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In This Issue V O L U M E 30

http://michigangolfer.com MICHIGAN GOLFER Publisher/Editor Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Editor Emeritus Terry Moore Associate Publisher/Producer Jennie McCafferty Writers Jeff Bairley Susan Bairley L’anse Bannon Mike Beckman Jack Berry Tom Doak Mike Duff Topher Goggin Thad Gutowski Kelly Hill Janina Parrott Jacobs Greg Johnson Vartan Kupelian Tom Lang Chris Lewis Jim Neff Bill Shelton Brad Shelton Norm Sinclair

Michael Patrick Shiels Herschel Nathanial Bernice Phillips Ron Whitten Photo/Video Kevin Frisch Brian Oar Dave Richards Carter Sherline Brian Walters

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Video Gallery: U.S. Senior Open at Indianwood Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

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Inside the Ropes: The Scorers By Mike Duff

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OK, R & A, How About It?

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Burnett Sets Record in Runaway Michigan PGA Women’s Open Win at Crystal Mountain

Director of Accounting Cheryl Clark Michigan Golfer is produced by

By Jack Berry

By Greg Johnson 16

Destination Golf: Lexington Kentucky By Brad Shelton

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Glimpse to a Vision: The RTJ Trail

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Canadians Win Treetops Cup

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Collegiate Spotlight: Siena Heights University By Chris Lewis

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Fall Golf in Michigan Photo Gallery

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Collegiate Golf – A Paradigm of Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct

By Bill Shelton

By Art McCafferty

By Bill Shelton Michigan Golfer is published online four times a year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement of views and/or philosophy of Michigan Golfer. Back Issues: May be ordered by sending $5.00 with your name, address and issue requested to Michigan Golfer, 4007 Carpenter Road, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

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Collegiate Spotlight: Spring Arbor University By Chris Lewis

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Wrap Up to a Great Golf Season

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Slice of Life: Charlie Sorrell: One of the Best By Terry Moore

By Jack Berry

Cover: Lake Michigan is part of the scenery at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Club; photo courtesy of Arcadia Bluffs GC.

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MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE


Video Gallery: U.S. Senior Open at Indianwood Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Roger Chapman has a second “Pure Michigan” moment while the pipers serenade his victory. 4

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Bill Mory studies a putt with his caddy.

Greg Reynolds shot 151 to miss the cut.

J.R. Roth faultered in the second round to miss the cut.

Tom Gieselman is on his way to a 151 and a missed cut.

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Inside the Ropes: The Scorers

Photo courtesy of fIndianwood

By Mike Duff

Photo courtesy of Mike Duff

Indianwood Club House o you love golf, love playing, love watching it. Well you are not alone. So do I. As much as I have watched golf on TV and Mike Duff attended dozens of tournaments I have always wondered what goes on “inside the

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ropes?” Many of us have. It may not be on your bucket list but those who admire the game just might want to try it. David Graham, Executive Director of the Golf Association of Michigan, helped me understand/ clarify this sophisticated scoring process. David and his co-chairman, Tom Schwanitz, were responsible for the selection, training and evaluating of the 83 volunteer scorers at the Senior US Open at Indianwood

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Country Club in Lake Orion this past July. It starts with wanting to volunteer. The will to volunteer is a noble deed but you have to be physically able and mentally alert to be a scorer. A web site was set up to promote the event and to attract volunteers. An assortment of jobs was available. For example, marshals, security and even medical-- to name a few. The

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walking scorer position was one of the most popular according to Graham because “it allows people to get inside the ropes, up close and personal, with the professional golfers and, in some respects, in the middle of the action.” Those who made the “cut” had to go through an interview process where they shared their golfing experiences, understood the rules to some extent, and were healthy enough to handle the rigors of the course and scoring. People with past experience were included, too. Those rejected were done so either because they were unable to attend the training sessions or were restricted because of physical reasons. Graham and Schwanitz made the final selections. Most tournaments use this selection process depending on the circumstances surrounding their event.

Scoring is in real time so everything must all add up hole by hole. Each scorer has a PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) which has a customized screen and the names of the players in the group. Tee shots are preloaded. As the golfer moves through the golf hole each shot is entered from where the shot originates. For example if the tee shot

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landed in the fairway it would be entered as F. If it lands elsewhere, a drop down menu would appear to help choose the correct entry such as fairway bunker, intermediate, first cut, second cut or other. Simultaneously, you have a sheet where you are tracking each shot manually. The system is set up for (T) tee shot, (F) for fairway, (I) for intermediate, (R-1) first cut of rough, (FB) fairway bunker or (G) green. The shot is entered in the PDA and on the score sheet. The idea, Graham says is “to kind of get into a rhythm.” He also makes it clear that you never release the score until the ball is in the hole because that score gets transmitted immediately. After you have completed the hole (ball in the hole), the score is officially transmitted to Score Central (SC). Score Central in return will verify your reported score back to you. On a par four the scoring might be recorded like this: TeeFairway-Green-Green- Ball in the hole. The scorer would then verify the shots and score with SC. Each scorer is equipped with a two-way transmitter allowing them to be in verbal contact with SC at all times. The standard bearer is also a key person in the working group. The standard bearer has the players’ names, current score and cumulatively on how they are in relation to par. Plus (over par) is black, minus (under par) is red. At the close of each hole the scorer and the standard bearer confirm the score via the PDA unit and hand written score sheet. The walking scorer has, if he/she chooses, the rules official and the standard bearer to help verify a score before reporting it to SC. In addition, the network station (NBC)

Photo by Jennie McCafferty

Once selected, the first phase was the training. The training began on Monday of the event–– starting with

a Power Point presentation from the USGA which included what the scoring process is, the device they will be using and a collective handson exercise where by a small group of club pros played three holes so the scorers could practice their scoring skills. Scorers were able to ask questions and dialogue about the scoring process. The next training session was Wednesday. IBM, who provides the official scoring, had the scorers in groups of two follow the pro golfers during their practice rounds simulating the actual scoring process.

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The walking scorer is generally not involved when a player incurs a penalty. That decision is in most cases left up to the rules official. But Graham says “the scorer has to be in sync with the rules official in case a penalty is assessed and, furthermore, understand what the penalty is and how it applies to the scoring process. “ If an error occurs and the shots and score do not match with Score Central’s number, the scorer would then contact SC via their two way transmitter. Score Central would ask what hole the error occurred and what score was recorded. They would next ask the scorer to repeat the scoring trail such as T-F-G-G which represents tee, fairway, green, green (one putt). Once SC has determined the accurate score and strokes, the scorer would use the refresh button on their PDA and SC would then enter the revised score and score trail on their PDA. The scorer must also correct the error on their manual sheet and advise the standard bearer of the change.

When the round is finished, the players are directed to the scoring verification center. The standard bearer remains outside the center. The persons in the verification center are the rules official, a representative from the USGA, the caddies, the players, the walking scorer and the USGA scorer. The players and the USGA scorer sit together to verify the scores hole by hole while the others are in the background and can be called upon if necessary. The players do not keep their own score. They keep score for one of the other players in their group. The term is called a “marker.” After they complete going through the process of checking their scores with the marker (other player) they now have the option to have the walking scorer read their own scores back to them. The scores are read in cadence three at a time. For example, three, four, four ….four, five, three….five, four, four. The process is repeated for the back side if the player requests it. If everything checks out correctly then the score stands and is officially recorded. I asked David to describe his experience scoring the final group on the final day ofthe tournament. His response was, “nerve racking!” His day started by scoring a double bogey on the first hole for Langer and a double bogey for Pernice on the second hole while Chapman was on his way to playing lights-out golf. David was hoping for a dog fight among the leaders to enhance the drama going in to the final holes but that never developed. Even though the drama didn’t happen, Graham characterized his experience as “draining” but added it was truly a “great experience.” Susan Newmann, a volunteer scorer

Photo courtesy of G.A.M.

has another person inside the ropes who also is keeping score as well. The network is primarily communicating with the course announcers on the course and whoever is in the broadcast booth. However, the walking scorer is the official person who transmits the score to SC. Score Central, after verifying the scores, sends them to the network, the score boards around the course and virtually around the world via the web. By the way, this is all done in real time. This happens somewhere between 15 seconds to 60 seconds depending on the verification process between the walking scorer, Score Central and the network.

