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In This Issue VOLUME 31

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http://michigangolfer.com MICHIGAN GOLFER Publisher/Editor Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Editor Emeritus Terry Moore Associate Publisher/Producer Jennie McCafferty Writers Jeff Bairley Susan Bairley L’anse Bannon Mike Beckman Jack Berry Tom Doak Mike Duff Topher Goggin Thad Gutowski Kelly Hill Janina Parrott Jacobs Greg Johnson Vartan Kupelian Tom Lang Chris Lewis Jim Neff Bill Shelton Brad Shelton Norm Sinclair

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Michael Patrick Shiels Herschel Nathanial Bernice Phillips Ron Whitten

The Canadians are Coming, the Canadians are Coming – The Treetops Cup By Art McCafferty

Photo/Video Kevin Frisch Brian Oar Dave Richards Carter Sherline Brian Walters

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The Berry Patch By Jack Berry

Director of Accounting Cheryl Clark

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Michigan Golf History from 2001 to 2010 By Art McCafferty

Michigan Golfer is produced by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc. GLSP Advertising & Business Office 4007 Carpenter Road, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 734.507.0241 734.434.4765 FAX info@glsp.com glsp.com

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Doak, Brady, Balmer Elected to Michigan Golf Hall of Fame

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Collegiate Spotlight: Grand Valley State University - Men’s Golf By Chris Lewis

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Collegiate Spotlight: Grand Valley State University - Women’s Golf By Chris Lewis

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Michigan Golfer is published online four times a year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement of views and/or philosophy of Michigan Golfer. Back Issues: May be ordered by sending $5.00 with your name, address and issue requested to Michigan Golfer, 4007 Carpenter Road, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

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Slice of Life

By Terry Moore

Cover: The Canadian team celebrates winning the Treetops Cup in 2012. Photo by Jennie McCafferty

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Photo courtesy of Treetops Resort

Treetops Cup golfers play the spectacular Smith Signature Course.

The Canadians are Coming, the Canadians are Coming – The Treetops Cup By Art McCafferty or the first three years of the Treetops Cup, the Americans had been the victors. That all changed last year, as the Canadians broke through on the win column http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e

aFS1lzz0vw and let their southern neighbors know that they can play the game.  Now that there has been blood drawn on both sides, the upcoming fifth Treetops Cup should have even more drama.  

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R RZtLgJQwDA The tournament, a creation from the fertile mind of Kevin McKinley, the Director of Golf and Skiing at

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Photo courtesy of Treetops Resort. Photo courtesy of Treetops Resort.

The Fazio Course is in the rotation for the Treetops Cup tournament

Saturday’s fourball matches will be played on the Tradition. M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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Year

Canadians

Americans

2009

7

9

2010

33

35

2011

35 1/2

2012

44

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July 5-7

Last year, with a strong contingent of Canadian 40 golfers, our neighbors to the North beat a late charging American team, 44 to 40. The Canadians were ahead 24 to 18 after the second day’s action, but the outcome was not settled until the final groups came in.  37 1/2

Treetops, has grown in size and stature since its inception. One of its many attractions for golfers is the Ryder Cup format.  This year the Tradition will be foursomes and Signature Four balls  with the Fazio as single matches.  There will also be a shotgun start on Sunday, so all can finish together and not have to wait around for all to finish. Also this year, the participants will be treated to fireworks on Friday night to celebrate both Dominion Day and the 4th of July, a timely touch indeed. Add those ingredients to golfing on the Fazio Premier, the Smith Signature

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and Tradition courses and you have the stuff that North American golf dreams are made of.

The Michigan Golfer was on hand to capture all the action.  We broke it down into five shows for your viewing pleasure.  Our first show features the pairings and the pre tournament dinner. A second show introduces the 84 players of the two teams.  The third and fourth shows depict the action of the tournament and the celebration of the Canadian team.  

We created a fifth show to showcase the work of the Treetops maintenance staff. We were capturing some early morning video on the Fazio course and happened on a broken water main that was sending a steady and spectacular water spout nearly 100 feet into the air. We caught the action of Treetops North Superintendent Doug Hoeh and his crew as they hurriedly worked on the broken pipe as the tournament players were nearing the hole. Generally, it is not a scene that golfers witness and it was terrific drama. You will find all of these shows at http://michigangolfer.tv/2012shows/ treetops_cup/.  Enjoy the shows. Kevin McKinley, Director of Golf and Skiing at Treetops, and the creator of the Treetops Cup, had this to say about the upcoming  event: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R RZtLgJQwDA - MG -

2013 Preview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRZtLgJQwDA

2012

http://michigangolfer.tv/2012shows/treetops_cup/

2011

http://michigangolfer.tv/2011shows/treetops_cup/

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Photo by Jennie McCafferty

One of the many tees that have been lengthened at Augusta

The Berry Patch By Jack Berry s it Spring yet? as the telecast began with views of the course that is unlike any other. Now in some ways, “tradition” It’s been comes across as old, stuck in place. Spring somewhere. But the Masters isn’t stuck. I saw azaleas in bloom along the Bill Pennington wrote an amusing piece in the New York Times 13th hole during the Masters Sunday that it’s a wonder the Jack Berry Augusta National Golf Club wasn’t Tournament named the Country Club of No. telecast. Pennington listed the “No’s”: No I also heard Jim Nantz reverently running, no coolers, no signs, no breathe “Tradition unlike any other” flags, no hats worn backward, no

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ladders, no chairs with arms, no strollers, no radios, no recorders, no cell phones, no periscopes although back in the 1950s they sold cardboard mirror periscopes. Masters chairman Clifford Roberts decided that was unsightly, as it were, and began erecting grandstands. Seats aren’t sold. It’s first come first served. And the seats have backs on them, not like the bare ‘planks’ at the Big House or Spartan Stadium.

