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ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY-THREE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM Monday, September 16, 2013

Ann Arbor, Michigan

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STATE GOVERNMENT

Snyder is silent while Dems rally for Schauer PATRICK BARRON/Daily

LSA junior Lars Johnson also member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraterniety, participated in the “Wheel in their Shoes” event by racing wheelchairs from the Michigan Cardiovascular Center to the Union Sunday.

Trying life in a wheelchair Fraternity event focuses on disabilities through wheeled-5K By ALICIA ADAMCZYK Daily News Editor

About 40 members of the University’s chapter of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity gathered Sunday for the fourth-annual Wheel in their Shoes 5K. But instead of lacing up tennis shoes in preparation of the event, the brothers lowered

themselves into wheelchairs for the trek across campus. The two-hour event, which began at the University of Michigan Health System’s Cardiovascular Center and continued across Central Campus, was held to raise awareness for people with disabilities among the University community. The 2012 event raised about $1,500 for Push America, a national non-profit that serves people with disabilities. LSA junior Nicholas Guys, Pi Kappa Phi’s philanthropy chair, said

GLOBAL OUTREACH

they expect to raise roughly the same amount of funds in 2013. Guys said the 5K is the fraternity’s largest event of the fall, and, in addition to raising awareness, the event also allows the brothers to gain a better understanding of the difficulties of using a wheelchair for mobility. “The point of the event is for us to learn firsthand about ways that we can make campus a little bit more accessible for people with disabilities,” Guys said. “Because as ... we all know from doing this, it’s really, really tough.”

In addition to those in wheelchairs, other members of the fraternity helped to push their brothers up hills and keep them on course. As the caravan made its way down from the Cardiovascular Center, a few members slid into the street or off into the bushes. A minor traffic jam was caused when the brothers crossed State Street on their way to the Cube. One wheelchair lost its tire. LSA senior Paul Willar, a member of Pi Kappa Phi, said the event can be an “eye-opening See WHEELCHAIR, Page 3A

GOP governor hasn’t yet said whether he’ll run in 2014 By SAM GRINGLAS Daily Staff Reporter

With this November’s ballot absent, Detroit’s mayoral contest is likely to grip political focus throughout the fall. But more than a year from midterm election season, state political organizers are beginning to mobilize forces around two crucial decisions in 2014: the election of a U.S. senator and governor. Though Republican Gov. Rick Snyder said he wouldn’t announce whether or not he would seek a second term until early 2014, Michigan Democrats have been rallying prospective Democratic nominee Mark Schauer for much of the summer. Schauer, a former state and

U.S. representative from Battle Creek, announced his candidacy last spring and will likely glide through primary season without another Democratic challenger. Schauer has spent most of the summer attempting to build statewide familiarity, a challenge faced by most non-incumbent candidates. It’s especially crucial for Schauer to gain recognition because he hasn’t previously competed in a statewide race. In an interview with The Michigan Daily Thursday, Schauer said a unified Democratic Party has provided him the chance to construct a solid campaign organization much earlier in the election. He also noted that there has only been an unopposed Democratic primary once since 1970. “I can focus on 2014, and that’s a fantastic position to be in,” Schauer said. Schauer has already racked up significant millage crisscrossing the state over the past few See DEMS, Page 3A

HANGING OUT

ADMINISTRATION

SI students to Students injured tackle India’s after falling from University bus toughest issues Trip participants to work with local technology leaders By RACHEL PREMACK Daily Staff Reporter

In the summer of 2014, a select group of students in the School of Information will be given the opportunity to tackle some of the toughest problems facing Indian society, including agricultural marketing, health care and job skills. Up to 18 students will receive funding to participate in the program through the Global Information Engagement Office. Information Dean Jeffrey MacKie-Mason said the students will be able to use skills learned to leverage India’s technological capabilities to help alleviate some long-standing general issues. “One thing that is interesting about India is a vast population living in poverty ... but, at the same time, it’s a country that is very technologically advanced and has strong systems of high-

er education for those that can afford it,” MacKie-Mason said. Though the school’s faculty works on projects around the world — like a venture in South Africa to create a Nelson Mandela archive — this is the school’s first formal education program abroad. MacKie-Mason said the program will expand to other countries in coming years after its initial run in India. Other top information schools, such as the University of Maryland and the University of Washington, have also established programs in the country. Information prof. Joyojeet Pal, the faculty lead for the program, said the investigation of information problems in India will begin this academic year before students travel to India next summer. Indian technology organizations submitted their most pressing issues to the School of Information for evaluation, but Pal said the college is not considering those issues that only have relevance in India. See STUDENTS, Page 3A

Three hospitalized after door gave way in transit

By WILL GREENBERG and KATIE BURKE Daily Staff Reporter and Daily News Editor

Your campus commute may be more dangerous than you previously thought. At about 10:30 a.m. Saturday, three students fell out of

the rear-side door of a Blue Bus headed to Michigan Stadium, according to University Police. The bus was heading westbound on Huron Street and was turning onto southbound Fletcher Street. It’s suspected that the weight of the 60 or so students on board shifted and caused the door to open, police reported. The three students were taken to the University Hospital for treatment of nonlife threatening injuries and See BUS, Page 3A

PATRICK BARRON/Daily

A window washer scales the Shapiro Undergraduate Library Friday while cleaning the building’s large windows.

ACADEMICS

Entrepreneur class shakes up lecture format ‘Talk-show’ format gives students more variety By YARDAIN AMRON For The Daily

As students shuffled into Stamps Auditorium for their “Entrepreneurship Hour” seminar, the stage was set with

a rug, coffee table covered in colorful books, and two homey armchairs. The set up was quite different from most lectures, as was the class that followed. Engineering prof. David Thompson introduced this week’s guest entrepreneur, Josephine Polich, founder and CEO of Cearna, a homeopathic medicine company developing surgery and trauma recovery products. Thompson played interview-

er, asking Polich questions about her personal story and company’s founding. The hour ended with questions from the student audience. The class wasn’t a lecture, but it wasn’t always that way. “Entrepreneurship Hour” began in 2008 as a one-credit pass/fail seminar required for a Program in Entrepreneurship certificate — a nine-credit “mini-minor” offered through

the Center for Entrepreneurship within the College of Engineering, though the program is open to students across the University. Thompson said a significant percentage of the 440 students in the course are from LSA and other schools. Each week, the course provides a forum for entrepreneurs to come and share their stories with the students. Thompson See ENTREPRENEUR, Page 3A

Unfamiliar territory Volleyball, men’s and women’s soccer tally first losses of year.

» INSIDE

WEATHER TOMORROW

HI: 68 LO: 48

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INDEX

Vol. CXXIII, No. 131 ©2013 The Michigan Daily michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A OPINION.....................4A ARTS........................... 5A

SUDOKU..................... 3A CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A S P O R T S M O N DAY. . . . . . . . . .1 B


News

2A — Monday, September 16, 2013

MONDAY: This Week in History

TUESDAY: Professor Profiles

WEDNESDAY: In Other Ivory Towers

THURSDAY: Alumni Profiles

Ladies get to swim, finally

30 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK (SEPT. 15, 1983): Ann Arbor members of the

People for the Reassessment of Aid to Israel signed a petition asking President Ronald Reagan to discontinue aid to Israel. The petition, which attempted to garner 5,000 signatures, called for a formal statement to be issued to the U.S. Secretary of State and congressional representatives from Michigan that would request the United States to halt all economic aid to Israel in response to hostilities in the region. Stanley Mendenhall, founder of the PRAI, cited the forceful acquisition of the Arab territories in 1967 as the reason for the protest. Mendenhall personally financed the organization with a $5,000 payment.

CRIME NOTES

20 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK (SEPT. 15, 1993): The University tested a new voicemail system in the Mosher-Jordan Residence Hall. The new system was put in place in response to the popularity of similar systems that administrators used. Students received personal accounts, which required that callers press a number corresponding to the name of the resident they were attempting to reach. This allowed residents to maintain privacy unlike with traditional answering machines.

— IAN DILLINGHAM

Take the beat WHERE: University Hospital WHEN: Friday at about 10:40 p.m. WHAT: A pair of headphones were stolen from a bag in one of the hospital waiting room and there are no suspects, University Police reported.

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes?

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tor, discusses the social implications of space. WHO: Center for Middle Eastern and Northern African Studies WHEN: Today at 12:10 p.m. WHERE: School of Social Work Building

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EDITORIAL STAFF Matthew Slovin Managing Editor Adam Rubenfire Managing News Editor PATRICK BARRON/Daily University alum Shawn Blanchord hands out free Muscle Milk in the Diag on Sunday to help publicize Run This Campus, a new club for fun fitness competition at any level.

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SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Peter Shahin, K.C. Wassman, Taylor Wizner ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Ariana Assaf, Jennifer Calfas, Hilary Crawford, Ian Dillingham, Will Greenberg, Sam Gringlas, Matt Jackonen, Rachel Premack, Stephanie Shenouda, Christy Song

Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com Adrienne Roberts Editorial Page Editors SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Dan Wang, Derek Wolfe ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

WHERE: Michigan Stadium and surrounding areas WHEN: Saturday WHAT: At Saturday’s game of 107,120 attendees the University Police and supporting law enforcement made 3 arrests at Saturday’s football game: one for resisting and obstructing a police officer, one for Minor in Possession of Alcohol and one for possesion of marijuana. Nine people were ejected from the game. No citations were given. In addition, emergency medical personnel treated 66 people. Eight were taken to University Hospital.

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Peace lecture Guest jazz Picked up kicks Crime stats WHAT: Fatma Müge WHERE: Central Campus from Saturday’s recital Göçek, professor of socioloRecreational Building gy and women’s studies and WHAT: Trumpet player WHEN: Friday at about football game CMENAS associate direc6:10 p.m. and Detroit native MarWHAT: Between 5:15 p.m. and 5:25 p.m. two pairs of athletic shoes were taken from a woman’s pool locker. There are currently no suspects, University Police reported.

FRIDAY: Photos of the Week

GOT MILK?

EXPANDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN

60 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK (SEPT. 16, 1953): In an effort to expand the limited opportunities for women in sports, the University began construction of a new women’s swimming pool complex. The project was slated for a total cost of $1 million. The pool — along with the Barbour Gymnasium and Palmer Field — was one of several facilities offering athletic classes for women. The Women’s Athletic Association hosted classes in rifle, golf, field hockey, tennis and other activities.

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cus Belgrave will perform alongside jazz faculty. The performance is free. WHO: School of Music, Theatre & Dance WHEN: Today at 6 p.m. WHERE: Moore Building

Anxiety skills

Dance lecture

WHAT: Attend this event to learn how to efficiently manage your anxiety. These sessions will help attendees learn how to reduce stress and deal with the tosses and turns of everyday life. Group sessions take place every Monday. WHO: Counseling and Psychological Services WHEN: Today at 4:15 p.m. WHERE: Michigan Union, CAPS office 3100

WHAT: Thomas DeFrantz presents the free event “Performing Queer African American Histories.” WHO: School of Music, Theatre & Dance WHEN: Today at 5 p.m. WHERE: 4701 Haven Hall CORRECTIONS l Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW TODAY

1

Last Friday the world’s oldest man, Salustiano Sanchez-Blazquez, died at the age of 112, the Huffington Post reported. SanchezBlazquez, was born in Spain, was a self taught musician who claimed his longevity was due to eating one banana every day.

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2

The Michigan football team narrowly avoided an upset loss to Akron. In the latest issue of SportsMonday, the Daily’s football beat examines why. >> FOR MORE, SEE INSIDE

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Everett Cook and Zach Helfand Managing Sports Editors

Flooding in Colorado required the air-evactuation by helicopter of 85 school children yesterday, The New York Times reported. Hundreds of others have needed evacuaion with four dead and severe damge done across Boulder, Larimer and Weld Counties.

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BUSINESS STAFF Amal Muzaffar Digital Accounts Manager Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager Lexi Derasmo Local Accounts Manager Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager Ellen Wolbert and Sophie Greenbaum Production Managers The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily’s office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subscription rate. On-campus subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

Biden backs diplomatic Summers withdraws from Fed consideration approach to crisis in Syria Yellen likely to lead nation’s monetary policy WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawrence Summers, who was considered the leading candidate to succeed Ben Bernanke as Federal Reserve chairman, has withdrawn from consideration, the White House said Sunday. Summers’ withdrawal followed growing resistance from critics, including some members of the Senate committee that would need to back his nomination. His exit could open the door for his chief rival, Janet Yellen, the Fed’s vice chair. If chosen by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate, Yellen would become

Tuesday,

the first woman to lead the Fed. In the past, Obama has mentioned only one other candidate as possibly being under consideration: Donald Kohn, a former Fed vice chair. But Kohn, 70, has been considered a long shot. The administration also reached out to former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner early in the process. Geithner maintained that he was not interested in being considered. Obama is expected to announce a nominee for the Fed chairmanship as early as this month. Bernanke’s term ends Jan. 31, 2014. Summers and his allies have been engaged in an unusually public contest with supporters of Yellen, with each side lobbying the administration.

