic fraud investigation found dozens of athletes taking no-show classes, along with assorted other abuses, and led to Thorp’s resignation from the top job at his alma mater — the sole college he applied to as a high school senior in Fayetteville, N.C. “I wanted to get back closer

to the academic side of things,” said Thorp, who arrived in St. Louis three months ago. “Washington University, more than a public university, is on the whole more unapologetically devoted to academic achievement as its primary focus.” For him, “that is a liberating feeling.” His move down the academic chain surprised many, but Thorp is not alone among college CEOs seeking such refuge, especially those who have weathered the turbulent world of big-time sports. Current and past college presidents, as well as education industry observers, say many campus heads are unprepared for the white-hot glare that campus athletics emit when things go wrong, from player arrests to NCAA investigations and coach firings — or in Thorp’s case, all three. “There were a lot of misconceptions about college sports,” Thorp said, alluding to the notion that at UNC, the quest for athletics success would never compromise the school’s academic standards. “In some ways, I was as much a part of this as anybody, protecting people from

some of the tough truths about college sports.” In a report last year by the American Council on Education, nearly one-quarter of the more than 1,600 college presidents surveyed said they were also unprepared for the rigors of fundraising — whether for academics or athletics. At Syracuse University, president and chancellor Nancy Cantor is headed to the much smaller Newark, N.J., campus of Rutgers, two years after firing an assistant basketball coach who’d been accused of sex crimes but never charged. Former University of Colorado president Betsy Hoffman, who left Boulder amid a football recruiting controversy, resurfaced as provost at Iowa State and is now an economics professor. And Martha Saunders, who left the University of Southern Mississippi after an athletics audit found a $1 million shortfall, quietly became provost at the University of West Florida, the school where her academic career began three decades ago as a public relations professor.

Monday, November 4, 2013 — 5A

INDIA From Page 1A are the largest representatives of students of international origin in Ross, Davis-Blake said. Over the last few years, she said Indian students have stood as the second largest. There are more than 500 Ross alumni currently situated in India as members of the University’s India Alumni Association. Additionally, every year, 25 to 30 Ross students are sent to the nation for business projects. The keynote speaker was Mark Fields, chief operating officer of Ford Motor Company. As a company that has recently made several manufacturing investments in India and employs approximately 11,000 people in the country, Ford served as an example of a firm that truly understands how to succeed in the unique Indian marketplace. “You have to be very, very cognizant and have open ears

BUS From Page 1A gone missing earlier in the night. After calling the situation in to dispatch, University Police told the driver that he could be arrested for fraud and would “most likely” be fired. Shortly thereafter, the driver was handcuffed and taken away. University Police later said the student was arrested on charges of unlawfully driv-

and open eyes to learn the local market,” Fields explained, narrating several examples in which Ford’s vehicles had to be redesigned for the country — including more “vibrant” interiors to suit the bright color choices many Indians preferred, strong air conditioning to fight the country’s humidity and more durable horns as frequent honking is a common practice. As a manufacturer, Fields said the firm’s takeaway from working in India was to “listen to the market and make trade-offs.” “We’re a growth business and a growth industry,” he said. “By 2020 we see (majority of growth) happening in China and India, and that’s why we’re so excited to be here.” Other leaders distinguished in business, leadership, academia and entertainment were highlighted over the remainder of the day. Alternating between speakers, panel discussions and question and answer sessions, the

conference covered the breadth of culture and business. Additional speakers included Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje, who along with Bill Mayer, director of local business incubator Ann Arbor SPARK, spoke about how his firm is helping new startups in the city. Ross alum G.V. Sanjay Reddy, vice chairman of the Indian conglomerate GVK Group, also addressed the ability of leaders to make a social difference through business. University alum Nina Davuluri, who was recently crowned Miss America, also attended the event. As the first woman of Indian-American origin to win the title, Davuluri spoke on her platform of diversity and her experiences traveling the country. Given that Miss America had always been the “girl next door” to Davuluri growing up, she said she felt as if her winning the title was appropriate in a changing America where the girl next door was no longer only white.

ing away of an automobile — a statutory term for motor vehicle theft. If found guilty, the driver could face up to two years in prison for the felony. He was later released pending warrant authorization. A replacement driver drove the bus back to the garage on South Campus. University spokesman Rick Fitzgerald said the University is looking into the matter, but stressed that drivers are never allowed to take their buses home

for breaks when they’re on the job. When asked why dispatch didn’t alert police to the missing bus sooner, Fitzgerald said it is too soon to comment. Last year, Antoine James, an ex-University bus driver, was charged with unlawfully driving away in a car. James, two years after his time as a bus driver had ended, stole a University bus and was later caught by police on a highway in Romulus. It was later found that he kept the keys to the lot after leaving the job.

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Arts

6A — Monday, November 4, 2013

BOOK REVIEW

Giovanni’s poetic pursuit of equality ‘Chasing Utopia’ continues famed poet’s legacy By KATHLEEN DAVIS For the Daily

Nikki Giovanni is undoubtedly an accomplished woman. Her breadth of work ranges from being the author of 19 collections of B+ original poetry and writing Chasing 10 children’s Utopia books, and she earned a Gram- Nikki Giovanni my Award nomination for Best Harper Collins Spoken Word Album in 2004. She is a seven-time winner of the NAACP Image Award as well a recipient of the Langston Hughes Medal for Outstanding Poetry, among many other awards. Giovanni’s impact on American writing is mainly due to her poetic stance on social justice and equality. Her latest collection, “Chasing Utopia,” however, is a lighthearted reflection on younger days and a positive outlook on growing older. To set the scene of the book in cheeky fashion, Giovanni clarifies that the titular “utopia” she’s chasing isn’t necessarily based on the perfect society you’d expect, but on the Samuel Adams

27-percent alcohol-by-volume pseudo-beer called “Utopia.” This lighthearted tone sets the scene for the book and is a testament to Giovanni’s ability to not take herself too seriously. The structure of “Utopia” is characterized by pages of poetry broken up by longer anecdotes, which allow her readers to gain a more personal and straightforward look into her life. The anecdotes range anywhere from the analysis of the logistics and legalities that should be more involved in “Aesop’s Fables,” to peace and naivety during a segregated childhood. An overarching theme in the book is the concept of cooking, both traditionally and in a fantastical sense. While reading “Utopia,” we gain detailed recipes for soups, biscuits and even for a perfect man (which, if you were wondering, involves a nice handful of intelligence, a pinch of ambition and a sense of humor, if desired). For the serious recipes, Giovanni notes that she has such a positive connotation with the flavor because of the memories attached with cooking them back home. Since Giovanni has been a prolific poet for several decades and is now 70 years old, it’s appropriate that the idea of aging is heavily embedded in “Chasing Utopia.” In “I Am At That Point,” she writes, “embracing the old things is a good new thing.” This

simple phrase captures the overall essence of the book, looking fondly at growing up in the suburbs of Cincinnati and summers with her grandparents in Tennessee. There is no aging without the concept of death at the finish line, and the darker poems within “Utopia” are unafraid to explore it. While there are poems about the passing of old friends and family, one of the sadder anecdotes within the book makes mention of the lives lost during the 2007 Virginia Tech massacre. Giovanni, who was a professor of English at the university during the shooting, actually taught shooter Seung-Hui Cho in a poetry class. But these poems tinged with sadness are only a small percentage of the overall content in “Utopia.” And it couldn’t be Nikki Giovanni poetry without the theme that made her such a prolific writer during the 1960s: equality. Many of these poems are written through the voice of a childish self, still naïve to the extremity of social turmoil happening outside her door. However, there doesn’t seem to be much disdain from Giovanni when it comes to reflecting upon her childhood. “What a pleasure to be young and creative and so sure of the future,” she writes, a statement which could truly be an embodiment of the whole college experience.

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FILM REVIEW

FOX SEARCHLIGHT

Just see this movie.