Kate Moore, David Graham & Kevin Helm from Brighton, Michigan, expressed the same views Graham did. She was thrilled with her experience and would like to do it again. She felt that the training she received really helped her adjust to the responsibilities and demands of the assignment. The scoring system that I have described is generally used by the USGA and the PGA. There may be a few minor differences but for the most part they are the same. Now that you know how the system works, you may want to think about volunteering the next time a pro tournament comes to Michigan. Keep in mind that the mental and physical stress of a walking scorer can be difficult. But if you’re up to the task…..Go For It! - MG -

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OK, R & A, How About It?

Photo courtesy of Royal Portrush / www.royalportrushgolfclub.com

By Jack Berry

Royal Portrush Golf Club’s yawning traps f the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews doesn’t award Royal Portrush Golf Club and Northern Ireland with an Open Championship now, it’s out of its head.

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turned out for the week, a record for the European Tour.

“This is the best course we’ve played on the European Tour,” Welshman Jamie Donaldson raved after winning the Irish Open, “and the crowds!”

There was hard rain in the morning, drizzly in the afternoon, then sunshine. The crowds never dwindled. You’ve never seen so many multi-colored golf umbrellas and people in rainsuits, pull-down wool hats and tweed caps. Everything you get in links golf all around the island.

For the first time in the 85-year history of the Irish Open, this one was a sellout before the first ball was struck. More than 130,000 men, women, children, young and old,

Northern Ireland’s quartet of Padraig Harrington, Darren Clarke, Graeme McDowell and Rory McIlroy, winners of six major championships, were coming to home

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turf. And an American Irishman, Keegan Bradley, winner of the 2011 PGA Championship, and two-time major winner John Daly, brightened the weather with his usual array of color, were on board as well. “To grow up in the town of Portrush and to be part of the reason the Irish Open is here, myself and Padraig and Rory and Darren, we all feel a sense of pride that we have kept the Irish Open alive for the last four or five years and brought it up to this fantastic venue in the north coast of Ireland,” McDowell told the Belfast Telegraph.

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The Open struggled for sponsorship in the Republic of Ireland with the economy in the downturn but Northern Ireland is a part of Great Britain, and it has promoted tourism and golf heavily and successfully. New is a Belfast museum dedicated to the Titanic, which was built in Belfast. Old are the village of Bushmills on the River Bush and its distillery producing some of the world’s tastiest beverages since 1608. Older yet are the untold thousands of great stones formed by a volcano perhaps at the dawn of time. It’s the Giant’s Causeway, also with a new visitor center. Farther along is the ruin of Dunluce Castle and the 36 holes of Royal Portrush Golf Club. And it is only golf, no tennis, no swimming pool.

links across the top of the island including Portstewart, Castlerock and Ballyliffin.

Royal County Down, south of Belfast on the Irish Sea, and Portrush on the North Atlantic have anchored golf and the half dozen

And if they didn’t like all the red numbers on the scoreboard?

So where does the oldest championship in the game, the British Open, fit in? It has been played off the island of Scotland-England-Wales only once and that was 1953 when it was played at Royal Portrush. Officials from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews visited Portrush on the weekend and must have been impressed. “Could we handle another 1015,000?” McDowell went on. “It would require a lot of planning but I figure the R&A are pretty good at doing what they do.”

“The golf course has had a

resounding, successful reaction from the players. They loved it. Yes, it was a little slow (and soft thanks to the rain) but get it firm, fast and get the rough up, this is a great British Open test. I’d love it, love in my heart to see it come back here.” If the R&A agrees with all the praise, the earliest available British Open is 2017. If it happens, you’ll really see Irish eyes smiling. Northern Ireland, with the terrible Troubles of Protestants vs. Catholics, shooting and bombings not so long ago, showed everything last week that is good and great about Ulster. The week started with Queen Elizabeth, wearing green, visiting Belfast and shaking hands with former Irish Republican Army commander Martin McGuinness, the Deputy First Minister, absolutely unthinkable during The Troubles.

Photo courtesy of Royal Portrush / www.royalportrushgolfclub.com

Bill Murray played in the pro-am with McDowell, charmed the crowd and walked with G-Mac’s family during the second round. Irish actor Aidan Quinn helicoptered up from Connemara, where he’s filming, to play in a group with former Michigander Brandon Tucker. And then it was the championship. Ivan McMichael, a friend of mine in Belfast who strode the Links of Heaven, summed it up: “It was Magic.” Royal Portrush, a very special golf course 12

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- MG -. MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE


Photo courtesy of Crystal Mountain

Burnett Sets Record in Runaway Michigan PGA Women’s Open Win at Crystal Mountain

By Greg Johnson

Then she added more firsts, like first professional win, first record score and first runaway. The 22-year-old from Brunswick, Ga., who recently graduated from South Carolina, shot a final round 3-under-par 69 for a record-setting 11-under-par 205 total and resounding 10-shot win on the Mountain Ridge course Wednesday. “I feel pretty awesome right

now,” she said. “I don’t know if I can describe it. It hasn’t quite hit me yet. It gives me a lot of confidence. It was goal of mine to come out and get the confidence and momentum going into the U.S. Open.” Her 205 was the lowest in tournament history, besting a 10-under performance by 2007 winner Lisa Fernandes. She also did it while the rest of the field of 60 golfers found the Mountain Ridge course and par hard to handle. Runner-up Laura Bavaird of Grosse Ile, a Symetra Tour player, was the only other golfer under par in the 54-hole $36,000 event. Bavaird closed with a 1-over-par 73 for 1-under-par 215.

Photo cby Greg Johnson

THOMPSONVILLE – Katie Burnett didn’t want next week’s U.S. Open in Kohler, Wis., to be her first professional event, so she headed north by way of Crystal Mountain Resort to play in the 19th Michigan PGA Women’s Open Championship.

Katie Burnett’s tee shot on number 6 MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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Elizabeth Nagel of DeWitt, a Michigan State golfer, finished as the low amateur with a 72 for 221. Burnett won $5,500 for first place, and gained the confidence she was seeking heading into her first U.S. Open. She was a medalist in May in a sectional qualifier to make the field, all part of a great spring which included a fifth-place individual finish in the NCAA Championships. “I’m really happy with the way I played,” she said. “I wasn’t sure how I would play because I had about a month off and I’m usually better

when I’ve played a bunch of tournaments in a row. I’m really excited about the way I played.” Burnett dashed the hopes of others in the field and eliminated any drama with three birdies in the first six holes at Nos. 3, 4 and 6. She finCrystal Mountain’s Mountain Ridge par 3, hole number five ished the three rounds with 14 Burnett said. “I’m really happy I birdies and an eagle against three came here. It’s a great place, and the bogeys and one double-bogey, and course was in perfect shape. I would started the tournament with a love to come back.” course-record tying 66. Photo cby Greg Johnson

Ashley Tait of Littleton, Colo., finished third at even-par 216 with a final 69, and defending champion Laura Kueny closed strong with a 68 to tie for fourth at 217 with Olivia Jordan-Higgins of the United Kingdom.

