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In This Issue VOLUME 31

http://michigangolfer.com

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Pure Michigan, Pure Chapman By Art McCafferty

MICHIGAN GOLFER Publisher/Editor Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Editor Emeritus Terry Moore Associate Publisher/Producer Jennie McCafferty Writers Jeff Bairley Susan Bairley L’anse Bannon Mike Beckman Jack Berry Tom Doak Mike Duff Topher Goggin Thad Gutowski Kelly Hill Janina Parrott Jacobs Greg Johnson Vartan Kupelian Tom Lang Chris Lewis Jim Neff Bill Shelton Brad Shelton Norm Sinclair

Michael Patrick Shiels Herschel Nathanial Bernice Phillips Ron Whitten

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The Berry Patch By Jack Berry

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Maggie, MS, and Moe By Bill Shelton

Photo/Video Kevin Frisch Brian Oar Dave Richards Carter Sherline Brian Walters Director of Accounting Cheryl Clark

Michigan Golfer is produced by

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Oakland County– Where Golf is Plentiful By Mike Duff

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Collegiate Spotlight: University of Michigan Wolverines: Confidence. Consistency. Progress. By Chris Lewis

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Collegiate Spotlight: University of Michigan Wolverines: Hail! to the Victors By Chris Lewis

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Yes, Michelle, There is a Difference

Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc. GLSP Advertising & Business Office 4007 Carpenter Road, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 734.507.0241 734.434.4765 FAX info@glsp.com glsp.com

By Bill Shelton 30

Golfing for California University–Pennsylvania By Mike Duff

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A Flower in the Rough– Yarrow By Mike Duff

Michigan Golfer is published online four times a year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement of views and/or philosophy of Michigan Golfer. Back Issues: May be ordered by sending $5.00 with your name, address and issue requested to Michigan Golfer, 4007 Carpenter Road, #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

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Redcoats, White House, and Green Fairways By Bill and Brad Shelton

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Slice of Life:  Twenty-five Years of Golf Shows . . . and Counting, By Terry Moore

Cover: Roger Chapman celebrates the first of two major titles at Harbor Shores Golf Club. Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince

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Pure Michigan, Pure Chapman

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

By Art McCafferty

Roger Chapman wins U.S. Senior Open at Indianwood Golf and Country Club

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Indianwood G & CC and the 73rd Senior PGA Championship, held at the Golf Club at  Harbor Shores. in Benton Harbor.

Chapman was able to lock down the senior category of the award by winning the U.S. Senior Open at

Chapman, born in Kenya in 1959, seemingly has been around forever. He got into serious golf competition by winning the English Amateur in 1979 and nailing a birth on the Walker Cup team in 1981,

hen Roger Chapman, along with Rory McIlroy and Stacey Lewis, accepts one of the Player of the Year by the Golf Writers Association of America at their annual Awards Dinner, it will be a Pure Michigan moment.

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where he defeated Hal Sutton, twice. Chapman turned professional later that year and won his European Tour card on his first visit to the Qualifying School. He finished in the top 100 on the European Order of Merit 19 years out of 21 from 1982 to 2002. He finally won a tournament in 2000 with his first place finish at

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the Brazil Rio de Janeiro 500 Years Open on his 472nd tour start.  With his twin wins, Chapman can be mentioned in the same breath as Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player and

second, expressed the significance of the breakthrough. “I guess, when you read about him, you always hear ‘journeyman’ or something like that,” said Pavin. “But he has always been a very solid player. Sometimes, people bloom

the Senior Open Championship. at Turnberry, but had to withdraw due to some neck problems. He shot an opening round of 72 and pulled out that evening.

“Just love the air - it’s pure Michigan.” Hale Irwin as one of only four men to have claimed both these veteran major championships in the same season.

Chapman had the chance to tie Jack Nicklaus’s record of three senior wins in one year, with a victory at

Chapman, was able to sum up his memories of the Wolverine state by saying , “Just love the air - it’s pure Michigan.” - MG -

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Corey Pavin, who finished tied for

a little later.”

