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In This Issue VOLUME 31

JULY / AUGUST 2013

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http://michigangolfer.com MICHIGAN GOLFER Publisher/Editor Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Editor Emeritus Terry Moore Associate Publisher/Producer Jennie McCafferty Writers Jeff Bairley Susan Bairley L’anse Bannon Mike Beckman Jack Berry Tom Doak Mike Duff Topher Goggin Thad Gutowski Kelly Hill Janina Parrott Jacobs Greg Johnson Brad King Vartan Kupelian Tom Lang Chris Lewis Jim Neff Bill Shelton Brad Shelton

4 Norm Sinclair Michael Patrick Shiels Herschel Nathanial Bernice Phillips Ron Whitten

Photo/Video Kevin Frisch Deb Moore Dave Richards Carter Sherline Brian Walters Director of Accounting Cheryl Clark Michigan Golfer is produced by

By Chris Lewis 12

The Berry Patch: Patching It Together By Jack Berry

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Hungry Like the Wolf By Brad King

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Collegiate Spotlight: Adrian College - Women’s Golf By Chris Lewis

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Collegiate Spotlight: Adrian College - Men’s Golf By Chris Lewis

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An Interview with Rick Robbins, President of the ASGCA

Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc. GLSP Advertising & Business Office 4007 Carpenter Road, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 734.507.0241 734.434.4765 FAX info@glsp.com glsp.com

Oakland University’s Katke-Cousins and R&S Sharf

By Bill Shelton 30

Golfing Gaylord – Three Good Choices By Mike Duff

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MWGA Announces Golfer and Players of the Year

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“Hey Buddy,” It’s Not the U.S. Open By Brad Shelton

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Werkmeister First Amateur to Win Michigan Open in 38 Years By Greg Johnson

Michigan Golfer is published online four times a year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement of views and/or philosophy of Michigan Golfer. Back Issues: May be ordered by sending $5.00 with your name, address and issue requested to Michigan Golfer, 4007 Carpenter Road, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

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Can You Buy a Better Golf Game? Yes and Yes By Bill and Brad Shelton

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Slice of Life

By Terry Moore

Cover: Oakland University’s R&S Sharf Golf Course. Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

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Oakland University’s Ka Two Visions

Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

By C

“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?’” -- George Bernard Shaw his line, taken from Shaw’s Back to Methuselah play, has often been quoted by some of the world’s most famous leaders,

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from President John F. Kennedy to his brother Robert. Although it was written more than 90 years ago, its basic principle still applies today: if

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you have a vision you believe in, pursue it. You just may change the world.

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atke-Cousins and R&S Sharf: s Fully Realized

Chris Lewis

Katke Cousins Hole No. 17

Marvin Katke, a long-time trustee of Oakland University, was a visionary, a man who truly “dreamt things that never were” and asked “Why not?” In 1976, Katke had a vision: to develop an 18-hole golf course on the grounds of Oakland University, near the Meadow Brook Estate. An avid golfer, he knew full well just

how beneficial the course would be, not only for the greater community, but for the university and its students. His idea was quite brilliant – develop a course entirely funded by donors, rather than tax dollars, thereby attracting benefactors who may not have donated to the university in the past. Upon the completion of the course, all course fees and donations would be allocated to

the course, the university, and its students. At the time, Katke had enough funds to begin the course’s construction. However, he encountered one issue. He only had enough money to develop nine holes. He would need donations to complete the rest of the course.

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Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

R & S Sharf Golf Course Cart Path With that in mind, he decided to speak with his friend and next-door neighbor, Harold Cousins. During a casual conversation on a warm summer day, Katke proposed his vision to Cousins in an unusual manner, as the two trimmed their outdoor hedges. Hoping Cousins would refer him to donors, Katke was surprised by his response. Cousins did not offer any referrals; instead, he was interested in partnering with Katke and contributing his own money to the second nine holes of Katke’s 18hole dream. With a donor fully secured, construction continued, as the course’s first nine holes were opened to University affiliates in September 1976. Less than one year later, in May 1977, the final nine holes were completed and opened. Katke’s vision had finally been realized, as Oakland University’s Katke-Cousins began to welcome guests from all around the world.

Around this time, Bill Rogers, golf and managing director of Oakland University’s Golf and Learning Center, was hired by Katke and Cousins to help develop the course’s reputation. “I was an assistant professional at Bloomfield Hills Country Club from 1972 to 1977 and met Mr. Katke there,” said Rogers. “I began at Oakland in May 1977 as the golf professional. By September of that year, I was named the general manager and director of the entire operation.” Designed by Bob Beard, the 7,178yard-long, par-72 Katke-Cousins Golf Course is now renowned throughout the state of Michigan for its tight, narrow fairways, subtle greens, and length. Its signature hole – the 215 yard par-3 8th – has attracted thousands of guests throughout the last four decades. “Designed as a showpiece hole for

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the course, the eighth hole has been placed in front of the Meadow Brook Hall, providing outstanding views of the historic mansion,” Rogers said. In fact, Katke-Cousins has been so popular with guests and beneficial to the Oakland community, with millions of dollars generated and donated, that two other donors, Stephan and Rita Sharf, were intrigued by the idea of creating a second course on the property. Fully funded by the couple, and named in their honor, Oakland University’s second highly-rated course, the R&S Sharf Golf Course, was finalized and opened to the public in August 2000. “Stephan was Vice Chair of Chrysler Corp., as well as an Oakland University trustee who understood the value of golf as a recreation vehicle for campus life and the engagement of the community as a whole,

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said Rogers. “He also knew the course would help stimulate collaboration between businesses and the university, much like Katke-Cousins has.” The Sharfs, along with the Oakland University golf staff, hired well-known course designer Rick Smith, whose portfolio includes Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course, to create the R&S Sharf. “The entire design and construction teams from Arcadia Bluffs were retained and started working on the R&S Sharf as soon as they completed the construction of Arcadia Bluffs,” Rogers stated.

“The first 11 holes are generally viewed as the course’s most difficult, while the last seven holes offer golfers their best scoring opportunities,” said Rogers. “The R&S Sharf requires strategic placement of tee shots in broadly shaped fairways, in order to provide golfers their best angles into the various pin locations, which, in some cases, are on undulating greens.” He added, “The 12th hole, designed in collaboration with Stephan and Rita, is the course’s most recognized, as it is located in a meadow that displays unique beauty every season of the year.”

The R&S Sharf, along with Katke-Cousins, is maintained by superintendent Tom Schall, CGCS. A former employee of the Club Corporation of America, and a certified course superintendent since 1995, Schall has served Oakland University since January 2003. “Tom maintains the entire 36hole complex, covering 560 acres, with approximately 24 personnel, including five full-time staff members,” Rogers said. On a regular basis, he works with colleagues like Perry Busse, head golf professional. A former employee at Carl’s Golfland and Great Oaks Country Club, Busse has managed both courses’ daily operations since 2006.

Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

Measuring at 7,103 yards from the tips, the par-72 R&S Sharf chal-

lenges golfers of all skill levels with its fast greens and wide assortment of pin locations.

Steve Sharf Clubhouse M I C H I GAN G O LF E R MAGAZ I N E • J U LY / AU G U ST

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“Perry provides unparalleled, topquality customer service. Our goal is to out service every golf facility in the world,” said Rogers.

Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

Throughout the year, Busse and his staff oversee a Golf and Learning Center that encompasses a 30,000 square foot driving range, complete with 28 hitting areas, and a five acre short game area, featuring three putting greens and five bunkers. Course guests and University golf affiliates have access to the Center before and after their rounds, even if they are not receiving instruction.

R & S Sharf Hole No. 12.

As of May 1, 2013, the site is now home to one of Rick Smith’s exclusive Golf Learning Academies, proudly flying the Rick Smith Golf Academy banner, as Smith and his renowned instructors are available for world-class golf lessons. This summer, the academy will lead its annual, three-day junior golf camp from July 9th to 11th. Limited to 32 boys and girls aged six to 16, the camp will include instruction on etiquette, rules, driving, iron play, and a variety of other aspects of the game. Participants will also

enjoy lunch, earn prizes, and compete in contests designed to entertain, as they hone their swings and sharpen their short game skills. In addition to its Golf and Learning Center, Oakland University offers golfers a newly designed, state of the art Steve Sharf Clubhouse. Finalized in June 2012, the clubhouse features an aboutGolf swing simulator, high-definition televisions, men’s and women’s lockers, and a pro shop. The clubhouse also provides


guests an opportunity to relax and socialize at Patti Finnegan’s Pub & Grill, a cozy restaurant that opened last summer. As they reflect on their rounds and savor the beauty of the pub’s gorgeous, rustic interior, they are welcomed to order bacon, lettuce, and tomato lawash roll-ups, served with dijon aioli, or relish menu items like the Michigan harvest chicken wrap, complete with dried cherries, blue cheese, apples, greens, and raspberry vinaigrette. Much like Katke-Cousins and the R&S Sharf Golf Courses, the

clubhouse financially benefits the university and its students. “Again, the courses fiscally stand on their own, as no general fund tax dollars are allocated to the golf department whatsoever,” Rogers said. “Both courses facilitate a friendly, front porch feel of exposure, so to speak, to Oakland University in many individuals’ cases, who have then become major educational and university departments’ benefactors.” He continued, “There have been

millions upon millions of dollars of contributions that have been cultivated, as a result of collaborations that have either occurred on the courses, or through golf employees’ outreach.” Clearly, the courses have contributed to the university in a positive manner, just as Katke envisioned 37 years ago. But, with two nationally recognized courses, a topnotch Rick Smith learning center, and a stunning clubhouse already established, does Rogers have any other visions in mind for the univer-


solid, cutting-edge business planning and implementation of employee, community, and institutional ideas,” Rogers stated.

Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

Rogers’ vision, along the lines of George Bernard Shaw’s popular line, to dream things that never were and say “Why not?,” is likely one that Katke, Cousins, and Sharf would wholeheartedly support.

Patti Finnegan’s Pub and Grill sity’s golfing facilities as he looks ahead to the future?

- MG -

Photo by Rick Smith / Rick’s Photography

“Right now, I am determined to

further expand our community involvement and support, while operating the most successful golf business in the region, through

For further information about Oakland University’s Golf and Learning Center’s lessons, as well as Katke-Cousins and R&S Sharf rates, including twilight specials, please visit http://www.oakland.edu/golf.

R & S Sharf Clubhouse Pro Shop 10

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The Berry Patch

Patching It Together By Jack Berry shot. GOLF Magazine advises “Load more energy into your rear end.” Maybe not a pretty picture. Houtteman’s tip for my crummy grip was turn your left hand from left to right as though you’re turning a doorknob. A half turn from bottom to top with the back of the hand on top, a strong grip.

Photo by Art McCafferty

“That’s what’s fun about my job, makes it enjoyable” the 52-year-old one-time hockey player from St. Clair shores said.

Jack Berry (r) with Jim Engh at the True North grand opening. t took so long for June to be bustin’ out all over (apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein) that it’s maddening to be so far along and we haven’t gotten much golf weather.

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But on a foggy, chilly, three-layer, rainsuit morning when the Manitou Passage on Lake Michigan couldn’t be seen from the hilltop eighth tee at Manitou Passage Golf Club, Lee Houtteman made golf fun again for me. 12

Real simple. He fixed my weak grip with a doorknob. Golf is filled with tips. They occupy more pages in the magazines than even projections on whether or not Tiger Woods will match Jack Nicklaus’s hefty collection of major championships. Let the clubs do the work. Hold your head still. Turn your head. Heel off the ground. Inside out. Outside in. Do a hockey player slap

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Until he was 15, Houtteman said every day he wanted to play hockey and be on All-Star teams. He played right wing for St. Clair Shores’ 1978 state championship team but said in the off-season “It was too hard to get 12 guys to play hockey and I got hooked on golf. I could practice golf by myself.” Houtteman’s brother, Michael, stuck with hockey, played at Michigan State and then played in the World Hockey League with the Long Island Ducks. “I could beat him in golf and he said that’s where I should go. I went to Florida and got into minitours

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and I found out that was a whole different league. I worked at Grand Cypress and Phil Rodgers took me under his wing. It was the Jack Nicklaus Golf Academy. Phil was a good teacher. Jack gave him credit for two majors he won.”

should be familiar. Lee Houtteman’s father was related to Art Houtteman who signed at 17 with the Tigers in 1945 right out of Catholic Central and pitched 12 seasons in the American League.

PATCHES – Spring was a too brief Houtteman spent 12 years teaching in Orlando, gave tour golf another shot in Japan in 1990 and when that didn’t work he returned to America and taught in Las Vegas. He returned to Michigan and taught in the Jim McLean School at Grand Traverse Resort and then with sixtime Michigan Open champion Scott Hebert when Hebert was appointed head professional. Together Houtteman and Hebert won the Michigan PGA Pro-Pro in 2011 and Houtteman won the Boyne Tournament of Champions. Last year was another championship season for Houtteman with the Michigan PGA Match Play and the Senior PGA titles. He’s doing pretty nicely this year, too. He tied for 13th in the Michigan Open, the top senior in the minitour player-loaded event, and featured an ace on the 12th hole at The Orchards. Houtteman made the short trip from Grand Traverse to Manitou Passage this season and is head professional at the Arnold Palmer designed course, formerly named King’s Challenge. Under the leadership of Bob Kuras of the Homestead Resort, Manitou has become a top player among the collection of Up North courses that are the match of any section of the country. For readers of a senior or super senior age, the name Houtteman

trip Up North with a nice stop at well-named Forest Dunes, Tom Weiskopf at his designing best. I hadn’t been there since the office was in a double wide. Now there’s a fine clubhouse and restaurant and new Au Sable Lodge. After hearing and seeing two big whistling swans glide into a pond at Forest Dunes, then watching a wild turkey family at Manitou Passage the thought struck me that Pure Michigan should do a piece featuring our wildlife, deer, elk, moose, fox, bears, bald eagles, redtail hawks, all the trout varieties, bass and salmon. Did I leave any out? Golf Channel could do an Oscarworthy feature of wildlife at the pro tour stops, whales, dolphins, alligators, big snakes, all kinds of longlegged water birds, ospreys and birds of every color. Golf Channel keeps getting better with its live coverage and when Comcast swallowed up NBC and its channels it’s become the sports powerhouse. Great job at the majors, even hit all the sectional qualifying for the Open. They called it Golf ’s Longest Day. Baloney. Golf ’s longest day was before television and before the USGA got off the couch and started staffing the sectionals. The longest day was Thursday, first round of the Open, when everyone started from the first tee and rounds took forever

on a tough course with so many players unaccustomed to deep rough, fast greens and Open nerves. Cheers to Shanty Creek for its junior program and starting a high school program. The Summit course, Shanty’s first, features eight inch cups and Golf Director Brian Kautz said it’s working very well with families, seniors, women and kids. Can you imagine, no threeputt greens! Folks at the top of all the golf organizations talk about fun and those big cups should be fun…before you get back to those tiny cups that can seem no wider than a dime. Asked about the weather Kautz said that as much as Michigan golf benefited from good weather last year “It’s working against us this year.” Michigan isn’t alone. From the severe Pacific Ocean winds that stalled the PGA Tour’s opener at Maui, weather has interrupted nearly every week on the three major tours and the biggest headache was the U.S. Open at Merion where Executive Director Mike Davis was seen building an ark. Maybe I exaggerate. Just a bit. One last patch – I was very happy to see Traverse City’s Tom Doak voted into the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame along with good guys Steve Brady, winner of every major in the state, and Fritz Balmer, no number on his uniform but the game wouldn’t go without the Balmers. Doak has contributed to the game with designs that rank him with golf’s greatest…and he hasn’t moved heaven and all its earth to do it. - MG -

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© 2006 LC Lambrecht

View from the Wolfdancer Tee No. 12

Hungry Like the Wolf Centerpiece of the comfortably luxurious, conveniently secluded Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa outside fabled Austin, Wolfdancer Golf Club is forging a reputation as one of the game’s most scenic and challenging resort layouts. By Brad King BASTROP, TEXAS — The Wolfdancer Golf Club roared onto the Austin, Texas golf scene in 2006. Buoyed by an incredible setting and a thought-provoking, challenging layout — all under the respected Hyatt brand flag — Wolfdancer was 14

immediately bestowed prominent national awards including GOLF Magazine’s “Top 10 New Courses You Can Play” while at the same time storming to the top of regional and state rankings.

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The centerpiece of an easy-toarrange, one-stop resort destination that includes a world-class spa, premier accommodations, horseback riding — all in the form of a luxurious base camp from which to experience Austin‘s legendary culinary,

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arts and music scenes — the sprawling, 405-acre Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa is a 491-room destination resort comfortably adjacent to a larger, 1,100-acre natural park. Hyatt Lost Pines is truly a hidden wonderland equally idyllic for traveling golfers, family getaways and corporate retreats.

Wolfdancer Golf Club features an unexpectedly large amount of

rolling, wooded and flowing topographical variance resulting in one resort and one golf course, yet three entirely different experiences: A true cross-section of Texas Hill Country geography playing through three eco-systems. Holes one through four are set on covered rolling prairie land, five through 12 on a heavily wooded ridgeline and 13 through 18 along a shaded valley bordering the Colorado River. A former owner of the land, Marjorie “Tiny” Leach, is a legendary cattle rancher who once owned an Austin leather shop, “Tiny’s Leather Shop,” and today the Wolfdancer starter’s hut stands in her honor. While the Hill Country is chock full of layouts designed by names like Fazio, Crenshaw and Trent Jones Sr.,

© 2006 LC Lambrecht

For those in the know, this resort offers an elegant, backwoods experience minutes away from the hustle and bustle of civilization. Hyatt Lost Pines is located 20 miles of east of the “Live Music Capital of the World” and just 13 miles due east of AustinBergstrom International Airport on Highway 71, yet feels completely secluded in its sleepy farmland surroundings buffered by the McKinney Roughs nature preserve.

Designed by Arthur Hills/Steve Forrest and Associates, the 7,205yard, par-72 Wolfdancer Golf Club was named after the land it occupies formerly belonging to the Tonkawa American Indian tribe, who performed ceremonial dances covered in wolf skin and imitating the behavior of wolves by dancing on all fours. A golf course is only as good as the land it sits upon, and the property at Hyatt Lost Pines is superb. The Hills layout rambles over a dramatic, 150-acre stretch of terrain dotted with oak, cedar elm and pecan trees and cut by the Colorado River, which dramatically frames the right side of layout’s memorable finishing holes.