An openly waged succession battle is something that the Fed, which will turn 100 in December, has never before witnessed. The selection of a chairman has long been a matter handled privately by a president and his senior advisers. In a statement, Obama said he had accepted Summers’ decision. “Larry was a critical member of my team as we faced down the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, and it was in no small part because of his expertise, wisdom and leadership that we wrestled the economy back to growth and made the kind of progress we are seeing today,” Obama said. As director of the National Economic Council, Summers oversaw the administration’s response to the economic and financial crisis early in Obama’s first term. Yet Summers faced strenuous opposition from some Democrats, including on the Senate Banking Committee. Summers alluded to that opposition to his candidacy in a letter he sent Sunday to Obama to formally withdraw from consideration. “I have reluctantly concluded that any possible confirmation process for me would be acrimonious and would not serve the interests of the Federal Reserve, the administration or ultimately, the interests of the nation’s ongoing economic recovery,” Summers wrote. Summers’ ascent to the top of the list to succeed Bernanke rankled both opponents of the president as well as some liberal supporters. He has alienated colleagues in the past with a brusque and at times domineering style. Unlike Bernanke, he’s not been known as a consensus-builder — one reason some critics had opposed his nomination. He was also seen as having been too cozy with Wall Street and was criticized for critical comments he made about women and math and science.

VP considers presidential run, anti-war sentiment at Iowa rally INDIANOLA, Iowa (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden, speaking to a decidedly antiwar audience in Iowa on Sunday, played down the Obama administration’s pledge to use military force to rid Syria of chemical weapons. Biden, weighing a run for president in 2016, instead touted the U.S.-Russian diplomatic proposal for Syria to relinquish its chemical arsenal under international supervision. “We’re going to the United Nations with a resolution this week that will in fact call on the United Nations of the world to put pressure on Syria to have the confiscation and destruction of all those weapons,” Biden told hundreds of Iowa’s most devout Democrats at Sen. Tom Harkin’s annual steak picnic and fall fundraiser. Biden touched only lightly on the administration’s continued insistence that “there are consequences should the Assad regime not comply.” National public opinion polls show a military strike on Syria is unpopular, especially with Democrats. The vice president worked to stoke hope that the diplomatic solution would work. Making the administration’s first trip outside Washington since Obama’s speech to the nation Tuesday, Biden said Obama “is the reason the world is facing up finally, finally to this hideous prospect of this largest stockpile of chemical weapons.” There was no applause for his Syria comments from the audience, supporters of Harkin, a veteran Democrat popular with his party’s anti-war activists. But listeners rose to their

feet and cheered loudly when Biden ticked through the economic gains the country has made since Obama took office, improvements the vice president could benefit from, should they continue, if he runs for president in 2016. Biden praised Harkin as the “conscience of the Senate,” and the senator also raised hope the U.S.-Russian proposal would resolve the Syria issue, which is dominating world headlines. “We didn’t lose one American life,” Harkin said, in introducing Biden. “That’s leadership folks, that’s leadership.” The hopeful tone in Biden’s and Harkin’s remarks came despite Obama’s warning in an interview Sunday, “if diplomacy fails, the United States remains prepared to act.” Obama, who rode an antiwar wave to victory in Iowa’s 2008 presidential caucuses, had proposed limited air strikes in Syria in response to what the U.S. says was a chemical weapons attack last month that killed more than 1,400 people. His administration blames the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Some Democrats in attendance said that even if the president later orders a military strike, Obama will not have rushed to war. “At the end of the day, if that terrible option has to be played out, this crowd, what they voted for Barack Obama to do, what they wanted, was this kind of leadership: smart, thoughtful not reactionary,” said former state party Chairwoman Sue Dvorsky. His own party cool to a military strike, Obama has struggled to win support for military action from members of Congress, whose constituents have endured more than a decade of war. An Associated Press poll taken Sept. 6-8 showed 34 percent of Democrats said they wanted Congress to back

military action. More than three-fourths said they thought any military such action was at least somewhat likely to turn into a long-term commitment of forces, including 44 percent who said it was extremely likely. Asked if he could rally leery Democrats should diplomacy fail, Biden told reporters briefly “I think we’re going to be OK.” Biden is considering running for the top job in the White House in 2016, and the crowd he mingled with Sunday, including many familiar with the two-time presidential candidate, would have the opening say during the state’s caucuses. He linked himself with the administration’s efforts to lift the slow-recovering economy, and with Obama in particular. And while Biden is well known in Iowa from his presidential races, Obama’s approval nationally, under 50 percent, would be a challenge for him. “We have a clear vision for America that rests on a growing and prosperous middle class, where the playing field is level,” Biden said, “and where we lead the world again in the power of our example.” With Hillary Clinton and Biden as the most prominent Democrats being discussed for their party’s 2016 nomination, Obama said in a broadcast interview that he suspects both politicians would say it was “way too premature” to focus on the race. Asked about Biden’s visit, the president told ABC’s “This Week” that “Iowa’s a big state and (Biden is) an old friend of Tom Harkin’s.” The two were Senate colleagues. “We consider Joe Biden one of our own,” said Jon Mixdorf, who serves on the executive committee for the Black Hawk County Democrats. “If Joe Biden can carry that tradition Obama has started, we would be behind him. But honestly it would be close.”


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NEWS BRIEFS

DEMS From Page 1A

DETROIT

FBI seizes $700,000 from Kilpatrick friend The FBI has seized about $700,000 from bank accounts linked to Bobby Ferguson, a close friend and co-defendant of exDetroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. The Detroit News says the FBI obtained a search warrant and made the seizures March 10, one day before a federal jury in Detroit convicted Ferguson and Kilpatrick for their roles in a City Hall kickback scheme. Their sentencing is Oct. 10. The newspaper says search warrants in the case were unsealed Friday in Detroit U.S. District Court. Ferguson’s lawyer Michael Rataj says he’s angry at the seizure and says the money belongs to Ferguson’s 88-year-old mother.

WASHINGTON

Budget tightening could widen income gap On the fifth anniversary of the Lehman Brothers collapse, President Barack Obama says the Republican focus on budget tightening could widen income disparities in the nation even as the economy climbs out of a debilitating recession. Trying to lay claim to an economic turnaround, Obama acknowledged that despite progress, middle- and low-income Americans have not benefited as much as the top 1 percent in the country. “We came in, stabilized the situation,” he told ABC’s “This Week” in an interview broadcast Sunday. He cited 42 months in a row of growth, 7½ million jobs created and a revitalized auto industry.

ACAPULCO, Mexico

Tropical storm, hurricane batter Mexican coast Tropical Storm Manuel edged onto Mexico’s Pacific coast Sunday while Hurricane Ingrid swirled offshore on the other side of the country, as heavy rains and landslides caused at least 13 deaths and led authorities to evacuate thousands. Stormy conditions led some communities in affected states to cancel Independence Day celebrations planned for Sunday and Monday. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Manuel began to weaken as soon as it made landfall near the port of Manzanillo during the afternoon, but remained a threat to produce flash floods and mudslides. It was predicted to dissipate by Monday.

KINSHASA, Congo

Congo accuses Rwanda of ‘kidnapping’ soldier Congolese officials accused Rwandan soldiers of detaining a sergeant from Congo’s army near the countries’ shared border Sunday, a move they described as a “provocation.” The incident appeared to ratchet up tension in the border region, which was the sight of heavy fighting late last month between the Congolese army and a rebel group allegedly backed by Rwanda. Sgt. Munanga Kafakana was detained Sunday while trying to visit family in the eastern Congo city of Goma, army spokesman Col. Olivier Hamuli said. Rwandan officials said Kafakana had crossed into Rwandan territory, but Hamuli insisted he had not. “He had not crossed the border, but he was found in a neutral zone when the Rwandan soldiers kidnapped him,” Hamuli said. “We are trying to calm the tension here at the border, because the population that alerted us to this arrest wants to go look for him on the other side of the border.” —Compiled from Daily wire reports

months, recently making stops in several Michigan communities, such as Escanaba, Manistee, Leland, Southfield and Detroit. Aaron Kall, director of the University’s debate program, said an uncontested primary presents a rare situation that can greatly influence the strategy of a race, as Schauer will likely have the full support of Democrats across the state. At this stage in the race, Kall said a new candidate’s best strategy is visiting counties and districts — and shaking as many hands as possible — in an effort to garner name recognition and positive media attention. “Nothing can replace good old-fashioned campaigning,” Kall said. In addition, Schauer has the opportunity to focus all of his energy on his likely general election opponent, Snyder, rather than dueling in a brutal primary battle. Primaries tend to force candidates to shift to one side of their ideology, Kall said, in order to differentiate themselves from other challengers. “Not having primary opponents allows both candidates to be who they are, who are very moderate, in a state that kind of leans blue, but is purple and could go either way,” Kall said. Kall said some of Snyder’s policies, such as Medicaid expansion and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, have angered many subscribers to the Tea Party faction of the Republican Party. An issue that

STUDENTS From Page 1A Before Oct. 15, teams of students will submit their plans concerning one of the 10 to 20 challenges. Five or six student groups, each working with a faculty member, will coordinate remotely with the tech companies during winter

News could greatly differentiate Snyder and Schauer may arise with debates concerning labor, referenced by Snyder’s support of Right-to-Work legislation. Snyder has also refrained from speaking on an array of social issues, instead choosing a narrative centered on economic growth for families and businesses. Kelli Ford, press secretary for the Michigan Republican Party, emphasized Snyder’s commitment to rebuilding the economy. “Right now, Governor Snyder is focused on doing the job he was elected to do: build Michigan’s comeback,” Ford wrote in a email interview. “New jobs are being added because Governor Snyder and the Republican legislature know what it takes to get our economy back on track.” In a January op-ed published in the Detroit Free Press, Snyder cited multiple economic reforms initiated under his administration that he said contributed to Michigan ranking as the sixth fastest-growing economy in the nation. However, Schauer said Snyder’s economic policies, which he believes cater to corporate special interests, have made it difficult for communities to remain viable and retain young people. “I see Rick Snyder talking about those things, but his actions don’t back them up,” Schauer said. Education, it seems, may also arise in potential debates as the electorate begins to pay more attention to the gubernatorial race. Schauer has dedicated multiple recent op-eds and social media posts to education-relat-

semester before implementing their plan in summer 2014. The School of Information is covering travel and housing expenses, along with providing a small stipend for participants to help cover food and other needs. Pal said the dynamic between the Indian organizations and University students is different from typical

ed issues. Though Schauer has not laid out a specific policy platform, he has a track record from his time in the state legislature and has recently railed against Snyder for large-scale budget cuts in both higher and k-12 education. “We need to fundamentally reconnect to our constitutional promise of a quality public education for every child,” Schauer said. “We need to recommit to supporting our universities. We have seen consistent cuts in state support for higher education. I think it should be one of our values; it should be one of our top priorities in Michigan.” At the 18th-annual Governor’s Summit on Education in April, Snyder’s comments focused on better matching skills with high-demand jobs through collaboration with business leaders. When asked about potential initiatives to engage college students, both Schauer and Ford emphasized the importance of involving young voters. “College students are a very important demographic,” Schauer said. “They are engaged in issues, and their energy is infectious.” Ford welcomed young Republicans to join campus teams as part of their effort to recruit college students from across Michigan. And in a mid-term election, lacking a presidential election to drive turnout, Kall said engaging voters in every demographic will be crucial. In a Detroit Free Press poll released last week, Snyder is polling eight points ahead of Schauer. But with more than a year to go, the race is far from a final call.

development opportunities where external organizations find an issue and formulate a plan without local consultation. “There is a lot of local community working on problems that we can learn from and we can bring unique skills from the site itself,” Pal said. “This is a great collaborative opportunity for us.”