Roger Chapman was the surprise winner of the 73rd Senior PGA Championship at the Golf Club of Harbor Shores. MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • MARCH/APRIL

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The Berry Patch By Jack Berry

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re you ready for another perfect weather year for golf? Last season was one of the best ever. My old guy Jack Berry Tuesdays league didn’t have a single washout and we started April 24 and ended October 30. Weekends were great practically the whole season. But all the blue skies were not shared across America and 2013 might be time to hold our breath. Remember that hot spell in March? Eighty degrees? Followed by a hard freeze

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that killed the cherry and blueberry crops all along the west coast of the state from Traverse City down to the Indiana border. Then we hit 100 degrees in July and while no days were lost to rain, rain was needed. The corn crop suffered. Puny cobs of corn at best. The drought was devastating from Texas through the corn belt. Meager corn yield meant costlier feed for cattle so ranchers reduced herd size and beef price is up. Times definitely are achanging. Flooding, hurricane and blizzard in the east, more snow in the Detroit area than last year although not knee deep and a cou-

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ple dozen mallards are still swimming in river by me. Nothing is surprising and the term now is Climate Change, not global warming. The fact is, we’re getting hot and that affects golf. Grass needs water. Michigan is surrounded by the greatest tubs of fresh water in the world. But Lakes Michigan and Huron are way down. Beachfront property goes way out. The price of water is up. Snowfall is down not only in Michigan but across the top tier of the country. Minnesota cancelled moose hunting season because the moose population is down 52% since 2010. Moose

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don’t like heat and Minnesota has had uncommonly hot summers. Out west, where wolverines roam – not in Ann Arbor or anywhere in the Wolverine State for that matter – the population of the fierce 40-pound animals is down so far that the government wants to put them on the endangered list and ban trapping. Wolverines supposedly love snow and there hasn’t been enough of it from Minnesota to Washington. In Alaska they’re concerned about not having enough snow along the 1,000 mile run of the Iditarod dog sled race and one musher expressed concern whether all the rivers they must cross will be frozen. It’s been so warm in the Canadian Arctic that nine villages in northernmost Quebec, 150 miles south of the Arctic Circle, have gone to cooling systems in community ice rinks. According to the New York Times, the Canadian environmental ministry said Canada is warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the world and even faster in the winter. Put it all together and it appears the big sellers in golf won’t be Pro V1s this year. Instead it will be Gatorade, sun block, ice buckets, wide brim hats and quick dry shirts. Cart girls will run out of beer. Golf course superintendents are very concerned about water use and fairways should be firmer so you’ll get more run and I doubt anyone will complain about that.

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eanwhile, if you use a broomstick putter, don’t get hot and bothered.

Stay cool. There has been a lot of kickback on the 2016 ban on anchoring the club to the body, either the broomstick or the belly putter. Orville Moody introduced the 48-inch long shafted putter in 1984 when he joined what is now called the Champions Tour. The Sarge was the upset winner of the U.S. Open in 1969 but he started getting more publicity when, after unsuccessfully fighting the yips, he went to the long putter, anchored on his chest. He won three of his first five starts on the old boys circuit and in 1989 he won the U.S. Senior Open at Laurel Valley, Pa. That really got the attention of the U.S. Golf Association and the Royal & Ancient. They huddled and decided it was legal. Older golfers, not just old pros, decided the long putter was easier on their backs and so it got a following but no wringing of hands at Golf House or over at the R&A in St. Andrews. However, when three major championships were won in short order – Stewart Cink at the 2009 British Open, Keegan Bradley at the 2011 PGA Championship and Webb Simpson at the 2012 U.S. Open — the rulesmakers decided the long putter had gone, well, gone too far.

game” even though they said it was OK in 1989. So they’re decreeing it will be illegal in 2016. If it goes through, it will be followed in all USGA competitions but I have a feeling that the vast majority of people who play golf will ignore it, just like they play “winter rules” year-round. The 27,000 member PGA of America, which has been campaigning to “grow the game” and to get folks to play from forward tees to enjoy the game more and play faster, is against it, fearing it could drive people away. One Michigander it would affect is Hall of Fame member Bill Zylstra whose senior career took off when he switched to the long putter. Zylstra has been ranked at the top of senior amateurs in the country. And it would affect Adam Scott of Australia although he missed a short putt to win the British Open last year. He didn’t blame the putter. Long stick or short, it still takes nerves. - MG -