‘12 Years’ triumphs with breathing, real detail By JAMIE BIRCOLL Daily Arts Writer

Simply put, “12 Years a Slave” is the best of the year, a triumph — a project of courage and heart that is unsettling, provok- A+ ing and truly stirring. It por- 12 Years trays slavery in a Slave all of its horror and forces At the the audience Michigan, to examine a Quality 16 past typically and Rave shoved to the deepest recess- Fox Searchlight es of the mind. Based on the memoir of its protagonist, the film stars Chiwetel Ejiofor (“Salt”) in an award-caliber performance as Solomon Northup, a free man, husband and

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DOWN 1 ’80s TV’s “Miami __” 2 “That’s my cue!” 3 Closed 4 Top-shelf 5 Refuges for overnighters

6 Battery terminal 7 Morse code character 8 Stretchy bandage brand 9 “All the President’s __” 10 Limb for Ahab 11 Spanish stewpot 12 Dinner’s often on him 13 Conifers with pliable wood 18 1982 Disney sci-fi flick 21 Drummer Ringo 23 Chirps from chicks 24 Run __: get credit at the pub 25 Bit of foolishness 26 Cook by simmering 27 Kipling’s “__-TikkiTavi” 28 Mined find 29 Treaty of __: War of 1812 ender 30 Show again 31 Halved 32 “Horsefeathers!” 34 Clinch, as a deal 37 Sky holder of myth

38 “Let’s Make a Deal” choice 39 Listening organ 44 What 46-Down totally isn’t 45 Puff up in the wind, as a sail 46 “Garfield” pooch 48 Houston baseballer 49 Shopper’s aid 50 “This can’t be good”

51 Waikiki’s island 53 High-tech handheld gadgets, briefly 54 Go (over) in detail 55 Baaing mas 56 Genetic messengers 58 Espied 59 Yalie 60 Turner of broadcasting

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father of two, who lives out his days in happiness in New York — until 1841, when he is kidnapped and sold into slavery. During his captivity, he is moved to different owners of varying degrees of cruelty. Paul Giamatti (“Turbo”), in that slimy fashion he does so well, plays Solomon’s first owner, a slave trader who quickly sells him to Ford (Benedict Cumberbatch, “Star Trek Into Darkness”), a devout Christian that shows a sort of pity for his slaves. He reads scripture to his workers every Sunday and goes so far as to treat Solomon almost as family, later protecting him from his twisted overseer (Paul Dano, “Prisoners”). All in all, Ford seems to be a good man, but does his very involvement in the practice of slavery make him evil?

Blood, sweat, and tears, but also beautiful performances.

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ACROSS 1 Credit card choice 5 Woman’s address 10 Nosegay 14 Blogger’s “That’s what I think” 15 Like beer in a cooler 16 Vogue rival 17 Mathematician’s “Stay cool!”? 19 Radiant look 20 Signed up for, as a contest 21 Bacon hunks 22 Corrida cry 23 Hors d’oeuvres liver spread 25 Waist-tied kitchen protectors 29 Golfer’s “Stay cool!”? 33 Pinot __: red wine 34 Remove wool from 35 Half of the word “inning” 36 Diver’s “Stay cool!”? 40 “Ewww!” 41 Whistlestop places 42 Former Sony brand 43 Refrigeration mechanic’s “Stay cool!”? 45 Take out a loan 47 Senior advocacy gp. 48 Help out 49 Roller coaster segments 52 Bedroom shoe 57 “If __ a Hammer” 58 Realtor’s “Stay cool!”? 61 Arty NYC section 62 Last new Olds 63 Vicinity 64 Ruffian 65 Black __ spider 66 Legis. meeting

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Ford eventually sells Solomon to Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender, “Prometheus”), another deeply religious man that uses the Bible to justify his role as master, contrasted to Ford’s use of scripture as a means of salvation. Epps prides himself on his reputation as a “slave breaker,” doling out lashings on a daily basis, raping the young women to fill his lust. Fassbender’s portrayal of Epps will be compared to Ralph Fiennes’s portrayal of Nazi war criminal Amon Goeth in “Schindler’s List,” an evil man of no redeeming quality and unrelenting cruelty — much like Fiennes, Fassbender should receive an Oscar nod for his work. The audience is subjected to multiple scenes of suffering, brutality and violence, and without the brief levity of, say, a Tarantino script heavy on sarcasm, it will likely become burdensome for some viewers. And yet I myself could not look away from the screen. My eyes never turned from the writhing bodies being hanged, the lacerated backs and bloody shirts. It’s a testament to the greatness of the performances; to miss even the slightest nuance, the subtlest expression is to miss something profound. But it’s even more than that. As much justice as the actors

owed to finding the truth in their characters, we, too, owe Solomon Northup and the countless others like him our undivided attention, to finally accept that our past is a dark one, to acknowledge that Edwin Epps was as real as the man or woman in the seat next to us in the theater. Many film critics are lamenting that it took an English director (Steve McQueen, “Shame”) to craft the film that “properly” portrays American slavery. But there is no better director than McQueen to tackle the central human condition of this project: pain. All of McQueen’s films have focused on the pain imposed on their protagonists by their societies, and McQueen then uses that pain and suffering to explore each character’s strength of will. Despite the blood, sweat and tears throughout “12 Years a Slave,” there is something beautiful to be found. I expect this film will be taught to future film students for every aspect of what makes a great film, from Hans Zimmer’s haunting score, to the powerful performances and strong writing, all the way down to the importance of each lingering angle of the camera. It’s a fantastic film, and no amount of praise will satisfy. Make no mistake that “12 Years a Slave” will be a classic for one reason: For 133 minutes, the story of Solomon Northrup comes to life. As an audience member, you will not see a movie but a life, a real life filled with sorrow and tragedy, but also with hope and strength — a story about perseverance and healing as equally as torment. Each gazing stare from Ejiofor reveals a man breaking inside, struggling every day to fathom just why this fate has befallen him. And yet, even as he burns what is likely his last hope for rescue (a letter home), as those embers slowly smolder and fade into the black night, Northup’s will to endure, to survive, to live never falters. And at last, when the credits roll, when you have dried your eyes and left the darkness of the theater, you will recognize that what you have seen is poetry as much as it is biography. You will turn to your friends or family and you will discuss what you have just witnessed, and you will be haunted by every crack of the whip as much as you will be moved by the mounting crescendo of each spiritual, and you will realize that you feel alive, so very alive.

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Arts

FILM REVIEW

Monday, November 4, 2013 — 7A

FILM REVIEW

SUMMIT

“That’s ‘Mr. Solo’ to you.”

Ambitious ‘Game’ Film adaptation strays too far from source material By NOAH COHEN Daily Arts Writer

One of the greatest sciencefiction books in the genre canon, “Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card had been B considered unfilmable. Even Ender’s Card himself Game has expressed reluctance At Quality 16 at trying to and Rave bring his own Summit novels to the big screen. “Ender’s Game” balances its moral maturity with heavy respect for the intelligence of youth, and this uncommon balance puts the book in a class of its own, in limbo between young adult and high science fiction. Both the youth and seriousness of the story’s cast of characters makes it impossible to manipulate into a normal space-age thriller. Why? Well, (spoilers) let’s say the good guys don’t just win and celebrate. Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield, “Hugo”) is as empathetic as he is ruthless, and it kills him to kill. In this film adaption of the same name, Butterfield does a fine job (despite his soft appearance) of carrying the severity

intended in Ender’s character. The whole cast of young actors holds their own remarkably in an adult script and under the questionable direction of Gavin Hood (“X-Men Origins: Wolverine”). However, it feels as though Hood ought to have read the book a couple more times before directing this film and crafting the story’s sci-fi boy genius. Despite the foolish lightness with which Hood handled the children-forcedinto-adulthood motif and the strangely fast pace of the movie (which should have been a half hour longer), the cast is better than a hardcore fan might expect. The integrity of the franchise is preserved by the barest margin. This movie serves as a fierce defense of child-acting. Butterfield and Hailee Steinfeld (“True Grit”), as Petra, share an unusual romantic chemistry: The saccharine undertones in this retelling, which are pure Hollywood, undermine the severity of the plot but add to the intrigue of the characters, and so can be forgiven. Even Bean, who readers pegged as an impossible cast, was portrayed with spunk by Aramis Knight (“Crossing Over”). Guided by a grave (read: sexy) Harrison Ford (“42”) as Colonel Graff, our young heroes confront a military atmosphere constructed to mold them into merciless tacticians. “Ender’s Game” compresses much of