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Photo courtesy of Augusta National GC

Payne is a master of public relations and he’s hit all the right notes, televising the Wednesday Par Three tournament where players bring their families and some of the kids get a whack at it, and following the British Open’s lead by permitting a junior to attend the Masters free with an adult Patron (the Masters name for fans).

Photo courtesy of Augusta National GC

Billy Payne has made many popular changes at Augusta.

Condolezza Rice is a new member. There is not a sign banning progress at Augusta and no one runs a better sporting event, not the NFL, the NBA, MLB, NCAA, Kentucky Derby, or any golf organization. Concession prices are so low even Walmart couldn’t beat them.

During Payne’s reign the course was eased a bit from the necessary toughening under Hootie Johnson’s chairmanship that included planting 30-40 foot tall pine forests on the 7th, 11th and 17th holes and moving tees back almost off the property. The weekend roars from the par 5 13th and 15th holes and groans from the watery 11th and 12th remain. The yearly question of why aren’t there any female members was answered last fall with the announcement of the membership of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore. So much for the tradition of No Females.

Progress keeps marching on at the Masters, especially under the lead of Chairman Billy Payne, AllSoutheastern Conference end of the University of Georgia football team, then Atlanta lawyer, head man of the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta and chairman of the Masters since 2007 after six years as head of the Media Committee.

Golf has been on a campaign to expand the game around the world and has been successful in getting golf into the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil. The Masters has been a leader popularizing the game – the just-ended tournament was televised to more than 200 countries worldwide and fittingly Australian Adam Scott defeated Argentinian Angel Cabrera on the second extra hole. Twenty-one countries were represented in the field. The only continent not represented was Antarctica. Penguins haven’t learned to putt.

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Earlier in the day, a 125-pound wisp of a boy, 14-year-old Guan Tianlang of China, youngest ever competitor in the Masters, completed a 73-75-77-75 run and was the only one of six amateurs, most of them collegians, to make the cut. He parred the difficult par 3 12th hole all four days, reached the back of the par 5 13th hole with his hybrid second shot and chipped down close and made a birdie and made another birdie on the par 3 16th, also over water. He played two rounds with Ben Crenshaw, played Sunday with another former champion, Sandy Lyle and impressed Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson in practice rounds. Guan got to the Masters by winning the Asian Pacific Amateur, a tournament begun in 2010 by the Masters and the Royal & Ancient to promote golf in Asia. Now the Masters, working with the PGA of America and USGA, is introducing the Drive, Chip & Putt Championship, a competition similar to the NFL’s Punt, Pass and Kick program. It’s open to boys and girls from 7 to 15. Play will be in four age groupings, 7-9, 10-11, 12-13, 14-15. The champions from each region will get free travel to Augusta and the overall championship will be Sunday before the Masters. Registration is online at www.drivechipandputt.com. It closes April 30. Using the internet is old stuff for the unstuffy Masters. During the tournament it shows live action from positions all along the back nine. It’s on Masters.Com and you can still watch Kevin Na and Bubba Watson make 10s on the par 3 12th

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Na made 10 the conventional way, always from the tee. He splashed the first one, hit the bank with the second and it rolled back into the pond, splashed the third one, finally got his fourth attempt over the green, chipped short to the front pin, two putted, took off his cap, smiled and waved to cheers.

Na and Bubba are candidates for my Aquaphobes Anonymous Society and so is Phil Mickelson who was in the water on 11, 12 and 13 Saturday and 13 and 16 Sunday. My kind of golf. Tradition. Now, where’s the sun? - MG -

Guan Tianlang

Photo by Jennie McCafferty

Bubba was even par for the tournament after the ninth hole but was seven over on the last nine helped by the 10. He managed to hit grass with his first two but they rebound-

ed into the water. He knocked his third attempt into the back bunker, knocked it out and it rolled, rolled, rolled all the way down and into the water. With his fifth ball (eighth stroke counting penalties) he chipped from the side of the green and two putted.

Photo courtesy of the Guardian

hole, shortest hole on the course, the one the young Chinese boy parred all four days.

Weather was warm and wonderful for most days at this Masters. M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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Š Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios


Michigan Golf History from 2001 to 2010 By Art McCafferty

Tiger Woods won twice at the Buick Open, including the last one in 2009.


ichigan was the place to be in golf course construction during the 1990s and the close out of the 20th century. This state had built more golf courses than anyone,  anywhere.   I remember the reception I got when I visited the National Golf Foundation in the early ‘90s. I was preparing for one of our Michigan Golf Summits as well as doing some research for the state.  

In the heady days of the 80’s and 90’s over 260 golf courses were built in Michigan, roughly one fourth of our total. We had a plethora of architects. Arnold Palmer, Dan Pohl, Ray Floyd, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, Gary Koch and Tom Weiskopf were former golf professionals that had gone into the design business and had all designed courses for the Michigan market.   They were joined by nationally known architects; Rees Jones, Robert Trent Jones, Arthur Hills, Tom Fazio 12

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Art Hills designed many courses in Michigan. He’s pictured here at Red Hawk.

Photo by Art McCafferty

I had asked to meet with Joe Beditz, the Executive Director of the NGF.  I was ushered into his office for my interview with him only to spend the first hour being interviewed by him and his staff. “How long can you keep building all of those golf courses in Michigan?” he led off the conversation. His staff was clearly astounded by our construction record.  At that time, the NGF which publishes among other things,  Golf Market Today, had Michigan leading the nation in new golf course openings, new course construction and new course planning for the third consecutive year. Michigan, was the flatout winner of the trifecta of golf course  construction in the nation. 