Old champions Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and Tom Watson voiced opposition and today’s rulesmakers felt that anchoring isn’t in “the spirit of the

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Maggie, MS, and Moe By Bill Shelton

Photo courtesy of Bill Shelton

Senior Amateur, the US Women’s Amateur Public Links Championship, South Atlantic Amateur, Harder Hall Invitational, Doherty/Jones Challenge Cup (she faced 16-year old Morgan Pressel in the semifinal round), Women’s International Four-Ball, and in 2006 the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship—all after learning the game after her 40th birthday and battling Multiple Sclerosis! Her life’s journey has drawn the attention of dozens of publications, both

Bill Shelton

golf-related and daily publications. Perhaps her most treasured publication is the Summer 2006 edition of Natural Golf magazine with the cover showing Moe Norman swinging and an insert photo of Maggie demonstrating the swing Moe taught her. Maggie Weder was born in Monroe, Michigan, one of nine children in an unstable home environment. A star high school athlete she earned 10 varsity letters in softball

(Maggie and the writer are members of the Ironwood Country Club in Greenville, North Carolina. Although a recent neck surgery has restricted her ability to play golf, she is always at at the club working with women members trying to improve their games. She was recently named Captain of the North Carolina team competing in the South East Women’s Team Championship, a five-state competition. She has been featured in national publications about using golf to battle her multiple sclerosis, a “chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the central nervous system.”)

aggie” may be the most recognized name in women’s amateur golf in the mid Atlantic States. She has qualified and competed in the US Mid-Amateur, US

“M

Photo left: Maggie Weder shows her trophies. Photo courtesy of Maggie Weder.

Photo courtesy of Maggie Weder.

Part I - From Monroe to the Marines

Maggie displays souvenirs of her Marine days.

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In 1979 she returned to Paris Island as a drill instructor with the rank of Sargeant where she developed a Physical Condition Platoon, a second chance for recruits who struggled in basic training. Her next stop was at Quantico where she became Chief Warrant Officer, responsible to the internal investigations division for the Corps. “If you messed up, you didn’t want to see me,” she chuckles. For almost 15 years, she served proudly as a Marine and was awarded two Navy Commendation Medals. She represented the Corps with distinction in all sports EXCEPT golf. Suddenly, in 1991 her world seemed to fall apart.

Anticipating deployment to the Mid-East in 1989, Maggie returned to her office after a rigorous training regime. Sitting behind her desk, she suddenly realized she couldn’t move her legs. The medical staff could not determine the cause and decided to place her on a Temporary Disabled Retirement list, where she remained until being awarded full retirement status almost ten years later. “My only income during those years was about a third of my regular pay and it was difficult to get by. Thankfully, I was receiving medical care at no cost.” Without a clear diagnosis, a doctor at the Bethesda Naval Hospital suspected the illness was MS.

Photo courtesy of Maggie Weder.

and basketball. Upon graduation in 1975, her grandmother encouraged her to find a “way out” and the quickest route was the military. She had earlier read an article about the Marines and went to the local recruiter’s office. “He promptly threw me out,” remembers Maggie. She can only guess as to why but she was persistent. Finally she was accepted and headed to Paris Island, SC for boot camp. Almost immediately she was named Platoon Leader. It seemed her life’s journey would be a career in the military. She then moved on to Camp Pendleton to Legal Services School where she became a Specialist, then to the Marines Law Center in San Diego.

Maggie rides around the club in her dark blue golf cart flying the Marine Corps flag, 10

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Her condition slowly improved and she regained approximately 85 percent of her motor skills. Her mental condition was not as positive as she wrestled with a life that went from a nationally-ranked triathlete and softball player to someone who seldom left her house. During a visit to her doctor, it was suggested that she start playing golf. Her response was “I can barely walk and talk, how the hell can I play golf?” (Actually, she had had a brief encounter with golf and owned a set of Walter Hagen irons. “While I was stationed in Camp LeJune, they would have ‘free beer and day off ’ golf events. Needless to say, my participation was not motivated by golf.”) But thanks to a doctor’s advice and Moe Norman, golf changed her life!