Alabama church observes 50th anniversary of bomb BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of people black and white, many holding hands, filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago Sunday to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle. The Rev. Arthur Price taught the same Sunday school lesson that members of 16th Street Baptist Church heard the morning of the bombing — “A Love That Forgives.” Then, the rusty old church bell was tolled four times as the girls’ names were read. Bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, who lost her right eye and sister Addie Mae Collins in the blast, stood by as members laid a wreath at the spot where the dynamite device was placed along an outside wall. Rudolph was 12 at the time, and her family left the church after the bombing. She said it was important to return in memory of her sister, who was 14, and the three other girls who died: Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley Morris, both 14, and Denise McNair, 11. “God spared me to live and tell just what happened on that day,” said Rudolph, who testified against the Klansmen convicted years later in the bombing. Congregation members and visitors sang the old hymn “Love Lifted Me” and joined hands in prayer. The somber Sunday school lesson was followed by a raucous, packed worship service with gospel music and believers waving their hands. During the sermon, the Rev. Julius Scruggs of Huntsville, president of the National Baptist Convention USA, said, “God said you may murder four little girls, but you won’t murder the dream of justice and liberty for

all.” Later Sunday, attendees of an afternoon commemoration included Attorney General Eric Holder, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young, Jesse Jackson, Rev. Joseph Lowery and director Spike Lee, who made a documentary about the bombing. The church was full, with the only surviving mother of one of the girls, Maxine McNair, sitting in the front row. Holder called the girls’ deaths “a seminal and tragic moment” in U.S. history and recalled gains that followed their killings like the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. Alluding to the Supreme Court decision this year that struck down a key part of the voting law, Holder said the struggle continues decades later. “This a fight that we will continue,” Holder said. The dynamite bomb went off outside the church Sept. 15, 1963. Of the Klansmen convicted years later, one remains imprisoned. Two others died in prison. Two young men, both black, were shot to death in Birmingham in the chaos that followed the bombing. Birmingham was strictly segregated at the time of the bombing, which occurred as city schools were being racially integrated for the first time. The all-black 16th Street Baptist was a gathering spot for civil rights demonstrations for months before the blast. The bombing became a powerful symbol of the depth of racial hatred in the South and helped build momentum for later laws, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. During the morning commemoration, an honor guard composed of black and whites

officers and firefighters watched over ceremonies with mixed-race crowd, something that would have been unthinkable in Birmingham in 1963. That same year, white police officers and firefighters used dogs and water hoses on black demonstrators marching for equal rights. President Barack Obama issued a statement noting that earlier this year the four girls were posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, one of the country’s highest civilian honors.

Monday, September 16, 2013 — 3A

WHEELCHAIR From Page 1A experience” that shows how inaccessible campus can be for handicapped persons. Guys said the hills and potholes around campus are especially difficult for those with physical disabilities. He said he has been working with the University’s Office for Institutional Equality to improve accessibility, but progress has been slow. The brothers also handed out fliers to curious passersby. Nursing sophomore Asa Smith stopped

BUS From Page 1A police reported Sunday that all three have been released. Police determined that the incident was not due to operator error or from excessive speed and said they didn’t know if the bus was over capacity. Many University buses are modified to have significant standing room. LSA freshman Tristan MacKethan was on the bus at the time of the incident. He said the bus was packed with the usual amount of students for a game day, and he did not see anyone standing past the yellow line that cautions riders to stay away from the door. “As we went around a turn going left, people were pushed to the right of the bus … three people were pushed against the door, the

ENTREPRENEUR From Page 1A said he hopes the class allows his students to interact meaningfully with entrepreneurs, who may be able to offer guidance on how students can shape their careers. Besides listening, students are also required to pitch their own idea in front of a camera and submit it to 1,000 Pitches, n competition between the University and Pennsylvania State University that’s hosted by entrepreneurship group MPowered. The goal of 1,000 Pitches is to encourage students to turn their ideas into actual business plans. The winner of any of the nine pitch categories is evaluated by a panel and is eligible to receive a $1,000 prize. While this is only his first year teaching the seminar, Thompson has played a prominent role in the course’s evolution. Historically, the format of the class was a traditional lecture, with speakers standing behind a lectern and clicking through a PowerPoint presentation. However, Thompson felt that speakers were limited by the formal setting of the course. “In other words, some entrepreneurs are really good at communicating in a lecture format, and some are ... OK at it,” Thompson said. The class “pivoted” toward a more TEDx style, ditching the lectern for a more intimate environment. Thompson said he began to notice some recurrring themes from multiple speakers last year.

briefly to chat and offer support. “When I saw them passing by I really wondered if they all had disabilities,” Smith said. “Then I saw their shirts, and I thought it was really cool.” Though the 5K is the fraternity’s most visible event, they also host other events to raise funds, including a charity dinner for students, faculty and community members with disabilities. “It’s good for us to learn and to build some solidarity,” Guys said.

Adam Glanzman contributed reporting this story.

doors were pushed open and three people fell out,” MacKethan said. He said the bus stopped a short distance from where the students fell out, and someone called 911. Ambulances arrived on the scene about two or three minutes later. MacKethan accompanied two of the victims to the hospital, but said students were able to take other buses to the football game. “Two of the girls are back in our dorm and they’re OK after they were treated,” he said. As of Sunday evening, the Daily wasn’t able to reach the two victims to which MacKethan referred. The investigation to determine the cause of the accident is still pending, police said. The bus has been removed from service for evaluation of a mechanical failure, and it’s not yet clear when the bus will be back in service.

“You would start to hear things like ... ‘fail fast, fail early’, over and over again,” Thompson said. Drawing inspiration from “The Charlie Rose Show,” Thompson proposed another “pivot” — making himself a journalistic-style interviewer to better engage with the course’s guests. With a more intimate format, Thompson said there is “a little bit more facility to draw out who this person really is ... and you get some fun stories.” For instance, in response to a question about how an engineer became a doctor and entrepreneur of homeopathic medicine, Polich delved into a personal anecdote about discovering a homeopathic cure for her sick daughter while at Whole Foods. After class, Polich also offered praise for the new interview format. “The problem is that if I just try to make something up myself,” Polich said, “it might be the same thing somebody else lectured on last week, but I’m not going to know that — where he can direct me into specific areas, which really was helpful.” LSA senior Conrad Brown said the talk-show format was more engaging than a traditional lecture and a good way to expose students to new business disciplines. “The talk-show setting is key to it not being boring, that you’re not being lectured with a PowerPoint, like we are in 90 percent of our other classes,” Brown said. “I’d recommend it to anyone, no matter what major, what year. If you’re not busy 2 to 3 on Fridays, there’s no reason you shouldn’t be here.”


Opinion

4A — Monday, September 16, 2013

Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan since 1890. 420 Maynard St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109 tothedaily@michigandaily.com MELANIE KRUVELIS ANDREW WEINER EDITOR IN CHIEF

and ADRIENNE ROBERTS

EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS

MATT SLOVIN MANAGING EDITOR

Unsigned editorials reflect the official position of the Daily’s editorial board. All other signed articles and illustrations represent solely the views of their authors.

FROM THE DAILY

Don’t adopt this bill State-funded agencies shouldn’t be allowed to discriminate

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wo bills, introduced in late August and discussed by a Michigan House of Representatives committee last week, allow private adoption agencies to refuse to place a child in the care of a family that contradicts the agency’s religious beliefs or polices, effectively allowing discrimination. Lawmakers could vote on these bills this week. Although these religiously affiliated agencies are deemed “private” institutions, the majority of them utilize public funding. Any agency receiving funding from the state shouldn’t be permitted to place precedence on their own perhaps discriminatory agenda over the best interest of the adoptees. Under these bills, agencies may extend their religious liberties beyond potential clients of a different faith to include screening single people or same-sex couples. Adoptions by same-sex couples are on the rise and by some are viewed as a muchneeded resource for children in government care. Bryan Samuels, the commissioner for the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, explained in a memo, “The childwelfare system has come to understand that placing a child in a gay or lesbian family is no greater risk than placing them in a heterosexual family.” The focus of agency efforts and emphasis should not be placed on the sexual orientation or religious affiliation of prospective parents, but rather if they can and will provide a positive, nurturing environment for the adoptees. The bills, both introduced and sponsored by Republican state representatives, are just another example of Republicans allowing their moral arguments to get in the way of effective policy. State representatives only continue to delay any forward movement or final decision on Common Care funding — despite the fact that 45 other states have already adopted the standards. Similarly, and under the belief that their children and

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grandchildren will eventually lie responsible for what state Senator John Moolenaar deemed the “crushing federal debt” of the program, Republican representatives vehemently fought Medicaid expansion — until, of course, it was passed this August with the potential to aid 320,000 people in the first year and 470,000 by 2020. The underlying ethics the bills represent should neither be ignored nor dismissed. House Bill no. 4928 would permit an adoption agency the ability to refuse to place a child with potential parents because the couple violates the child placing agency’s written religious or moral policies; subsequently, House Bill no. 2937 disallows the government’s ability to deny those agencies state funding. Both policies essentially enable religious discrimination and possible neglect of the primary purpose of adoption agencies: finding orphaned children supportive, loving and nurturing families. The proposed doctrines are fundamentally unsound, receiving state funding and discrimination should be mutually exclusive — and adoption agencies that enjoy financial support of the government should therefore not also ask to undermine its existing foundational principles.

Art adds value

ith more than 35,000 pieces in its collection, the Louvre is an art buff’s dream and more. Wandering through it this summer, I had a sort of epiphany, if you will. Forgive me for stating the obvious, but back in day, people invested in art. A lot. It’s nothing new, but stick with me for a second. In the Louvre, it hit me HARSHA that there was a time, not NAHATA too long ago — OK, a few hundred years ago — when artistic expression was valued in a way that can’t even be considered today. People were paid (quite handsomely, too) for being able to paint, write or sculpt. We didn’t scoff at the “creative” types, but instead admired their talent and work. Take the Renaissance, for example: It’s overwhelming to see the amount of sheer beauty and artistry that came out of a single time period. It gave us the likes of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and Shakespeare. It spawned a period of immense growth and exploration that both created the Roman empire and the 67,000 square meters of pure splendor that is the Versailles palace. But most importantly, we can thank the artists from the golden years of the Renaissance for the ways they have inspired so many artists after them. Perhaps what’s most striking about this period to me is that so much of the art and architecture was commissioned by the state. From France and Italy to Spain and England, states have invested in cultivating intellectual and cultural progress. The best artists and minds of the region were sought after and commissioned to create masterpieces. Breathtakingly beautiful cathedrals and basilicas were built and royalty regularly sought out the most talented artists to design the interiors of palaces and state buildings. Having the most creative geniuses at hand was not just a matter of encouraging cultural growth, but was seen as a symbol of status. Today, the United States can’t even agree to keep funding the National Endowment for the Arts.

Of course, the trade-off is that instead of spending on splendor for the rich, we are now able to provide a higher standard of living for a larger percentage of people overall. We have made technological advancements and constructed standards for safety and hygiene. We have a longer life expectancy and more medical technology at our disposal to prolong life even further. Moreover, we have more choices for what we will consume, and access to more people and information than ever before in history. The industrial revolution allowed us to provide more products for a greater number of people and at a higher efficiency. But the downside has been losing the unique beauty that comes with fostering creativity and artistry. Our world has also become dominated by one-size-fits-all standards and a need for functionality above all else. It took 120 years to build St. Peter’s Basilica. It took Michelangelo three years to build his most famous sculpture, the sculpture of David. And da Vinci spent about four years on the Mona Lisa. Today, we can take a photograph in a split second. We live in a world that moves faster, but it is also a world in which people don’t make time to stop and appreciate the smaller details. Wandering through countless museums and basilicas in Paris, one realizes that out of everything these historical kingdoms and civilizations built up, it’s the art that we remember. It’s the sheer creative genius and admirable human talent that thousands of people flocked to these museums to see every day. The Renaissance began more than 600 years ago. And yet, people still seek out these sculptures and paintings. By promoting an interest in the arts, these Renaissance societies created collections with timeless value that continues to add to people’s lives. To paraphrase a quotation by C.S. Lewis, art isn’t necessarily something that has intrinsic value for survival, but is rather something that adds value to life. It only makes me wonder: When history looks back on our generation, what creative value will people say we added?

Our world is dominated by one-size-fits-all standards.

— Harsha Nahara can be reached at hnahata@umich.edu.

S

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Segregated internships

ix months ago I received an e-mail from a U.S. senator’s office. It was the director of the office’s internship program, and she was offering me an internship on Capitol Hill for the summer. I was ecstatic. After countless PATRICK cover letters, MAILLET resume rewrites and awkward phone interviews, I had finally achieved my goal: I was going to work on Capitol Hill. To a political junkie like me, working in our nation’s capital is truly the Holy Grail of summer internships. I responded to the e-mail minutes after receiving it, accepting the internship and thanking the woman for this auspicious opportunity. After calling my family and telling them the awesome news, I sat back in my chair in silence and embraced the moment. I had fulfilled my lifelong dream. Then reality set in: How the hell am I going to pay for this? Every year, more than 20,000 college-age individuals descend onto Washington, D.C. for internships in offices varying from the White House to lobbying firms on K Street. The vast majority of them are unpaid. As if working 45 hours a week unpaid wasn’t costly enough in terms of the forgone income that one could be making at a minimumwage job, living costs in D.C. are among the highest of any U.S. city. In fact, according to BusinessInsider.com, an online publication that annually measures the cost of living throughout the country, D.C. is ranked the eighth most expensive place to live in the United States.