Photo by Art McCafferty

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Jim Engh is with Jack Berry at True North. •

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Keith Gornick shows a map of The Tribute.

Photo by Art McCafferty

The new century started off with this same optimism, but dropped off dramatically within the decade due to a rapidly cooling economy and falling golf participation. As you can see by the listing below, courses built in the new century started off strong, but then quickly fell off as the economy soured.

Photo by Art McCafferty

and Pete Dye. However, the demand was such that Michigan produced its own golf course  architects;  Jerry Matthews, Bruce Matthews III, William Newcomb, Warner Bowen, Ron Otto, Mark and Mike DeVries, Mike Husby, Ray Hearn, Jeff Gorney, Kevin Aldridge, Susan Nyquist, John Sanford Jr., Rick Smith, Pat Conway, Jim Dewling  and Tom Doak all fit into that category.

Gary Koch, Keith Gornick and Rick Robbins at The Tribute M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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2010 The Golf Club at Harbor Shores , Benton Harbor, Jack Nicklaus http://www.harborshoreslife.com

2008 Sweetgrass GC, Harris, Paul Albanese http://www.sweetgrassgolfclub.com

2006 Beeches Golf Club - South Haven, W. Bruce Matthews III http://beechesgolfclub.com

2005 Matacawa Legends, Holland, Ray Hearn http://macatawalegendsgcc.com True North, Harbor Springs-Jim Engh http://michigangolfer.tv/2005shows/truenorth/

Photo courtesy of Mike Husby

Twin Lakes - Third Nine, Rochester, Jerry Matthews http://mytwinlakesgc.com/golf-course

Photo courtesy of Island Resort & Casino

Mike Husby designed five courses in the Michigan golf boom.

Paul Albanese designed Sweetgrass. 14

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College Field, Okemos, David Savic/Nicklaus Design http://www.collegefields.net/?ct=1 Sundance Golf Course, Kewadin, Jerry Matthews http://michigangolfer.tv/2004shows/ show24/ Greywalls, Marquette, Mike DeVries http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u zaQYSrLWQQ The Mines Golf Course, Grand Rapids, Mike DeVries http://www.minesgolfcourse.com

2004 Angels Crossing, Vicksbury-W. Bruce Matthews III http://michigangolfer.tv/2004shows/ show9/

Skyline, Grayling, John Robinson

Lyon Oaks, South Lyons, Art Hills/Steve Forrest

2003 The Nightmare, West Branch, Jeff Gorney http://www.westbranchgolf.com/thenightmare Eagle Eye, Bath, Chris Lutzke http://michigangolfer.tv/2003shows/ newcourses/eagleeye/

2002 Forest Dunes Golf Club, Roscommon, Tom Weiskopf http://forestdunesgolf.com Yarrow Golf and Conference Center, Augusta, Ray Hearn http://yarrowgolf.com Diamond Springs Golf Course http://diamondspringsgolf.com

Hemlock Golf Course, Ludington, Ray Hearn http://www.hemlockgolfclub.com/ Pheasant Run-Canton, Arthur Hills & Steve Forrest http://michigangolfer.tv/2002shows/ show19/ Sandy Pebbles GC, Neil Isaacson/Dale Isaacson, 9 holes, Ahmeek

2001 Blackshire at Lakewood Shores Resort, Oscoda, Kevin Aldridge http://lakewoodshores.com/blackshire.htm

Photo courtesy of Forest Dunes

Hawk Ridge Golf Course At

Hawk’s Eye, Bellaire, John Robinson http://michigangolfer.tv/2002shows/ show5/

Forest Dunes GC M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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Calderone Farms, Jackson, William Newcomb http://michigangolfer.tv/2001shows/ show1/ Double R Ranch Resort & Golf Club, Sterling http://doublerranch.com/golf.htm

The Grande Golf Course, Jackson, Ray Hearn http://www.grandegolfclub.com

Vartan Kupelian winds up two years as President of the Golf Writers Association of America.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

The Jackal, Brighton, W. Bruce Matthews III http://www.jackalgolfclub.com

Photo by Art McCafferty

Fox Hills Strategic  Fox, Plymouth, Ray Hearn http://www.foxhills.com/golf-courses-overview/strategic-fox

Arnold Palmer’s Turning Point Invitational drew US Amateur winners from all over. 16

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Kingsley Club, Kingsley, Mike DeVries http://youtube.com/watch?v=t1iJM Q4T6C8

The Tribute, Gaylord, Rick Robbins/Gary Koch http://www.otsegoclub.com Tullymore, Stanwood, Jim Engh http://michigangolfer.tv/2002shows/ show12/newgolfcourses02qt.html

2004 Ryder Cup winners.

Photo by Art McCafferty

Moose Ridge, South Lyons, Ray Hearn http://michigangolfer.tv/2001shows/ show22/

Photo courtesy of Charity Executives

Lochenheath -Traverse City, Steve Smyers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V Eregc40CBk

Oakland Hills was the perfect host of the Ryder Cup. M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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he golf course boom turned into golf course doom as the following courses had all closed their fariways since the turn of the century.

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Course, Holes, Location Bogie Lake Golf Club, 18, White Lake Rochester Hills Golf Course, 18, Rochester Union Lake Golf Club, 9, Commerce Twp Westbrook Golf Course, 18, Novi

Partridge Creek, 45, Clinton Township Tee-js, 18, Macomb Meadowlane, 18, Kentwood

Photo by 3springers 2010

Shady Hollow Golf Course, 18, Romulus

Mitchell Creek, 9, Traverse City

Willie Mack and the Michigan Amateur trophy.