Part II-Moe Saved My Life Finally accepting the doctor’s explanation that golf would help the rehabilitation of her motor skills, she noticed a copy of Golf Digest in the waiting room. It featured an article on Moe Norman and his one-plane swing with Norman on the cover and the

Photo courtesy of Maggie Weder.

From 1991 until 1997 she was homebound as her condition worsened. She lost most motor skills, could not speak nor walk. Her vision was significantly distorted (a challenge that continues to plague her). “Some days are better than others but the bad days are very troubling.” A care provider had to assist her in virtually every basic function. After her neurologist at Bethesda transferred to Camp LeJune, Maggie decided to relocate to the area to continue treatments with him. Thus begins a remarkable golf story!

Moe Norman and Maggie Weder are featured on the same cover of Natural Golfer.

caption “Moe Knows What Nobody Else Knows” followed by the question “Is he the best ball striker ever?” (Golf Digest, December 1995). It included a series of photos depicting each part of his swing. Maggie recalls, “It suddenly hit me. Moe and I were very much alike in terms of golf physique and need for simplicity. So I ‘borrowed’ the magazine and for the next 30 days I went to the driving range, laid the magazine down on the grass and hit practice balls. Much of the time I would be sitting on a 5 gallon bucket

due to vertigo but I still could practice his swing and follow-through. He always had a very wide stance which was most comfortable for me. Most appealing was his belief that simply you aim and you hit it HARD—and I did!” Using that magazine articles and Moe’s swing photos, Maggie became a self-taught golfer who later competed on the largest stages of women’s amateur golf, always challenged by both her competitors and a personal battle with MS. She carried a plus 2 handicap and played from the blue tees.

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She played an aggressive amateur tournament schedule until 2004 when the disease bought on another major setback and, in her mind, golf was over. A call came to her home from the Director of the Gimbel Center, a MS Comprehensive Care Center, asking her to participate in their charity golf event. She initially refused but a friend sensed she was giving up and insisted she attend. The event rekindled her joy of the game and gave her a new reason to live. The 5’5”

powerhouse amazed the participants with her prodigious length off the tee and raised $1,000 for the charity. Although her skills were clearly being impacted by MS, her spirit was renewed. Using her golfing prowess, she returned home and created “Golfin 4 MS,” a charity that raises funds available for individuals who need financial assistance for MS treatments. She raises the money by getting sponsors who pay an amount for every birdie she

makes in a tournament “provided I finish the round and sign the score card.” Until her recent neck surgery, she had raised almost $90,000 and declares, “I am going to play again to reach the goal of $100,000.” Every dollar raised goes to the Gimbel Center for MS at the Holy Name Hospital in Teaneck NJ. (a detailed personal account of her decision to create the charity can be found at http://www.freewebs.com/golf4ms/i ndex.htm). Battling often torturous pain, she continued to participate in competitive events until a recent neck surgery. “Although I was carrying a 1 handicap there would be days that I struggled to break 90. My competitors saw the pain and would encourage me to leave the course. I couldn’t because I had to finish the round and sign the scorecard to receive the designated amounts from my sponsors for any birdies I had or would make in the round.” Though she can’t play currently, she is still involved in the game working with club members (at no charge), officiating at USGA and CCA tournaments, caddying at women’s amateur tournaments where carts are allowed, and amassing a garage full of golf clubs and other equipment. (A local golf shop recently went out of business, and guess who bought the golf club racks!)

Photo courtesy of Maggie Weder.

She was recently named Captain of the North Carolina team for the Southeastern Women’s Team Championship with representatives from 5 states. In January Maggie headed to Florida to assist as a rules official in several amateur tournaments. Maggie Weder met her hero, Moe Norman, in 2004.