“My goal was to win, that’s always the goal, but I never would have thought I would win by 10,”

Bavaird, a fourth-year pro, headed to Harris, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula for a Symetra Tour event this weekend, said the other golfers knew starting the day they were probably playing for second place. “She was pretty untouchable, very impressive,” she said. “I almost made a lot of putts. It could have been great. She seemed to make a lot of putts. She’s a strong player.”

Photo courtesy of Crystal Mountain

Bavaird, too, lauded Crystal Mountain Resort, which celebrated its 10th year as host of the 19-yearold tournament. More information about the award winning family resort can be found at http://crystalmountain.com as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Complete scoring and information on the tournament is also available at http://michiganpgagolf.com. Crystal Mountain’s Mountain Ridge par 3, hole number five 14

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MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE


Now on iPad

issuu.com/michigan_golfer/docs

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Photo courtesy of Marriott

Destination Golf: Lexington, Kentucky

Lexington golf: a spectacular golf awaits you. By Brad Shelton aving lived in Michigan for a few years and visiting family members in The Great Lakes State for many more, I Brad Shelton am very aware that Old Man Winter can come too soon in the Fall and overstay his welcome in the Spring, especially for those of us that play golf.

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If you find yourself itching to play a little longer this year or get an early start next season, Lexington, Kentucky 16

is a destination you should consider. Only 5 hours or so south, Lexington and the surrounding area offers myriad choices for a few more annual rounds on the links. As for the weather, Lexington averages about 7 degrees higher than Michigan for most of the year with average temperatures in March and November about 10 degrees higher. Maybe the biggest factor is the absence of snow for a majority of the year. Sure, it gets cold in Kentucky and occasionally a little snow will fall, but for the most part it melts in short order and courses stay open year round.

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Within 30 minutes of Lexington, there is a golf course for every taste. If you are resort type, Marriot’s Griffin Gate Resort and Spa may meet your needs. The former host of the original Bank One Senior Classic, the Rees Jones design has ample bunkers gua ding every green, water in play on 12 of 18 holes and few flat putts. IF the family wants to join you, the spa and other amenities will make for a wonderful getaway. Perhaps the best-kept secret in Lexington is its 4 championship municipal courses. Most well known is Pete Dye?s Kearney Hill Golf Links which has hosted such events as the

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For more information on Lexington?s municipal courses, check the website at http://playgolflexington.com Lexington has many excellent daily-fee courses within close proximity to the central city. With far too many to mention them all, the courses that attract the highest ratings from local players include The University Club of Kentucky and The Golf Club of the Bluegrass in Lexington, Old Silo in Mount Sterling, Cherry Blossom in Georgetown, and Houston Oaks in Paris. The University Club of Kentucky has 36-holes, Big Blue and Wildcat, and is home to the University of Kentucky men’s and women’s golf teams - the feature course is Big Blue. An Arthur Hills redesign of 6,992 yards from the longest tees for a par of 72, the course is rated 74.6 and has a slope rating of 139. Old Silo Golf Club was designed

Photo courtesy of Marriott

Picadome Golf Course is another municipal course in Lexington?s portfolio that offers a different type of challenge. Established in 1927 as the first public golf course in central Kentucky, it is an old style course with small undulating greens and tree lined fairways with tight landing areas. Picadome was the home course of 1967 Master?s Champion Gay Brewer and is always in immaculate condition.

by Champions Tour Player Graham Marsh.ˇ The 18-hole championship design is situated on 209 acres of rolling bluegrass countryside, and is located just 30 minutes east of Lexington. The golf course features bent grass tees, fairways, greens and 84 white sand bunkers. The course offers four sets of tees, ranging from 5,509 yards to 7,009 yards, and is designed to accommodate players of all skill levels.

A unique Rees Jones course.

Photo courtesy of Marriott

Senior PGA Tour, Celebrity Players Tour, PGA Junior Series, the 1998 Men?s United States Amateur Public Links Championship. It is a Scottish links-style course, characterized by open, rolling terrain, deep sand and grass bunkers and a few trees.

Located just Hole no. 10 at Griffin Marriott, a Rees Jones Design minutes north of Lexington is Cherry Blossom Golf Club in see a past Derby winner. Basketball Georgetown. A championship level tickets are hard to come by, but an course created by world-renowned evening in downtown Lexington durgolf course architect Clyde Johnston ing the games is almost as fun. As for of Hilton Head, Cherry Blossom dining, the city is highly rated for the was recognized as “Kentucky’s Best most restaurants per capita where New Golf Course” and was voted by you?ll find award winning steak housGolfweek Magazine as the “#1 pub- es, fine French cuisine, and a host of lic golf course in the state of American and International fares. Kentucky” for seven years running. Typically known for basketball and horse racing, Lexington has much to offer beyond golf. Keeneland Race Track has a Fall and Spring thoroughbred meet for after round entertainment. Tours of the horse farms are always available where you just might

Even if the weather cooperates this winter in Michigan and you get on the course sooner rather than later, a golf trip to the Bluegrass would be well worth your time. - MG -

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Photo Š Michael Clemmer / michaelclemmer.com

From a Glimpse to

The R


a Vision:

TJ Trail by Bill Shelton

Grand National Golf Course, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Auburn, AL


Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

had management oversight of the $500 million pension fund of the 330,000 state employees. He entered negotiations with U.S. Steel over one of its abandoned facilities as a site but the process moved too slowly for the aggressive Bonner. Meanwhile, the Bill and Brad Shelton press leaked word that Bonner was n the late 1980’s David Bonner interested in building a public golf wanted to build a public golf facility and “Before I knew it, every course in Alabama primarily as mayor in the state was calling me!” an investment. As CEO of the Thus began the largest golf project Retirement Systems of Alabama, he of all time as the glimpse of a single

Alabama was a lightweight in the golf world compared to it neighbors, Florida and Georgia. Quickly seeing an opportunity to boost tourism dollars both Mobile and Birmingham pursued Bonner’s interest. Suddenly it was not just a one course idea. Working with his long time friend, Bobby Vaughan, groundwork was laid for what would become the “most ambitious golf construction project in America.” A key element for Bonner was that the courses had to be at a level of quality that would attract golfers from other states. Two decades following the opening of the first courses, state tourism dollars have risen from less than $2 billion

Photo © Michael Clemmer / michaelclemmer.com

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golf course resulted in the Robert Trent Jones Trail with 468 holes on 26 courses at 11 different sites.

The Judge, Number 1, Capitol Hill, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Prattville, Alabama 20

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Photo © Michael Clemmer / Golf Landscape Photography

Renaissance Birmingham Ross Bridge Resort and Spa 9 and 18 with Turrets to almost $10 billion. This year, the 20th anniversary of the RTJ Trail, total rounds played since its opening will exceed 10,000,000. In the early 1990’s Bonner like a “good little bureaucrat . . . sent out RFPs” to all the “famous golf course architects.” All responded with a letter except Robert Trent Jones who called Bonner with a simple question, “Are you serious?” Thus began the RTJ Trail. Although Jones made numerous public appearances on behalf of the trail, the actual design work was performed by his protégé, Roger Rulewich, who laid out 18 courses in less than 30 months. The end results from the approximately $200 million investment (with an additional $300-$500 million in

Hittin’ the Trail

Carolina University Tennis Coach) and Rob (Head of the prestigious Oakwood School) are golf fanatics. So, their goal was to play as many different courses as possible in five days—in the South’s hottest month! Considering the Trail covers some 400 miles, the first step was to decide where to begin our tour. The final route had us entering the Trail at the Grand National in Opelika near the Georgia border and following a northerly route playing 9 courses in 5 days at 5 different sites.