Wolverine, 54, Macomb Byron Hills, 27, Byron Center Four Winds, 9, East Lansing Moravin Hills, 18, Clinton Twp Marion Oaks, 18, Howell

Veronica Valley, 9, Lake Leelanau Matheson Greens, 18, Northport Sycamore Hills Municipal, 18, Lansing

Photo by Art McCafferty

Sparrow Hawk, 18, Jackson

Michigan Open winner: Andrew Ruthkowski 18

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Marsh Point Par 3, Bay City

he first decade of the 21st Century, truly has been a transitional one. The economic downturn, the dearth of new golfers, the inability to keep marginal golfers interested in the sport, the expense and the length of time that it takes to play the game, all contributed to this sad state of affairs.

Twin Knolls, 18, Grass Lake Cedar Hills, 9, Traverse City he great legacy of national golf tournaments being held in Michigan continued, but also dwindled. In 2002, Oakland Hills hosted the U.S. Amateur and The Orchards hosted the U.S. Publinx.  In 2004, the Ryder Cup was held at Oakland Hills, thus giving the nation the opportunity to see great golf in Michigan.  This enthusiasm was tempered by the final Buick being held in 2009, a victim of the auto industry meltdown.

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However, help does seem to be on the way. There have been a number of initiatives to grow the game throughout the golfing world. These include making the sport more attractive to women, breaking up the nine or eighteen hole regimentation, getting more youth in the game, and making the game faster and more affordable. Hopefully, the coming decade of 2011 – 2020 will see fruits borne from the grow the game mentality of a concerned golf industry.

Michigan produced some terrific professional players during the first part of the century. The person cashing the biggest checks was Scott Hebert, who won Michigan PGA Player of the year, from 2006 to 2010.  Players who were in the hunt during that time included Ron Beumann, Bob Ackerman, John DalCorobbo and Tom Harding.  

Photo courtesy of Grand Traverse Resort & Spa

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Ponderosa, 18, Middleville

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Scott Hebert

On the ladies side, Kim Benedict won twice, Laura Bavaird also won twice, and then there were singular wins by Mary Jane Anderson Heistand, Sarah Martin, Mandi McConnell, Lindsay Davis, Britney Hamilton and Natalie Brehm.

Photo by Art McCafferty

Michigan Amateur winners included; Andy Matthews, Korey Mahoney, Colby Beckstrom, Jeff Cuzzort, Christian Vozza, Greg Davies, Ryan Brehm, Jimmy Chestnut, Tom Werkmeister, Joey Garber and Willie Mack III.

Bob Ackerman wins Michigan Open in 2001.

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Doak, Brady, Balmer Elected to Michigan Golf Hall of Fame

Tom Doak, Steve Brady and Fritz Balmer will be inducted May 19 at the Henry Center at Michigan State University’s Forest Akers West Golf Course. fter college at Cornell, caddying a summer on the Old Course at St. Andrews and then playing and studying Scottish courses for seven months, Doak returned to America, worked for Pete and Alice Dye, settled in northern Michigan where he could play the classic Crystal Downs course by Alister MacKenzie and did his first solo work.

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Tom Doak, who started designing courses in Michigan, has become world-renowned. haps the last great meeting of sand and sea on American soil.”), Mullen in the Nebraska sand hills, spectacular Cape Kidnapers in New Zealand, The Renaissance Club in Gullane, Scotland and just-opened Streamsong in Florida, near Lakeland.

lished by Sleeping Bear Press, won praise from readers and wry comments by many fellow designers.

Doak’s Michigan courses are High Pointe at Acme, unfortunately closed, Black Forest at Wilderness Valley in Gaylord, and Lost Dunes at Bridgman.

Doak said he’s mellowed some over the years and while he remains sought after internationally, he reworked the greens at Country Club of Detroit and then, asked by friend Dave Richards, he designed a practice area with several short greens and bunkering on the campus of Marygrove University. Free.

Unlike his mentor Dye, Doak moves little dirt, living up to the “traditionalist” and “classicist” labels that accompany nearly every description of him. He’s also opinionated and his Michigan Golfer TV 1996 book The http://michigangolfer.tv/2005shows/ghf/ Confidential Guide, pub-

teve Brady, 54, has been a dominant player in state play since graduating from Saginaw Valley State University where he made All-American in 1980. He was named to the SVSU Hall of Fame in 2010. Brady turned pro and played in 10

While Doak, 52, lives in Traverse City, he has designed courses in Tasmania, Australia, Mexico, Scotland and 15 states. And he has work in China. He’s the hottest architect in the game with Bucket List courses at Bandon, Ore., (Golf Digest architecture editor calls Pacific Dunes “per-

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Photo by Art McCafferty

DEXTER, Mich. - The hottest golf course architect in the business, one of the most dominant players in the state who is passing on his knowledge to the wannabes and an executive who rescued the Golf Association of Michigan and patched it back together have been elected to the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame.

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Photo courtesy of Cape Kidnappers © T. Doak

Tom Doak’s Cape Kidnappers in New Zealand, Hole 4b

Hole No. 16, Pacific Dunes at Bandon Dunes in Oregon is a Tom Doak design. M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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Buick Opens, played the Ben Hogan (now web.dotcom) Tour, played in two United States Opens and three PGA Championships. Brady always had family support – his wife, Judi, and parents and friends wore BRADY BUNCH shirts and always got gallery support. Brady became one of the state’s top players at a time when the competition included now current PGA Tour millionaire Tom Gillis, Jeff full page and template_Full 2/23/13 4:11 PM Page 1 Roth JackpageSeltzer, both now in the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame and sure-to-be member Scott Hebert. He won three Michigan Opens, two PGA Championships, two Michigan Bell Showdowns at Grand Traverse Resort, one Assistant Professional championship and one Shanty Creek title, six Pro-Pro, two SeniorJunior one Pro-Am and one ProAssistant, all events sponsored by the Michigan PGA Section.