Wolfdancer Golf Club, Hole No. 6 M I C H I GAN G O LF E R MAGAZ I N E • J U LY / AU G U ST

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longer than wide — are challenging for golfers of all ability.

© 2006 LC Lambrecht

Widely considered one of the most exhilarating public golf courses in the Southwest, Wolfdancer represents a striking combination of strategy and swagger: A sturdy, sophisticated and balanced golf experience suggesting at various times during a round the stark simplicity of Scottish seaside golf, the tradition of classic American parkland golf and the heroic school of golf course design.

Wolfdancer Golf Club, No. 9 Green Wolfdancer is the only design save Hyatt Hill Country Golf Club credited to the equally well-respected golf course architect Arthur Hills. With Wolfdancer, Hills delivers a classic layout capable of challenging the Texas single-digit handicapper while delivering an unforgettable resort experience for the visiting family or transient golfer.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Wolfdancer is indeed hungry like the wolf, legitimately staking claim as Austin’s toughest track from the black tees. Holes dubbed “Through the Trees” and “Random Long” serve as a warning of what to expect at Wolfdancer — as well as a reminder to check one’s ego at the door. While the tips at Wolfdancer are manageable only by low singledigit handicappers, the middle-back tees are rated 74.3, and four shorter sets of tees are available daily down to under 5,000 yards from the women’s, making the golf course navigable, fun and interesting for golfers of all level of playing ability. Much of Wolfdancer’s front nine

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careens over bold, rolling ground where there was little earth movement required and featuring some jaw-dropping views of the countryside. The opening nine and the first two holes after the turn were built on a meadow above the Colorado River, meaning the speed and direction of the wind factors significantly, particularly on higher ground. “I like the sound of the wind in Texas rushing through the trees,” course architect Hills said. “It can really add to the quality of a golf experience in a very subtle manner.” Generally wide open off the tee, the Wolfdancer fairways are enjoyably generous. It is the approach shots that define the character of Wolfdancer, with scoring opportunities rising and falling upon the execution of a player’s shot into the greens, which can be difficult to hit particularly when those aforementioned Texas winds start howling. Make no mistake, this is not a resort course where low scores come easily, as the Bermuda grass green complexes — varied in size and typically

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Hyatt clearly knows how to deliver the complete golf experience, and its Wolfdancer Golf Club creates a balance between maintaining the site’s natural beauty and designing a golf course that feels like it has been there forever. The massive landscape and topography are highlighted by this well-conditioned course, which represents luxury in a beautifully rugged setting — and at times will take your breath away. In addition to the upper-tier conditioning and service one comes to expect from a golf course associated with a Hyatt resort, the Wolfdancer Academy of Golf was established to promote and deliver a unique one-onone customized golf learning experience, while the golf experience at Wolfdancer also includes a 13-acre driving range, a full-scale practice facility featuring 10 target greens and eight tee boxes, and a short-game area with two chipping greens and bunkers, and GPS units in each golf cart. Visitors not wishing to travel with their golf clubs to the resort can take advantage of the Callaway club rental program, while the Wolfdancer Academy of Golf offers individual instruction and family and group clinics by PGA certified instructors.

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A beautiful clubhouse features outstanding cuisine and beverage selection at Major Neighbors Grill, while the Wolfdancer Golf Shop offers the latest trends and fashion in men’s and women’s apparel, cutting-edge game improvement golf equipment and accessories, and men’s and women’s locker rooms.

Writer, editor and public relations specialist Brad King (Winston-Salem, NC) is former managing editor and senior editor of LINKS Magazine, where he wrote comprehensive cover stories and opinion columns for the magazine covering professional tours, world-wide travel and the game’s most revered legends. In 2002 founded Brad King Communications, a public relations team incorporating media expertise and publishing experience to generate positive exposure for its clients. Brad penned a golf column in Hilton Head’s Island Packet newspaper for five years, and has edited and contributed to numerous book projects.

He helped produce award-winning editorial coverage of the 2005 U.S. Open and the 2007 U.S. Women’s Open for the Southern Pines Pilot. Brad is a longtime advisory board member for Georgia Magazine, the University of Georgia’s alumni magazine, member of the Golf Writers Association of America (GWAA) and a member of the North Carolina Golf Panel. He has twice been recognized by the GWAA for editing and column writing, and by the South Carolina Press Association for newspaper column writing. Brad has an undergraduate degree in communications from the University of North Carolina and a master’s degree in mass communications from the University of Georgia. - MG -

© 2006 LC Lambrecht

Home to a variety of outdoor activities including horseback riding trails visible from points of the golf course, rafting on Texas’ Lower Colorado River, full-service Spa Django, eight dining options, live music and a water park featuring a 1,000-foot Crooked River with twostory water slide, Hyatt Lost Pines is a truly luxurious, family-friendly golf resort.

Web sites … http://LostPines.Hyatt.com http://WolfdancerGolfClub.com

Wolfdancer Golf Club, Hole No. 3 M I C H I GAN G O LF E R MAGAZ I N E • J U LY / AU G U ST

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Collegiate Spotlight

Adrian College Bulldogs Prepare for a Fruitful Future – On and Off the Course

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

By Chris Lewis

Adrian College, 2012-2013 Women’s Golf Team n June 2008, Troy Martin was offered the opportunity of a lifetime – to oversee both the men’s and women’s programs of a Chris Lewis renowned liberal arts institution, Adrian College.

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Martin knew the position would require a considerable amount of time and responsibility, but he was prepared. After all, he had worked in the golf industry throughout his entire career, serving as the University of Findlay’s assistant golf coach, as well as the assistant club professional at two of Findlay, Ohio’s most prestigious clubs,

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Findlay Country Club and Red Hawk Run. Although he would have to move away from home, and adjust to the responsibilities of a new position, he quickly accepted the job, knowing full well that he was embarking on a career move.

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For instance, during the 20102011 season, Adrian’s women’s team set all-time 18 and 36-hole scoring totals. Last season, junior Chelsey Wyman was named to the MIAA AllTournament team, an accomplishment that no other ladies golfer has ever achieved in team history. And junior Ariel Gruber became Adrian’s first female individual medalist during the Fall 2012 season. As Martin prepares for his sixth season at the helm of the women’s program, he is confident that his team members will continue to add their names to the college’s record books. “Our team’s chemistry is unique, as everyone is very, very close to each other, almost like family. That type of camaraderie will help them succeed not only as individuals, but as a team unit as well,” said Martin. “The girls have plenty of potential in all aspects of the game and are improving every day. This is an exciting time in our program’s history.”

The Bulldogs Enjoy a Successful 2012-2013 Campaign Last season, the Bulldogs acquired seven top-five finishes in 12 tournament appearances. Adrian’s first top-five was recorded during its very first tournament

of the season, the Trine Fall Invitational, which was held at Angola, Ind.’s Zollner Golf Course, a 5,765-yard-long, par-71 layout. Ariel Gruber led all Adrian scorers with an 83, which included a backnine 38, resulting in an individual fourth place finish. Less than one week later, the Bulldogs competed in the Crusader Classic at Treetops, hosted by Madonna University. Adrian tallied a two-round score of 746, which included rounds of 378 and 368, at The Tradition at Treetops, a linksstyle course designed by Rick Smith. Rated as a four-and-a-half star course by Golf Digest, The Tradition is known throughout the state for its usage of wooden pins and pennant flags, a salute to the game’s past. With a two-round total of 177, freshman Sydney Heasley led the Bulldogs, finishing in 11th place individually. After recording two sixth place showings at the MIAA Round #1 and #2, contested at Marshall’s The Medalist Golf Course and Alma’s Pine River Country Club, respectively, the Bulldogs secured their third top-five finish of the season at the MIAA Round #3, held at South Bend, Ind.’s Blackthorne Golf Course. With a 14-over-par 86, Chelsey Wyman, of Marysville, Ohio, led Adrian, finishing in a tie14th individually. Although the Bulldogs’ consistency was well-noticed by Coach Martin, one tournament of the Fall 2012 season stands out above the rest – the Defiance Invitational, which occurred four days after the conclusion of the MIAA Round #3.

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

Since accepting Adrian’s offer, he has witnessed his men’s and women’s teams steadily improve, establishing new scoring records, receiving MIAA All-Tournament Team honors, and earning individual medalist victories.

Chelsey Wyman Held at Defiance, Ohio’s Eagle Rock Golf Club, a par-71, 5,772yard-long course known for its tight fairways and elevation changes, the Defiance Invitational featured a field of eight Midwestern-based teams. With a one round total of 360, the Bulldogs shot lower than all teams, except for Madonna University, recording its first – and only – runner-up finish of the 2012-2013 season. Ariel Gruber’s 83, which included a final nine total of 36, not only led all Bulldog scorers, but the entire field. “We played really well at the Defiance Invitational,” said Martin. “Ariel made history that day, as she became the first Adrian women’s golfer to capture an individual tournament title. I think the girls realized what they are capable of achieving.” Although the runner-up did not lead to further close calls, as the

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Bulldogs finished the fall season with a sixth place and fifth place showing, at the MIAA Round #4 and MIAA Fall Invitational, respectively, the team continued to improve during the off- season, as it prepared for its Spring 2013 campaign. “The weather was a challenge for everyone this past spring, as we faced some awful weather conditions,” Martin said. “But the girls still found a way to score and compete.” Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

In four tournament appearances, the Bulldogs captured two more top-fives during the spring, including a fifth place finish at its home tournament, the Adrian Spring Invitational. Yet again, Ariel Gruber led the Bulldogs, firing an 88 at Adrian’s home course, Lenawee Country Club, which is currently celebrating its 93rd anniversary. Ariel Gruber

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

Two weeks later, the Bulldogs earned their final top-five finish of the season at the Ohio Northern Spring Invitational, a 27-hole tournament contested at Harrod, Ohio’s Colonial Golfers Club. On Friday, April 19th, the Bulldogs played nine holes, shooting a 206 on the par-36 layout. The following day, Adrian played 18 holes, finishing with a 381 and a 27-hole total of 587 for a solo fourth place showing. Chelsey Wyman’s 135 led Adrian, resulting in tie-12th place individual finish.