what makes these children brilliant and dramatizes the quietly philosophical Ender into an orchestral conductor of war, but it effectively addresses the strange world author Card makes of Battle School. The brittle hardness that Ender develops so quickly is a believable side effect of the tension that Ford brings to the screen as his superior. But there isn’t enough runtime to appreciate the scope of Card’s universe. Because of the film’s brevity, one of the more complex relationships of the film, the intimacy Ender shares with his sister, Valentine (Abigail Breslin, “Little Miss Sunshine”), comes off as slightly incestuous. On a positive note, fans will enjoy Mazer Rackham’s (Ben Kingsley, “Iron Man 3”) half-Maori descent. The true-to-text explanation of his moko — a face-painting tradition that connects a warrior to his roots — gains a special gravity in the context of Mazer’s present living situation: Even after having abandoned Earth, he is still Maori. Still, there’s no getting around the fact that this film is too ambitious and ultimately fails the book. But the sheer possibility of “Ender’s Game” finding box-office success is a raised fist in the air for any fan who has witnessed a number of studios struggle to bring this film to life. The movie is both an honorable attempt and a worthwhile ride.

NEW MEDIA NOTEBOOK

Resurrecting podcasts from their perceived grave By KELLY ETZ Daily Arts Writer

Lately, when the subject of new media comes up, it seems all anyone wants to talk about is the new Twitter IPO or Google Glass (which admittedly, sounds intriguingly futuristic), but I have a special place in my heart for the humble podcast. I know what you’re thinking. This isn’t 2005. As Apple just keeps rolling out those upgrades, it’s easy to dismiss podcasting as part of the Dane Cook era. There were only two iPod generations at that time, and everyone was a bit more naïve. But seriously, even though the just-a-tiny-bitstuffy New York Times axed nearly all of its podcasting content in the last few years (followed by many major news and media outlets), podcasts are far from irrelevant. Sure, my first listen was around the time I was rocking a lime green iPod mini and when “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” was still in theaters. But podcasting is hardly ancient news. Apple announced they passed the 1-billion-subscribers mark earlier this year (much to everyone’s collective astonishment), and some pretty illustrious people are just now jumping into the podcast game. In fact, in the comedy-centric arena, there’s almost too many fabulous podcasters to choose from these days, with powerhouses like Marc Maron and the overwhelming program lineup from Earwolf — which hosts the

can’t-miss “How Did This Get Made” — dominating the scene. The only (kind-of-important) problem with these little nuggets of awesome is that they make virtually no money. Not exactly a sustainable business model. Sure, there’s advertising (if I have to hear one more Audible soundbite … ), but most podcasts are ultra-niche, meaning they don’t garner significant downloads. Unfortunately, not everyone can be Dan Savage. But is this really an issue? Sure, money makes the world go round, but with more and more podcasts starting up every day, monetizing may not be the key to success anymore. Companies like Slate have credited much of their overall success to podcasts — Slate editor David Plotz acknowledged the less-thanstellar profitability of podcasts, while also highlighting the boost they give to brand recognition.

Get into the heads of some of your favorite artists. While some lament a disconnect for comedians between live performances and their podcasting cousins, I’ve found this to be patently untrue. Listening to Jim Gaffigan on “The Nerdist” only heightened my enjoy-

ment of his live shows — it’s not recycled material, and even if it was, there’s nothing else like a live show. Maybe I’m a little bit biased as I’ve acquired a bit of a (healthy) podcast obsession. If podcasting were to go the way of the tape recorder, I’d really miss Jason Mantzoukas’s (“I’m not on Twitter, guys”) theories about movies and learning stuff I never knew I wanted to know from Steven Levitt. And while I’m on the subject, I’d be remiss if I didn’t plug both fabulous Andy Zaltzman cohosted podcasts — firstly “The Bugle” featuring Zaltzman and John Oliver. As the birthplace of the fuckeulogy and everyone’s favorite purveyor of bullshit, it’s a must-listen every week. Even the Andy-only sub episodes aren’t that bad. And second, “Answer Me This!” with Helen Zaltzman and Olly Man — an indescribably British half-hour that answers all the questions you never had about what’s up with the Queen’s gynecologist and how not to be attracted to nuns. My point is: Podcasts are worth your time. For me, it’s a fulfillment of that oh-so-human need to know everything about everyone — remember frantically flipping through the pages of Teen Beat’s ’N Sync interview, dying to know Justin’s innermost thoughts and desires? Podcasts let you get into somebody’s head — they are literally speaking right into your ears — and that’s endlessly, timelessly, fascinating.

FILM ARCADE

J.K. Rowling is really trying to re-invent herself.

Commitment problems stall weak ‘A.C.O.D.’ By KARSTEN SMOLINSKI Daily Arts Writer

Much like his main character, writer and first-time director Stu Zicherman seems afraid to take love seriously in this romantic C+ comedy about the effects of A.C.O.D divorce on a At the Michigan generation of young Ameri- Film Arcade cans. In “A.C.O.D.” — which stands for Adult Children of Divorce — restaurant owner Carter (Adam Scott, “Parks and Recreation”) discovers that as a child he unknowingly participated in a study on the psychological effects of divorce. The original researcher, Dr. Judith (Jane Lynch, “Glee”), decides to begin a study on how his parents’ divorce affected his adult life right as his naïve younger brother Trey (Clark Duke, “Hot Tub Time Machine”) decides to get married to his girlfriend of four months. When Clark attempts to get his parents, Hugh (Richard Jenkins, “Step Brothers”) and Melissa (Catherine O’Hara, “Where the Wild Things Are”), to agree to attend the same wedding, his own carefully controlled life gets shaken up.

A mediocre ‘Crazy, Stupid, Love.’ While the entire cast performs commendably, the storyline neglects to give it much emotional depth with which to work. The film never finds any strength in the connections between its main characters, making their relationships seem tenuous at best. Amy Poehler (“Parks and Recreation”) and Jessica Alba (“Valentine’s Day”) pop in and out with minimal character development, Carter’s parents can’t commit to anything and Trey comes off as a dumb kid rushing into marriage. Carter himself fears committing to his girlfriend of four years (Mary Elizabeth Winstead, “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World”), and their relationship feels woefully underdeveloped. “A.C.O.D.” doesn’t necessarily come across as cynical on the subject of love; it just never ceases treating it like a farce. This wouldn’t present a problem if the jokes delivered enough laughs, but the per-

formers struggle against the limitations of the script here as well. Genuinely humorous situations fill the plot, but none of them manage to elicit anything more than the lightest chuckle. Focused mainly on the unique details of several intricately entwined relationships and the unpredictable nature of love, “A.C.O.D.” resembles a less amusing, less poignant version of 2011’s “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” The movie tries to legitimately portray the effects of divorce on adult life, perhaps even hoping to help people in similar circumstances as Dr. Judith suggests her research will. However, the plot fails to offer compelling insight or guidance. When the credits roll, they frustrate audi-

ence expectations with a clever ambiguity, but they also leave many of the film’s conflicts unresolved. Carter’s improved understanding of himself becomes the storyline’s primary resolution. Undermined by the farcical treatment of the conflicts Carter confronts, this personal realization hardly carries enough emotional weight to make an impact. Perhaps for those audience members familiar with the effects of divorce, this film will hold more affectation and entertainment. However, for most audiences, “A.C.O.D.” provides a thoroughly mediocre experience, not witty enough to succeed as a comedy and not moving enough to succeed as a romance.