Brady now is Director of Instruction at Oakland Hills Country Club, his home for 16 years. In addition to teaching club members, Brady gives back to the game. He is volunteer golf coach at Rochester Adams High School, is a CYO basketball and soccer coach, gives numerous free golf clinics and exhibitions to high school and elementary school students and is a volunteer at the Pontiac Soup Kitchen.

ritz Balmer, 73, began his service to golf in 1975 when, as a member of Spring Meadows Country Club, he became Club Representative to the Golf Association of Michigan, a position he held for nine years. Also in 1975 he began service as a GAM Volunteer Rules Official and he still works that today.   

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Ubiquitous Michigan Golf

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24/7/365

Balmer was appointed a Governor of the GAM in 1986 and chaired the Junior Committee from 1987-1991. He was chairman of the GAM Long Range Planning Committee, member of the Club Relations Committee and somehow managed to find some time to play. Balmer lettered on the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse golf team in 1966, won the Spring Meadows Club Championship in 1982 and Senior Championship in 1990, 1998 and 2005. Balmer and Fred Tabor paired to win Boyne’s Senior Kircher Cup in 1994. But Balmer’s primary contribution was in putting the GAM back on solid ground in 2000 when there was a rift among member clubs over handicap service providers and an ill-fated effort to move the headquarters to a golf course site. He was elected GAM president in 2000 and was appointed Interim Executive Director, the association’s paid position. He served as GAM president until 2002 and in 2007 was given the GAM’s Distinguished Service Award. The induction of Balmer, Brady and Doak brings Hall of Fame membership to 101. Learn more about the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame at its website: http://www.michigan-golf-foundation.com. For more information on this year’s induction ceremony, contact Loretta Larkin at llarkin@michigan-golf-foundation.com or (248) 719-0650.

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Collegiate Spotlight

Champions! Grand Valley State University Lakers Capture GLIAC Championship

© Tom E. Puskar / GVSU

By Chris Lewis

GVSU Men’s Golf Team, GLIAC Men's Golf Championship Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012 at Elyria Country Club, Elyria, Ohio. hroughout his career with Grand Valley State University, men’s head golf coach Don Underwood has practically wit-

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nessed it all: championship victories, heartbreaking losses, and the ups and downs that all collegiate coaches encounter at one time or another. Hired in 1997, the first year in which Grand Valley initiated its men’s golf program, Underwood has led his teams to two NCAA •

Division II National Championship tournament appearances throughout the last 16 years. He has coached an honorable mention All-American, Josh Orler, while also leading a squad to six tournament victories in a single season, as well as a runnerup finish at the NCAA Great Lakes Super Regional. And, he has over-

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seen the first men’s golfer to ever be inducted into the GVSU Athletic Hall of Fame, Eric Cowles, arguably the most successful golfer in Grand Valley history. Yet, despite his past successes, he had no time to reflect on his accomplishments as the Fall 2012 season neared.

The first, a third place finish at Marquette Golf Club – Greywalls, occurred at the Northern Michigan Invitational, a match play tournament.

the second – and final – day of the Invitational, the team still maintained some positive momentum as it prepared for the rest of the fall season.

During the first day of competition, Grand Valley posted a 16-5 team record, leading every team in the field, as sophomore Jack Rider, of Kalamazoo, junior Ian Ellis, of Northville, and freshman Sean Carlino, of Hamilton, Ontario, each completed seamless 3-0 records.

After finishing in ninth place at the University of Indianapolis Invitational, held at the 7,180-yardlong, par-72 Brickyard Crossing Golf Course on September 17th and 18th, the Lakers responded with yet another third place finish at the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC) Fall Invitational, hosted at South Haven’s HawksHead Links.

Although the team’s record, 8-13, was not nearly as noteworthy during

Led by junior Chris Cunningham, of Milford, and Rider,

© Tom E. Puskar / GVSU

With six freshmen, two sophomores, three juniors, and no seniors, his 2012 – 2013 roster was one of the least experienced golf teams in school history. However, the team’s lack of experience did not affect its performance, as the Lakers claimed three top-three finishes in five tour-

naments last fall.

GVSU Head Coach Don Underwood, GLIAC Commissioner Dell Robinson, and GVSU golfer Joel Siegel M I C H I GAN G O L F E R MAGAZ I N E • MAY / J U N E

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who shot four-over-par and fiveover-par, respectively, during the two-day competition, Grand Valley tallied a team total of 600, one stroke behind runner-up Saginaw Valley University and six strokes behind Wayne State University, which captured the team event.

One week later, the squad secured its second straight third place finish at the Great Lakes Region Fall Invitational, with a team total of 592. Once again led by Cunningham and Rider, who shot an even-par 144 and a two-over-par 146, respectively, the Lakers finished 16 strokes behind the tournament champions, Wayne State University. “The University of Indianapolis Invitational and Great Lakes Region Fall Invitational each had fields with a large number of teams, so our overall finishes, compared to the field, were respectable,” said Underwood. “Unfortunately, the team’s fourth and fifth best scorers did not shoot low enough scores until the final round of the conference championship.”

The Lakers End the Fall 2012 Season on a High Note

Photo courtesy of GVSU

“While the team’s top three golfers played well, we struggled to receive a solid fourth score,” said Underwood. “With some of the youth we had in the lineup, this was not unexpected though.”

Chris Cunningham With junior Joel Siegel, of Sparta, shooting a final round 65, resulting in medalist honors, Grand Valley enjoyed a remarkable comeback. Down by 11 strokes prior to entering the final round of the three-day tournament, the team completed a third round 278, 10-under-par, the lowest round in tournament and Grand Valley history.