With perhaps a mixture of both excitement and skepticism, along with two of my North Carolina buddies we decided to hit the Trail to judge for ourselves. While I am a golf enthusiast, Shawn (East

Along the way we stayed in what I believe is one of the nicest hotels in American golf—the Renaissance Birmingham Ross Bridge Resort and Spa, named by Golf Digest as one of the “75 Best Golf Resorts in North

hotels) include Alabama identified as a “top 5” market for golfers; new industry attracted; and the economy boosted. And, most importantly to Bonner, the Retirement Systems investment has provided a solid annual return for the pension fund. Eight of the eleven sites feature Marriott hotels and, according to CEO Bill Marriott, “four of these are in our Top 10 Golf Locations.”

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America.” Booking all of our tee times and lodging was as simple as a phone call to the RTJ Reservations Specialist (Amy did a great job for us even revising our schedule twice). All we had to do was tee it up on our golfing adventure.

gain in the country.” And, perhaps most amazingly, ALL of the courses are open to the public! Our “northern” tour took us from Grand National in Opelika where we played the Links and Lake courses to Montgomery’s Capitol Hill challenging the Judge and Senator to the Birmingham stop at the Ross Bridge and Oxmoor Valley treks up to Muscle Shoals to tackle the Fightin’ Joe and then finishing up in Huntsville at the Hampton Cove’s Highlands and River courses. By my calculations, we still only played 35% of the holes on the Robert Trent Jones Trail! That means we have a lot more Trail to cover next summer, so SADDLE UP. - MG -

Photo © Michael Clemmer / Golf Landscape Photography

The Trail exceeded our expectations although perhaps not meeting Bonner’s goal that every course could be a U.S. Open venue. Numerous RTJ courses have hosted tour events including the Champions Tour’s Regions Charity Classic at the Ross Bridges, the Navistar LPGA Classic at The Senator Course at Capitol Hill, and the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic. Based on our experience, Bonner’s criteria of distinctive personalities, fun to play, immaculate condition,

and affordability have been clearly achieved. While the clubhouses and pro shops are identical in design and course maintenance is excellent, the courses are far from a cookie cutter design. Being “fun to play” does not mean easy though multiple tees do provide some relief. Tees vary from over 8000 yards to under 5000 yards. Both bent and Bermuda greens can be found on the Trail. Shawn and Rob are scratch players and both found the courses can present major challenges. (As tour director, I had to invent games that somehow allowed me to win— including getting points if I finished the hole with the same ball I started with!) The relatively low cost, typically $45-$64 per round, prompted the Wall Street Journal to label the RTJ Trail as “maybe the biggest bar-

Schoolmaster Hole 10 at the The Shoals, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Florence, Alabama. 22

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Photo by Jennie McCafferty

Canadians Win Treetops Cup

The Canadian team celebrates with a drink from the Treetops Cup. By Art McCafferty or the past three years, the Americans have been the victors of the nascent Treetops Cup. The tournament, a creation from the fertile mind of Kevin McKinley, the Director of Golf and Skiing at Treetops, has grown in size and stature since its inception. One of its many attractions for golfers is the Ryder Cup format.

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Also this year, the participants were treated to fireworks on Saturday night to celebrate both Dominion Day and the 4th of July, a timely touch indeed. Add those ingredients to golfing on the Fazio Premier, the Smith Signature and Tradition courses and you have the stuff that North American golf dreams are made of.

This year, with a strong contingent of Canadian golfers, our neighbors to the North beat a late charging American team, 44 to 40. The Canadians were ahead 24 to 18 after the second day’s action, but the outcome was not settled until the final groups came in. The Michigan Golfer was on

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Photo courtesy of Treetops

We created a fifth show to showcase the work of the Treetops maintenance staff. We were capturing some early morning video on the Fazio course and happened on a broken water main that was sending a steady and spectacular water spout nearly 100 feet into the air. We caught the action of Treetops North Superintendent Doug Hoeh and his crew as they hurriedly worked on the broken pipe as the tournament players were nearing the hole. Generally, it is not a scene that golfers witness and it was terrific drama.

The spectacular Smith Signature course show introduces the 84 players of the two teams. The third and fourth show, depict the action of the tournament and the celebration of the Canadian team.

You will find all of these shows at http://michigangolfer.tv/2012shows/ treetops_cup/ Enjoy the shows. - MG -

Photo courtesy of Treetops

hand to capture all the action. We have broken it down into five shows for your viewing pleasure. Our first show features the pairings and the pre tournament dinner. A second

Treetops Tradition, Hole Number 7 24

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Collegiate Spotlight

Siena Heights University Saints Prepare to Compete for the WHAC Title This Fall

Photo courtesy of Josh Reilly, Sports Information Director, Siena Heights University

By Chris Lewis

Dylan Orr, Siena Heights University Golf Team n Septemb er 8th, Siena Heights University’s men’s golf program will host its first WolverineChris Lewis Hoosier Athletic Conference (WHAC) jamboree of the Fall 2012 season at Lenawee Country Club, a par-71, 6,289-

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yard-long layout located in Adrian. The team is returning from a successful Spring 2012 campaign, in which it captured one tournament victory and five top-ten finishes, including a fifth-place showing at the WHAC Men’s Golf Championship.

1980 Siena Heights graduate, and assistant coach Brett Quitiquit, a highly successful amateur golfer who has recently competed in the U.S. Amateur Championship. As Sandifer and Quitiquit look ahead to the coming 2012 – 2013 season, they are prepared to ensure it is one of the Saints’ most successful campaigns yet.

Since late February, the Saints have been led by head coach Al Sandifer, a

“The team is fully stacked with talent, from transfer students and

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freshmen to juniors and seniors,” Sandifer said. “I expect the team to be competitive in every tournament it participates in this season.” With five freshmen, one transfer student, and 10 returning players, the Saints should have a solid combination of youth and experience, as Sandifer and Quitiquit strive to develop a team capable of winning future WHAC titles. “We want to build the team to eventually compete at the national level,” Sandifer said. “We want to be competitive in the league and play well in all of the conference jamborees.” Their expectations for the team may appear to be quite lofty. After all, Sandifer has only coached the team for six months thus far – and the team only won one WHAC jamboree last season. Nonetheless, Sandifer is still one of the most experienced coaches in the WHAC. From 1996 to 2006, he also led the Saints as head men’s golf coach. And, for more than 25 years, he has coached a variety of other varsity athletic teams, including Siena’s men’s basketball squad. Furthermore, if last season’s results are of any indication, the Saints are well on their way to a highly competitive season this fall. “Last fall, we had two runner-up and two third-place finishes,” Sandifer said. “We finished in the top-ten in every tournament we played in last year. But we did not play to our full potential in the spring. We have the ability to achieve even more this year.” 26

The 2011 – 2012 Siena Heights University Saints Capture Their Home Invitational On September 7, 2011, the Saints competed in their first WHAC jamboree of the Fall 2011 season at Grand Rapids’ The Highlands Golf Course. Hosted by Aquinas College, the tournament featured nine WHAC members, including jamboree champions Davenport University. The Saints finished the jamboree with a score of 16-over-par, which was low enough for a second-place showing. Led by Nick Campbell ’13, a native of Britton, Michigan, the team finished five strokes behind Davenport. “Nick is the team’s top returning player – and he has the ability to shoot low scores frequently,” Sandifer said. “He is solid from tee to green. I am counting on him to play well again this fall.” Throughout the next two weeks, the Saints acquired back-to-back third-place finishes at the second and third WHAC jamborees of the fall season. Campbell once again led all Saints scorers during the second jamboree, which was hosted by the University of Northwestern Ohio and contested at Harrod, Ohio’s Colonial Golfers Club. However, Dylan Orr ’15 shot a 77 at Indiana Tech’s Jamboree III, which occurred at Fort Wayne, Indiana’s 6.978-yard-long Coyote Creek Golf Club. “Dylan was my number two