I knew interning in D.C. was my dream, but now I just needed to figure out a way to pay for it. Luckily, the University has a lot of financial aid available to students who seek unpaid internships. I was fortunate to get a couple sizable grants, but even still, those would just barely cover my rent. Between a part-time job and a serious subsidization from my incredibly supportive parents, I was going to be able to pull it off, but it wasn’t going to be easy. When I got to D.C., I realized very quickly that the dynamic on Capitol Hill is far from reality. People often say that the Senate is made up of rich, white men. This stereotype isn’t very far from the truth, but what people don’t realize is that the offices that work for these senators share a similar makeup. From the first day I started my internship, I began to notice an extreme lack in diversity on Capitol Hill — not just in race and ethnicity, but also in terms of socio-economic status. If the United States has a serious “haves and havenots” problem, then D.C. can almost be considered the epicenter of this rampant societal dysfunction. You don’t have to be an economist to figure out why this unrepresentative demographic exists in Washington: The only people who can afford to take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that is a Congressional internship are kids from wealthy families. After all, how many inner-city kids from single-parent households do you know that can afford a job that requires one to pay rent that usually exceeds $800 a month, $15 or more for meals, and has a business-

formal dress code Monday through Thursday? The problem of having an internship program made up primarily of rich, white kids is one that will cause a viscous cycle that will have detrimental effects on our political system. Internships in D.C. are meant to be an opportunity for young Americans to experience government and policy firsthand and to prepare a future generation of leaders. If the only people that can afford this experience are the wealthy few, then our future leaders will be equally as unrepresentative. While many argue that there should be a minimum wage for interns in D.C., I understand just how complicated that would be considering how tight our nation’s budget is right now. However, if Congress wishes to host an internship program that truly benefits future generations there should be federal grants for unpaid interns for which underprivileged students can apply. Yes, this program would cost the federal government money, but the results would be a generation of young leaders who actually represent the country that they will inherit. My summer internship in D.C. was one of the best experiences of my life. It pains me to think that those less fortunate than I are unable to share such an unbelievably constructive opportunity. The federal government needs to change its internship program; otherwise our future government will be even more unrepresentative than the one we have now.

Federal grants should be offered to unpaid interns on the Hill.

—Patrick Maillet can be reached at maillet@umich.edu.

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS Kaan Avdan, Sharik Bashir, Barry Belmont, Eli Cahan, Eric Ferguson, Jesse Klein, Melanie Kruvelis, Maura Levine, Patrick Maillet, Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald, Harsha Nahata, Adrienne Roberts, Paul Sherman, Sarah Skaluba, Daniel Wang, Derek Wolfe

RYAN DAU | VIEWPOINT

What makes a liberal?

Why do Republicans hate President Barack Obama? Conservative readers will likely find the find the question vacuous: Why shouldn’t they hate Obama? He’s at the masthead of the “secular-socialist machine,” according to Newt Gingrich; the “most radical president” in our country’s history, according to Dick Cheney; and a “neo-Leninist communist,” according to the columnist Mychal Massie. To them, a bottomless contempt for the president is intuitive, like an unhealthy interest in the Old Testament or a fetish for Milton Friedman. After all, we’re talking about the man who socialized medicine, bowed to foreign powers and played party politics at the expense of bipartisanship. For them, the totality of this antiAmerican — and connivingly European —agenda can be summed up in a simple phrase: He’s a liberal. This is really a case of the right side of the aisle complaining that they only got half a loaf instead of the whole; Obama has been nothing if not amenable to conservatism, an oddly servile lapdog of what was the Republican mainstream barely 15 years ago. So, perhaps some introspection is required on the part of the left: Why don’t Democrats hate Obama? Picking on health-care reform is almost too easy. Older readers might find the Affordable Care Act suspiciously familiar, if only because it’s almost a line-by-line paraphrase of the legislative proposal that Bob Dole ran on when he was the Republican presidential candidate in the 1994 election. How did Dole get away with his apostasy to Marxism? Well, it might have something to do with the Heritage Foundation’s endorsement of an individual mandate in their 1989 article “A National Health System

for America.” Or perhaps he was just taking a page from Gingrich, the Republican Party’s brainiac, who championed the same policy when he was speaker of the House during the Clinton administration. Single-payer health care has never been on Obama’s lips, let alone his legislation. Even the Congressional Progressive Caucus, the Disneyland of the political left, refuses to call for what has commendably served the sick and dying in the Great White North (and Western Europe, Australia, Japan ... ) for decades. After Obama’s most current speech, most of you can write this paragraph in your head faster than I can put it on the page. Any misguided notion that Obama was a limp-wristed peacenik who spent his off hours genuflecting to Imams and fellating Latin American dignitaries should’ve been dispelled when he carpet bombed Syria six months ago; anyone who still clings to this self-serving delusion can loosen their grip on it now that pacifism’s crown prince has called for turning Syria’s few remaining buildings into rubble but a day ago. This is no doubt the thin edge of the wedge. If Obama is genuine in his desire to upend Assad’s regime, then a lengthy occupation of the country will be required, but it’s much easier to sell the conflict as a cheap, noninvasive military exercise that can be measured in hours instead of years. Maybe some troops will have to put their feet on the ground eventually, but, hey, variables are in flux during war. President George W. Bush said we could tame Iraq in months, and Democrats laughed. Obama says that we can leash Syria in days, and Democrats cheer. Obama is nothing if not amicable. He compromised with Blue Dog Democrats and axed the public option. He compromised with

Speaker of the House John Boehner and agreed to mandatory sequestration. He compromised with House Republicans and kept almost the entirety of the Bush tax cuts. Most recently, he’s been pushing for a (no laughing, please) “Grand Bargain” on the budget deficit, where slight increases in tax rates are paired with savage cuts to welfare and entitlement spending. Republicans, always the perennial free marketers, don’t seem to be taking the bait, but, much like gift-giving, it’s the thought that counts. Obama, for whatever reason, is a slave to consensus-building, to reaching a middle ground even if that middle is tilted decidedly to the right. Republicans wring their hands and gnash their teeth because the president hasn’t signed on to every dot and tittle of supply-side economics, but if laissez-faire is a house, then he’s at least made his way through the front door and is snacking in the foyer. In the spirit of full disclosure, I’m a liberal, or at least I think I am. I think “socialized medicine” is alright, I wish we could stop all this international fighting and just get along, and I wish that Democrats would find their misplaced backbones and start throwing punches for the left-wing again. But really, in modern political discourse the bar for what constitutes “liberalism” has been set so low that it’s applicable to almost every politician and intellectual anywhere at any time. Nixon? Supported Canadian-style health care and created the EPA. Eisenhower? Got big government involved in public infrastructure. Buckeley? Advocated pot legalization. Goldwater? Wanted federal same-sex marriage. If these are liberals, I tremble for who’s considered conservative. Ryan Dau is an LSA freshman.

CONTRIBUTE TO THE CONVERSATION

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Arts

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Monday, September 16, 2013 — 5A

VIDEO GAME REVIEW

FINE ARTS NOTEBOOK

‘Tales of Xillia’ makes stateside debut By JULIAN AIDAN Daily Arts Writer

WARNER BROS

Dumbledore doesn’t look a day over 90.

Rowling returns to wizarding world New spinoff film to feature fresh cast of characters By REBECCA GODWIN Daily Arts Writer

I heard the news in three parts. Part One: J.K. Rowling was going to be writing a screenplay for Warner Brothers. My excitement level was fairly low, as I hadn’t been all that thrilled with Rowling’s work since “Harry Potter.” Part Two: The screenplay was just the first in a series she would be writing for the film studio. My excitement level increased a bit as I thought of all the possibilities for the films. Part Three: The series of movies would neither be sequels nor prequels to the “Harry Potter” stories, but would still take place in the magical world she had created. The first film of the series will focus on Newt Scamander, the author of Hogwarts textbook “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” At this point, the HP fan-girl inside of me was having a disco party intermixed with minor bouts of cardiac arrest. The day I had been waiting for since the last HP movie premiered was imminent and I had never been happier. Once I had calmed myself a bit and my head no longer felt bogged down by a confundus

charm, I began to think over the news. Was I ready to reenter this magical world? I had started reading the HP books in the second grade and, for almost 12 years, they had been a place where I could escape and dream and imagine. It had taken me a while to accept the fact that the series was done, to accept the fact that my childhood was over. Would I be able to go on this crazy broomstick ride again? The answer is yes. Always. But while I may be ready to dive back into the wizarding world, some are concerned Rowling is only using these screenplays to return to her HP days of glory, especially after her first non-magic related novel was considered such a huge disappointment. My answer to such allegations: perhaps. But does it really matter? When HP ended, the world over screamed, cried and begged for more stories. A sequel about the Trio’s children or a prequel about the Marauders’ time at Hogwarts — the fans were willing to take anything so long as the magic didn’t end. But Rowling said no. She said she had plenty of stories she could write, plenty of background and history on all the characters that the fans never knew (some of which has been slowly released in the last couple years on Rowling’s Pottermore site, which offers tons of new, exclusive information), but she wanted to stop. Now she’s back and people are

questioning her motives? They need to sort out their priorities. I, for one, completely trust Rowling and her decisions. She never once, throughout the whole HP series, disappointed me (though she did try her best to make me sob with each character she killed off — some of whom I still refuse to believe are actually dead and not simply kicking ass in an intense game of hide-and-seek). The world she created was so extensive that there are hundreds of opportunities for new stories that can be completely unrelated to Harry Potter and his friends, but which are equally as enchanting and enthralling. As a writer, I do not believe that Rowling would ever try to disrupt the canon or exploit her original creation. She is simply branching out from the very sturdy trunk she’s already grown. As for the movie, I hope that a couple familiar faces pop up. At least Dumbledore, who seemed practically 1,000 years old when he died (actually, he was 114, in case you were wondering), could make a brief appearance. As for what else I want in the movie, well, I really couldn’t care less because I’m just happy the world that I love so much is coming back. But I guess we all should have seen this coming, as the things we lose have a way of “coming back to us” in the end, if not always in the way we expected.

DO YOU LOVE FILM, MUSIC, TELEVISION, VIDEO GAMES, BOOKS, FINE ARTS, CAMPUS ARTS EVENTS OR ANY COMBINATION OF THESE THINGS? THEN IT’S TIME FOR YOU TO APPLY TO THE DAILY’S ARTS SECTION. Email arts@michigandaily.com to request an application today.

Being the 13th game in the expansive “Tales” series, “Xillia” had a lot to live up to: The series is regarded as the third B most important world- Tales of wide, with sales exceeding 15 Xillia million units. Namco Bandai Shattering preorder records for the series and receiving critical acclaim following its Japanese release in September 2011, “Xillia” appeared to have lived up to the hype. Almost two years later, the first copies of “Tales of Xillia” meant for a North American audience hit shelves nationwide. As the game starts up, a Japanese pop-rock song sweeps through your speakers, with artist Ayumi Hamasaki’s voice preceded and supported by soaring strings. An intro straight out of an anime, the camera pans over cute, drawn renditions of the cast. Four options, ranging from “toddler-friendly” to “repetitivemotion-injury inducing” present themselves to the player. You’re presented the option of incarnating one of two protagonists: Jude Mathis, a promising medical student, or Milla Maxwell, the physical incarnation of the Lord of Spirits. The former is a nerdy brawler with an awesome habit of punching people out, the latter is an elemental spirit-summoning deity of sorts with hair that defies conventions like gravity and logic. In Rieze Maxia, the isolated land where “Xillia” takes place, two nations — Rashugal and Auj Oule — enjoy an unstable peace. Jude, spurred by the disappearance of his professor, stumbles upon Milla trying to enter the very military research facility Jude was headed toward. Within, they find Spyrix technology: Advanced and dangerous weaponry with the potential to destroy the world as they know it. As the story unfolds, the pair encounters a diverse cast of friends and foes — stalkers, mercenaries, kings bent on world domination — in the ultimate goal of maintaining stability

NAMCO BANDAI

Is video-game snow good packing snow?

between the inhabitants of Rieze Maxia and the spirits with which they coexist (and in many ways depend on). Gameplay is split between various optional side missions, including social relationship-based character development, and exploring areas as you journey from plot point to plot point.