The conference championship, known officially as the GLIAC Championship, was, without a doubt, the highlight of the Lakers’ season.

Siegel’s 65, another tournament and Grand Valley all-time record, included five birdies and an eagle, leading to an individual seven stroke victory. The Lakers’ 880 three-day total was nine strokes lower than runner-up Ferris State University, as

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the team captured its second consecutive GLIAC Championship title. “This was the sixth time in the last 11 years that we have won the GLIAC Championship,” stated Underwood. “And all five of my top scorers contributed, as two of my freshmen [Chris Beltzer, of Hamilton, and freshman Tyler Polulak, of DeWitt,] shot 71 and 73, respectively.” There is no doubt about it. The Lakers certainly saved their “best for last.” But, with the fall season drawing to a close on such a high note, how would the team respond five

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months later, at the beginning of the Spring 2013 season?

days that come our way in order to practice and prepare for upcoming tournaments.”

As the Super Regional nears, Underwood is optimistic about the future of his team.

Grand Valley Prepares for the Impending Super Regional

One forthcoming tournament, the NCAA Division II Midwest/South Central Super Regional, especially stands out. It will be contested at Kenosha, Wis.’s The Club at Strawberry Creek, from May 6th – 8th.

“I brought in five freshmen this year and I believe they will have very successful careers as Lakers,” said Underwood. “Although the team’s start was not as strong as I would have liked, I’m confident that everyone will step up and play to the best of their abilities the rest of this season.”

Continuing his positive streak, Siegel shot a five-over-par 113 during the 27-hole Cardinal Spring Invitational, contested at Florence, Ky.’s Boone Links Golf Course, a par-72, 6,742-yard layout, from March 23rd to 24th. Siegel’s score was the Lakers’ second lowest, good enough for a tie for fourth place finish. However, Grand Valley’s leading scorer that week was freshman Chris Beltzer, who also used the momentum from his performance at the GLIAC Championship to his advantage, carding a three-over-par total, resulting in a third place finish. Overall, the team shot a 459, finishing third in the tournament.

“By winning the GLIAC Championship, we received an automatic bid into the first stage of the National Championship, the Super Regional,” said Underwood. “At that tournament, the fop five of 20 teams will then advance to the National Championship, which will be held at Hershey, Pa.’s Hershey Country Club.”

For further information regarding Grand Valley State University’s athletic programs, please visit www.gvsulakers.com. - MG -

This finish was then followed by a fifth place showing at the Parkside Spring Invitational, held at Columbus, Ind.’s Otter Creek Golf Course on March 31st and April 1st. This time, one of the team’s older leaders, Cunningham, stepped up to the plate, leading all Grand Valley scorers with a three-over-par 147, as well as an individual tie for fifth place finish. “Last fall we were ranked number two in the nation, so we would like to improve on that this spring,” said Underwood. “We will need to make sure we take advantage of any nice

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Collegiate Spotlight

Grand Valley State University Lakers: On the Verge of a Breakout Season

Photo courtesy of GVSU

By Chris Lewis

GVSU Women’s Golf Team s a native of Rhode Island and a graduate of the University of South Florida, Rebecca Mailloux was not very

familiar with Grand Valley State University when she first met former Lakers head coach Lori Stinson at a 2008 coaches’ convention.

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However, a friendship quickly formed as the two discussed their careers and passion for the game of golf. At the time, Mailloux was lead-

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ing the women’s golf team at Saint Leo University, a Catholic, liberal arts college located near Tampa, Fla. Hired in 2003, one year after the team was first formed, she had overseen a convincing transformation, as the team steadily improved during her first five seasons, from averaging 18-hole scores of 100 and higher in 2003 to contending for the Sunshine State Conference in 2008.

win a national championship. My goal has not changed.”

The Lakers Maintain a Clear Vision: Win With this goal in mind, the Lakers began the 2012 – 2013 season on September 16th, competing in the Concordia University Invitational, which was held at Lake Elmo, Minn.’s Tartan Park Golf Course, a par-72 layout. With a first-round score of 316, Grand Valley secured second place, 11 strokes behind Augustana College.

A few months after the coaches’ convention concluded, she received a surprise phone call in the midst of the off-season. It was Stinson. The longtime coach had just resigned in June and was wondering if Mailloux would be interested in applying for Stinson’s former position.

The stroke margin appeared to be too high to overcome, but the Lakers had quite an impressive comeback, with a second-round score of 308, low enough to reduce Augustana’s lead to four as the Invitational concluded. Led by sophomore Kelly Hartigan’s 73,

At first, she was uncertain. After all, she knew little about Grand Valley, let alone Michigan, and had enjoyed the recent successes of her team, knowing full well that her squad was talented enough to eventually become national contenders. But, after speaking with a former Grand Valley student, she agreed to an interview.

which tied the low round of the tournament, the team’s solid turnaround offered its fans an indication of the Lakers’ potential. “This comeback showed the team its strengths early on in the season, helping them quickly realize that, despite their youth, they can compete,” said Mailloux. “It also helped the girls build momentum for the rest of the season, as they remained hungry for the first place finish they were looking for at the Concordia Invitational.” The Invitational was also noteworthy for Hartigan’s individual medalist honors, as she captured the Invitational by one stroke, finishing at one-over-par, the first victory of her collegiate career. “Kelly soon realized just how much she had matured since her

“When I first came to Grand Valley, my goal was to win a national championship,” said Mailloux. “The reason I took the job was because I felt Grand Valley had everything in place that it needed to become the first northern team to

Photo courtesy of GVSU

By August 2008, after completing two successful interviews, she was meeting with her new team, in preparation for the upcoming 2008 – 2009 season, with the firm belief that the Lakers had the potential to win a national championship sooner, rather than later.