Arts

8A — Monday, November 4, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

TV REVIEW

FILM REVIEW

Behind the effects ‘Styled’ to underwhelm of famed KNB By EMILY BODDEN Daily Arts Writer

EPIX original documentary looks at horror icons By DREW MARON Daily Arts Writer

This past month, Video-onDemand provider EPIX featured their 2011 documentary “The Nightmare Factory” in honor Aof Halloween. The film depicts The the rise of KNB Nightmare EFX as the premier practical Factory effects maeAvailable for stros in televistreaming sion and film. Their work EPIX spans multiple genres; however, their specialty is definitely their work on cult favorites like George A. Romero’s “Living Dead” saga and the films of Quentin Tarantino. For those who faint at blood or avoid horror at all costs, you probably won’t enjoy “The Nightmare Factory.” As for hardcore fans who bingewatch old horror movies — this movie might as well be nirvana. The documentary focuses on KNB founders Greg Nico-

tero, Howard Berger and Robert Kurtzman as they pursue their dreams of making movies, monsters, zombies and gore. They sport ’80s rock hair and work long, demanding hours all for “the love of the movies,” as Berger puts it. It’s a film geek’s paradise and a truly inspirational story for anyone interested in joining the industry. The movie’s an original production from EPIX, and it’s nice seeing EPIX pursue content like “The Nightmare Factory” instead of just competing with Netflix. “Factory” itself is a fantastic exposé on an art form largely ignored by the public, which is a shame because Nicotero and his colleagues embody the words “master craftsmen” — their work provides an authenticity seldom seen in today’s world of CGI blockbusters. After re-watching “Evil Dead II” and “Land of The Dead,” both worked on by KNB, I’m reminded of something horror is slowly losing: the terror of reality. To me, that’s what makes Greg Nicotero invaluable. His creations look so real yet stem from the illusory wonderment of cinema in a way that is both bloodcurdlingly scary and oddly statuesque. Think Michelangelo’s David, but covered in blood and guts.

The documentary includes interviews with filmmakers Quentin Tarantino, George A. Romero, Frank Darabont, Robert Rodriguez and John Carpenter, among others. There are also several behind-the-scenes clips, including Sam Raimi’s “Evil Dead II” and Robert Rodriguez’s “From Dusk Till Dawn.” Additional cameos are supplied by Elijah Wood (“Sin City”) and Simon Pegg (“Star Trek”). If that lineup doesn’t fill you with nerdish glee, this movie might not be for you. It’s understandable that a great majority of film-watchers don’t really care if a movie has practical or digital effects. In fact, for a great many, the effects of ’80sand ’90s-genre pictures would be considered campy or obsolete. “Factory” definitely touches on this through revelations of how bad the studio system has gotten about the tiny details and the bottom-line profit versus pure love for movie-making. Despite this bitterness, “The Nightmare Factory” still succeeds as required viewing for film buffs. It’s a modern day Hollywood success story, a tragic bemoaning of the current state of special effects and an unabashed celebration of some of the most influential figures in the industry.

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Bravo has successfully created a show that we all will probably catch ourselves watching a marathon of accidentally, not be C able to find the remote and qui- Styled to etly succumb Rock to. “Styled to Rock,” the net- Fridays at work’s latest 8 p.m. venture, holds aspects of the Bravo best trashy TV shows. While not bringing anything new to the television industry, the show is hosted by Rihanna, mentored by Pharrell and welcomes an array of celebrity guests. The only thing bad about @badgirlriri in the series premiere is her hair in the opening commentary. While explaining the premise of the show, the attention turns to the strange mullet-inspired hairstyle that not even Rihanna can rock. A bit concerning considering the show literally centers around the concept of celebrity styling. Luckily for the rest of the show, she looks flawless per usual. While these designers were chosen from “thousands of applicants” for their blossoming talent, personal style doesn’t seem to have been requisite. Two contestants wore essentially the same outfit at one point in the episode — and no one seemed to notice. Ahni wore her barely there, cut-up black shirt with a neon-yellow bikini top, while Andre wore his barely there, cut-up black shirt with black shortshorts. It’s hard to imagine that designers supposedly on the cusp of fashion greatness would create unintentional his-and-her shirts that look they were made by a seventh grader. “Styled to Rock” combines elements of MTV’s “Real World,” any singing competition ever to air and “Project Runway.” The contestants share living space with minimal

BRAVO

Say yes to the mesh.

privacy á la “Real World.” Without a system for choosing beds, drama is guaranteed to arise later on. Talks of “cute undies” and sleeping naked occurred within about a minute of the housing arrangement being revealed.

Not even Rihanna can make this Bravo flop rock. A particularly captivating moment occurred when the designers realized that the producers had kindly stocked the contestants’ fridge with champagne. The designers responded by squealing, and bottles were promptly popped open to much delight. One of the designers, Jordan, looked legitimately frightened and made an astute observation about the

other designers’ flamboyant personalities. Considering the competitors are designers competing to become celebrity stylists, this confessional seemed unnecessary. “Runway” had a multitude of great catchphrases with Heidi Klum’s signature “Auf Wiedersehen” reigning supreme, but “Styled to Rock” only has a lame attempt. “This has been your last look” does not have the same power as Klum’s formal German goodbye. Since they are creating a show that is bound to be compared to similar past programs, these writers should work on something with more punch to send the designers packing.   “Styled to Rock” appears destined to remain mediocre and uninspired. Thankfully Rihanna has other talents to fall back on, because her endeavor in TV may not last long. Unfortunately, “Styled to Rock” does not offer up anything exciting enough to waste DVR space on — wait for the inevitable Bravo marathon instead.


SportsMonday B

The Michigan Daily | michigandaily.com | November 4, 2013

DISMANTLING

EAST LANSING IN

Michigan State 29, Michigan 6 ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily

Five Things We Learned By ZACH HELFAND Daily Sports Editor

1. Things haven’t gotten better for the offensive line. They’ve gotten worse. Blood ran down Taylor Lewan’s forehead as he stepped to the press conference podium after Michigan’s 29-6 loss to Michigan State on Saturday. The cut above his

brow opens up nearly every game. This time, he didn’t bother to wipe away the blood. His quarterback, after all, was in worse condition. The Spartans’ defense battered redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner all game, breaking through a porous Michigan offensive line that again couldn’t protect the passer or open holes for the running game. He was pulled for Michigan’s last offensive series because he had already taken enough abuse. Lewan said he felt bad for him, that the line let him down. The pummeling was so thorough that Michigan State coach Mark Danto-

nio, in his postgame press conference, felt the need to address the thought that the Spartans’ dominance was somehow too mean. In a football game. This is the current state of Michigan’s offensive line. The team rushed for negative 48 yards, the lowest total in 134 years of Michigan football. It allowed seven sacks and seven more quarterback hurries, crippling the passing attack. The opposing coach had to defend his players from accusations of bullying. “We’re not trying to go out there and bully anybody,” Dantonio said after the game. “We’re not trying to do that.