Dated graphics distract from gameplay. Areas outside of villages are populated by monsters and rife with treasures. Glints of ore, sacks of loot and chests are well within reach of players with a careful eye. Battles are instanced and begin after characters come into contact with enemies, with factors like whether or not the player-character manages to catch the enemy off-guard, affecting the beginning circumstances of the fight. As a bonus, the flashy, button-mashing 10-second fights feature the energetic guitar riffladen battle music that makes “Tales of Xillia” fit right in with JRPGs of the past.

Combat is simple enough that one can get away with not learning any of the intricacies on any of the lower difficulties. However, the rewards for properly utilizing the various resources (which correspond to the amount of abilities the character is able to use) and synergies between characters are enormous. For tougher fights, using chains of abilities between characters make short and cinematic work of otherwise impossible enemies. Players gain experience through combat and gain new abilities and stats through a spiderweb-like system they place points into with every level-up. There’s more than enough to distract and satisfy the most meticulous completionist, with in-game titles and trophies rewarding the devoted. Unfortunately, “Xillia” is a little graphically dated, even for a 2011 game. The in-game combat dialogue can be an earsore and the voice acting occasionally leaves something to be desired. Though this doesn’t detract from the depth and complexity of the gameplay and its plot, it does make the experience less enjoyable aesthetically. In Nov. 2012, “Tales of Xillia 2” was released in Japan, and is expected stateside in 2014.

www.michigandaily.com/blogs/the+filter


Arts

6A — Monday, September 16, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

MUSIC COLUMN

Bringing Yeezus down to Earth

A

BBC AMERICA

Someone’s about to take a dip.

‘Broadchurch’ presents bare-bones television Fan-favorite David Tennant shows he’s more than a ‘Doctor’ By KELLY ETZ Daily Arts Writer

From tight plotting to deft acting, there’s nothing unnecessary about “Broadchurch.” It’s the bare bones of what TV can A be: no CGI, no fancy camera- Broadchurch work, no extra frills. “Broad- Season One church” plays Midseason like the love Wednesdays child of Poirot at 10 p.m. and Miss Marple (too weird?) BBC America — delightfully restrained and unrelentingly British. If you’re not watching, you’re missing something fantastic. The eight-part series, created by Chris Chibnall (“Torchwood”), concluded back in April

in the UK, but is still finishing up its U.S. run on BBC America. It has already been picked up for a second season, and FOX is in the works for a stateside adaptation to begin filming this January, proof of the near-immediate popularity of the series. Some of the insta-love can be attributed to “Doctor Who”favorite David Tennant (floppyhaired and perfectly scruffy) as detective inspector Alec Hardy. Tennant is wonderfully selfrestrained here, proving his acting ability is hardly one-note. Hardy is as suspicious as any local, popping pills (just what are those anyway?) and struggling with a pretty self-destructive personality. As an out-of-towner, Hardy brings the threat of the unknown crashing into the tiny hamlet of Broadchurch when he arrives to investigate the murder of an 11-year-old boy, Daniel (Oskar McNamara, “Anna Karenina”). Dueling Hardy at every turn, local Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller (Olivia Coleman, “The

Iron Lady”) is the antithesis of “uninvolved.” Originally up for Detective Inspector, Miller was unceremoniously thrown aside in favor of gate-crashing Hardy. Who should claim seniority over Danny’s case is a constant pushpull between the two leads, creating a zinging tension. The chemistry between Coleman and Tennant is flawless as their rocky relationship clashes at every new turn in the case. The mystery of Danny’s murder spans all eight episodes, giving the actors and the viewer time to sort through every well placed red herring. Sharp, concise dialogue prevents the series from feeling leaden with detail. Instead, each episode is a shrewd character study, as we watch more and more locals fall under Broadchurch’s collective suspicion. Even Danny’s best friend and Ellie’s son, Tom (Adam Wilson, “Mr Selfridge”), suddenly deletes text messages with decidedly shifty eyes. “Broadchurch” deftly handles the unraveling of a once-tran-

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quil small town, turning idealistic neighborhood intimacy into something ominous and threatening. Startlingly gritty, the series refuses to shy away from the realties of emotion. Going farther than even “The Killing,” each compact episode will twist up your insides with an expert hand. More than anything, “Broadchurch” feels real, from a grieving mother to a small town reporter intent on his big break to a worrisome reverend. The town is miles away from ideal, which only makes it that more believable. Enough waxing poetic. Why should you watch this series? Far from “hate-watching,” rerun fueled obscurity or endless second-rate murder mysteries, “Broadchurch” is a metaphorical palate cleanser before the craziness of pilot season. Perfectly composed, the series will remind you of what TV can be when it stops trying so hard. And come on, it’s David Tennant.

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week after Yeezus dropped and the music world at large went cuckoo for Kanye, Pitchfork sat down with a few of the hip-hop heavyweight’s collaborators to talk the new release. Among the kind of praise-heavy talk you’d expect to be ELLIOT generated, ALPERN guest producer Travi$ Scott offered up a fairly transcendental quote about the G.O.O.D. Music crew: “We always undermine the commercial.” Always? Look, I consider myself one of Kanye’s countless listeners — I have all seven of his studio albums (if you count Watch the Throne, which is close enough). I, too, got Yeezus the first day I could and had probably played through it three or four times before hitting the mattress that night. In short, I really do think Kanye West is a special musical talent, one of those ahead-oftheir-time-type deals. He is, legitimately, an artist. But I think we need to keep two things separate about Kanye: Yes, he is a fantastic musician. But he is absolutely a one-percent, profit-driven mega-mogul. West is not, as his album seems to suggest a few times, the newest coming of mankind’s spiritual/societal savior. “Fuck you and your corporation / Y’all niggas can’t control me,” Kanye raps on “New Slaves,” and the crowd goes wild. And then, the crowd finds Kanye’s fashion offerings, including a plain white cotton T-shirt clocking in at a cool $120 (don’t worry, it already sold out within a day of being posted). It’s cool — Yeezy still has a “Fuck you and your corporation” felted baseball cap for $195 if you really feel like treating yourself.

Can you really rap about the hood when your hat costs $195? I acknowledge that Kanye isn’t even close to the first music star guilty of the same kind of hypocrisy — preaching to the choir while passing around that gold-plated collection plate. But can we please just stop worshipping the guy? Looking at his latest release, Yeezus is a pretty solid album, including a few of Kanye’s best, most creative hits in a while. But, brace yourselves — it’s not perfect. Probably not even best of the year. “But can’t you see how incredible it is that he’s releasing this music in today’s hiphop world?” Let me stop you right there. An album should never be

judged based on the status of the individual, or strictly how it approaches a music scene. That’s like if I reviewed J.K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy,” a rather lukewarm novel: “But can’t you see how incredible it is that J.K. Rowling is putting out an adult novel in today’s literary world?” Not really — until you give me something I can hang my hat on, those intangibles shouldn’t have a say in the equation. Now, like I stated before, I really do like Yeezus as an album. “Blood On The Leaves” is magnificent in its grandeur, and a number of other tracks (“Hold My Liquor,” “Send It Up,” “Black Skinhead”) are repeatedly pumping through my car speakers. But, then, we inevitably get to tracks like “I Am A God.” Again, I’d like to profess that I’ve listened to the song enough to know, at least, that the hook/ title “I Am A God” isn’t purely literal (though I’m sure it didn’t pain Yeezy much to pen a song by that name). The first half of the song actually touches on this, if not to assert the lack of sacrilege when he compares himself to Jesus in the latter verse — but I digress. One of the most distinguishing features of the song is the very recognizable triplet of screams after the hook, something that happens twice. I don’t want to simplify the issue, but I’ve noticed something about this particular part of the song: The way people react to it tends to tell me what kind of Kanye fan they really are. Most seem to mirror my own actions, either by hitting fast-forward or just changing the song, but every now and again I run into an audiophile or a Kanye fanatic who tells me how much they enjoy those screams, how “primal” and “raw” and “untamable” they are. Not to be the analogy man, but this reminds me of those indie music writers who praise the experimental fringe of their genre. “What, man, you don’t like two sheets of corrugated metal scraped against each other for four minutes? But it sounds so primal, man, so raw.” That’s fine — I genuinely believe that these people, for whatever reason, really enjoy their screams. But can’t we consider the viewpoint that, maybe, Kanye just got really high and decided to scream a bunch on his new album ’cause he had nothing better to do? It’s like Pootie-Tang’s chart-topping album of pure silence — are we simply here to just listen, and then dissect everything to its core like it really has some mote of meaning? No, it’s not that simple. Kanye is, legitimately, a musical savant if not a genius, and his albums deservedly get more hype (and controversy) than almost any other artist in the field. But I’m just tired of the over-reverence. I guess I’ll just have to wait until Yeezus Part II. Alpern is waiting for the screaming to end. To help, email ealpern@umich.edu.

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Arts

FILM REVIEW

Suliman powers emotional ‘Attack’

Monday, September 16, 2013 — 7A

FILM REVIEW

Character-driven film examines class divide By NATALIE GADBOIS Daily Arts Writer

What drives people to sacrifice themselves for causes that don’t directly affect them? Where does the violent passion come from B+ that incites people to perform The Attack unspeakable acts of vio- At State lence? Are all Scope terrorists psychopaths? Or is there always another, more complex explanation? “The Attack” delicately delves into these questions, and the result is a bare portrayal of a woman conflicted and the man who loved her. Amin Jafaari (Ali Suliman, “Under the Same Sun”) is a Palestinian surgeon living in Tel Aviv — well respected and accepted by the Jewish society that surrounds him. Soon after the film begins, a suicide bomb detonates close to his hospital, killing 17 and injuring countless victims who are rushed to his operating room. His efficiency and dignity are evident as he saves life after life, only stopping when an injured Israeli man screams that he does not want Amin — an Arab — as his doctor. Hours later, exhausted and beleaguered, Amin discovers that his wife Sahim (Reymond Amsalem, “Plasticine”) was found dead in the attack. We see her body bluntly torn in two, her torso lying meekly under a sheet in the morgue. And as Amin pulled shrapnel from children, his wife’s body was floors below him, being identified as the perpetrator of the attack. Director and screenwriter Ziad Douieri (“Lila Says”) doesn’t spend much time establishing Jaafari’s uniquely privileged

SCOPE

Look at this photograph.

world before it is explosively disassembled, so he uses flashbacks in Amin’s gold-tinged memory to create his wife, Sahim. Douieri worked as a cameraman for Quentin Tarantino, and his tutelage shows, each shot perfectly framing the before and after of Amin’s life. Sahim, a liberal Palestinian, is for the majority of the film a beautiful enigma, defined by her soulful glances and overly scripted declarations against Israel. As Amin searches for answers, we sense that he is discovering just as we are: The question becomes not about Sahim’s innocence, but one of Amin himself. How could he love her so deeply yet know nothing of the dark resentments beneath her beautiful face? The film masquerades as being marked by contrasts: shiny Tel Aviv with archaic Palestine; Amin’s granite-countered, stainless-steeled mansion with his humble birthplace; Sahim the dream girl vs. Sahim the mass murderer. However, all these distinctions mask the real ambiguity of the film, as Amin unravels the real complexity of Sahim’s political beliefs. Suliman shines as Jaafari, using masculine brevity to portray the pillar of strength he was before the attack. He shows Amin’s anguish through subtle gestures: a downturned head,

a blank stare that lasts a second too long. These little actions are often drowned out by the script’s creative view of what “grief” is. Amin constantly imagines the living memory of his wife standing next to him, a faltering attempt to build her character without using flashbacks. The film is strongest when Amin bares everything — his anger, confusion and all-consuming grief — but it sometimes drifts into symbolic theatrics. Amin is interrogated, he is pitied, he is rejected from a society that once granted him special access, and at the same time distanced from his birthplace because he betrayed them so long ago. He is a man who once had everything: a beautiful wife, fulfilling career, wealth and most importantly, a valued place in a society that normally doesn’t accept people like him. While “The Attack” gracefully examines how Amin reacts when his entire life is upended, it focuses on the reasons someone like Sahim would throw it all away, sacrificing her life and countless others to a cause she can’t even admit to her husband. “The Attack” is powerful, and while its consequences linger, the audience never fully understands the most burning question: Who is Sahim Jaafari?