A Bright Future – On and Off the Golf Course Adrian’s top six golfers of the 2012-2013 season, juniors Chelsey Wyman, Ariel Gruber, and Kaela Hierholzer, sophomore Haley Bandt, and freshmen Kari Somerville and Sydney Heasley, will all be returning this fall. Three new recruits will be joining them, leading Coach Martin to believe next season’s team may be one of the deepest lineups in the history of Adrian women’s golf. “Right now, our goal is to finish in the top four of the MIAA conference,” said Martin. “Next year should be a very good year for us.” Although Coach Martin is certainly proud of his team’s golfing achievements, he believes his team members’ accomplishments away from the course are even more noteworthy than their golf games. “I feel the ladies’ greatest achievements occur in the classroom, rather than on the golf course. Every girl on the team has a GPA of over 3.0, with most girls averaging 3.5 or higher,” Martin stated. “These girls are preparing themselves for successful futures not only in golf, but in their careers. And they definitely have the potential and work ethic they need to achieve their goals.” For further information concerning Adrian College’s athletic programs, please visit http://adrianbulldogs.com. - MG -

Kaela Hierholzer 20

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Collegiate Spotlight

Adrian College Bulldogs Anticipate a Successful 2013-2014 Season

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

By Chris Lewis

Adrian College, 2012-2013 Men’s Golf Team estled in the heart of Adrian, Mich., roughly 30 minutes north of Toledo, Adrian College, a private liberal arts institution, has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the Midwest’s number one up-and-coming college on multiple occasions.

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With 40 undergraduate majors

currently offered, along with Master’s degree and study abroad programs, Adrian is expanding at a rapid pace. In fact, the college recorded an all-time record enrollment as recently as 2012, with 1,700 students registered in all. Much like the college itself, Adrian’s men’s golf team is also

steadily improving. Since fall 2008, coach Troy Martin, a former assistant club professional in Findlay, Ohio, has guided the Adrian Bulldogs to recordbreaking tournament scores, individual First and Second Team AllConference honors, and tournament victories. But, despite his teams’ suc-

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Hosted by Kalamazoo College, the jamboree was contested at Kalamazoo’s Milham Park Golf Course, a par-72, 6,630-yard-long municipal course, on September 8th. With a 71.8 rating and a slope of 126, the course not only challenges golfers of all skill levels, but is also quite popular with local residents, as it has previously been voted the Best Golf Course, according to the Kalamazoo Gazette Readers’ Choice Awards.

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

Brandon Skytta, of Ishpeming, and Cameron McKee, of Newmarket, Ontario, led all Adrian scorers with a pair of 74s, low enough for tie-fourth individual showings. One week later, Adrian hosted its own MIAA Jamboree, the second of the season. Held at Lenawee Country Club, a par-71 private course renowned for its immaculate condition, as well as its quick, undulating greens, the jamboree featured MIAA competitors like Calvin College and Trine University. Brad Haley cesses, he believes the Bulldogs have yet to reach their full potential. “I think the 2013-2014 season could very well be the men’s golf program’s best in Adrian history,” said Martin. “Our goal is clear: to win the MIAA conference championship for the first time since 1977.” To do so, Coach Martin will rely on his veteran players, from seniors Brad Haley and Connor Doria to juniors Cameron McKee and 22

Brandon Skytta, along with some promising freshman and sophomores who have been recruited to ensure the program has a solid foundation for years to come.

Despite Brad Haley’s 74, which included 37s on the front and back nine, the Bulldogs finished 13 strokes behind Calvin and six behind Trine, but still secured a respectable tie-third place showing.

Consistency, Perseverance, Victory

“We held our own against a very talented field,” Martin said. “As one of the team’s leaders, Brad showed what he is truly capable of.”

The Bulldogs’ 2012-2013 season began with a strong showing at the MIAA Jamboree #1, as the team shot an 18-hole total of 306, four strokes behind first place finishers Hope College and Trine University.

On September 24th, Adrian recorded its second straight tie-third place finish, once again trailing Calvin and Trine. Led by freshman Nick Hocker’s 75, Adrian shot an

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18-hole total of 311, respectable scoring, especially considering the layout the Bulldogs encountered. Contested at Battle Creek’s par71, 6,980-yard-long Bedford Valley Golf Course, the fourth of five courses developed at Gull Lake View Golf Club and Resort, the jamboree is one of several tournaments that have been held at Bedford Valley over the years. Since it was first designed in 1965, Bedford has hosted tournaments as prestigious as the Michigan Open, the Michigan Senior Open, and the NCAA Division III National Championship. Formerly listed by Golf Digest as one of the nation’s “Best Places to Play,”

Bedford Valley presently has a 73.5 course rating and a 131 slope. After a strong showing at a renowned layout, the Bulldogs’ momentum continued, with two more third place finishes, at the MIAA Jamboree #4, held on September 27th, and the MIAA Jamboree #6, which occurred two days later. Brad Haley, of Pickering, Ontario, shot a 71 to lead all Adrian scorers and finish tie-third individually. As a team, the Bulldogs shot 294, six shots behind host Trine University, leading to a third place showing. Par was 71 for the tournament, which occurred at Angola, Ind.’s Zollner Golf Course, known for its elevation changes and reconfigured fairways. “I was pleased that the team maintained its consistency, while competing against some of the MIAA’s most gifted teams,” said Martin. “My upperclassmen stepped up to the plate.”

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

Connor Doria, also of Pickering, Ontario, continued the veterans’ solid run by shooting a 73 at the MIAA Jamboree #6 on September 28th. Doria’s tie-second score helped Adrian maintain its consistency, finishing the tournament in a tie-third, at Alma’s Pine River Country Club, a 6,615-yard-long layout notorious for its challenging greens. Yet, despite the Bulldogs’ solid play throughout the Fall 2012 season, one tournament stands out from the rest – the MIAA Jamboree #8, an Albion College-hosted event. Brandon Skytta

Not only did Skytta and McKee

earn individual medalist honors, shooting two 76s, but Adrian captured its first victory of the season, defeating Hope College by seven shots at The Medalist Golf Club, a par-72 layout located in Marshall. “The weather was terrible, but we still managed to shoot 312 on a difficult marshland course,” Martin stated. “Looking back, we should have won by even more strokes, but it was definitely the highlight of the season either way.” With individual honors and a team title firmly secured, what could Adrian possibly do for an encore? Continue its steady play, of course. On October 14th, five days after Jamboree #8 concluded, Adrian competed in its final tournament of the fall, adding another third place finish to its collection of top-five showings. While competing in the DePauw Small College Classic, a two-daylong event, Adrian tallied scores of 302 and 322, finishing 11 strokes behind tournament host DePauw University at Clayton, Ind.’s Deer Creek Golf Course. A 6,695-yardlong, par-71 layout, the course’s numerous water hazards and bunkers offered the Bulldogs a variety of risk and reward holes, which they used fully to their advantage. “With another solid showing, right after our win at the jamboree, we were able to record a scoring average of 309 last fall, low enough for third in the conference,” Martin said. “Our fall campaign provided us with positive momentum as we prepared for the following spring season.”

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Anticipating Future Success The Bulldogs’ Spring 2013 season began on April 5th, as the team traveled to Zanesville, Ohio’s EagleSticks Golf Course to compete in the Muskingum Spring Invitational. Renowned for its elevation changes and bentgrass fairways and greens, EagleSticks, formerly included in Golf Digest’s list of America’s 100 Greatest Public Courses, provided Adrian with an opportunity to extend its streak of top-three finishes. After shooting a first round total of 303, the Bulldogs improved the following day, tallying a second round score of 295 and a two-round

total of 598, resulting in a second place finish. Once again, Cameron McKee led all Adrian scorers with a 146 total and a tie-fourth individual showing. “We played very well at the Invitational, finishing only two shots behind Denison University, the tournament champions,” said Martin. “This performance definitely helped the team prepare for the MIAA Spring Championship, which began one week later.” Although the Bulldogs did not qualify for the National Championship, the entire team demonstrated its potential. During the first round of the Spring Championship, contested at West Olive’s Wuskowhan Players Club, a Rick Smith design, Connor Doria and freshman Jordan Pittman fired a pair of 77s to lead all Adrian scorers. The team’s total score of 313 resulted in a third place finish, nine strokes behind Calvin College.