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Part III-Meeting her Hero With all of the success Maggie had achieved in golf, she had two unfulfilled wishes. First, she wanted to meet and thank her hero, Moe Norman. “That man kept me alive!” Her wish would be fulfilled only a few months before his death in 2004. “I heard he was doing a clinic at the Sally Tournament (South Atlantic Ladies Tournament) at the Oceanside Club in Ormand Beach, Florida. This was my best chance to meet him and I had to go.” As she was walking along the eighteenth hole following a friend, she thought she saw Moe sitting on a bench. “He was recovering from cataract surgery and had a patch over his right eye. After peeking through the bushes for several minutes, I finally got up the nerve to walk up to him. I had heard stories of his gruff behavior to people but this was my idol and I wanted to thank him.” Rather than reacting negatively to Maggie, an immediate rapport developed and the two spent hours discussing golf and life. Over the next two days he wanted her to be his constant companion. He introduced her as “My new best friend” to everyone he met at the tournament. Because of the eye surgery, Moe didn’t want to actually hit balls at the clinic and insisted that Maggie demonstrate. “Although he said I understood his swing better than anyone at the tournament, I did not have to fulfill that assignment thankfully.” The next day Moe walked into the pro shop and asked for Maggie. When she came in, he decided to

give her a tour of the facility—arm in arm! “I had heard how Moe reacted to others touching him so I was amazed when he put my arm in his and off we went on the tour. I am not sure why but he wanted to show me everything in the clubhouse—even the inside of the men’s restroom!” They later spent some time on the range hitting balls and, as Maggie remembers, sharing Moeisms such as “why hit down to make the ball go up” (Moe may never have taken a divot nor does Maggie) or why have your hands so close to your body instead of straight arms (basically a one plane swing with no wrist flex) or maximum power is best achieved with a ten-finger grip and wide stance. He even showed her perhaps his most prized possession— his car. “I have never seen so much stuff in one car! His trunk was full of golf balls, I couldn’t even guess how many,” laughs Maggie (who has her own reputation as a golf pack rat!). Although she never saw Moe again, she has two reminders of those two days with him in Ormand Beach. “He gave me a copy of his 30 Ways to be a Better Golfer’ which he usually refused to share. He also took a picture with me that has been in my wallet ever since.” In spite of all the reports of Moe’s erratic behavior, quirks, oddities, gruffness, Maggie knows only another person. “It’s not often you meet your hero and he lives up to your expectations. Moe did.” Maggie has had an amazingly career from star high school athlete to a proud Marine to nationally ranked triathlete to homebound for

six years to a limited but improbable presence in women’s amateur golf. Though she has to battle the effects of MS every day, her spirit is upbeat and her will indomitable. “In one way or another, I will continue to contribute to the game that saved my life.” Her mantra has remained the same throughout— “Golf is Easy, Life is Hard.” With her ever-present cup of coffee, riding around the club in her dark blue golf cart flying the Marine Corps flag, Maggie is more than an icon in amateur women’s golf but to most who know her, she is a real life miracle! It is estimated that 400,000 Americans have MS with women developing the disease at twice the rate of men. In her own way, Maggie is trying to make a difference in at least a few of those Americans. As to her own battle with MS, Maggie personifies the Moeism, “Stop worrying about when you are going to die, but how you will live.” Maggie’s second wish has yet to be fulfilled. Following her grandmother’s advice to find a way out of a difficult home environment, Maggie has returned to Michigan only a very few times since 1975. “I have never played a round of golf in my home state of Michigan and I have never been recognized for whatever I have achieved in golf. But, I haven’t given up on that wish and hopefully there will still be an opportunity.” Maybe one day that will happen—maybe even recognition in the Michigan Golfers Hall of Fame? - MG -

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Photo courtesy of Fieldstone Golf Club

Fieldstone, Hole No. 10.