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player last spring. He definitely has a bright future ahead of him,” Sandifer said. “His biggest weakness is consistency though, which he has been working to improve upon this past summer.” During the fourth jamboree of the fall season, the Saints were again led by Dylan Orr, who shot a 74, which was low enough for secondplace individual honors. The entire team also finished runner-up in the event, three strokes behind jamboree champions Davenport University. The Saints did not compete again until April 6th’s Cougar Invitational, which was held at Kendallville, Indiana’s par-71 Cobblestone Golf Course. Kyle Hanson ’13, a graduate of Tecumseh High School, was the Saints’ leading scorer, with a two-round score of 13-over-par. “Kyle is currently our most consistent player. He is accurate off the tee and hits a lot of greens in regulation,” Sandifer said. “He has the ability to lower his scores this fall and become one of the team’s leaders.” One week later, the team secured its best finish of the year – a victory at the Siena Heights Invitational. Contested at Tecumseh’s Hantz Golf Course, the Saints shot a team total of 24-over-par. Campbell once again led all scorers, with a 75, which secured second-place on an individual basis. “Although Hantz is not our home course, everyone on the team is familiar with it since it is so close to Siena,” Sandifer said. “We were obviously pleased with the victory, but we were disappointed with our

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Recruits and transfer students have also been intrigued by the university’s recent construction of an outdoor performance stadium, baseball field, and university center, as well as its expansion of athletic offerings, primarily football, which will be a varsity sport for the first time this fall.

He continued, “We definitely did not play to our full potential then. But, we are ready to shoot even lower at next year’s invitational.” Two weeks later, the Saints secured yet another top-five finish at the WHAC Men’s Golf Championship. The championship was held at Caledonia’s Stonewater Country Club, a daunting 6,757yard-long layout. Nick Campbell and Dylan Orr led the Saints with three-round totals of 24-over-par and 28-over-par, respectively. “We will use our experiences from last season to improve upon our results this fall and next spring,” Sandifer said. “We are progressing towards our goals – to become more consistent and to contend more often. Everyone on the team has the ability to achieve these goals.”

Siena Heights University – A Renowned Liberal Arts Institution Affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church, Siena Heights University was founded in 1919. Located near downtown Adrian, the university currently offers students more than 40 academic programs within a variety of disciplines, including business and management, humanities, social and behavioral science, and computing, mathematics, and science. Whether students are interested in accounting, nursing, or criminal justice, Siena Heights has an educa-

Photo courtesy of Josh Reilly, Sports Information Director, Siena Heights University

score. There is no reason for us to shoot higher than 300 there – and we shot 312.”

“The university’s athletics are improving each day. Progress is being made and will continue to occur,” Sandifer said. “This is definitely an exciting time to attend Siena Heights.”

Adam Schmaltz, senior, Siena Heights University Golf Team tional program for nearly everyone. “All of the academic programs are solid. And, classroom sizes are smaller than most other universities, so students have more opportunities to interact with their professors and know them on a more personal basis,” Sandifer said. The university’s highly reputable academic programs have attracted Sandifer’s latest recruits, including freshmen Tim Combs, Joe Forest, Joe Richards, Parker Ross, and Collin Smith, as well as transfer student Alex Willnow ‘15. “Alex is a transfer from Grand Valley State University who has a lot of experience and is tournamenttested,” Sandifer said. “He will have a major impact on the team once he is eligible to play next spring.”

Siena Heights University Saints Fall 2012 Men’s Golf Schedule WHAC Jamboree I @ Siena Heights University, September 8th, 2012 WHAC Jamboree II @ Cornerstone University, September 11th, 2012 WHAC Jamboree III @ Davenport University, September 12th, 2012 Bill Bockwitz Intercollegiate, September 21st – 22nd, 2012 WHAC Jamboree IV @ Madonna University, October 6th, 2012 WHAC Jamboree V @ Lourdes University, October 12th, 2012

For more information about Siena Heights University’s wide array of athletic programs, please visit http://www.shusaints.com/. - MG -

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Photo © Brian Walters

Fall Golf in Michigan Photo Gallery

Photo © Nile Young Photography

Fall Golf at Shanty Creek

Arcadia Bluffs Golf Club 28

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Photo © Brian Walters Photo courtesy of Treetops

Arnold Palmer’s Manitou Passage Golf Club

Jones Hole No. 6, Treetops

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Collegiate Golf – A Paradigm of Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct By Bill Shelton

Photo courtesy of Bill Shelton

football and men’s basketball. Although many of the abuses probably had been occurring earlier, the frequency and notoriety of misconduct in college athletics demanded strong leadership and organizational reform. Rules violations, academic improprieties, escalating expenditures, and an overall lack of institutional control often resulted in abuse of student athletes and the absence of the fundamental values of sportsmanship and ethical conduct.

Bill Shelton (This commentary was prompted by both my recent experiences of attending the 2012 Big Ten Conference Golf Championship and earlier serving as a volunteer at the 2010 NCAA Women’s East Regional Golf Tournament and secondly the escalation of misconduct in intercollegiate athletics, specifically the “revenue sports“ of football and men‘s basketball. From 1990 to 1997, I served as a member of the NCAA Presidents Commission. From 1994 to 1996, I chaired the Presidents Commission’s Committee on Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct.) ntercollegiate athletics in the 1980’s was defined primarily by excesses and improprieties in

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The NCAA had been controlled primarily by athletics directors, conference commissioners, and to a lesser degree coaches since its formation in 1906. The organization began at the encouragement of President Theodore Roosevelt in response to public concern about injuries and deaths occurring in the extremely rough and violent football games. The ultimate goal was to protect the student-athlete (many of the football players were actually hired non-students). The organization continued to expand in both size and influence although smaller amateur sports association existed. In 1980 the administration of women’s athletics was added to the responsibilities of the NCAA. As the organization matured, it was deemed necessary to implement a division membership system based on the level of emphasis on athletics at an institution.

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Although presidents and faculty representatives occasionally attended the annual convention, the NCAA continued to be an organization dominated by athletics administrators. The Executive Director, the senior administrator, came from the ranks of Athletics Directors of member institutions. NCAA committees were comprised of athletics administrators and conference staff. The impression was that the involvement of college and university presidents was neither solicited or welcomed. As one athletics director said publicly, “Presidents should stay out of stuff they know nothing about!” By the mid-eighties, the presidents could no longer remain on the sideline as several high-profile cases of academic and financial improprieties gained national attention. At the same time, it was becoming increasingly evident that the commissioners of the “super” conferences were quietly but systematically assuming critical control of major revenue producers (such as the football bowl series a few years later). In 1984, the initial step to presidential control of the NCAA was taken with the establishment of the Presidents Commission. However, it would take almost 10 more years before the NCAA’s top leadership position would be filled by a university president rather than a former athletics director.

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The Knight Commission, led by former University of North Carolina president Bill Friday and Father Ted Hesburgh of Notre Dame, was created by the Knight Foundation with the goal to encourage reform of college athletics, especially emphasizing academic integrity. Members of the Commission included academics, corporate leaders, journalists, and athletics administrators. The 1991 report, Keeping Faith with the Student Athlete: A New Model for Intercollegiate Athletics, proposed a major change in the operation of institutional athletics programs. The “one plus three” model advocated that the institutional president (one) lead in three goals of academic integrity, financial integrity and independent certification. Receiving national press attention, it appeared that the reform of intercollegiate athletics finally would become a reality. Two decades later, a cursory review of the sports pages and news broadcasts would suggest that, if anything, intercollegiate athletics is farther away from academic and financial integrity, and the underlying values of sportsmanship and ethical than ever before. Even dedicating two years to focus on sportsmanship and ethical conduct in the 1990s would at best heighten public awareness temporarily.