They’ve got big guys too, OK?” At the start of the year, the line underperformed but still allowed Gardner enough time in the pocket in wins over Central Michigan and Notre Dame. Now, after four failed combinations in the interior of the line, it looks as bad as ever. 2. Michigan is not a power team. Michigan State is a power team. That is the team Michigan wants to be. That is not the team Michigan is. The negative 48 rushing yards says it all, really. But there was physical

dominance on both sides of the ball. The Spartans’ offense didn’t perform particularly well. Had it capitalized on its field-position advantage, the score would’ve been even more lopsided. But the offense wore down Michigan’s defense late in the game after rushing 39 times for 142 yards. Those aren’t world-beating numbers, but this was a classic Big Ten game plan. Michigan wants to be more than that — more dynamic and explosive — but first, it wants to execute the downhill running game. It wants to control the line of scrimmage on both sides of the ball. It See FIVE, Page 4B

Field position Worst rushing game in ‘M’ history was the dagger By EVERETT COOK Daily Sports Editor

A

EAST LANSING — ccording to a statistical analysis conducted by FBSDriveStats. com, a difference of a yard of starting field position amounts to an MATT advantage of SLOVIN .06 points per drive. This seems negligible, at least before considering the massive advantage Michigan State held over Michigan in field position Sat-

urday, and how that helped translate into a 29-6 Spartans victory that was close for all of a half. The Wolverines’ drives began, on average, at their own 24-yard line. That lent zero favors to an offense facing its toughest task of the season in what is likely Michigan State defensive mastermind Pat Narduzzi’s strongest unit in his time in East Lansing. To make Saturday’s game competitive — and make no mistake, the Spartans’ biggest win over the Wolverines since 1967 was nowhere near competitive — Michigan probably would’ve needed to See SLOVIN, Page 3B

WARM SEAT?

n Michigan coach Brady Hoke is a great recruiter and motivator. But are his teams progressing? SportsMonday Column: Page 2B

EAST LANSING — Michigan State has a great defense, the Michigan football team’s offensive line is inexperienced, and Michigan was playing in a hostile road environment. All of those things are true. But it’s easy for the excuses to pile up, to make the number “-48” seem unimportant and to blame sacks and a missed snap for that atrocious number. The bottom line is that no team in the 134 year history of Michigan football has ever run for fewer yards than the Wolverines did on Saturday in a 29-6 loss to Michigan State. The next closest Michigan team to rush for that many negative yards (48) was the

1962 squad, which ran for -46 against Minnesota. That team went 2-7, was outscored 214-70 on the year and finished dead last in the Big Ten. This 2013 team was still very much alive in the Big Ten title race before Saturday’s debacle began. Now, a game later, the Wolverines have muffed themselves out of contention while putting themselves in the record book in the worst possible way. “It’s a matter of straining for that extra half-second,” said fifth-year senior left tackle Taylor Lewan. “There were a couple runs where (fifth-year senior running back Fitzgerald Toussaint) really could have broke out, but we just needed to straighten that much more

on blocks. These guys will get it, they will, but this is going to sting for a bit.” Through all the switches and substitutions, the offensive line has been criticized all season, particularly, the three interior lineman. Saturday saw another starting unit, the fourth different starting offensive line in as many games, get beaten up the middle. Redshirt sophomore Graham Glasgow remained at center after a mid-season move from guard. Freshman Kyle Bosch made his first career start at left guard. Redshirt freshman Erik Magnuson made his second at right guard. Evaluation will have to wait, though, because of the beating the entire unit took. It’s hard to single out players when a

BUCKEYES BEATEN

n The Michigan women’s soccer team didn’t clinch the Big Ten title, but it did beat Ohio State Saturday. Page 3B

whole line struggles. “It’s not just those guys,” Lewan said. “Absolutely not. This is a team effort, but a lot of it falls on the offensive line. It’s not just those three guys.” Part of the reason for the new record-setting number was the number of sacks redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner took — seven. That bumped the total, as did a high snap that moved Michigan’s offense back 20 yards. Still, a dominant — or even average — running game would have pushed Michigan past that 1962 team. Toussaint had another underwhelming game, finishing with 20 yards on eight attempts. All night long, Michigan See GROUNDED, Page 3B


SportsMonday

2B — Monday, November 4, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SPORTSMONDAY COLUMN

Time to re-examine Brady Hoke

B

EAST LANSING — rady Hoke’s go-to excuse, the one he uses as a safe word in case things get too rough and as his security blanket in case things get too scary, needs to be retired. Every time anything goes wrong with this Michigan EVERETT football team COOK — and recently, that’s been fairly often — Hoke blames “execution.” The reason why Michigan was dominated in every aspect in Saturday’s 29-6 loss to Michigan State on Saturday? A lack of execution, says Hoke. Putting the blame on executing the existing gameplan means putting the blame on the players and not on the coaching staff. This matters because, yes, there were execution issues, but that was not the biggest problem. Hoke had two weeks to prepare his team for Michigan State, and offensive coordinator Al Borges had two weeks to come up with a plan that made sure redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner didn’t get trampled. Gardner was sacked seven times. Michigan’s offense did absolutely nothing. And after the game, both fifth-year senior offensive tackle Taylor Lewan and redshirt junior linebacker Jake Ryan blamed intensity for the loss. “I think it’s who is tougher, that’s what it comes down to,” Ryan said. “We played a tough game, but it came down to who wanted it more and who played their technique better. That’s something we definitely, definitely need to improve on these weeks coming up. “We didn’t play the game we

Michigan coach Brady Hoke has aspired to have the type of team that he was coaching against on Saturday — Michigan State.

wanted to play. We need to go 100 percent every single play, and some plays we didn’t do that … so they came out with the win.” That’s Hoke’s responsibility. That’s his job. He’s not a numbers guy, or an offensive guru. Those responsibilities are delegated to his coordinators, so as the head coach, he’s essentially a motivator. And if Michigan is failing at going hard on every play, in the first week of November against a rival, then how are we evaluating Hoke? Saturday was the type of game

the third-year coach has talked about winning since the moment he arrived in Ann Arbor. It was rainy, cold and muddy. Defense and running the football mattered more than anything else. By the end of the day, jerseys were brown and one team was limping to the locker room. If Hoke can’t succeed with that

“...it came down to who wanted it more...”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Offense leads ‘M’ in exhibition By ALEXA DETTELBACH Daily Sports Writer

Friday night, the Michigan women’s basketball team took the court for the first time this season in the team’s lone exhibition game. Playing Division II foe Wayne State, the Wolverines got to work early on the offensive side of the ball. Michigan had no problems brushing off the offseason rust by scoring on its first six possessions and never looking back, holding on for a 81-55 win. After leading 21-4 early, the offense stayed hot throughout the first half, leading by as many as 25. The Wolverines went into halftime shooting 56.4 percent from the field. But coming out of the locker room for the second half, Michigan looked sluggish and tired, letting the Warriors cut into the lead — the Wolverines only outscored Wayne State by

four in the second half. With a significant part of last season’s squad gone, sophomore guard Madison Ristovski and junior forward Nicole Elmblad jumped into the spotlight as the most experienced returning players. While both rose to the occasion, Ristovski was particularly impressive early in her first career start, showing an aggressive, offensive instinct she lacked last season. “It was an amazing feeling having my name called out, first time being out there at the beginning of the game,” Ristovski said. “I definitely had butterflies going through my stomach.” The sophomore attacked the basket early and often and found success with layups, long-range jumpers and even from beyond the arc for her first 3-pointer in Crisler Center. Ristovski had 13 first-half points and finished the

type of play, then where is he succeeding as a head coach? In 63-47 shootouts with Indiana? The problem is that the team he’s always envisioned was wearing green, and the team that was getting bulldozed into earning the fewest rushing yards in program history was wearing maize and blue.

game with 15 points, six rebounds and four assists. “I thought (Ristovski) did a great job,” said Michigan coach Kim Barnes Arico. “One of the things we were talking about was her really being able to contribute on the offensive end and knock down some open shots. I thought she really showed that tonight and did a great job. “I was really pleased with how she played tonight, and hopefully that gives her some confidence because I know a big thing for her is confidence. So I hope, after tonight, she feels real good about her performance.” Elmblad, the only returning starter, added eight points and led the team with 15 rebounds. Last season, Elmblad brought a defensive dimension the team desperately needed, but this year Barnes Arico needs her to play an offensive role as well as be aggressive on the boards. As for the newer faces, junior transfer guard Shannon Smith — who Barnes Arico pointed to as the team’s biggest scoring threat — showcased her shooting ability and led the team in scoring with 22 points. Smith also added eight rebounds. “I was really proud of Shannon,” Barnes Arico said. “She knows it’s an adjustment period playing for a new coach.” Meanwhile, freshman guard Siera Thompson also contributed heavily despite finding herself in early foul trouble. Thompson has a firm hold on the starting point guard position and showed her flashy quickness early, ending the game with 13 points and seven assists. Thompson kicked off the team’s offense, scoring the first of Michigan’s 21 points, which led to a 21-4 run to open the game. But after the Wolverines’ fast start, Michigan soon looked tired and winded, forcing Barnes Arico to turn to her bench. “We ran out of gas a little bit,” Barnes Arico said. “What we’ve really been emphasizing is trying to get stops on the defensive end, and I think when we run out of gas we slack on defense. ”