Oakland County– Where Golf is Plentiful By Mike Duff

Photo courtesy of Mike Duff

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Mike Duff 14

aving been playing golf for the better part of fifty years, I finally realized that I am spoiled because

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of the number of golf courses in Oakland County. It is somewhere in the neighborhood of 50+ public courses. Where can you go and find such an assortment of quality courses at such reasonable rates? I don’t think there is another county that can compare to Oakland when it comes to public golf course offerings

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At last count, I have played 40 different courses in Oakland County at one time or another. A few of them I have played multiple times over the past fifty years. I certainly have my favorites - usually the ones that are within a half-hour drive of my home. The diverse number of

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courses in Oakland offers a variety of services, golf course design, course fees and amenities. The choices are unlimited.

My choice of courses in the county range from Pontiac Municipal to Shepherds Hollow in Clarkston. I live in the Waterford area so I usually golf within a 50 mile radius of my home. Some of my favorites, and ones that I would recommend, are Lyon Oaks, Pine Knob, Pine Trace, Tanglewood and Boulder Pointe to name a few. I would also

- MG -

Photo courtesy of Fieldstone Golf Club

Oakland County appears to be the right location for great golf. Public courses are affordable and

plentiful. So, enjoy what we have and let’s be grateful that we live in such beautiful area with plenty of golf opportunities.

Fieldstone, Hole Number 7.

Photo courtesy of Copper Hills

Generally golfers are a fussy group when it comes to selecting a course to play. Golf rates are not always the main criteria for selecting a course. Quite often the design, the playability, the degree of difficulty and the location is as important as the greens fees. Factoring in all of these tends to whittle down the choices. One good thing about having so many courses within the county is that greens fees become quite competitive and, therefore, good for the consumer. Matter of fact, Michigan has been criticized for over building golf courses which has forced many courses to go under. Oakland County has not been caught up in this “overbuilt” frenzy. We haven’t seen a lot of new courses spring up in the last few years and I am not aware of any new courses in the works. So, Oakland remains a county of abundant resources for golf.

include Captains Club, Fieldstone and Copper Hills.

Copper Hills, Hole Number 4.

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Collegiate Spotlight

University of Michigan Wolverines: Confidence. Consistency. Progress

ç Patrick Lovell / Michigan Photography

By Chris Lewis

Coach Cheryl Stacy and Yugene Lee line up a putt at the 2012 NCAA Regional Championship.

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Chris Lewis

s fouryear head coach Cheryl Stacy prepares for the Spring 2013 season, her objective for the women’s golf team is clear.

“Our goal every time we tee it up is to win.” 16

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This determination has culminated in a long list of success stories since she first accepted the university’s head coaching position in July 2009. Three consecutive NCAA postseason appearances. An alltime single season scoring record. And a record-breaking single round score of 285.

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Coach Stacy’s successful run continued last fall as the Wolverines recorded three top-ten finishes in four tournaments. During their first tournament appearance, the Mary Fossum Invitational, contested in East Lansing, the Wolverines shot a three-round team score of 933. Led by sophomore Linda Luo, whose two-over par 218 secured an

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2013 University of Women’s Golf Team

ç Martin Vloet / Michigan Photography


Although the team did not compete for the title, it did acquire some positive momentum as it prepared for its next tournament – the Wolverine Invitational. Hosted at the University of Michigan Golf Course, an Alister Mackenzie design, the Wolverine Invitational offered Coach Stacy’s squad an opportunity to improve upon their recent top-ten finish. With a three-round total of 930, the Wolverines proved they are capable of competing with – and defeating – some of the nation’s best women’s golf programs, as they finished the tournament in a tie for first place. Junior Alicia Weber, of Northville, claimed individual hon-

ors, as she defeated nearly 80 other golfers with a 227. “It was a lot of fun to see the team win our home tournament and have lots of family and friends come and watch the team play,” said Stacy. “It was also special to have one of our players win the individual medalist.” She added, “We are normally on the road playing, so it gave us a chance to showcase our new indoor golf facility, as well as our top-ranked Alister Mackenzie course.” Created by the worldrenowned designer of Augusta National, the par-71 course features contoured greens and narrow fairways, leading to a rating of 72 and a slope of 135. Opened in 1931, the course has become one of the university’s longest-standing traditions. But, the addition of the university’s golf facility, the Weisfeld Family Golf Center, which offers users a V1 coaching and camera system, a TrackMan golf radar system, and an aboutGolf simulator, is especially noteworthy.