TV REVIEW

‘The Million Second Quiz’ reinvents game-show genre By ALEC STERN Daily Arts Writer

In 1999, ABC struck gold with its question-and-answer megahit, “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” Since its meteoric B+ rise and quick fall, the pri- The Million metime quizSecond Quiz show genre has remained idle … Pilot until now. NBC hopes to recap- NBC ture some of the magic with “The Million Second Quiz,” an innovative new series hosted by Ryan Seacrest. Though “MSQ” suffers from a somewhat complicated premise, this fastpaced game show should excite fans of the genre. “MSQ” is a two-week event series and seems to be NBC’s kickoff to the 2013-2014 television season, which officially begins the week of Sept. 23rd. The premiere episode is littered with previews for the network’s new shows, as well as crosspromotions with existing shows, most of which will premiere the week after “MSQ” ’s big finale. And as “MSQ” airs every weekday at 8 p.m. for the next two weeks, all of NBC’s series are getting tons of free exposure. “The Million Second Quiz” ’s biggest issue is that it’s hard to nail down a description; it’s nearly impossible to fit all of the show’s parts into one succinct logline. In other words, there’s a lot going on. At the most basic level, “MSQ” is a head-to-head quiz battle between two contestants. The winner earns a spot in the money chair and remains in the chair until he or she loses a battle. If you’re sitting in the

NBC

You ain’t no Regis, Seacrest.

chair, you’re earning 10 dollars per second. Therefore, the aim of the game is to stay in the money chair for as long as possible. Beyond that, there are several more aspects to the show, including a leader’s room (where the top four contestants must live until they are knocked out) and a huge interactive component.

It’s entertaining, but very complicated. The interactivity of “The Million Second Quiz” is one of the show’s biggest strengths. The “MSQ” app, which spent time as the No. 1 free app in the country (it is currently No. 10), enables viewers at home to play along with the contestants and even qualify to be a part of the show. If you can rack up enough points,

NBC might pick you as a “line jumper” and give you an automatic spot on the show, as well as an interview on “The Today Show.” Another defining component of “MSQ” is that the competition goes on 24/7. Though the show only airs for one hour per night, the quizzing never stops. Contestants are playing the game at all times, for one-million seconds straight (12 days or so). When the million seconds are up, the four people who have spent the longest time in the money chair will face off with the potential to win up to $10 million. Ultimately, people tend to respond to simplicity — a quality that is sorely lacking in “The Million Second Quiz.” However, “MSQ” does complicated well, and with the help of Seacrest, the show rarely falls from complicated to confusing. “MSQ” is at its best during the quiz battles, which are fast, fun and thoughtful. Viewers will just have to remain on their toes because at every turn, there are a million more gimmicks being introduced.

FILM DISTRICT

‘I got your baby.’

‘Insidious Chapter 2’ can’t live up to original By AKSHAY SETH Daily B-Side Editor

If you had a dollar for every time I said, “I got your baby” on the car ride over to see “Insidious: Chapter 2,” you’d have B$8. My asshole friends and I Insidious: were excited. Chapter 2 I’m pretty sure all of us had At Quality 16 seen enough and Rave horror movies in our time Film District to know that sequels in this genre are almost never bankable, but we were hoping against hope. The trailer, if not terrifying, had been an experience, and without it, belligerent exclamations of “I got your baby” to random passers-by would never have been possible. Oh, and #RoseByrne. Hope can be a terrible thing, and watching it get suffocated at the hands of director James Wan (“The Conjuring”) over the course of an agonizing 105 minutes only makes it worse. Agonizing may be the wrong choice of word. This is by no means a terrible film, delivering expectable scares at unsurprising points, but the problem, as it often is with most horror sequels, is it’s a follow-up to a much better movie. In a perfect world, we’d judge it based only on its merits, and

not its predecessors, but sorry James, this is not a perfect world. Our opinion on a film is dictated by our viewing experience, and if that experience suffers in any way, the easiest target becomes what we’re viewing. The problem with horror sequels is simple: They offer exposition for developments that should be left unexplained, and in doing so inherently dilute whatever made the original worth watching. As that popular saying goes, “we’re scared of what we don’t understand,” and “Insidious: Chapter 2” ’s greatest failing becomes that it tries too hard to explain the supernatural. News flash: People who watch scary movies don’t really give a shit why an imaginary place called The Further exists. We watch scary movies to be scared, and since when has someone explaining anything been at all frightening?

Don’t try to explain The Further. The big “gotcha” moment that sets “Insidious: Chapter 2” in motion (relax, I’m not spoiling anything) comes when we learn that Josh Lambert (Patrick

Wilson, “The Conjuring”) has been possessed by the creepy, old demon-woman from the last film. So this time around, the son, Dalton (Ty Simpkins, “Iron Man 3”), is never really in danger. Much like the rest of the supporting cast, including Rose Byrne (“The Place Beyond The Pines”), he serves as a prop for the duration of the film, one of the countless people daddy could hurt if his evil side finally kicks in. Byrne’s character runs around scared, hoping to keep her kids from harm’s way, but again, she doesn’t have any meaty input in guiding the story. That rests on Josh and his weird mom, Lorraine (Barbara Hershey, “Black Swan”), as they desperately try to figure out how to get da baby back. When I walked out of the theater, the first thing I remember exclaiming was something vaguely along the lines of “what the fuck?” I think if someone asked me to elaborate, I would have said, “the reason this film doesn’t work is that it gravitates too much toward two characters without really establishing an atmosphere of tension for them to react to. It uses the supporting cast like cue cards, regurgitating useless BS about the “why’s” and “how’s” no one cares about.” It’s sad. But the saddest part? James Wan’s next project is “Fast & Furious 7.”


8A — Monday, September 16, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com


SportsMonday B

The Michigan Daily | michigandaily.com | September 16, 2013

CAUGHT IN THE ZIPPER

Michigan 28, Akron 24 TODD NEEDLE/Daily

The Michigan student section (top) was stunned as Akron approached a near-upset. Redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner (left) committed four turnovers. Fifth-year senior running back Fitzgerald Toussaint found little room on the inside.

By MATT SLOVIN Managing Editor

Quarterback Devin Gardner, who had four turnovers, called it the worst game he has played at any level. Captain Taylor Lewan called it an “embarrassment” to the Michigan football program, which “works too hard to have games like this.” Coach Brady Hoke said it’s like a college final — how much you study, or pre-

pare, will dictate the outcome. The Wolverines were not prepared for Saturday’s game against Akron, and it showed. Had it not been for a last-second goal-line stand, Michigan’s season that started almost perfectly would have been spoiled before Big Ten play even began. Instead, the Wolverines held on for dear life, avoiding one of the worst losses in the history of the Big House by beating Akron 28-24 and remaining unblem-

ished on the season. “It was embarrassing,” said Lewan, an offensive tackle. “We didn’t prepare. This is on the seniors and the leadership of this team.” Junior linebacker Desmond Morgan stuffed Zips running back Jawon Chisholm on 3rdand-goal from the 1-yard line for a loss of two. Then with the final seconds ticking off, another junior linebacker, Brennan Beyer, hit Akron quarterback

FOOTBALL

What was that?

T

aylor Lewan used the word “embarrassing” five times after Michigan’s 28-24 win over Akron on Saturday, and that might not have done it justice. What was that? What team was that out there? It wasn’t the team that EVERETT beat Notre COOK Dame on national television last week, it wasn’t the team with a potential Heisman candidate at

quarterback and it sure as hell wasn’t the team that has aspirations to compete in the Big Ten Championship game in a couple months. This team was flat and boring and unable to execute anything on offense. This team made the Zips look competitive, never mind the fact that Akron now has a 28-game losing streak on the road, a 3-34 record over the previous three years and has not beaten an FBS opponent since 2010. This team made everyone forget about the magic of last week, Under the Lights II, real quick. Lewan, the All-American

(ALMOST) APP. STATE

n For many, Saturday’s near-meltdown brought back memories of the worst loss in program history six years ago. Page 2B

fifth-year senior offensive tackle, blamed it on the seniors and the leadership of the team, who he said were responsible for a poor week of preparation during practice. He didn’t blame his quarterback, redshirt junior Devin Gardner, who had four turnovers and single-handedly let Akron back in the game with an awful pick-six on the second play of the fourth quarter. Nor did he blame the secondary, which let the Zips throw for 311 yards, the second straight week the defense has allowed over 300 yards of passing offense. See COOK, Page 3B

Kyle Pohl, causing his pass to fall harmlessly to the ground in the end zone. Hoke said he knew that defensive coordinator Greg Mattison’s final play call would be cable zero train, a blitz. Beyer turned around, saw his teammates celebrating and knew Michigan had survived. To set up the improbable stop, Zips quarterback Kyle Pohl, who threw for 311 yards, hit receiver L.T. Smith for 15 yards and was

ruled down just shy of the goal line. Earlier in the drive, the Wolverines forced Akron into a 3rdand-5 situation, but like they did so many times Saturday, the Zips turned it into a conversion and a sizeable gain. Overall, Akron was 9-for-18 on third downs. “The problem is not tight enough coverage, not fitting the run well enough and no pass pressure,” Hoke said. Trailing 21-17, Akron sus-

tained an 11-play, 67-yard drive that included two of those nine third-down conversions and ended in a one-yard touchdown pass. Michigan got the ball back with about four minutes to go in the game and needed only four plays to cover 70 yards. Gardner hit fifth-year senior wide receiver Jeremy Gallon for a gain of 20 and the duo’s longest completion of the day. Fifth-year senior See CAUGHT, Page 3B

VOLLEYBALL

Wolverines drop first contest of the season By ERIN LENNON Daily Sports Writer

Three sets into a match against No. 16 Florida State, the final match of the Texas A&M Invitational, the No. 7 Michigan volleyball team looked poised to fly back to Ann Arbor with a perfect 8-0 record intact. The Wolverines entered Saturday’s contest coming off a fiveset comeback win over Texas A&M and a three-set sweep of Siena. Two sets later, Michigan suffered its first loss of the season, finishing the Texas A&M

Invitational 2-1. Down by one through the first half of the third set, the Wolverines (7-1) 0 SIENA and Semi3 MICHIGAN noles traded points 3 MICHIGAN before the TEXAS A&M 2 Florida State sisFLORIDA ST. 3 ter duo 2 MICHIGAN of Nicole and Elise Walch — who each finished with 22 kills — found a hole in Michigan’s block. The pair combined for nine of Florida State’s last 11 points, sealing the 25-17 win.

FIELD HOCKEY

n After a shutout of Louisville on Saturday, Michigan’s offense exploded for six goals to beat UC Davis on Sunday. Page 3B

Three straight kills from freshman middle blocker Abby Cole kept the Wolverines within one through the first half. But two more late kills from Cole, and one from senior cocaptain outside hitter Lexi Erwin, kept Michigan in the game late. But it was not enough to top the sisters a second time around. Despite two key service errors and a late Erwin attack error in the fifth set, Michigan was able to tie the game at 13 off a kill from Cole. But two kills from Florida State — the Seminoles See VOLLEYBALL, Page 3B


SportsMonday

2B — September 16, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SPORTSMONDAY COLUMN

For 315 Saturdays, Michigan outruns its past

T

hree hundred and fifteen Saturdays had passed since Michigan Stadium felt just like this, and time seemed to melt and then fuse into one thread. This time it was a third-and-1 from Michigan’s 2-yard line, but it felt like it did when Michigan had a 37-yard field-goal attempt to save a season from destruction before it even began. No players remain from the team that lost to Appalachian ZACH State in 2007. HELFAND Michigan’s current freshmen were in sixth grade then. Most probably didn’t watch. But look closely and the past is everywhere in this stadium. The whole place was built in Fielding Yost’s vision: the corner where Braylon seemed to fly, the goal posts torn down in 1969, a loss that still defies belief. That’s the allure of Michigan, of college sports. Four years pass, and everything is new but it’s the same. No. 98 is gone and then washes up again. Howard’s No. 21 finds its way back too. Michigan coach Brady Hoke likes to say his players represent every Michigan player who has worn the jersey. 3:39 p.m. on a Saturday in 2007 becomes 3:16 p.m. in 2013. Appalachian State lines up in a field-goal block, and Akron lines up on the goal line and it’s as if a stadium had been holding its breath that entire time. The past crashes into the present like a wave, and sometimes it’s easy to get crushed.

FILE PHOTO/Daily

TODD NEEDLE/Daily

Appalachian State coach Jerry Moore celebrated after the 2007 upset.

A Michigan fan grimaces after Michigan’s narrow victory over Akron.