Photo courtesy of the Knight Foundation

In the early years of the Presidents Commission, the impact was more superficial than substantive. It would not be until the establishment of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics and release of its initial report in 1991 that presidential control of intercollegiate athletics became part of the national agenda.

North Carolina President Bill Friday and Father Theodore Hesburgh of Notre Dame In spite of efforts by the NCAA, the Knight Commission, potential federal intervention, and the always looming investigative reporting of the media, the incidents of poor sportsmanship and ethical conduct have increased. The NCAA has a standing committee to deal with the issue. The Knight Commission was created with the intent of staying in existence for one session and issuing one report. Instead it has met numerous times and has submitted multiple reports and recommendations. Supporters, athletics directors, coaches, players, and, yes, even presidents and board members have engaged in or condoned inappropriate conduct often to the embarrassment of the institution. Are “sportsmanship” and “ethical conduct” difficult concepts to understand? Sportsmanship was defined in terms of one’s behavior to

his or her opponent (and teammates). Terms such as respect, fairness, civility, honesty and responsibility were identified as indicators. Ethical conduct was defined as not only adherence to the concept of sportsmanship and playing by the rules but also the “spirit of the rules.” Ethics has been defined as “obedience to the unenforceable.” Is winning the culprit for the rash of incidents today reflecting a lack of civility in intercollegiate revenue sports (football and men’s basketball) and casting a derogatory shadow on all college sports? Though often cited, I do not believe these inappropriate behaviors can be attributed fully to the desire to win. (During my time as Chairman of the Sportsmanship Committee I was invited to talk about the committee’s work with the coaches of “non revenue” sports at a major university.

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During my discussion I suggested that the pressure to win might not be as great on these coaches and their teams. A female coach spoke up quickly to disagree. Her comment was that every time her team lost, she went home and “threw up!”) Every coach and every team wants to win but not only a small percentage enjoy in conducting unbecoming college sports. Is there another reason that explains the decline of sportsmanship and ethical conduct? M-O-N-E-Y! Money from donors, gate receipts, television con-

tracts, equipment agreements to fund the programs, to charter aircraft, to build sport palaces, and pay ridiculous salaries to coaches. Money that lures premier player to do whatever is necessary to be offered professional contracts including academic fraud, illegal payments, and performance enhancing drugs. Sure, winning is a key to the money vault but in those sports, it is become more the means than the end. Regardless of past behaviors and program irregularities, a “winning” coach commands multi-million dollar contracts. Big-time basketball programs are filled with “one and

Ubiquitous Michigan Golf

http://glsp.com

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out” players who focus on huge professional contracts. Many university administrators are less than genuine when they tell coaches that “clean programs,” academic integrity, graduation rates are the performance measures and then fire those coaches because they don’t win games (and bring in revenues for the programs). It is ironic that in 1916 President Roosevelt advocated an organization (NCAA) to be created because nonstudents were being hired to play football and the hottest topic in intercollegiate sports today is paying student athletes!

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I sadly had reached the decision voiced by President Bok to our committee that winning and financial considerations superseded the concept of sportsmanship in intercollegiate athletics—until I spent some time recently with collegiate golfers. I served as a volunteer scorer at the 2010 NCAA Women’s East Regional and more recently covered the 2012 Big Ten Golf Championship for Men and Women. Among my observations were that the players from different teams could sit at the same breakfast tables and carry on cheerful conversations. They could warm-up on the range side by side. They could go out in competition on the course without officials or coaches and play by the rules. When necessary they would call a penalty on themselves. They would congratulate each other on good play and even “high five” opponents on occasion. Many players were not on “full ride” scholarships and rode in vans rather than charter planes to the competitions (often driven by the coaches!).

manship and ethical conduct. It reminded me that the behaviors of a few whose motivation is personal gain at ANY cost should not define student athletes. I am sure other collegiate sports could set an example also but somehow college golf seems to encompass all those things that are right about intercollegiate athletics. If only . . ..

Bill Shelton retired in 2000 from his presidency of Eastern Michigan University following an 11-year tenure and then served a couple of year’s as a faculty member in the EMU College of Education. Earlier in his career, he served as vice president for institutional advancement at Kent State University in Ohio and as vice presi-

dent for university services at Henderson State University in Arkansas. A native of Tennessee, Bill Shelton holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from the University of Memphis and a doctorate in higher education administration from the University of Mississippi. A motivational speaker and former sportscaster, he has been active in professional and civic activities. He has served on the NCAA Presidents Commission, chaired the NCAA Committee on Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct in Intercollegiate Athletics, and was the 1995 president of the MidAmerican Conference. He also served on the National Education Commission on Time and Learning. - MG -

Speaking of coaches, they were constantly “serving” the student athletes by picking up lunches for students at the turn or delivering rain suits or assisting with tournament administration—and none of the coaches are receiving multi-million dollar contracts. They do it because they love the sport. The players and coaches respect the integrity of the game and strive to excel as individuals and team. And, typically college golfers attain excellent grades and graduate! These two weeks have reenergized my support for those collegiate athletes, coaches, and administrators who embrace the values of sportsMICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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Collegiate Spotlight

Spring Arbor University Cougars: Commitment. Desire. Promise.

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

By Chris Lewis

Caleb Jones

Tyler Owen ixteen years ago, Dave Mayotte sank his final putt as a Spring Arbor University Cougar, while competing in the Chris Lewis Indiana Wesleyan Collegiate Invitational. With a round of 76, he concluded one of the university’s most celebrated golfing careers, which included seven tournament victories and two

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National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) National Championship team memberships. However, as he walked away from Marion, Indiana’s Meshingomesia Country Club, he could have never imagined that his career in collegiate golf had only just begun. Fourteen years later, Mayotte was offered an opportunity that he simply could not resist – to lead his Alma Mater’s men’s golf program as

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head coach. “I have loved Spring Arbor since the moment I stepped on campus in 1991. Having the opportunity to attend the university and play golf forever changed my life,” Mayotte said. “It has been such an honor for me to come home and lead the golf team at this time in my life.” As Mayotte prepares for his third season as head coach this fall, he believes this year’s team has the

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potential to once again become a steady contender for conference championships, just as it was when he competed for Spring Arbor. “I currently have a great group of young men who are committed to helping the program return to its glory days of the early to mid1990s,” Mayotte said. “If last season’s finishes are of any sign, this team definitely has the potential to be competitive not only in the fall, but throughout the entire season.”

Reflections: The 2011 – 2012 Spring Arbor University Cougars

of St. Francis Cougar Invitational, Jones fired rounds of 76 and 70 to finish in a tie-third individually. The entire team itself shot 630 for two rounds, which led to an eight-place showing at Kendallville, Indiana’s Cobblestone Golf Course and Noble Hawk Golf Links.

Last season, Dingee led all scorers with a 76.8 average, 0.4 strokes lower than Jones. Nevertheless, Jones was actually the squad’s leading scorer in a majority of its tournaments.

Two weeks later, Spring Arbor shot 615 for two rounds and recorded a fifth-place finish at the Malone University Fall Classic. Held at Alliance, Ohio’s Tannenhauf Golf Club, a 6,694-yard layout, the Classic featured more than 50 competitors from colleges as wide ranging as Madonna University and Grove City College. Jason Dingee led all Cougar scorers with rounds of 72 and 76 for his first top-ten finish of the season.

During the team’s first tournament of the Fall 2011 season, the University

The following week, the Cougars relished its most consistent showing

He continued, “Caleb, on the other hand, is a gritty competitor who simply gets the job done day in and day out. He doesn’t have a classic swing per say, but it is repetitive.”

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

Led by Jason Dingee ’13 and Caleb Jones ‘13, the Cougars relished 10 top-ten finishes in 12 tournament appearances last season.