Kelly Hartigan

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Course one week later to compete in the Wolverine Invitational. Not only did the Lakers have to compete against highly-respected Division I colleges and universities, they also had to overcome Mother Nature, as cold, wet weather provided a distraction. Regardless of the challenges, Grand Valley finished the Invitational with a three-day score of 978, low enough for solo eighth place. With six birdies throughout the tournament, tied for the secondmost in the field, Hartigan once again led the Lakers, shooting a final round of 78 in windy, brisk conditions. “Kelly’s talents always come out on tough and long golf courses, as she is a long hitter,” Mailloux said. “A very consistent iron player, she hit a lot of greens that week, which definitely helps on a course like the University of Michigan’s.”

Photo courtesy of GVSU

Although the team did not continue its streak of top-three finishes, the Lakers remained positive, as the Gilda’s Club Laker Fall Invite, the only home tournament of the season, loomed.

Gabrielle Shipley freshman year, as her hard work during the summer months paid off,” Mailloux added. “She is very competitive and doesn’t get easily intimidated. She loves the pressure and actually feeds off of it.”

Contested on September 29th and 30th, the Invite was held at The Meadows, a former host of Division II Men’s and Women’s National Championships. Designed by Dr. Michael J. Hurzdan, ASGCA, the course provided the team some comfort as it sought its first victory of the season.

With positive momentum secured, the team traveled to Ann Arbor’s University of Michigan Golf

Despite expectations for a topthree finish or better, the Lakers shot a two-day total of 655, which was only low enough for a sixth

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place finish. Notably, one of the team’s two seniors, Marni Weinstein, a native of Farmington Hills, led the Lakers for the first time in her fouryear career, shooting a final round of 74, thereby securing solo fifth place. “Marni was actually a walk-on for me her freshman year, but she has improved immensely since then,” said Mailloux. “There is no doubt about it: she is a fighter.” Less than a week later, the Lakers were on the road again, traveling to Findlay, Ohio to compete in the University of Findlay’s Bing-Beall Classic, the last tournament of the fall schedule. With one final opportunity to win before winter, the Lakers fired a first-round score of 312, led by Hartigan’s 73. In second place after the first round, the team appeared to be poised for a potential victory. But, in spite of Hartigan’s even-par 72 final round and subsequent sixstroke individual victory, it was not meant to be, as the team shot 316 and tallied its second runner-up since mid-September. Losing by only one stroke, the Lakers nearly overcame Ferris State, who had led by seven strokes after the first round. With yet another remarkable comeback, as well as Hartigan’s second medalist honors, the team absolutely proved that it is capable of solid, steady play, as well as future victories.

GVSU Captures the Las Vegas Desert Classic After a five month break, the team did not waste any more time

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Unsurprisingly, the team once again enjoyed another comeback, as it began the second round with a seven-shot deficit. By shooting a second-round 310 at Henderson’s Revere Golf Club, a Billy Casperdesign less than half an hour from Vegas, the team defeated schools such as Midwestern State University, the University of Indianapolis, and the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Led yet again by Hartigan, whose 14-over-par finish resulted in a tie for second, the Lakers not only impressed Coach Mailloux with a solid performance at a course no player had ever seen before, but also verified that hard work ultimately leads to victories. “The fact that the Lakers beat Midwestern State, a top-ten team in the country, which had been outside all winter, speaks volumes about these girls and their work ethic,” Mailloux stated. “They all worked hard on their individual weaknesses during the off-season, as some bought new clubs, while others worked with mental coaches. It definitely paid off.” With another top-ten finish at the Perry Park Spring Fling, contested in Carrolton, Ky., on March 24th, the team appears to be on the verge of a breakout season. “We usually have certain team goals, like winning the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Association (GLIAC) Championship and

Regionals and then qualifying for Nationals,” Mailloux said. “But a national championship is always the ultimate goal.”

this chemistry will be essential, as the team prepares for next fall’s season.”

As the team’s future leaders, like Hartigan and freshman Gabrielle Shipley, continue to gain confidence, the Lakers’ potential is limitless.

For more information about Grand Valley State University’s wide array of athletic programs, please visit www.gvsulakers.com. - MG -

“Kelly and Gabrielle are both competitive and experienced. All they want to do is win,” said Mailloux. “And I believe their level of play will motivate their team members to continue to improve.” Although the Lakers’ future leaders certainly stand out, Coach Mailloux believes the team’s chemistry is its primary key to imminent success. “Everyone on our team enjoys themselves no matter the situation and they all get along very well. Several of them even live together,” Mailloux concluded. “This is by far the best team dynamic that I have ever had and I think

Photo courtesy of GVSU

in its quest for a tournament victory, winning the first event of the Spring 2013 season – the Las Vegas Desert Classic – by four shots on March 4th.

GVSU Coach Rebecca Mailloux and Marni Weinstein

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Slice of Life By Terry Moore

Photo courtesy of Terry Moore

A Review of David Graham: From Ridicule to Acclaim by Russell James.

y primary Terry Moore reason for reading this book was to explore the reasons behind David Graham being forced to resign as the captain of the 1996 Presidents Cup International team. It was an embarrassing setback for Graham, a two-time majors champion at the 1979 PGA at Oakland Hills and the 1981 U.S. Open at Merion. Thoroughly exploring the events and machinations of that sorry episode, the author also does a commendable job in chronicling Graham’s hardscrabble upbringing and how he ascended to the top rungs of the game.