Losing isn’t much different from winning. With two plays left, Akron thought Michigan would pinch, but Michigan was waiting wide for the outside pitch; Greg Mattison called the right blitz, and Michigan won. Someone missed an assignment, and Appalachian State blocked the field goal and Michigan lost.

didn’t do a good enough job preparing you. We will prepare you better, I promise you.” The first was Lloyd Carr. The next, Brady Hoke. Take out the context, and it’s impossible to tell one from the other. Michigan still hasn’t dug itself out from the Appalachian State hole. The loss didn’t start

After the game, a coach blamed himself. “We were not a well-prepared football team,” he said. “That is my job, and I take full responsibility.” Six years apart, a different coach tells his team the same: “Guys, it’s our fault. Starts with me. Our fault. Our fault. We

the spiral; it was more of a symptom. Remember, though, the Wolverines were national championship contenders at 3:39 p.m. of that day. At 3:40, they weren’t. They went to the Rose Bowl the year before and haven’t been back since. The memory of the loss had long receded before Saturday,

but Michigan was still not out of that hole: still no Big Ten titles, still no Rose Bowls. And then an Akron team even worse than Appalachian State threatened to start the nightmare over again. On the bus to the game, the Akron coaching staff showed the game tape of Michigan’s game against Notre Dame. They weren’t analyzing plays or looking for tendencies. They wanted to show their players how emotionally draining that game was for Michigan. They wanted to show them Michigan couldn’t possibly come out with that same intensity two weeks in a row. Akron understood. Part of the deal of 20-year-olds playing football is that sometimes they don’t show up. All that’s left is to survive and move on. There’s not much to learn from a game like this. Does Michigan seem like a worse team than last week? In the locker room after the game, Hoke gathered his team and spoke, his voice growing more hoarse as he went on. “No. 1 goal is to do what?” he said. “Win,” the team said. “Did we win?” “Yessir.” “That’s the good part,” Hoke said. “That’s the good part.” Michigan managed to outrun its past, even if just by four yards. For players after the game, it hardly seemed like a win. But the Wolverines have now survived 315 Saturdays since the worst loss in program history. That’s the only good part, but that’s the only part that matters. -Helfand can be reached at zhelfand@umich.edu or on Twitter @zhelfand

Five things we learned: Akron By EVERETT COOK Daily Sports Editor

1. Devin Gardner giveth, and Devin Gardner taketh away The redshirt junior quarterback had 83 percent of Michigan’s total yards on Saturday, continuing his role as the backbone of the offense. He’s immensely talented and athletic — the Wolverines’ offense would look a lot different (read: worse) without him. But so far this season, there’s been at least one play a game that a Pop Warner quarterback shouldn’t be making, much less a collegiate quarterback who was expected to be in contention for the Heisman Trophy before the season. Against Notre Dame, it was an interception in the end zone that let the Fighting Irish back into the game. Saturday, it was an awful pass into the flat that was again returned for a picksix. It was his fourth turnover of the day and immediately brought Akron back into the game. WithSudoku Syndication out that play from Gardner, a goal-line stand likely wouldn’t

have been needed. If Michigan is going to win a Big Ten championship, he will have to be better than that. Earlier in the season, Michigan coach Brady Hoke said that Gardner’s talent is both a blessing and a curse. It allows for his quarterback to make insane, remarkable plays, but it also lets Gardner believe he can do anything and that mistakes are for other people. Michigan’s season depends on whether he can find the line between talented and mistakeprone. “I wasn’t myself today,” Gardner said after the game Saturday. “I made a lot of mistakes today. It was probably my worst game ever, but it won’t happen again.”

was lacking on Saturday, but also because he felt like the offensive line wasn’t doing anything to help the running game. “Being the one offensive tackle on this team, I put that offensive performance on myself,” he said. “Devin didn’t have enough time to throw. Our running backs didn’t have holes. That’s my fault.” It wasn’t entirely his fault, obviously, but the offensive line didn’t look like a finished group Saturday. For the second straight game, fifth-year senior running back Fitzgerald Toussaint ran for 71 yards. He had a few long runs but was bottled up for the most part. That was acceptable against Notre Dame, a team with one of the best defensive lines in 2. The offensive line isn’t quite the country. It was not against there Akron. Lewan and fellow fifth-year Fifth-year senior offensive senior Michael Schofield form tackle Taylor Lewan was furi- one of the best offensive tackle ous after the game, to the point duos in the Big Ten, but the intewhere he told reporters, “You rior line is incredibly inexperiall don’t even know. You all just enced and raw. write shit down.” We’ll see in the next couple http://www.sudokusyndication.com/sudoku/generator/print/ He was angry because he felt weeks whether it’s a matter of leadership from upperclassmen cohesion and inexperience or if it’s a matter of talent. If the interior line doesn’t play well against Connecticut next week, offensive coordinator Al Borges might look to shake up the group.

SUDOKU MEDIUM

3. Paging Frank Clark

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WORK IT.

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Junior defensive end Frank Clark said before the season that his goal was 10 sacks. He was supposed to be a wrecking ball on a unit that looked devilish and deep in the first game of the year against Central Michigan. Yet for all the talk before the season, Clark still doesn’t have a sack. He’s the biggest disappointment on a struggling unit that hurried Akron quarterback Tyler Pohl but, for the second straight week, didn’t record a sack. Pohl — just like Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees the week before — had all the time in the world to throw in the pocket. The defensive line played best when it had to, in the red zone, but it’s the first 80 yards that raised warning flags Saturday.

Generate and solve Sudoku, Super Sudoku and Godoku puzzles at sudokusyndication.com!

TODD NEEDLE/Daily

Redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner had four turnovers on Saturday, including a crucial pick-six in the fourth quarter.

4. The secondary doesn’t have Greg Mattison’s trust yet Part of the blame for the secondary’s struggles can be placed on the defensive line. The more pressure they apply, the easier the secondary’s job is. That doesn’t let the unit off the hook. Akron passed for more than 300 yards, becoming the second team in a row to do that to Michigan. Starting junior safety Raymon Taylor was beaten several times on deep routes, and Mattison had to rely on freshman Jourdan Lewis and junior Delonte Hollowell, both of whom played more of a reserve role the

first two games of the year. If Mattison trusted this group more, he could dial up more blitzes to help apply pressure that the defensive line so far cannot. But because he understandably can’t, the two units struggled together Saturday. If one of these units improves, the other one will, too. 5. Bold Prediction: Gardner will throw at least one interception in every game this year Again, Michigan’s offense would be a lot less exciting and impactful without Gardner. His primary backup is a true fresh-

man — Michigan needs him. But if Gardner is throwing three interceptions against Akron, what happens in Big Ten games or games on the road? Unless Gardner has a sudden awareness epiphany, his false sense of security will always be there. Maybe the revelation will happen soon, but it’s far more likely that the trend of Gardner making one big mistake per game continues. He will have stunning performances, but ultimately, every Saturday will end with at least one pick from Michigan’s most dynamic playmaker.


SportsMonday

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

September 16, 2013 — 3B

‘D’ dominates, then offense erupts in sweep

GAME STATISTICS

By ZACH SHAW Team Stats First Downs Rush/Yards Passing Yards Offensive Plays Total Offense Kick returns/yds Punt returns/yds Comp/Att/Int Punts/Avg Fumbles/Lost Penalties/Yards Time of Possession

Michigan 19 32/177 248 62 425 4/64 1/9 16/30/3 4/33.0 2-1 5-45 26:44

Akron 21 30/107 311 79 418 3/61 2/9 25/49/2 5/44.4 0-0 5-38 33:16

M I C H I G A N PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Int

Gardner

16-30

248

2

3

248

2

3

Totals

16-30

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Gardner

10

131

10.3

36

1

Toussaint

19

81

3.7

21

1

Green

1

3

3.1

3

0

Chesson

1

2

2.0

TEAM

1

0

-2 .0

Totals

32

217

5.5

2

0 0

0

36

2

RECEIVING Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Gallon

6

66

11

20

0

Funchess

2

65

32.5

48

1

Butt

2

27

13.5

Chesson

1

33

33

Norfleet

2

20

Toussaint

1

27

Houma

1

9

9.0

9

0

Reynolds

1

1

1.0

1

0

16

248

15.5

48

2

Totals

14

0

33

1

10

15

0

27

27

0

PUNTING Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Wile

4

132

33.3

54

Totals

4

132

33.3

54

KICKOFF RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Norfleet

3

78

26

32

0

Totals

3

78

26

32

0

PUNT RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Dileo

2

30

15

Lg 23

TD

Chesson

1

19

19

19

0

Norfleet

1

15

15

15

0

Total

4

64

17

23

0

0

TACKLES Player

Solo Asst

Tot

Ross

6 4

10

Gordon

3 6

9

Morgan, D.

5

Countess

3 3

6

Wilson

4 0

4

Lewis

5

Ojemudia

2 2

4

Taylor

3 1

4

Bolden

2 0

2

Godin

1 1

2

Beyer

1 1

2

Clark

0 2

2

Jenkins

1 0

1

Kerridge

1 0

1

Glasgow

1 0

1

Chesson

1 0

1

Pipkins

1 0

1

Stribling

1 0

1

Thomas

1 0

1

Toussaint

0

Gordon

0 1

1

Gallon

0 1

1

Totals

2

7

0

5

1

67

A K R O N

PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Int

Pohl

25-49

311

2

2

Totals

25-49

311

2

2

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

Chisholm

15

58

3.9

12

0

Hundley

5

38

4.2

19

0

Pohl

3

11

3.7

8

0

Broderick

1

3

3.0

3

0

Jones

1

2

2.0

2

0

Totals

30

107

3.6

19

0

TD

RECEIVING Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Smith

5

125

25.0

43

0

D’Orazio

6

97

16.2

30

1

Pratt

3

24

8.0

11

0

24

24

24

0

16

5.3

9

1

16

5.3

6

0

Dillard.

1

Goodman

3

Chisholm

3

Traylor-Bennett

1

Hundley

1

Frieson

2

Totals

25

5

16.0

16

0

3

3.0

3

0

1

0.5

5

0

12.4

43

2

311

PUNTING Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Paul

5 222 44.4

58

Totals

5 222 44.4

58

KICKOFF RETURNS Player

No. Yds Avg Lg

Traylor-Bennett

2 42 21.0 21

Totals

2 42 21.0 21

TACKLES Player

Solo Asst

Tot

Freeman

7 2

Mizell

3 2

5

March

4 0

4

Rossi

4 0

4

Lartey

3 1

4

Holmes

3 1

4

McCray

3 0

3

Evans

2

3

Cheek

2 0

2

Robinson

1 1

2

James

1

Nordly

1 1

2

Turner

1 0

1

1

1

As the first half wound down Sunday, frustration began to set in for the Michigan field hockey team. Another missed shot, another groan from the crowd and yet another scream of disgust from the Wolverines. Michigan had outshot California-Davis 18-3 in the first half and had just a 2-1 lead to show for it. One week after failing to convert against No. 18 Wake Forest, it looked like history was destined to repeat itself. But 0 LOUISVILLE Michi1 MICHIGAN gan’s 19th shot of the 1 UC DAVIS afternoon 6 MICHIGAN changed its fortunes, as sophomore forward Shannon Scavelli’s goal broke the game open for the Wolverines (3-3) and sparked a 6-1 rout of the Aggies (1-4). The win was the second in as many days for Michigan at Ocker Field. After falling to a disappointing 1-3 start on the road, Michigan coach Marcia Pankratz knew it was important for her team to gain some momentum by winning at home. “It’s good for our confidence,” Pankratz said. “We have a lot of talent and depth, but we also have a lot of youth. So it’s important that when they go in the game they’re confident and know that they can play against anybody.” After a sluggish opening few minutes against UC Davis that put Michigan behind early, 1-0, the Wolverines picked up the tempo. Following the UC Davis goal, the Wolverines tacked on two goals off corners, grabbing a lead they would never relinquish. “Early on we were settling into their game,” said senior forward Rachael Mack. “We were a little lackadaisical, but after falling behind we were able to turn it around and play our game. We were able to play to our intensity, our pace, and do what we want to

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scored 15 points off of 13 kills — put the Wolverines away, 15-13. “(Florida State) played very well, and we could have played a little bit better,” said Michigan coach Mark Rosen. “We had played three games in 24 hours, so we were tired. This weekend exposed us a little and gave us a lot of information. We come back with a lot more information and direction into what we need to do to take ourselves to the next level.” The Wolverines needed five sets to complete a comeback victory over Texas A&M in their second match Friday. Having fallen quietly to the Aggies in the first set, Michigan earned a 24-18 lead off stellar blocking from Toon and sophomore middle blocker Krystalyn Goode. Despite a 6-0 Aggie run to tie the game at 24, a kill from freshman outside hitter Abby Cole and a Texas A&M attack error tied the match at one set apiece. Despite hitting just .220 as a team in the third set, Michigan took an easier 25-20 victory and a one-game advantage over the Aggies. In it, Goode — who recorded a season-high seven blocks and three of the Wolverines’ five solo stuffs — contributed five of her eight kills on the night. But Texas A&M would serve the same score back to Michigan in the fourth set, forcing a 15-point tiebreaker in the final set. Texas A&M outside hitter Angela Lowak gave the Aggies a four-point lead early on, from which the Wolverines would never recover. In the fifth set, Michigan was forced to play comeback when, down 13-11 and facing a match point, Toon’s team-high 12th kill put the ball back in the hands of junior setter Lexi Dannemiller for the serve. Down 13-12, Dannemiller’s ace tied the set before a kill from Goode put the Wolverines within one point of the match. A second Dannemiller ace secured the 15-13 win, and Michigan’s seventh of the season. Of course, Dannemiller