Photo courtesy of Adrian College Sports Information

On April 26th, nearly two weeks after the conclusion of the first round, the Bulldogs traveled to Grand Rapids’ Watermark Country Club for the second round of the MIAA Spring Championship. Although the team’s total score was not nearly as low as it had been during the first round, at 332, the Bulldogs still secured third place. Once again led by Nick Hocker, who shot an 82 and finished in a tie-fifth individually, Adrian’s score was low enough to advance to the third round of the Championship one day later. Cameron McKee 24

Bulldogs with a 77, which included a front nine score of 37. Adrian won the third round outright, firing 316, as the Bulldogs nearly advanced to the National Championship, defeating runner-up Hope College by five strokes. “We really mounted a comeback. Before the third round began, we were 12 shots behind the National Championship qualifiers,” said Martin. “By the time the third round had been completed, we were only five shots short of qualifying for the National Championship.” Adrian’s noticeable comeback, along with the team’s fall jamboree victory and streak of top-three finishes, have led Coach Martin to believe the Bulldogs’ full potential has not yet been realized. “First, our team is one big family, as we have great chemistry from top to bottom, which is very important,” Martin said. “We also have a mixture of youth and experience, as I will have two incoming freshmen who will compete and push our upperclassmen to perform to the best of their abilities.” He added, “Our future is very bright. I believe the team has the ability to win multiple tournaments next year and finally qualify for the National Championship after coming so close this season.”

For more information about Adrian College’s athletic programs, please visit http://adrianbulldogs.com. - MG -

Nick Hocker again led the

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An Interview with Rick Robbins, President of the American Society of Golf Course Architects By Bill Shelton

Currently Rick serves as the president of the American Society of Golf Course Architects. I had an opportunity to visit with him on a recent return from China.

diversity of golfers that is more inclusive of women, seniors, younger players and minorities of all types is a big part of the solution to growing the game. To groups like most women, junior and senior golfers, the game can be far too hard with intimidating rules, course designs and expectations of other players. To the younger generations golf is just not cool with the perception that it is a sport for rich, old, white guys. Figuring out what would make golf more fun for these new players while not abandoning the traditions of the game is an issue that needs work and serious thought from all the various golf industry stakeholders.

Photo courtesy of ASGCA

Rick Robbins is the head of Robbins and Associates International, Inc in Cary, North Carolina. His firm’s services include golf course design, master planning, and landscape design. Rick currently travels worldwide designing and renovating courses. He designed The Tribute course in Gaylord, Michigan in 2001 and noted that it had 18 “signature” holes. Following the opening, The Tribute received numerous acknowledgements by golf media for it scenic design and range of playability. A complete listing of his designs can be found at http://www.robbinsgolf.com.

Bill—Congratulations on your recent election as president of the American Society of Golf Course Architects. Tell us about the organization and your goals for the year. Recently you met with 100 congressmen on National Golf Day. What was your message? Rick—I do consider the election as President of ASGCA to be a tremendous honor, especially when I look at the list of past presidents like Donald Ross, Pete Dye and Dr.

Rick Robbins Michael Hurdzan to name a few. As president this year, I hope to use whatever influence I have to get the major stakeholders in the golf realm to start to work together to find ways to get more people to begin to play the game. Just as important is to retain a much higher percentage of those who do take up the game as active golfers. We need to break the 20+ year cycle of losing as many golfers each year as we gain, leaving the sport with no real net growth for a long time.

As for National Golf Day, the coalition of groups that make up We Are Golf like the club managers, superintendents, builders, owners and architects all gather to let our elected leaders know that golf in this country is a $4 billion dollar business that employs over 2 million people and generates outstanding amounts in charitable contributions each year. Our message was simple – please treat golf like any other business of that magnitude when considering any tax, disaster relief or other legislation.

To me, there are several key issues we need to address. Greater

Bill—Your home office is in Cary, North Carolina but you also have an

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Photo by Rick Robbins

The Tribute, Otsego Club, Hole No. 7 office in Beijing, China and recently attended China Golf Show and met with US Ambassador. Why do you have a focus on China and other Asian countries? What is the current status of golf in China?

Rick—My business in China has

introduced me to great contacts within development circles has helped with credibility in competing for jobs. Having an office in Beijing with a good staff of local Chinese who provide interpretation, marketing and communication services with our clients has also helped.

been a great thing for me from the standpoint of having work in the recent economic times here in the US. I was fortunate to go to China very early in their discovery of the sport. I lived in Hong Kong much of 1990 – 1991 and at that time there was only one operating golf course in the entire country at Chung Shan Resort. Now there are almost 600 courses by the latest count. Being involved early and with the right people who have

The status of golf in China is very confusing to most people and was the main reason that I and a few other golf industry people met with our ambassador. He wanted to help us remove as many obstacles as possible from doing business there because there are numerous American companies involved with things like irrigation and maintenance equipment sales, course design, turf and agronomic materi-

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als, construction and other related aspects of the golf development business that generate jobs and income. The complicated part of the deal is that the central government in Beijing has listed golf development as a use of land in China that is not in conformance with their philosophy. Basically, the government sees golf developments as an environmental problem, an unnecessary use of farmland, forests and water resources and a social issue with golf becoming a highly visible symbol of the difference between the social classes. They do not have a problem with the game of golf as there are numerous state supported golf programs. Their issue is with new

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course development in relation to land use. Meanwhile, the local and provincial officials want golf developments in their districts because they bring a great deal of prestige and tax revenues. This creates a “shadow industry” where golf courses are called sports parks, environmental recreation zones and other titles that do not mention golf so they can get land use approvals with less attention. It makes our business very difficult because we never know whether our clients will be successful in getting the rights to build the courses we design.

Another project we completed last year that I am personally proud of is the Shanghai Golf Training Center. This is a full learning and

practice center that includes a double-level driving range of 40 bays, a 9-hole, par 3 course and full chipping, pitching and sand game practice areas. This facility is being used by many residents of the Shanghai area to learn the game and is especially well used by school groups that bring entire classes there. This is the future of golf in China and resembles our First Tee program.

Bill—The recent USGA/R&A decision on the long putter reminds us again of the impact equipment has on the game. Equipment development from clubs to balls, even to tees all seem to focus on the hitting it further. What are the implications for golf architects and course design?

Photo courtesy of Rick Robbins

I have been very lucky in this regard. While I have had several projects stopped or put on hold for

some time, I have also had several more proceed very smoothly to completion. We will have a new 27hole course in Dandong called China Maple Golf Club open this summer and an 18-hole course in Wuhan open in a couple of months. We completed a resort course of 18 holes on Hainan Island last year and it will open officially when the clubhouse and hotel are finished later this year. We have 5-6 other major projects in the design stage and one other course at Tai Ning in Fujian Province in construction.

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Photo by Rick Robbins

China Maple Course, Tee Box No. 6 Have you expressed concerns with USGA? What is the answer?

Rick—This is a great and timely question that may not have a good answer but is the focus of my efforts as ASGCA president. I actually met Matt Pringle, head of the golf equipment section of the USGA, at a dinner in Shenzhen last fall. The subject of our discussion was the effect financially of the increased size of golf courses due to advances in equipment. Matt requested that ASGCA be involved in generating what the real additional costs are to developers (and later to the golfers) of expanding courses to fit the standards of today.

in the growth of golf. The complaints most often given by those who start and then leave the game are that golf is too expensive; it takes more time than I can devote to it and it’s simply too damn hard to play to a decent level. Expansion of golf courses to now be 7,300+ yards only makes all 3 of those complaints more of an issue. More land is needed to allow both length and width to meet size requirements. More water is used along with chemicals and fertilizer, creating the possibility of environmental impacts and increasing the cost of construction and maintenance. Finally, the tendency for all of us is to make the course longer for everyone which takes more time to play and increases the degree of difficulty.

To me, this is one of the key issues 28

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These are all long-term problems that must be addressed by the golf industry, governing bodies like the USGA, R&A and PGA and the media. I think one of the great initiatives recently that costs absolutely nothing to implement is the “Tee It Forward” program. For most golfers, moving up one set of tees would make the game more enjoyable and would speed play. If the average guy plays a course that allows him to hit his approach shot to a green using a mid-iron instead of wearing out his hybrid or long irons, he has a more realistic chance of actually getting a birdie or par. Along this same line is to create hybrid courses at golf clubs that play a combination of tees depending on the length and difficulty of each

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hole. This simple scoring and play option costs no more than printing scorecards and makes the course play options fit almost everyone.

of an 1100 acre development. The course was started in 2008 and then construction stopped when the recession hit. Now, things are moving forward again and we are finalizing plans. We should begin clearing work this summer and plant the course by next spring.

ect in Des Moines, Iowa at Echo Valley Golf Club. We added 9 new holes to the older, 1960’s era course about 6 years ago and renovated one of the existing nines 2 years ago. Now, he is considering whether to proceed with renovating the 3rd 9 holes or adding a 4th nine due to increased real estate demand.