“Jason and Caleb were named Co-MVPs last year and will be called on to lead Spring Arbor once again this season,” Mayotte said. “Jason has one of the more classic swings in college golf and is a very solid iron player, who has proven to be a consistent top-ten performer in every tournament that he tees it up.”

Nick Ward

Chris Chaney

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of the entire 2011 – 2012 season, while competing in the inaugural Bill Bockwitz Invitational. Named after Mayotte’s former head coach, the man who helped reinstate the university’s men’s golf program in 1988 after a near 10-year-long hiatus from collegiate competition, the Invitational featured a variety of Crossroads Conference members. With a two-round total of 612, the squad finished eight strokes behind tournament champions Madonna University. Still, Mayotte was pleased with the team’s overall performance. “The Bill Bockwitz Invitational was our best showing of the entire season,” Mayotte said. “That was the first tournament that we moved up the leaderboard after the first day. I

was proud of the way we played during the second round, especially. After all, we led all teams that day with a 302.” After earning a fourth-place finish at Trine University’s Ken Venturi Invitational, the team did not acquire another top-ten showing until March 17th’s Shawnee State Spring Invitational. Led by Caleb Jones’s 74 and 75, the Cougars finished in fourth-place, 17 strokes behind tournament champions Cedarville University. Although the showing was not as positive as the team had hoped for, the squad did gain some momentum as it prepared for the final five tournaments of the season. Nearly a month later, the team competed in Albion College’s Vic Cuiss Intercollegiate and faced extreme weather conditions. Despite 30 mph winds and snow flurries, the team finished the tournament in fourth-place, with a one-round total of 323.

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

“In those conditions, I thought a score between 315 and 320 would have won it. But, Alma actually shot a 313,” Mayotte said. “I was really proud of the way the team hung in there though, even while it was snowing.”

Dylan Eddy 36

A week later, the team hosted its annual Spring Invitational at Jackson’s Cascades Golf Course. With a

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slope of 136 and a course rating of 73, Cascades is a challenging layout for even the most experienced golfers, but Spring Arbor handled the course’s challenges quite well, shooting a 609 for two rounds, good enough for another fourth-place showing. “Everyone kept the ball in play and remained patient that week,” Mayotte said. “They really showed what they are capable of doing each time they tee it up.” In spite of another top-five finish the following week at Trine University’s Bill Gettig Invitational, the team only managed a sixth-place performance at the MCC Conference Tournament, which was hosted at Fort Wayne, Indiana’s Orchard Ridge Country Club. Overall, the team averaged 315.2 strokes per one-round event last season. Individually, team members averaged 80.2, a significant improvement when compared to the Cougars’ 2010 – 2011 seasonal statistics.

Coach Mayotte Prepares for the Upcoming Fall 2012 Season “As I prepare for my third season as head coach, I know there are still some pieces of the puzzle that are missing that have kept the team from reaching its full potential,” Mayotte said. “We need to play more consistently this season than we have during the last two years. And, I need to improve our recruitment process, so that we will have an even more competitive, successful future.”

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He added, “My sophomores, Chris and Nick, have been working hard on their games this summer and have the desire to be the best. They both have the ability to go low on any given day.” As Mayotte looks ahead to the upcoming fall season, his coaching style remains unchanged.

Phto courtesy of Spring Arbor University

“My philosophy isn’t complex. I don’t micromanage anyone’s swing,” Mayotte said. “My strength as a coach is helping these young men maneuver around the golf course so that they have the best opportunity to shoot as low of a score as possible. I always try to help them stay calm and remain focused on the present task at hand.”

As autumn approaches, Mayotte is just as excited about his coaching position now as he was when he was first hired. “It is an honor for me to coach the team I played on in the 1990s,” Mayotte said. “Everyone on the team is a lot of fun to be around and they are all high quality young men who will play competitive golf for the rest of their lives. Each golfer has such a promising future – and I can’t wait to see what they will accomplish.” For further information about Spring Arbor University’s wide variety of athletic programs, please visit http://www.saucougars.com/. - MG -

Jason Dingee One recruit – Austin Tuckerman, a recent high school graduate from Wauseon, Ohio – is anticipated to have an immediate impact. “Austin is a very good player who has the potential to start competing right away,” Mayotte said. “He will probably be one of the future leaders of our team.” Mayotte also expects three current team members, Tyler Owen ’14, Chris Chaney ’15, and Nick Ward ’14, to become dependable leaders this fall. “Tyler is looking to have his junior year become a breakout season for him,” Mayotte said. “He has a lot of talent and golf knowledge and he is a great ball striker. He will be a solid contributor to the program this season.”

Spring Arbor University Cougars Fall 2012 Men’s Golf Schedule Baldwin-Wallace College – Jon Spiess Memorial, September 11th, 2012 (Ironwood Golf Course, Wauseon, Ohio) Malone University Fall Classic, September 14th – 15th, 2012 (Tannenhauf Golf Course, Alliance, Ohio) *Bill Bockwitz Intercollegiate, September 21st – 22nd, 2012 (Cascades Golf Course, Jackson, Michigan) Bethel College Pilot Invitational, September 24th – 25th, 2012 (Blackthorn Golf Course, South Bend, Indiana) St. Francis University Cougar Invitational, October 1st – 2nd, 2012 (Cherry Hill Golf Course and Autumn Ridge Golf Course, Fort Wayne, Indiana) Taylor University Fall Invitational, October 11th – 12th, 2012 (Egypt Valley Country Club, Ada, Michigan) * Hosted by Spring Arbor University

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Wrap Up to a Great Golf Season

Photo by Art McCafferty

By Jack Berry

Gaylord Golf Mecca’s Paul Beachnau at Treetops hat a delight to talk about a great golf season in Michigan. It’s as though the state is coming up out Jack Berry of a storm cellar of a tough economy and tough weather.

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“We’ve had a really strong year coming off a strong year,” said Paul Beachnau, executive director of the Gaylord Visitors and Convention Bureau and the Gaylord Golf Mecca which celebrated its 25th anniver38

sary of drawing golfers from all over to play northern Michigan golf. “I attribute it to better consumer confidence, unemployment down and the Pure Michigan campaign. “It’s been a really good year and we even saw it last winter despite one of our worst snow years. We still were up 11%, January to May,” Beachnau said of the Mecca’s golf and ski resorts and member motels that started its own Pure Michigan type-sales pitch in 1987. While much of the Midwest roasted under record heat this summer and Michigan had a siege of

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90-degree, even triple-digit days, Michigan PGA Executive Director Kevin Helm said “It’s been anecdotal but mostly positive reaction from our members. They’ll take dry over rain. They didn’t lose any weekends or have to reschedule events. All in all, they’ve been very happy over the summer – no rainsuits and when it’s hot people drink more water.” Kate Moore, executive director of the Michigan Golf Course Owners Association, and David Graham, executive director of the Golf Association of Michigan mirrored Beachnau’s and Helm’s assessments.

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“I asked owners at our tournament at Bedford Valley how the season has been and they gave it thumbs up,” Moore said. “We don’t have hard figures yet but it’s so nice after what seemed like five or six years of down.” Graham said “Rounds definitely are up. We had a non-existent winter (resulting in early play) and I wouldn’t be surprised if we’re up 10 to 15% over last season. I don’t have hard numbers, that’s talking to people. “Knock on wood it’s not only a reflection on the weather. The economy hasn’t been a machine busting out all sorts of jobs but it’s better than it has been. We’re not hitting the ball out of the park yet but it’s a swing in the right direction,” Graham said.