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily

Michigan State had everything Hoke has always wanted in a football team — a mean, menacing defense coupled with a powerrunning game that wins football games with scores like 21-6 or 14-0 or, hey, 29-6. Instead, in Hoke’s third season, he has a team that still doesn’t have an identity. He’s got a team that is supposed to have a power running offense but ran for negative 48 yards on Saturday and has a featured running back who is averaging 3.7 yards per carry. He’s

got a smashmouth defense that is allowing almost 27 points per game and gave up 29 points to a Michigan State offense that has struggled to put up points against teams like Western Michigan and Purdue. His teams have gone 4-8 on the road while statistically getting worse every year in his three seasons as head coach. The reality is that Hoke’s best season came in 2011, his first year, when he was coaching Rich Rodriguez’s players. That was also the only time in Hoke’s tenure that Michigan has won a game as an underdog: the second game of the season, against Notre Dame. Even then, Michigan needed a last-second miracle to escape with a win The Wolverines lost five games last year, and this year, they were virtually knocked out of contention for a Big Ten Championship by the first week of November. Michigan has four more regular-season games in 2013. Two of them are at home against some of the toughest teams in the Big Ten (Nebraska and Ohio State) and two of them on the road (Northwestern and Iowa). Hoke isn’t on the hot seat yet. He’s a phenomenal recruiter, perfect for an alumni base that demands tradition above all and the players seem to love him. But the seat is getting warmer and will only heat up more if the next four games look anything like Saturday’s. Hoke can beat the same dead horse about why his team is failing all he wants, but at the end of the day, Michigan’s faults don’t lie with the players who aren’t executing the game plan. The faults lie with the man behind them. -Cook can be reached at evcook@umich.edu or on Twitter @everettcook

ICE HOCKEY

Blue completes sweep to spoil Pearson’s return Michigan gets first home sweep in more than 20 months By GREG GARNO Daily Sports Writer

Time and time again, Michigan coach Red Berenson has said goals are at a premium in any given game. But against Michigan Tech on Saturday, penalty minutes were provided, free of charge, and the No. 4 Michigan hockey team took advantage by way of an early goal. The Huskies (1-6-1) were called for 10 penalty minutes, leaving the Wolverines (6-1-1) with ample time in the opposing zone to set up chances en route to a 2-1 victory. “We got some good momentum from our power play,” Berenson said. “I thought we played better with the puck than we did last night all around. “I liked the way our team competed. I thought tonight was a better team effort than last night.” Sophomore forwards Andrew Copp and Justin Selman both scored for the Wolverines in Michigan Tech’s first visit to Yost Ice Arena since 1984. With the win, Michigan recorded its first regular-season home sweep since Feb. 17-18, 2012, against Northern Michigan. Playing in his first game since Oct. 18 against New Hampshire and second this season, Selman received the puck in the left circle from freshman defenseman Michael Downing, firing an awkward-angle shot past Michigan Tech goaltender Pheonix Copley for what would be the go-ahead goal. “I mean, obviously a goal is always nice, but I’m just glad we

got the win,” Selman said. Three late Michigan Tech penalties in the first period allowed Michigan to set up in the opposing zone, but, more importantly, hold the Huskies to just six shots in the opening stanza. After Saturday, Michigan Tech continued to lead the nation with 214 penalty minutes this season. With four forwards on the ice during an extra-man opportunity, Copp wove the puck through traffic to the left circle, where his shot from the faceoff spot proved too much for Copley to handle. Copp’s fourth goal of the season tied him for the team lead, one night after he scored the game winner in overtime. The Wolverines also drew a number of penalties themselves — 12 altogether — including two in the second period that slowed down play for both teams and a late call on junior forward Zach Hyman in the third period. “That gave us momentum going into the third (period),” Selman said. “It just gave us energy throughout the whole game.” Freshman goaltender Zach Nagelvoort surely appreciated the slow play, though. After he faced 36 shots the previous night, Nagelvoort stopped just 29 on Saturday — his fourth win in place of sophomore Steve Racine. “Our overall defense, they hung in there and they battled,” Berenson said. “The goals against is (on) the goalie, but it’s also on the defensemen, too.” Michigan’s victory was even more impressive without freshman defenseman Kevin Lohan, who remains out for at least the next three months with a lower-body injury that he suffered in Friday night’s game, according to Berenson. “Obviously it’s never good to be missing a guy like Lohan … but I thought (the defense) did

a really good job,” Nagelvoort said. “They let me see pretty much anything that was in front of me. There was only two or three times where (Michigan Tech) had a chance to tip in any kind of shots.” The Huskies tallied a late goal midway through the third period, nearly completing the comeback when they finally managed to limit their penalties. Forward Dennis Rix slapped one past Nagelvoort when he found the puck near the slot. A late penalty and a 6-on-4 advantage were not enough to force a second straight overtime, though. The loss spoiled former Michigan assistant coach and current Michigan Tech coach Mel Person’s return to Ann Arbor. Pearson served as an assistant coach for 23 years under Berenson, helping to lead the Wolverines to 11 Frozen Fours. “Yost is a place I love,” Pearson said. “I know it’s a hard place to play, and a hard place to win at, but it’s a great experience for our players to come here. “I’ve got a lot of fond memories here and I just love Michigan, coach Berenson and Michigan hockey.” Friday night: Andrew Copp played hero in the weekend opener, scoring the game winner in overtime after the Huskies came back from a two-goal deficit. Copp took the puck across the center line before he wound up near the top of circle and fired a shot that was too quick for the glove of Copley. Junior forward Phil Di Giuseppe scored his third goal of the season and added an assist, while senior forward Luke Moffatt tallied a goal of his own. Nagelvoort, meanwhile, continued his strong performance in Racine’s absence, stopping 34 shots.


SportsMonday

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

For first time, seniors beat OSU

GAME STATISTICS Team Stats First Downs Rush/Yards Passing Yards Offensive Plays Total Offense Kick returns/yds Punt returns/yds Comp/Att/Int Punts/Avg Fumbles/Lost Penalties/Yards Time of Possession

Michigan 12 29/-48 216 59 168 5/117 1/5 15/30/1 8/40.9 3/0 3-39 27:39

MSU 19 39/142 252 72 394 2/58 3/21 18/33/1 5/40.8 0-0 5-25 32:21

M I C H I G A N PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Gardner

14-27

210

0

1

Morris

1-3

6

0

0

Totals

15-30

216

0

1

Int

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Toussaint

8

20

2.5

9

0

Morris

1

0

0

0

0

Gardner

18

-46

-2.6

6

0

-48

-1.7

9

0

Totals

29

RECEIVING Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Funchess

6

65

10.8

25

0

Gallon

5

67

13.4

35

0

Chesson

3

82

27.3

58

0

Toussaint

1

2

2.0

2

0

15

240

16.0

58

0

Totals PUNTING Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Wile

8

327

40.9

49

Totals

8

327

40.9

49

KICKOFF RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

1

17

17.0

17

0

Norfleet

4

100

25.0

35

0

Totals

5

117

23.4

35

0

Chesson

PUNT RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Gallon

1

5

5.0

5

TD

Total

1

5

5.0

5

TD

TACKLES Player

Solo Asst

Tot

Taylor

6 6

Clark

3 6

9

Bolden

2 6

8

Morgan

1 7

8

Gordon, T.

2

3

5

Gordon. C.