From the golf course design aspect, our job has become almost impossible as far as how to design a golf course that is truly fair and has the same playing characteristics for We have another project in all levels of golfers. The disparity Washington State on the Pacific We have been very fortunate to between the distance gained from Ocean front that is a pure links have stayed quite busy through the new equipment by the single-digit course. This one took almost 8 years recession when many projects handicap player and the high handi- to get permits, started construction in stopped. Hitting the golf boom in template_Full page 2/23/13 4:11 PM Page 1 capper with slower swing speed is full page2008 and then was also hit by the China at the same time as our growing each year. The less skilled recession and was never finished. slowdown was a very lucky thing golfer does not get the shaft flex, Final negotiations are under way for a for us and now it seems that both COR effect of the clubface spring or new investor group to buy the proper- China and the US are on track to compression of the ball that high ty and get the course going again. If build new projects or renovate swing speed players do, so all these they can get all the details worked out, existing courses. innovations serve to separate the this will be one of the most interesting players even more. The end result is and beautiful courses I have ever Bill—Thanks for taking the time to that placement of hazards such as worked on. visit with us. bunkers or water so that the strategic effect and penalty is the same for We are working with a long- MG everyone is simply not possible any standing client on a renovation projmore. Hazards that challenge most female golfers from their tee shots are irrelevant to the Ubiquitous Michigan Golf - 24/7/365 guy who hits it 285 – 320 off the tee. We are going to have to be sure we pay more attention to tee and hazard placement as designers in an attempt to get the holes to be as close in strategy and playability as possible for everyone.

Bill—Robbins and Associates International, Inc has several current projects underway in the US. Between your Chinese and US projects, you are collecting a lot of sky miles!

Rick—We are back working on a project near Wilmington, NC called Compass Pointe. This is a 27-hole course as part

http://glsp.com

http://michigangolfer.com

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Golfing Gaylord – Three Good Choices By Mike Duff he boys of spring, we call ourselves the “traveling golf Wilburys”, were at it again this past May, in search of a golfing destination.  Previously we’ve traveled to Indiana and played some spectacular courses in the Fort Wayne area. Our decision to try upper Michigan instead of going south turned out to be a wise choice. The weather was perfectsunny, in the high 70’s and low 80’s even though there were still patches of snow on the ground. Our golf destination was Gaylord. Bob Moriarity, Bob Walker, Bob Duff and I found a three day- three course package that suited our budgets and provided the uniqueness of three quite different tracks - Black Bear, The Loon and Elk Ridge. Most golfers know that Gaylord is called the “Golf Mecca” of Michigan, and it boasts seventeen of the most spectacular championship courses in the state. Some facts about Gaylord golf.... 306 holes, average yardage/slope; 6278/129, terrain - forests, lakes, rivers, meadows, rolling hills and glacial moraine. Course architects include Tom Fazio, Robert Trent Jones Sr., Tom Doak, Rees Jones, Rick Smith, Jerry Matthews and Gary Koch to name a few. The Gaylord area golf is also rated as the 8th best destination in America and 12th best destination in world. People who golf these 30

Photo courtesy of Mike Duff

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The Golfing Wilburys: Bob Duff, Bob Walker, Mike Duff and Bob Moriarity courses rave about the big skies, towering forests and endless vistas. ur adventure began at Black Bear located in Vanderbilt a few miles north of Gaylord. A Mark Sauger design that follows an old-style links terrain. The facility offers a nine hole par-three course and a par three warm-up hole (#19) which is played before you go to the first tee. The practice area is made up of a bent grass tee range with four practice bunkers and four chipping and putting greens. The yardage ranges from 5,058 to 7,030.

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We played their first day of the season. All of us enjoyed the course layout but found the conditions of

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the greens a little rough and the traps hadn’t seen a raked since last season. Granted, the poor conditions may have been the result of this being the first day of the new season, plus we were the first group to play. Mark Sauger did a magnificent job matching each hole to the natural lay of the land. He once said, “You’ll notice that Black Bear doesn’t have mounds or moguls. We have sweeps and natural grades.” We all said we would like to play it again in mid - summer when everything is at its best. Nevertheless, Black Bear has received a host of recognitions and awards such as the 2013 Golf Digest #69 on “America’s 100 Greatest Public Courses,” and one of the 15 “Best Courses to Play in Michigan.” Contact Black Bear:

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golfblackbear.net, golfblackbear@yahoo.com<mailto:go lfblackbear@yahoo.com>, 866.938.4441 toll free. Included in our golf package was lodging at the Baymont Motel in Gaylord, which was centrally located to all the area courses. he next morning we headed for The Loon located a few miles south from the motel. The Loon is a Butch Harmon signature course and is very popular with the locals. I must say, the course conditions for being the first day of play, were exceptional. We  were appreciative of the generous fairway landing areas and the large greens. The course yardage ranged from 5123 to 6701 which makes it a very playable track for all abilities. The course is designed to showcase the surrounding homes and condos without bringing them

The club house is gorgeous and overlooks the 18th green which is protected by a small lake making for a controlled shot in to the green. Good shot making is a must but the course is still forgiving for those who have control problems. The greens were almost mid-season condition for being so early in the spring. The Loon was distinctly different from Black Bear. Contact The Loon: loongolfresort.com, 877.732.4455. ur third and final round was at Elk Ridge Golf Club in Atlanta. We saved the best for last. This is a thinking man’s golf course. The course opened in May 1991 and was designed by Jerry Matthews. It plays to every level of golfer. This is a magnificent

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course as evidenced by all the awards it has received over the years. It is in the top 100 courses in America. ER is truly one of those courses you think of as being pure Northern Michigan golf. The natural beauty of ER shapes your entire golf experience. The landing areas are generous but stray shots can be punishing. The greens are undulating and can be tricky if you don’t carefully plan out every putt. The condition of the greens were superb given the fact that we played on opening day and were the first group to tee off. Four hundred acres of serene North Michigan wilderness defines this beautiful course. Red and white pines surround the course and provide the golfer with colorful scenery on each hole. The yardage ranges from 7072 to 5261. The par three 10th hole reminds me a lot of the 16th hole at Treetops. Both offer incredible  tee

Photo by Art McCafferty

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into the structure of the course. It has a nice blend of forests with community living.

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have one of their varieties of honey baked ham sandwiches - their signature food choice, and another outstanding feature at ER. Contact Elk Ridge : 989.785.2275,

elevations inviting a target shot to the green. Your shot must be accurate because at ER the green is guarded by a unique trap that is shaped like a pig. This hole offers an unbelievable panoramic view of the course and Northern Michigan. s we made our way around the course, we kept an eye out for the many varieties of wildlife that inhabit the forest, like eagles, bear, elk and bobcat. Unfortunately, we never did see an elk even though this area is noted as Michigan’s Elk Capital. We saw plenty of turkeys, hawks and heard woodpeckers on nearly every hole. What a sensational golfing experience. All four of us thought ER was one of the best courses we have ever played. And we plan to go back again.

800.626.4355, info@elkridgegolf.com, http://www.elkridgegolf.com - MG -

Photo courtesy of Black Bear

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Before you leave ER you must

Photo courtesy of Elk Ridge.

Black Bear View from the Pro Shop

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MWGA Announces Golfer and Players of the Year he Michigan Women’s Golf Association recently held its annual meeting and spring scramble. 2012 Golfer of the Year and Players of the Year were announced. The 2013 board of directors was introduced, and following the meeting, the first golf competition of the year was held.

Sara Wold presents the Sara Wold Trophy to Shelly Weiss, MWGA 2012 Golfer of the Year 

Photo courtesy of MWGA

Photo courtesy of MWGA

2012 Player of the Year winners and runner-ups are Lu Stockton, Deb Horning, Cynthia Pinkard, Yvette Gagnon, Sue Macinkowicz., Joanne Robertson (Not pictured: Denise Buechel, Monica Oliver) 

2013 MWGA Board of Directors, seated, l-r: Belinda Friis, Sara Wold, Barbara Porter, Denise Buechel, Sue Madej, Kathy Brennan; standing, l-r: Deb Horning, Monica Oliver, Francine Pegues, Nancy Serra, Barb Coury, Pat Shelton, Mary Warnick, Lu Stockton, Bonnie Teegen (Not pictured: Shirley McClain)

Photo courtesy of MWGA

Photo courtesy of MWGA

Photo courtesy of MWGA

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First Flight winners of the 4-Woman Scramble Front row, l-r: Yvette Gagnon, Terry MacPherson, Sue Madej, Jodie Chapa, Pat Witek, Karen Beasley, Shelly Weiss; Back Row, left to right: Cynthia Pinkard, Deb Horning, Lori Rogers, Jane Kersjes, Barb Porter, Susan Bach, Melinda Counsell. Not picture: Darci Stocker and Sue Macinkowicz

Second Flight winners of the 4-Woman Scramble L-r: Kathy Brennan, Pat DeMaire, Pam Staub, Nancy Serra, Lori Moore, Denise Buechel, Joan Cleland, Joyce Sutton, Katy Mumm, Monica Oliver, Francine Pegues, Ester Cooper, Belinda Friis, Donna Zick, Barb Coury. Not pictured: Linda Stoddard

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“Hey Buddy,” It’s Not the U.S. Open By Brad Shelton

While We’re Young his June, The United States Golf Association announced its initiative titled “While We’re Young” to raise awareness of the challenges and solutions to the pace-of-play issues in golf. Borrowing the iconic line from Rodney Dangerfield’s character in the 1980 film “Caddyshack®, the campaign takes a comedic approach to encourage all golfers to join a movement to improve pace of play.