© Eric Bronson / MIchigan Photography

“Our student athletes have benefitted tremendously, as they have had more time to focus on academics since travel time to facilities has decreased considerably,” said Stacy. The facility has also improved the team’s consistency, providing team members an opportunity to hone their skills, even during the off-season. Linda Luo 18

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Such additional practice time likely had an impact on the 2013

© Daryl Marshke / University of Michigan Photo Services

individual third place showing, the University of Michigan finished the tournament in tenth place.

Lauren Grogan team’s fall finishes, especially as the team recorded a tie-fourth place showing at the Edwin Watts Palmetto Intercollegiate, which was contested at Kiawah Island, South Carolina’s Oak Pointe Golf Club, a course the team had never played before. “We had very good chemistry and the entire team contributed throughout the tournament,” Stacy said. “It really increased our confidence. What a way to end our fall season!” Coach Stacy Prepares for the Spring 2013 Season There is no doubt about it:

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Coach Stacy’s team is young. In fact, she has no seniors. But, the team’s two freshman, three sophomore, and four junior members have all shown their potential in recent months. Last fall, Linda Luo led all scorers with a 75.50 average, followed by sophomore Lauren Grogan, who averaged 77.08, and Alicia Weber, who averaged 78. “It will be a competitive environment as our spring schedule begins,” said Stacy. This spring, the Wolverines will travel to locales like Puerto Rico, Arizona, Florida, and California. “We are super excited about our schedule, especially our trip to San Diego, since we don’t normally travel to California,” said Stacy. “We are participating in San Diego State’s tournament and will have an opportunity to compete against some of the west coast’s

top teams, including USC.” She continued, “We will face a lot of top-ranked teams at most of the events, so the girls will be able to compete against some of the country’s best golfers. It will be a great experience!” Needless to say, Coach Stacy is enthusiastic about her team’s future. “I am very optimistic, especially knowing that all of my players will be returning next year,” Stacy said. “And we will have a new freshman next fall who is a top-ranked junior player.” That player, Grace Choi, was signed to a National Letter of Intent back in November. She is currently ranked number 37 in the American Junior Golf Association’s Polo Golf Ranking’s 2013 class. “Our new indoor facility has given us a wonderful recruiting advantage so far and will continue

to help the women’s program become a national contender in the future,” said Stacy. As Coach Stacy prepares for the Spring 2013 season, her objective remains unchanged – to win every tournament. “Again, every time we tee it up, our goal is to win,” said Stacy. “We want to win the Big Ten Championship and qualify for – and compete in – the NCAA Championship.” Her goals may appear to be lofty at first glance. But, with the team’s depth, chemistry, and rising confidence, Coach Stacy’s Wolverines are beginning to realize the sky truly is the limit. For further information about the University of Michigan’s wide variety of athletic programs, please visit www.mgoblue.com. - MG -

University of Michigan Wolverines Spring 2013 Schedule

Clover Cup Invitational, March 8th – 10th, 2013 (Mesa, Arizona) SDSU Farms Invitational, March 31st – April 2nd, 2013 (San Diego, California)

Big Ten Championship, April 26th – 28th, 2013 (French Lick, Indiana)

© Tim Carlson

Marsh Landing Invitational, April 8th – 9th, 2013 (Jacksonville, Florida)

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Collegiate Spotlight

University of Michigan Wolverines: Hail! to the Victors

Photo courtesy of University of Michigan Athletics

By Chris Lewis

1935 NCAA Champions - Men’s Golf Hail! to the victors valiant Hail! to the conqu’ring heroes Hail! Hail! to Michigan The leaders and best! Hail! to the victors valiant Hail! to the conqu’ring heroes Hail! Hail! to Michigan, The champions of the West! ~ “The Victors”

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et your imagination run wild for a second. It is the middle of October. The air is crisp, but not too cold. A steady rain has been falling most of the day, but you’ve hardly noticed it. The Big House has been filled to the brim with thousands of loyal fans. And the University of Michigan marching band is performing the most well-known song in college sports, “The Victors.”