1

4

5

Wilson

3 1

4

Ross III

3

Henry

1 3

4

Countess

1 3

4

Avery

0 4

4

Ryan

2 1

3

Lewis

1 1

2

Gallon

1 0

1

Wile

1 0

1

Kerridge

1 0

1

Norfleet

1 0

1

Black

0 1

1

Beyer

0 1

1

Washington

0 1

1

Wormley

0 1

Totals

12

1

4

Nebraska win means Michigan falls short of Big Ten title By JUSTIN MEYER Daily Sports Writer

With the players’ families sitting in the stands after traveling from all across North America for senior night, no one would’ve blamed the Michigan women’s soccer team for being a bit distracted. But they weren’t. The eighth-ranked Wolverines (9-1-1 Big Ten, 15-2-1 overall) took the field Saturday night with a determination and drive that has propelled them through the regular season. At stake was the senior class’ first-ever victory against Ohio State (4-5-2, 10-6-3) and a program-record eight-game win streak that extended back to Sept. 29. The unfazed Wolverines finished the game with a 2-0 win and mounds of confidence as they head toward the Big Ten Tournament. After walking onto the field arm-in-arm with their family members, all seven seniors started for the Wolverines not out of charity, but rather as a TRACY KO/Daily testament to the strength and Senior defenders Shelina Zadorsky and Holly Hein helped freshman goaltender Taylor Bucklin to a shutout Saturday. commitment of the group. “My whole class coming into experience.” this last month. this game,” Zadorsky said. “We Michigan, we knew that it was Michigan coach Greg Ryan Senior defenders Shelina weren’t cocky by any means, but going to be a rebuilding year,” said he was worried about how Zadorsky and Hein stonewalled we were confident and I think said senior forward Shelby his team would start the game the Buckeyes to help give fresh- that was a different feeling for Chambers-Garcia. “We were with all of the distractions, even man goaltender Taylor Bucklin me. In the past, we might have our coach’s first recruiting class going so far as to make time her ninth shutout of the season. been a little hesitant to play as a whole; (fifth-year senior for a second warm-up after the Ryan called the pair two of the Ohio State, but this year I think defender) Holly (Hein) was his ceremonies. When the Wolver- best center backs in the Big Ten, we prepared so well and we first recruit. We knew that we ines took the field against the and the cool and collected duo were excited.” were going to be starting some- opponent that eliminated them displayed that on Saturday night Every member of the senior thing special here at Michigan. from the 2012 Big Ten Tourna- to back up their coach’s praise. class displayed that confidence Growing up together, training ment, though, they looked every “I think we had a solid defen- Friday as Michigan put on a together, building this program bit the postseason contender sive day, but I also think we had clinic at both ends of the field. together has been an amazing they’ve proved themselves to be a lot of confidence going into Chambers-Garcia rocketed

1

30 50

80

GROUNDED From Page 1B

M I C H I G A N

State dominated the line of scrimmage. Lewan said after the game that the Spartans ran similar blitzes to the ones they ran two years ago. Michigan just

S T A T E

PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Int

Cook

18-33

252

1

1

Totals

18-33

252

1

1

couldn’t stop them. “A lot of this game absolutely falls on this offensive line,” Lewan said. “They ran a bunch of blitzes, a lot of the same exact blitzes they ran in 2011, but when it came down to it, we couldn’t pick it up. That’s our job.” That might have been Lewan’s

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

Langford

26

125

4.6

40

1

Shelton

2

38

19.0

35

0

Williams

2

5

4

0

Hill

1

2

2

0

TEAM

3

0

-2.7

0

0

Cook

5

4

-3.0

3

1

Totals

39

174

3.6

40

2

2.5 2.0

TD

RECEIVING Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

6

75

12.5

25

1

Lippett

5

62

12.4

21

0

Pendleton

2

62

31.0

49

0

Kings

2

14

7.0

10

0

Gleichert

1

18

18.0

18

0 0

Fowler

Price

1

12

12.0

12

Mumphery

1

9

9.0

9

0

18

252

14.0

49

1

Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Sadler

5 204 40.8

51

Totals

5 204 40.8

51

Totals

PUNTING

KICKOFF RETURNS Player

No. Yds Avg Lg

Shelton

2 58 29.0 36

Totals

2 58 29.0 36

TACKLES Player

Solo Asst

Tot

Allen

5 4

9

Drummond

5 3

8

Calhoun

3 3

6

Bullough

1 4

5

Dennard

3

1

4

Davis

2

2

4

Ruch

2

2

4

Lewis

1

3

4

Monday, November 4, 2013 — 3B

Waynes

3 0

3

Jones

2 0

2

Edmondson

1

1

2

Hicks

1 0

1

Meyers

1 0

1

Knox

1 0

1

Scarpinato

0 1

Total

31

24

1 55

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SLOVIN From Page 1B begin each drive at midfield. But even that might not have been enough against the nation’s top-ranked defense. Following an interception by junior defensive back Raymon Taylor, the Wolverines set up shop at the Michigan State 41-yard line. Though they trailed by 10 at the time, which in this game felt like a three-score deficit, the turnover could have changed the game completely. Best-case scenario, it results in a touchdown and suddenly Michigan is right back in the game. At the very least, it should’ve ended in a field goal, cutting it to a onepossession game. Instead, it became the worstcase scenario. The Wolverines’ offense had been moving backward all game, which left the team shell-shocked after moving the ball with hardly any resistance against Indiana in its last game. And even given a rare short field, the trend continued. Michigan State brought the pressure on redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner, who had no place to go on an option call to begin the drive and lost five yards. Two plays later, each resulting in one of the Spartans’ seven sacks on the afternoon, the ball had moved from the Michigan State 41 back to Michigan’s own 38. Forget that outlier drive — and Michigan offensive coordinator Al Borges would surely prefer that you do anyway — and the Wolverines’ average starting field position becomes their own 18-yard line. Now let’s revisit the .06 points per drive that teams sacrifice with every yard of starting field position lost. The Spartans began their drives, on average, at their own 35-yard line. For reference, in 2011, one of the years of the aforementioned statistical

analysis, the biggest discrepancy between a team’s starting position and its opponents was 15.9 yards, showing just how big Saturday’s field position differential was. It’s no coincidence that NCAA-leading field position team, Boise State, went 12-1 in 2011. Ignoring the miserable drive that netted negative 21 yards, Michigan State had a 17-yard edge in the field-position battle. According to the statistical analysis, done by a better math student than I, that difference equates to an advantage of about a point per drive. Each team held the ball 13 times in Saturday’s game, suggesting that Michigan cost itself about two touchdowns with its field position. Not all of the blame for that falls on the Wolverines. On three occasions, Spartan punter Mike Sadler pinned Michigan inside of its own 10-yard line. There’s nothing the Wolverines can do about that, except be thankful they only have to see Sadler one more time before he graduates. But on the nine other drives that began inside the Michigan 35, the Wolverines shot themselves in the foot. Poor starting field position meant little opportunity to move the ball on likely the best defense they’ll face all year. Drives were killed before they truly began. After the game, the Spartan Stadium scoreboard told you that 13 points wouldn’t have made up for what Michigan coach Brady Hoke called a lack of execution by his team. The Wolverines didn’t lose this game because of the field-position battle alone. But any time a math whiz tells you you’re spotting the other team 13 points worth of field position, don’t feel good about your chances. Slovin can be reached at mjslovin@umich.edu or on Twitter @MattSlovin.

opinion, but it wasn’t the opinion of everyone. “It’s not just the line,” said Michigan coach Brady Hoke. “There are backs involved, there are routes involved, there’s timing — all those issues are part of it.” And maybe that’s the biggest issue. It would be easier to point at one specific unit and place the blame on them, but it’s not that

easy. Toussaint was blown up repeatedly on blitz pickups, which essentially erased Gardner’s safety net. Wide receivers got no separation all night, while Gardner held onto the ball for too long and was hit on almost every passing attempt. Part of that is on offensive coordinator Al Borges, but part of that is also on Gardner.