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Many have offered valid solutions to pace of play issues. Play ready golf. Play it forward by choosing the right tees for your game. Quit spending too much time looking for 34

lost balls – if you are losing that many balls then buy cheaper golf balls. And, for you guys that are looking for a date after the round and holding up the course, limit your time trying to impress the pretty girl in the beverage cart – she’s working for tips. All are good ideas and can speed the pace of play, but I would like to offer my initiative that I will call “It’s not the U.S. Open” based on what I have learned from Dave Pelz. For those that don’t know, Dave Pelz is a golf coach known for his expertise and publications on the art

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of the short game, particularly putting. A former senior NASA scientist, Pelz has done extensive research on putting and published a New York Times best seller on the short game. His list of students on the PGA Tour is impressive. How do I propose to speed up the game? By studying Pelz’s empirical research on the short game and knowing your odds of making putts you have no chance of making – “Hey buddy, it’s not the U.S. Open – just putt it!!! I know it appears that pros make putts from everywhere based on

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Sunday’s TV coverage, but the only putts we see are the ones that are made. We then assume that all putts go in. But the truth is we only see the very few that rattle the cup and miss vast majority that run three feet by. Do you realize that a putt outside seven feet is missed more than half the time by Tour pros? From 15 feet plus the average Tour pro makes it only about 17% of the time? And those are stats from the best players in the world! Don’t be discouraged, Pelz built a putting machine he called the TruRoller, which produced putts that rolled in the perfect direction every

time and could also be set to roll the balls at the perfect speed. When the path was brushed away after each putt, even the Tru-Roller could sink the putt only about 70% of the time. When the variables and uncertainties of grain, slope, speed, wind and shoe marks are taken into account, 54.8% from six feet was the result. Pelz determined that no matter how perfect your stroke and how good your mental attitude, putting a 1.7inch golf ball into a 4-inch hole is a difficult endeavor. “There’s a lot of serendipity in the game, especially in putting,” he says. “Anytime the ball is rolling along the ground, even on what appears to be near perfect greens,

it can do something unpredictable.” Quit trying to hole every putt. Learn to read the general break from one angle, roll the ball at a good speed, lag the ball into the 3-foot circle, and two-putt for your par. The next time your playing partner is reading the 20-footer from every angle, taking 10 practice stokes, and holding up the entire course tell them “It’s not the U.S. Open! You won’t make the putt, and the beverage cart girl is about to leave. Let’s play While We’re Young!” - MG -

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Werkmeister First Amateur to Win Michigan Open in 38 Years By Greg Johnson

Michigan Open Champion Tom Werkmeister WASHINGTON, Mich. – Tom Werkmeister, a 45-year-old internet salesman from Kentwood, is just the fifth amateur to win the Michigan Open Championship in the 96-year history of the tournament, and the first since 1975. “It’s my biggest moment,” he said after a closing even-par round of 72 36

Thursday at The Orchards Golf Club left him at 13-under-par 275, two shots ahead of defending champion Barrett Kelpin, a 23-year-old mini-tour professional from Kalamazoo. “At this point nothing has been better than this,” said Werkmeister, who was the 2009 Michigan

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Amateur champion and has won every significant amateur title in the state in his career. “Yes, the Michigan Amateur (in 2009) is 1A probably, but to win this, in this type of field with a bunch of mini-tour players out there, that makes me feel pretty good. It is definitely the highlight.”

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Kelpin, who won the 2012 Michigan Open by eight shots with a record-tying 23-under-par total, shot 73 to close for an 11-under-par 277. He suffered bogeys at Nos. 16 and 17 by missing short three-foot par putts, and admitted his disappointment. “It was very disappointing that I couldn’t make those putts and keep the pressure on Tom and stay in it coming in,” Kelpin said. “Tom played great. He played better than me today. He was so steady. Hat’s off to him.” With Werkmeister, a dedicated amateur headed to next week’s Michigan Amateur in Muskegon with the James D. Standish Jr. Trophy for his victory, Kelpin received the $8,000 first-place money from the $50,000 purse. Andy Ruthkoski, a mini-tour player from Muskegon, and Chris Mory, a club pro from Haslett, each shot final-round 69s to tie for third at 278. They are both former Michigan State golfers, and each earned $4,000.

Werkmeister said he drew added inspiration for the week from Julie Breuker, the wife of his close friend John, who last week was diagnosed with stage four brain cancer.

though it was a tough shot with the wind to the green over water, I found my spot and hit it there. I didn’t play great, but I played steady, stayed in the lead and feel just great about it.”

“For me to be out here stressing over a four-footer for par really puts things in perspective,” he said. “It was horrifying news. To offer just a little distraction for him and his family, for me to offer that distraction, was kind of cool.”

Werkmeister will defend his title at a new site next year. Kevin Helm, the executive director of the Michigan PGA, announced the Open will move to Prestwick Village Golf Club in Hartland in 2014. He also announced a new primary sponsor – LaFontaine Werkmeister said he kept his cool Automotive Group. The tournament through the wind-whipped round by was played three years at The leaning on his years of experience in Orchards with DTE Energy as the presenting sponsor. competitive golf. “I stayed with my plan, and I never really thought I had it won until really the last hole,” he said. “I wasn’t really nervous on the last hole. I hit it in the fairway, and even

Greg Johnson, PGA media coordinator, at 616-560-8995 or greggie24@hotmail.com

- MG -

Matt Pesta, a professional from Forest Lake Country Club who shot 71, was next at 281, and mini-tour pros Matt Thompson of Battle Creek, who shot 72, and Clark Klaasen of Grand Rapids, who shot 70, tied at 282 with 18year-old Ypsilanti amateur Henry Do, who closed with a 71. Michigan Open Runner-Up Barrett Kelpin M I C H I GAN G O LF E R MAGAZ I N E • J U LY / AU G U ST

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Can You Buy a Better Golf Game? Yes and Yes By Bill and Brad Shelton he game of golf has come a long way over the last several decades in terms of equipment, instruction, golf accessories, and playing venues. Yet, the average golfer—if there is such an animal—amazingly continues to perform at approximately the same level as he or she did years earlier. Joe Bogey, there is hope! The 1520+ handicapper can buy a better game. In fact, you have more than one option to playing better golf: (1) equipment designed to maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses or (2) professional instruction through club professionals or golf schools focusing on all dimensions of the game. The challenge is determining the most cost effective way to improve your game and lower your score. Assuming Joe will continue to devote a similar amount of time for playing and practice, what would be the route for him to expend $1000 on his favorite recreation? Both Bill and Brad agree you can buy a better game but disagree on the best approach. Photo by Art McCafferty

T

Bill Shelton (l) and Brad Shelton

Bill—The best path to a better golf

sons but the overall premise is that Joe will not or cannot commit the time to the lessons and practice required to improve his game through professional instruction. That lack of time commitment does not mean that Joe would not be ecstatic with a few more pars and an occasional birdie during his weekend rounds. But is the cost in time, money, and frustration in making swing changes really going to make his weekend golf rounds with his foursome that much better? After all, Joe knows he can play a little better but realistically will never achieve a single digit handicap. So, there is a better option for Joe’s $1000. Let’s go shopping.

game for Joe Bogey is spend his money on equipment, training aids, and course aids. Why? Several rea-

Golf clubs have dramatically changed with the advent of cavity-

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back irons, metal “woods,” oversized club heads, graphite shafts, hybrids, long putters, and adjustable drivers. The clubs have been “test-proven” to help you hit the ball longer, higher, lower, and straighter, with less side spin and greater roll. Almost every month major golf magazines carry test results on some group of clubs, usually divided into three groups—Game Improvement, Maximum Game Improvement, and Better Player. Joe, spend the bulk of your $1000 on buying irons, woods, and hybrids from the “Maximum Game Improvement” section (Value—2 less strokes and one less lost ball). Speaking of balls, just go ahead and buy the longest cheap ball available since any spin you put on the ball was an accident. Although balls have really improved in spin control, swing speed, launch angle, and durability, your only variation should be in the color. As for the putter, there are limitless options. For Joe, a mallet-style is probably best but most importantly it must look “good” to him. There are a few other items that

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Joe can buy to improve his game: training aids can help loosen up the body before the round or break lamps in the home when you get the urge watching golf on television. Hinge clubs, bags to hit, pitching nets, laser putting aids, straps to hold your arms to your body, putting cups and instructional videos are readily available and some even guarantee fewer strokes. Advice to Joe—don’t buy most of this stuff. You will use it one time and then it becomes garage clutter. As to oncourse accessories, rangefinders and gps units have become popular. These devices are most effective for the more proficient golfer who needs exact distances to bunkers, water hazards, or pins. But for Joe Bogey, the value is questionable since the technology is expensive and the information rarely translates into a precise golf shot. It has not been improved to the point that it can adjust for banana slices and duck hooks. On the plus side, it will impress other members of Joe’s foursome and will probably increase the length of the round by 45 minutes! Joe Bogey can buy a better game through equipment. Rather than depending on magazine ads or his buddy’s advice, the wisest use of his golf funds would to be fitted by a golf professional. His golf score can decrease by a few strokes and that birdie may appear a bit more often. And even the scratch golfer gets excited by a birdie!

Brad – By far, the best path for Joe to spend his money is on regular practice and professional instruction. Without doubt, game improvement equipment, course knowledge (i.e.