PATRICK BARRON/Daily

Sophomore back Lauren Thomas helped to shut out Louisville on Friday. With a 6-1 win over UC Davis on Sunday, Michigan allowed just one goal on the weekend.

do, not what they wanted to do.” With just over three minutes remaining in the half, a high chip shot delivered by Scavelli near the right goalpost sailed over the UC Davis goalie and was tipped by Mack into the left corner of the net. With the goal, Michigan extended its lead to two goals, and the blowout was on. Mack continued her strong season in which she has carried the load on offense as the teams’ leading goal-scorer. This weekend showed a more giving side for Mack, as she totaled four assists on the weekend compared to just one goal. “It was a good team effort,” Pankratz said. “We had a lot of

could only deliver after getting in the zone. “I was on the bench and Tim, our trainer, meditates with us in the morning, so he told me to just focus on my breathing,” Dannemiller said. “That’s what I did, so I was just lucky to get the ball where it landed.” Several new Wolverine faces saw time against Siena in the first match of the weekend. Among them, sophomore setter Carly Warner — in her first appearance this season — contributed 28 assists and six digs in place of Dannemiller. Michigan never trailed Siena while resting multiple key starters and substituting 15 players, taking the match in three sets, 25-14, 25-17, 25-17. “Whenever we put someone else in, we know that they can play as well as they do in practice,” Dannemiller said. “Having everyone come in and be supportive of each other was cool. It was fun to see Carly run an offense because she did a really great job.” The trio of freshman middle blocker Gaby Bulic and sophomores Ally Davis and Kelly Murphy combined for 10 of Michigan’s 44 kills on the match. Redshirt sophomore middle blocker Olivia Reed added a block in the second set of the match, putting the Wolverines up 15-7. From Siena, Rosen and his squad learned that the second string can win. But from Florida State, they learned there are no second chances against a Top-25 team. “We need depth,” Rosen said. “That’s what’s going to keep us going through a long season. But that doesn’t mean that we can sleep against some teams and snap back to beat elite teams. We know now what we need to work on to move to that next level.” Note: Two Michigan middle blockers had career days Friday. Goode finished with a season-high 10 kills, while senior co-captain middle blocker Jennifer Cross moved into sole possession of third place on the program’s career total blocks list with 437. Both Cross and Dannemiller were selected to the Texas A&M Invitational All-Tournament team.

diversity, depth and versatility in our goal-scoring. Rachael Mack is our best firepower scorer and so she gets double — even tripleteamed a lot — so it’s nice to see other people stepping up in that department. “To see her being unselfish speaks to the fact that she’s a great captain and a great leader and the other players responded by putting it in. Hopefully they can become dangerous scorers themselves and really gain some confidence in the next few games.” The second half proved to be all Michigan, as it outshot the Aggies 14-2 in the second half and was able to control possession for the entire half. More importantly,

COOK From Page 1B Lewan could only blame his seniors, the backbone of this team who are theoretically the reliable ones. “If any guy on this team thinks they can do anything but prepare every single week — you have to take this as your job,” Lewan said. “You came here as a student-athlete. You go to school, get your degree and win Big Ten Championships. If we prepare like we did this week, we won’t win another game.” Saturday should and could be nothing but a wake-up call. Maybe it’s exactly what this young team needed — a strong punch to the gut, an awakening. It’s easy to see how this could be a let down game. Last weekend was incredible. There was nothing special about this Saturday, a noon game against a middling MAC team with a lackluster crowd and half-empty student section. But that type of letdown game only lasts to a

CAUGHT From Page 1B running back Fitzgerald Toussaint punched it in from two yards out with just under three minutes to go, regaining the lead before Pohl resumed his meticulous assault on the Michigan defense. It was because of Gardner’s mistakes — not unlike the atrocious one he made in his own end zone against Notre Dame last weekend resulting in a Fighting Irish touchdown — that Akron found itself in the game late. Gardner’s fourth turnover of the game, yet another inexcusable decision by the redshirt junior, came just when it looked like the Wolverines might be able to pull away. Facing significant pressure on the second play of the fourth quarter, Gardner hurled the ball right at Zips linebacker Justin March on a screen pass. He trotted 30 yards for a touchdown, pulling Akron to within four in a mostly silent Michigan Stadium. As a team, Michigan managed

it found the back of the net three more times in the second half to extend the lead to five. Sunday was one of two games this weekend, as the Wolverines faced off against No. 16 Louisville — the fourth ranked team Michigan has played in five games — Saturday. Junior midfielder Ainsley McCallister led the way against the Cardinals, scoring the lone goal as the Wolverines won the contest, 1-0. “Everyone loves winning at home,” Mack said. “It does great things for the younger player’s confidence when everyone’s involved. As much as I love scoring goals, others have to do it too, so I’m happy taking the backseat

and getting the assists.” After gaining momentum and confidence in the return home, Michigan will put it all to the test as they head east yet again, this time to visit William & Mary on Friday and future Big Ten rival Maryland on Sunday. Pankratz said both teams play faster and stronger than Louisville or UC Davis, and her team will have to come prepared. But all the preparation and talent in the world doesn’t win games — execution does. Despite the two wins this weekend, Pankratz remains unsatisfied. She knows her team must learn to capitalize quickly if they want the wins to continue.

certain point. It shouldn’t, and can’t, last until the last play of the game against the worst team on Michigan’s schedule. If Lewan is right, if there is a lack of leadership, that’s a much bigger deal than just playing down to an opponent. Leadership is what will carry this team in November, when the Wolverines play three road games in four weeks, or during Thanksgiving weekend against Ohio State. “Tuesday and Wednesday, we had back-to-back 90-degree days and some of the guys were kind of lacking,” said fifth-year safety Thomas Gordon. “(Lewan is) absolutely right. It’s leadership. We preached it all week, but obviously there were different circumstances today. We didn’t execute.” The last play, the one that saved Saturday, was an incomplete pass from the four-yard line, Akron’s second big missed opportunity of the day. Twice, the Zips had the ball on Michigan’s one, and twice, they failed to convert.

Junior linebacker Brennan Beyer broke through the line and sent Akron quarterback Kyle Pohl back toward the field and away from the end zone, back to a place where this Michigan football team is still undefeated and didn’t lose to a middling MAC team. It was a win, the same as Notre Dame and the same as Central Michigan. But Lewan didn’t go to the student section after this win. He went straight to the underbelly of the stadium, away from the field, where the only word he could think of was “embarrassing” and where he had more questions than answers. “I’m not here to celebrate that type of game or that type of preparation,” Lewan said. “We have a lot of work to do if we want to accomplish our goals. This senior class, we’ve worked too hard, way too hard, to have games like this.”

a grand total of 19 first-half rushing yards. But after an Akron touchdown to start the third quarter — a 28-yard strike from quarterback Kyle Pohl to Zach D’Orazio sucked the noise out of the Big House — the Wolverines’ offense finally showed signs of life. On that next drive, Michigan briefly resembled the team that put 41 points up on Notre Dame the weekend before. It took just three plays — including a 24-yard rush from fifth-year senior running back Fitzgerald Toussaint that more than doubled the team’s total rushing yards — for the Wolverines to pull back ahead. Redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner kept the ball himself on a read option and ran 36 yards for the go-ahead touchdown. But what Gardner had failed to do on an earlier read option was part of the reason the Wolverines found themselves in such a predicament in the first place. Early in the second quarter, Michigan moved the ball to the Akron 10-yard line, but Gardner chose to keep the ball instead of pitch it

to his tailback and ended up losing the football. A Blake Countess interception, the redshirt sophomore’s third in two games, gave Gardner the ball right back. But two incompletions followed by an interception immediately swung momentum back in the Zips’ favor, keeping hope alive in the hearts of the heavy underdogs. On the next Michigan drive, Gardner needed only two pass attempts to find a Zips defender, this time off a deflection. A 48-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to sophomore tight end Devin Funchess early in the game made it appear the Wolverines could score at will on Akron. But that would be the extent of the Wolverines’ scoring in the first half. Meanwhile, the turnovers that have haunted Gardner’s tenure as Michigan quarterback continued into the second half, giving an equally lethargic Akron offense opportunity after opportunity. “I’ll be thinking all night about why he made a couple of the decisions that he did,” Hoke said.

-Cook can be reached at evcook@umich.edu or on Twitter @everettcook


SportsMonday

4B — September 16, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TOP-10 POLL Each week, Daily sports staffers fill out ballots, with first place votes receiving 10 points, second-place votes receiving nine, and so on. 1. ALABAMA (17): AJ McCarron and company got revenge for last year’s loss to the Aggies. Nick Saban can finally sleep again.

2. OREGON (1): The Ducks voluntarily stopped scoring after the third quarter in their blowout win.

3. CLEMSON : Bored during his bye week, Tajh Boyd learned all the words to Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball.”

6. LOUISVILLE: After beating another in-state foe, the Cardinals celebrated in the KFC Yum! Center with all the fixins’.

7. TEXAS A&M: The Aggies may have lost, but everyone in attendance still went home with a Johnny Football autograph.

8. GEORGIA: The Dawgs went for a long walk in the park during their bye week.

4. OHIO STATE: With a majority of Cal’s stadium clad in red, the Buckeyes felt right at home.

9. SOUTH CAROLINA: The Cocks nearly blew a four-touchdown lead, but ultimately had a happy ending against the Commodores.

5. STANFORD: The Card showed its patriotism by only beating Army by 14.

10. LSU: To make a statement, the Tigers dismantled the Golden Flashes, proving they are more than a flash in the pan.

STAFF PICKS The Daily football writers do their best to predict, against the spread, what happens in the 2013 football season.

Zach Helfand

Matt Slovin

Everett Cook

Lloyd Brady, Michigan Legend

Liz Vukelich

No. 1 Alabama (-8) at No. 6 Texas A&M

Alabama

Texas A&M

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

No. 2 Oregon (-28) vs. Tennessee

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

No. 4 Ohio State (-16) at California

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

No. 5 Stanford (-29) at Army

Army

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

No. 7 Louisville (-14.5) at Kentucky

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

No. 8 LSU (-37) vs. Kent St.

LSU

LSU

LSU

Kent St.

LSU

No. 10 Florida State (-34) vs. Nevada

Nevada

Nevada

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

No. 11 Michigan (-37) vs. Akron

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

No. 12 Oklahoma State (-47) vs. Lamar

Lamar

Lamar

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Lamar

No. 13 South Carolina (-14) vs. Vanderbilt

South Carolina

Vanderbilt

Vanderbilt

South Carolina

South Carolina

No. 14 Oklahoma (-24.5) vs. Tulsa

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Tulsa

Oklahoma

No. 16 UCLA (+4.5) at No. 23 Nebraska

UCLA

UCLA

Nebraska

Nebraska

UCLA

No. 17 Northwestern (-30.5) vs. Western Michigan

Northwestern

Northwestern

Western Michigan

Western Michigan

Western Michigan

No. 19 Washington (-10) at Illinois

Washington

Illinois

Illinois

Washington

Washington

No. 20 Wisconsin (+6) at Arizona State

Wisconsin

Arizona State

Wisconsin

Arizona State

Arizona State

No. 21 Notre Dame (-21) at Purdue

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

No. 24 TCU (-3) at Texas Tech

TCU

TCU

TCU

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

No. 25 Mississippi (+2.5) at Texas

Mississippi

Mississippi

Mississippi

Texas

Mississippi

Indiana (-3) vs. Bowling Green

Indiana

Indiana

Indiana

Bowling Green

Indiana

Minnesota (-24) vs. Western Illinois

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minesota

Minnesota

Michigan State (-25.5) vs. Youngstown St.

Youngstown St.

Youngstown St.

Michigan State

Youngstown St.

Youngstown St.

Iowa (-2.5) at Iowa State

Iowa State

Iowa State

Iowa

Iowa State

Iowa State

Penn State (-6.5) vs. Central Florida

Penn State

Penn State

Central Florida

Penn State

Penn State

This Week

8 -14

8-14

12-10

7-15

9-13

Overall

44-33

42-35

49-28

41-36

9-13


2013 09 16