a ball past the keeper for the go-ahead goal in the second half, her first of the season. Senior forward Nkem Ezurike undressed the Buckeyes’ defense before cutting back on the goaltender and tucking the ball inside the far post to give the Wolverines the 2-0 advantage and extend the Michigan career goals record to 46. Senior midfielders Tori McCombs, Meghan Toohey and Kayla Mannino all turned in solid performances as well. McCombs threatened to score multiple times, including a point-blank chance on a long ball she blew past a defender to reach. Mannino and Toohey both helped hold the defense together, even as Ohio State brought four attackers forward in the second half. Mannino spent significant time watching the Buckeyes’ speedy Nichelle Prince on the wing, and Toohey broke up plays at midfield all game, frustrating Ohio State by forcing its forwards wide and not allowing plays to build up. When the final whistle sounded and the crowd stood cheering, the Wolverines finally let themselves soak in the scene of their final regular-season game. “We’re all emotional and upset,” Chambers-Garcia said, gesturing at the stadium around her. “I mean you look at this, and this wasn’t here when we got recruited. We’ve been here since the very beginning, and it’s just been an honor to represent the block ‘M’ on this beautiful field for this great university.” Fighting back tears, Chambers-Garcia headed to the locker room to celebrate the victory with her family, but also with her fellow seniors that have put the Michigan women’s soccer team in the best position it has ever been in to win a Big Ten title.

You can blame it on the line, or on Gardner, Toussaint, Borges, Hoke — whomever. There are many holes with many needed solutions. All that’s important is that on a night where Michigan could have made a statement win, it instead put up the worst rushing performance in school history. Sometimes, numbers say all that needs to be said.

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Expires: November 10, 2013


SportsMonday

4B — Monday, November 4, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TOP-10 POLL Each week, Daily sports staffers fill out ballots, with first place votes receiving 10 points, second-place votes receiving nine, and so on.

1. ALABAMA (32): No one lost to Alabama this week!

2. FLORIDA STATE (3): In Florida, having sexual relations with a porcupine is illegal, because Florida.

3. OREGON : Oregon’s offense is faster than the particle accelerator on Stanford’s campus.

4. OHIO STATE: Too bad there are no good teams left on their schedule. Welp...

5. BAYLOR: Bears. Beets. Battlestar Galactica.

6. STANFORD: Stanford has a two-mile long particle accelerator on campus. That’s not gonna help against Oregon.

7. MISSOURI: Missouri does not have a two-mile long particle accelerator. But it’ll probably beat Kentucky.

8. OKLAHOMA: Bob Stoops. Stoop Kid. Stoop Kid’s afraid to leave his stoop.

9. MIAMI (FL): We’ve run out of bad jokes. Please make a comeback, Cocks.

10. CLEMSON: Helfand’s buddy Fiek goes to Clemson. Sup, Fiek.

STAFF PICKS The Daily football writers do their best to predict, against the spread, what happens in the 2013 football season.

Zach Helfand

Matt Slovin

Everett Cook

Adam Glanzman, Co-Managing Photo Editor

Liz Vukelich

No. 3 Florida State (-22) vs. No. 7 Miami (Fl)

Miami

Florida State

Miami

Florida State

Florida State

No. 4 Ohio State (-32) at Purdue

Purdue

Purdue

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

No. 8 Clemson (-17) at Virginia

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Virginia

Virginia

No. 9 Missouri (-11.5) vs. Tennessee

Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

Missouri

Tennessee

No. 11 Auburn (-9) at Arkansas

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Arkansas

No. 12 Texas A&M (-46) vs Texas-El Paso

Texas-El Paso

Texas-El Paso

Texas-El Paso

Texas-El Paso

Texas A&M

No. 14 South Carolina (-13) vs Mississippi State

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

No. 15 Texas Tech (-3) vs No. 18 Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Texas Tech

Oklahoma State

Texas Tech

Oklahoma State

No. 16 Fresno State (-20.5) vs Nevada

Fresno State

Fresno State

Fresno State

Fresno State

Fresno State

No. 17 Northern Illinois (-23.5) at Massachusetts

Northern Illinois

Northern Illinois

Northern Illinois

Northern Illinois

Northern Illinois

No. 20 UCLA (-27.5) vs Colorado

UCLA

UCLA

Colorado

UCLA

UCLA

No. 21 Michigan (+6) at No. 22 Michigan State

Michigan

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan

Michigan

No. 24 Wisconsin (-10) at Iowa

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Iowa

Wisconsin

No. 25 Notre Dame (-17) vs Navy

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Navy

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Penn State (-10) vs Illinois

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Penn State

Indiana (-9.5) vs Minnesota

Minnesota

Indiana

Indiana

Minnesota

Minnesota

Nebraska (-7) vs Northwestern

Northwestern

Nebraska

Northwestern

Nebraska

Nebraska

Michigan Daily at State News

Michigan Daily

Michigan Daily

Michigan Daily

Michigan Daily

Michigan Daily

This Week

9-9

10-8

14-4

7-11

8-12

Overall

122-100

112-110

140-82

120-102

8-12

FIVE From Page 1B wants Michigan State’s physicality. After the game, Michigan coach Brady Hoke said the Spartans outplayed his team, but he doesn’t see a difference in the programs. “I don’t think there is a gap,” he said. “I think they played awfully well, executed awfully well. I don’t think we did.” But Michigan State was the better team. And it is the team Michigan aspires to be. 3. Play calling wasn’t the problem. It may be a problem. But offensive coordinator Al Borges’s hands were pretty well tied. Running the ball, clearly, was not an option. And in the passing game, for every two completions Gardner had, he was sacked once. For Borges, it was pick your poison. Fourteen negative plays will sabotage almost any game plan. After the game, Hoke defended

the play calling. “We wouldn’t have run the plays we ran if we weren’t satisfied,” he said, adding: “Hindsight’s always 20/20, right?” But in hindsight, what else could Michigan have done? Shortened routes would’ve helped Gardner get rid of the ball quicker, but that would’ve removed any big-play threat and made life easier on the Spartans’ talented secondary. The play action was ineffective because Michigan State didn’t have to respect the run, and it takes too long to develop. But that wasn’t close to the difference in the game. Michigan has struggled to run the ball with its tailbacks all season, so Borges largely avoided it. Fifth-year senior running back Fitzgerald Toussaint carried the ball just eight times for 20 yards. Plus, Michigan trailed for the entire second half. Borges had few other options aside from the pass. Despite all the sacks, Gardner still threw for 210 yards, a respectable figure against a fearsome secondary. This wasn’t Borges at his best,

as he was against Indiana two weeks ago. But the best play caller in the world likely wouldn’t have avoided a loss to a superior Michigan State team.

Overall, the Michigan defense limited the Spartans’ production for much of the day. The secondary, though, remains an issue. 5. Bold Prediction: B-Dubs Bound

4. The secondary has sprung a leak. Michigan State quarterback Connor Cook is something less than the world’s best quarterback. He had to beat out Andrew Maxwell for the starting position and has been middling, though reliable, since. Still, even Cook found room in the Michigan secondary. His 14-yard touchdown pass to Bennie Fowler — beating fifth-year senior safety Thomas Gordon — at the end of the half proved decisive. He completed 18 of his 33 attempts for 251 yards. And he left many throws on the field. Had Cook connected on the missed opportunities — an easy third-down completion over the receiver’s head, a would-be touchdown pass just underthrown — the score would’ve been even more lopsided.

Maybe this is wishful thinking because wings are yummy and Arizona is warm, but Michigan will end up in the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl in Tempe, Arizona. This is just speculation, of course, but here’s why it’s likely: the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl is slotted for the Big Ten’s No. 5 team. That’s not concrete, but that’s a reasonable projection for Michigan this season. To make the Capital One Bowl, Michigan may need to win out, or take three of its next four games. The Outback Bowl could hesitate to take the Wolverines for the second year in a row. That leaves the Gator Bowl and the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl. The Wolverines haven’t played a bowl in Arizona since the 1986 Fiesta Bowl, and the Tempe-based bowl committee would likely push hard for them. Wings for everyone!


2013-11-04