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But the President’s Cup affair most intrigued me. At the time, Graham insisted Greg Norman was the major instigator behind the coup, a charge quickly rejected by Norman and some of the players. But given Norman’s notorious role in 1995 when he falsely accused Mark McCumber of cheating at the World Series of Golf, I wanted to see if this book shed any light on not only Graham but also Norman himself. As background, Graham in 1994 was the first non-playing captain of the International Team for the

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Presidents Cup held at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club outside Washington, D.C. The favored U.S team won in comfortable fashion but the success of the event was clearly established. So when the Cup was held two years hence, Graham was again named captain, a post he didn’t seek or campaign for. The author states that the events leading

Norman was peeved at Graham because supposedly The Shark was still harboring ill will for the captain nixing him being a guest commentator for CBS-TV when it telecast the ’94 event. Explained Graham at the time: “The President’s Cup is not Greg Norman’s tournament. It’s a twelveman. It’s not Greg’s team.” And so, Graham rejected the CBS request to have Norman—not on the team due to injury—up in the TV tower. Elkington was upset because during the ’94 event, Graham refused his request, prompted by Elkington’s pregnant wife, for the entire International Team to leave early from a pre-tournament reception at the White House. The Elkingtons didn’t want to appear rude by leaving alone so they urged Graham to have to entire team leave together. Graham declined given the setting. The Elkingtons, very close friends with Norman, fumed. Adding salt to the wound, Graham was later overheard by Mrs Elkington on the team describing her with the B-word.

up to Graham’s resignation are “still something of a mystery.” Yet he performs able forensics in dissecting the “player revolt.” It seems Graham, well before the Cup, had not only ticked off Norman but also fellow teammates Ernie Els and Steve Elkington, all for different reasons.

Finally, the even-tempered Els also had a bone to pick with Graham. This was also due to another twoyear-old remark made by Graham when he learned Els was skipping the ’94 Presidents Cup due to a prior tournament commitment. At the time, Graham said: “I hope those who skipped the Presidents Cup will regret it the rest of their lives.”

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At the ’96 British Open, a majority of International team members present voted to replace Graham, a first ever happenstance for any team competition. Without further discussion, Mike Bodney of the PGA of America promptly asked Peter Thomson, a long time nemesis of Graham, to fill the vacancy. “When I first heard that I had been ousted from the 1996 Cup, I cried,” said Graham. “To get toward the end of your reputation and your credibility, you take it personally. I cried, absolutely. So did my wife.” When asked by the author if he could forgive “the collaborators,” Graham replied: “I won’t forgive them...the wound is healed but the scar is still there.” Incidentally, the International team led by Thomson again lost the Cup but in a close one-point margin. My conclusion is that Norman was definitely a ring-leader in the coup but with willing accomplices. Also, Tim Finchem didn’t help matters by not intervening. The book explores Graham’s humble upbringing in Australia. Oddly enough, his first clubs— found in his garage and purchased by his mother—were left-handed although he was naturally righthanded. His big breaks came when as a junior golfer he was mentored by pro John Crean at a nearby public golf course and later in a “traineeship” under respected pro George Naismith. Graham quit school at age 14, contrary to his father’s wishes. The two of them had a life long strained relationship and one that undoubtedly shaped the youngster’s “flinty” personality.

It was Naismith who became a father figure for Graham and who was responsible for him becoming a right-handed golfer. To make the switch, Graham didn’t play competitive golf for nearly a year. “It was at least eighteen months before I won anything ...playing right-handed.” The book traces not only the arc of Graham’s international golf career but also the slings and arrows prompted by his “hard-edged character” and the insecurities of fame. It’s a complete and telling story of Graham’s failings and triumphs and his “blunt” personality. A few shortcomings about the book, published in Australia, include the poor quality of some of its photographs and the omission of any background on the author, Russell James. (I had to learn from the publisher that James is a nephew of George Naismith and used to play junior golf with Graham.) But all in all, it’s a solid and recommended read—with ample and diverse quoted sources—about an enigmatic, somewhat distorted, but accomplished figure in golf. ther tidbits I relished from the book:

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At the ’79 PGA at Oakland Hills, Graham had a spat with his caddie on the 72nd hole when he was leading the tournament. After an errant drive, he was in a spot where he couldn’t determine the yardage to the green so he asked his caddie, Willie Peterson. “You haven’t asked me one question all the way around. I don’t know. Figure it out yourself,” said Peterson. Upset by the exchange, Graham took a doublebogey six on the hole, ending up in

a playoff with Ben Crenshaw which Graham eventually won. After his US Open win at Merion which was lauded for his nearly flawless final round of 67, Graham received a call from Ben Hogan who extended his congratulations and said, it’s “one of the best rounds of golf I’ve ever seen.” Since 1993, Graham has served on the six-man “Cup and Pins Committee” for the Masters. He counters the misconception that the greens are “tricked up” during tournament week. Instead, he says there are “very subtle shelves on the greens and it takes time to get to know them.” He also says “the pin positions the members play are far more difficult than what the tournament pins are.” A turning point in Graham’s battle with congestive heart failure in 2004 —when he became depressed— occurred when he saw a television program about a young cancer patient. On camera, she said, “I can choose to be sick and unhappy or I can choose to be sick and happy. I choose to be happy.” Struck by her upbeat attitude, Graham immediately changed his outlook on his health predicament. Now living in Montana and playing little if any golf, Graham is now a U.S. citizen (along with his Aussie citizenship) as are his two sons. “I will be forever grateful for what golf in the U.S. has given me.” David Graham: From Ridicule to Acclaim is published by Ryan Publishing and is available through a number of online sources, including Amazon. -MG -

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Michigan Golfer, May / June 2013  

A quarterly publication about Michigan Golf courses, Michigan golfers and Michigan golf events.

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