GPS), and training aids are nice compliments to the game, but without the correct fundamentals of the golf swing none of these devices are really helpful to the average golfer. So Joe knows that his GPS says it is 125 yards to the middle of the green – with his current swing he will still end up in the right bunker with his banana slice. Joe spent $400 on a new driver and $50 on a dozen balls that go 20 yards farther – he just ends up 20 yards farther into the trees on the left off the tee. The net result for Joe spending his $1,000 on equipment and course knowledge to buy a better game is a lighter wallet, pretty golf clubs, an irritated spouse, and a more frustrating experience on Saturday morning with his regular golf group. With all the recent advancements in golf equipment the average golfer still performs at the same level as in the age of persimmon woods, blade irons and balata golf balls. So how should Joe spend his $1,000? – let’s look at the professionals. Golf instruction is a must for professional golfers and should be for Joe. Watch any tournament on TV and you will undoubtedly see every player on the range and putting green, from Tiger Woods to the tour rookie, working with a teacher to improve their game. I certainly am not expecting Joe to aspire to tour status and not suggesting Joe pay $500 to see Butch Harmon for an hour, but a one hour lesson with the local pro could make a huge difference. Having taught the game for years, I can tell you that sometimes a minor adjustment can make the biggest of improvements. From the driver to the putter, every player can

benefit from a professional helping them develop a better game. Practice is now required for Joe to develop and maintain the improvements he is making in his game. Unfortunately, lessons can only show Joe what he needs to improve. Now it is time for Joe to spend a few bucks and time at the local driving range and putting green to incorporate his new knowledge into a regular part of his game. Vijay Singh hit thousands of range balls a day to “perfect” his swing. Phil would stay at the putting green as long as it took to make 12 consecutive 5-footers before he quit for the day. Nothing comes easy nor can be bought without the dedication necessary to get better. If Joe actually wants to enjoy his rounds, he will play one less day a week and spend that time learning the game. Joe Bogey can buy a better game through equipment, but not until he buys a better game through instruction and practice. The debate is somewhat absurd as we are assuming all golfers are trying to play a better round every weekend. Some play for a living and a better round means financial security ? for those, buy it all. Some play for the competition, whether against their best or an opponent, so they have a story to tell in the 19th hole ? for those buy a little of both. And some play just because they enjoy the 4hour escape with friends from life?s everyday grind ? for those buy a second round at a bar. Regardless of why you play, you can buy a better, more enjoyable golf game. Go get ?em Joe. Enjoy the game your way. - MG -

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Slice of Life A Q & A about Q & A By Terry Moore hen I was editor-inchief of Michigan Golfer, I initiated a regular Question and Answer (Q & A) column with Terry Moore many notable golfers in Michigan and elsewhere. I considered the feature a vital means to get readers talking about our fledgling statewide magazine. In its day, the Q & A format—allowing subjects in their own words to respond at length directly to the writer’s questions—was somewhat new in golf

Anyway, in honor of the Q & A permit me to use the format to talk about the “ins and outs” of some selected interviews as well as share some nuggets from those one-on-ones.

Who was Michigan Golfer’s first big interview?

In our August 1982 preview issue with Mount Pleasant’s Dan Pohl on the cover, I had a long Q & A with the two-time Michigan Amateur champion, the longest driver at the time on the PGA Tour. Here’s how he explained his long drive prowess: “I have a late hit, meaning I wait until the last moment to uncock my hands and wrists at the ball. The average golfer too often quits on their swing after hitting the ball. You lose a lot of power that way...Right now I’m fading the ball and it has helped my control and accuracy. My bad shots are not as bad as when I first joined the Tour.” That interview began a decades-long

Photo by Deb Moore

Photo courtesy of Terry Moore

W

media circles. Golf Digest didn’t start conducting a regular Q & A until several years after Michigan Golfer. Not that Golf Digest paid any attention to us. In truth, I was more envious of Golf Digest’s ad clutter than its editorial.

President Gerald Ford and Terry Moore 40

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Photo courtesy of Terry Moore

From left: Tom Cleary, Tom Watson, and Terry Moore friendship with Pohl who also became the magazine’s Playing Editor and lent added credibility to our enterprise.

What about when the magazine officially started in 1983? We received some national attention from an eye-opening and candid interview with Tom Watson at the 1983 Memorial Tournament in Dublin, OH. Contributing Editor Tom Cleary and I did the interview

inside the players locker room on Wednesday of tournament week. Watson was at the top of his game then and was particularly relaxed and expansive in his remarks. Cleary and I were well-prepared with our questions, some of which really caught Watson by surprise.

be? Golfers and non-golfers alike. He paused, mulled it over and said: “Babe Ruth, Walter Hagen, Bobby Jones, Alan Alda, President Reagan. I wish I could have had dinner with Anwar Sadat. There’s a man who really had courage, the most courage in the last two decades.” That was a dynamite quote which I highlighted in the magazine.

For example? Well, we knew Watson was wellread and enjoyed diverse interests so we asked if he had a chance to meet anyone in history who might they

Being competitive golfers ourselves (much further down the food chain), we also asked Watson about his swing thoughts when playing well. He said: “When you’re playing

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well, you have a lot less or fewer thoughts in mind. When you’re playing poorly you have a lot more thoughts in your mind. You dissect your game and sometimes it’s hard to get it back. Basically when I’m playing well, it’s freedom from any thought.” Watson also expounded on the PGA Tour and took some pointed shots at the Commissioner (Deane Beman) for the Tour’s all-exempt Tour and the recent rise of TPC courses around the country. Those remarks got noticed by some wellknown golf writers including Marino Parascenzo, the award-winning journalist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. In fact, Parascenzo called me out of the blue after the interview appeared and wondered how I managed to get Watson to be so frank and open on a variety of subjects. “Just blind luck by a rookie editor,” I confessed.

In the last issue of that first year how did you pull off an interview with former President Gerald R. Ford? That was luck, perseverance and hard work. Fortunately, when the magazine made its debut, I sent a copy to President Ford’s office and included a letter making him a lifetime charter subscriber. I also made a request to interview him at some point. A few weeks later, I received a handwritten note from Ford, on Presidential stationery, thanking me for the magazine and adding, “Sometime this summer I will be glad to talk about golf which is a wonderful game.”

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So you were ‘in like Flynn’ with Grand Rapids’ native son? Well, not exactly. A month or so later, I started making follow up calls to Ford’s office inquiring about the interview. I wasn’t getting anywhere with my calls and letters but I remained persistent without being perceived as a threat by the Secret Service. Finally one day, an exasperated secretary tired of my pesky calls said, “Okay, here’s the deal: you get out to Colorado in August and you’ll have 30 minutes with the President.” Done!

Where did that interview take place and how did it go? It took place at Ford’s beautiful summer residence at Beaver Creek, CO. My wife (Deb) and I flew out to Denver, rented a car and drove to Beaver Creek, an exit or so past Vail. At the interview, Deb was almost more nervous than me because she was entrusted with taking the photo of this lowly editor and the former President. But President Ford was a terrific host and made us feel right at home during our allotted thirty minutes in his home office. He was the quintessential Jerry from Grand Rapids.

What did Ford talk about? I asked him about his earliest memories of the game. He recalled, “I started as a caddy for my father and uncle when I was 12 or 13 years old at the old Masonic course which is now Green Ridge CC.” This was a fortu-

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itous start because Green Ridge was where my family belonged when we moved to Grand Rapids in 1962. Of course, I slipped that in. I also asked him about first tee jitters in pro-ams. He said: “I still get concerned when I see a big gallery all the way down the first tee because I’m not consistent off the tee. But my game’s getting better and the best evidence is that I’m hitting fewer spectators.” I bet his crony Bob Hope first popped that great line.

What else? I asked him about the keys to his success because it’s always astounding to me how someone ends up as President. He explained his success this way: “The establishment of a goal and discipline is key. Discipline as to your time, your life style. I don’t deny that some people get lucky but I think the odds are that if you have a goal and you’re disciplined...the odds are that you’ll do better than the person who’s just lucky.”

A few years later, Michigan Golfer had a long Q & A with the newly crowned British Open champion, Greg Norman. What’s the background? Weeks before the British Open, I heard that Norman was set to play in Roger Penske’s Michigan 500 Pro-Am at the Country Club of Jackson. So I called a media contact at Toledo’s Dana Corp., a big sponsor of the ProAm, and wrangled a special media invite for the upcoming event. Then lo and behold Norman wins his first major at Turnberry and comes to Jackson a few days later, honoring his

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Photo courtesy of Terry Moore

Terry Moore and Greg Norman commitment. Bingo! I’m right there at CC of Jackson with my tape recorder, notebook and camera. And since it was somewhat of a private corporate outing, there were few if any media present.

How was Norman that day? He was still riding cloud nine and was in high, cooperative spirits. Most of the interview took place as I walked down the fairways (no ropes, no marshals) with him and squeezed in questions between shots. He provided some good material that day. I asked him about his putting because at the time he was leading the PGA Tour in that statistic.

What did he say? Norman said: “Years ago, somebody gave me a lesson and told me you can’t putt well unless you stand square to the ball. Well, for five or six years, I tried that set-up and just couldn’t do it. So I said, ‘screw this.’ I’m going back to the way that got me here. So since last October, I’ve opened up my stance and it just feels more comfortable.” Later, he also talked about the mental side of the game: “When it comes right down to it, that’s all this game is: self-confidence.”

What else do you remember about that interview? I vividly recall when I knew I had asked one too many questions. After Norman just launched a towering drive off of a # 2 pencil on a dogleg par-four, I asked him about the impressive shot. He stopped, glared at me with a fierce expression and said sharply, “That’s it! I’m playing golf now.” Interview over, exit stage left and hurry! - MG -

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Michigan Golfer, July / August 2013