But Dr. Joe Vargas of the Michigan State University Turf Team said the up and down weather, early March heat, then frosts, more heat and some hard rains posed problems. “The three toughest years we’ve had for growing grass were 1998, 1995 and this year. Turf can stand heat, it can stand water but not together, and heavy rain in early July resulted in dead grass in low areas. There was a little disease and summer patch so we did a lot of handholding and empathizing with superintendents.”

ompetitively, Michigan got a great boost from two major senior championships that bracketed the state, the PGA Senior Championship at the Jack Nicklausdesigned Harbor Shores Golf Club in Benton Harbor and the United States Senior Championship at historic Indianwood G&CC in Lake Orion.

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Both tournaments had excellent weather and were televised nationally. The blimp shots showed Michigan’s Water Wonderland, bluer than blue Lake Michigan at Harbor Shores and the many Oakland County lakes around Indianwood. The commentators had nothing but compliments about the courses and areas. Englishman Roger Chapman dominated the starry field at Harbor Shores before wonderfully large galleries and then repeated, although not quite as easily, at Indianwood.

Photo © Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

While the sunny, blue sky days were great for the players, it was a dif-

ficult time for golf course superintendents. They didn’t suffer the way fellow grass growers in Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas, Iowa and other drought-stricken states did or Michigan corn and fruit farmers.

Roger Chapman wins the Senior PGA at Harbor Shores MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

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call that usually beige-colored grit found on courses.

Photo by Art McCafferty

It’s dead certain no major rule change will go into effect until 2016 but it wouldn’t be surprising if anchoring the putter to the body, as both long and belly putters do, would be banned in professional play.

Jack Berry with Billy Payne, Chairman of Augusta National Golf Club When Chapman was interviewed afterward he was asked about his liking for Michigan courses, unprompted he smiled and said “It’s Pure Michigan.” Indianwood would like another big time pro tournament but chances are slim for the PGA Tour which is fully booked. Warwick Hills, which hosted the Buick Open for a half century until Buick pulled its sponsorship during General Motors’ bankruptcy, would love to get back in the game too. The Web.com Tour, the PGA Tour’s steppingstone, has good players but doesn’t draw well. The one tour that isn’t full is the LPGA. Women have done exceptionally well in two U.S. Women’s Opens at Indianwood and that championship keeps going to premier courses. It’s recently been at the Broadmoor, Oakmont and Blackwolf Run and ahead has Pinehurst No. 2 and the Jack 40

Nicklaus-Tom Doak designed Sebonack on Long Island. State champions this year were Barrett Kelpin of Kalamazoo, just graduated from Iowa, who shot 23under-par at The Orchards to match Chick Harbert’s 1948 record in the Michigan Open, the state’s oldest professional championship, and Katie Burnett, 22, of Brunswick, GA, just graduated from the University of South Carolina. She shot 11 under at Crystal Mountain and won the Michigan Women’s Open by a record 10 shots. It was her professional debut. Grosse Ile golfers were runnerup in both Opens. Jeff Cuzzort was eight shots behind Kelpin in the Michigan Open and Laura Bavaird was second in the Women’s Open. he two major Golf Channel discussion points this year have been whether the long putter will be banned and what you

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As for the grit, that seems to be a problem only on two Pete Dye courses, Whistling Straits in Wisconsin and the Ocean Course on Kiawah Island, South Carolina. The grit is labeled sand trap everywhere at Whistling Straits, owner Herb Kohler’s joke in Wisconsin, instead of just by putting greens or in fairways. At the Ocean Course, a local rule says there no such thing as a sand trap and the player can ground his club, take practice swings, without penalty. So what is that grit pit called? The high mucky-mucks of golf call them bunkers. But it wasn’t always so. When I first covered golf in the 1950s, the players called them sand traps. Arnold Palmer still calls them sand traps. That’s good enough for me. ongratulations to the Augusta National Golf Club for extending membership to former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore, the first female members of the club. There is no more savvy executive than Chairman Billy Payne who has smoothed everything out after the reign of Hootie Johnson.

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MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE


Slice of Life Charlie Sorrell: One of the Best By Terry Moore

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A long time industry friend whom I first met when he won his national award in 1990, Sorrell, 71, is staying young by teaching at the PGA Center for Golf Learning and Performance in Port St. Lucie, FL. “My job is take on the overflow,” says Sorrell. “I’m the on-call doctor.” Sorrell and his beloved wife Joyce retired to Port St. Lucie in 2007 after selling their home and property which housed his Golf Meadows teaching academy in Stockbridge, GA. He’s compiled a laudable teach-

ing career that emphasizes a non-jargon, simple and fun approach to giving golf lessons. He’s also known for his clever rhymes to stress certain swing fundamentals, such as: “Wrists that are tight/destroy ball flight” and “When you’re balanced throughout the swing/A repeatable motion is a sure thing.” A long time ago, Deb and I visited the always affable and self-effac-

ever had—then or now. Basically, he encouraged her to generate more clubhead speed while remaining on plane by this simple adage: “Hinge and sling.” He got Deb to correctly hinge her wrists, creating a powerful and correct angle, and then for her to swing through the shot. The results were immediate and remarkable. As Charlie more fully explained, “The hands are made to hold, the wrists are made to hinge,

Photo by Terry Moore

his past winter when my wife and I spent some time in Florida we drove across the lower middle of the Terry Moore state, starting west from Naples to Port St. Lucie. It was a pleasant drive and we saw parts of the state we’ve never seen before. Along the way, we saw this sign: “Talk less, say more.” Darn if the message didn’t sum up later the captivating teaching philosophy of Charlie Sorrell, the former National PGA Teacher of the Year and twotime headliner at the West Michigan Golf Show. Now this doesn’t mean Charlie is a quiet sort. Quite the contrary. Rather he’s a jovial, talkative personality but when he’s giving a lesson his words are carefully chosen.

Charlie Sorrell, PGA Teacher of the Year

ing Charlie at his teaching academy in Georgia and he provided Deb with the most effective lesson she’s

the arms are made to fold and the arms are made to swing.”

MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

2012

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Sorrell’s golf career was influenced by his first boss in the business, Virgil Morey, head professional at Riverside CC in Lanette, Alabama. “He gave me two very important lessons about teaching golf. Number one: kill them with kindness; and number two: learn how to cure a slice or a hook quickly.” In over forty years teaching the game he loves, Sorrell has added a third bedrock tenet. “I also stress MYFI— which stands for Making You Feel Important.”

When asked about Tour Tempo and its recent research findings on tempo for Tour player swings, Sorrell brought up the story of how in winning the 1937 Masters Byron Nelson reminded himself to compare his swing tempo to dancing a waltz. “Most of what we know about the game and the swing is not new; but we’re seeing it in a new light with the help of technology.” Sorrell, a PGA Master Golf Professional, is a joy to be around because he loves what he does, helping to put a “smile back on a golfers’ faces as they play the game of a life-

time.” And it’s the everyday golfer getting better that remains the focus of his attention and astute eye. Sorrell said: “I always remember something Bob Toski once told me, ‘Anyone can teach a Tour player. That’s easy compared to working with beginners or struggling average golfers.’ ” Deb Moore was one such struggling golfer. But after another lesson with Charlie Sorrell, she was hinging, swinging and smiling. For more information about the PGA Center for Golf Learning and Performance visit http://www.pgavillage.com. - MG -

Photo by Terry Moore

Over the winter, Sorrell was part of a panel presentation that talked about “blending the old styles of teaching of modern technology.” He said today’s teachers have excellent tools, particularly with video, to identify and correct swing maladies.

“But the human element of teaching can’t be underestimated,” says Sorrell, “because everything still must be communicated properly.”

Charlie Sorrell helps Deb Moore with her swing. 42

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MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE


Michigan Golfer, September / October 2012  

A quarterly publication about Michigan Golf courses, Michigan golfers and Michigan golf events.