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Another Michigan Wolverines football game has begun, perhaps the most storied tradition in the university’s 196year history. The sights and sounds are unexplainable, from the deafening cheers to the bright hues of maize and blue. As you observe the action, you begin to realize why Wolverines fans are so passionate about their teams.

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After all, a majority of the university’s teams have been competing in the NCAA for more than 50 years and have won multiple national championships. When you ask a University of Michigan student or alumnus which teams stand out, they will likely mention the football team that captured the 1998 Rose Bowl, or the men’s basketball squad that won the 1989 national championship. Some may even talk about the “Fab Five,” comprised of NBA stars like Chris Webber and Jalen Rose.

Undoubtedly, the most recognized alumnus of the program is Chuck Kocsis, who led the university to back-to-back national championships in 1934 and 1935. As a result of his achievements, which include a runner-up finish in the 1956 U.S. Amateur, six Michigan Amateur titles, and three Michigan Open championships, the Golf Association of Michigan selected

Kocsis as the Michigan amateur golfer of the 20th century. In recent years, the university has recruited the likes of Lion Kim ’11, the 2010 U.S. Amateur Public Links champion, and upand-coming stars such as freshmen Chris O’Neill and Brett McIntosh. In 2011, Kim tied for third at the NCAA Finals, just weeks after competing in the Masters Tournament. “In all, Michigan has had three individual NCAA champions, John Fischer (1932), Chuck Kocsis (1936), and Dave Barclay (1947),” said head coach Chris Whitten. “And eight players have been selected as members of the All-America team, including Lion Kim.”

© Eric Bronson / Michigan Photography

But, oftentimes, one of the university’s longest standing athletic programs is overlooked, in spite of its consistency and national championship victories.

Since being recognized as an official varsity sport in 1921, the University of Michigan’s men’s golf program has won two national championships, while also developing the talents of some of the state’s most successful amateur golfers.

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recorded two ninth place finishes, at the Inverness Intercollegiate, held in Toledo, Ohio, and the Windon Memorial Classic, contested in Skokie, Illinois.

“Our performance goals are the same each year,” Whitten said. “First, we want to win the Big Ten Championship and, second, we want to qualify for the NCAA regionals.”

Although the team did not finish any higher than 11th place afterwards, four individual performances especially stand out.

He continued, “After that, we will hopefully qualify for the NCAA Finals and compete to win.” Momentum Last fall, the Wolverines

With a three-round total of 216, Brett McIntosh, a native of London, Ontario, finished with a tie-third place showing at the Inverness Intercollegiate, his very first appearance in a collegiate tournament. One week later, another freshman shined, as Chris O’Neill shot a three-round total of 218 at the Windon Memorial Classic, finishing in a tie for fifth, an impressive feat, considering the field consisted of 84 golfers – the largest field of the season.

© Lon Horwedel / Ann Arbor News

From October 7th to 9th, the Wolverines competed in the Fightin’ Irish Gridiron Classic, which hosted 71 golfers. Although the team shot a three-round total of 892 for an 11th place finish, the Wolverines were once again led by a less experienced golfer, sophomore Noori Hyun, a native of South Korea. With a second-round 68, Hyun finished the tournament in eighth place, another respectable showing from one of the team’s future leaders.

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After leading the Wolverines at the Windon Memorial Classic, Chris O’Neill’s positive momentum continued at the Alister MacKenzie Invitational. Following a two-under-par 69 in the first round, O’Neill shot a 70 and 71 during the second and third rounds for a three-under-par, tie2013

© Lon Horwedel / Ann Arbor News

Hired in 2011 as the ninth head coach in program history, Chris Whitten believes such past successes will continue to be duplicated.

Brett McIntosh 14th finish. The final event of the Fall 2012 season, The Stanford Classic, occurred at one of the most beloved courses in the world, Cypress Point. “It felt like a once-in-a-lifetime experience for all of us,” said Whitten. “We played some of the best teams in the country head-tohead and I think we realized where we stack up against that competition.” The Stanford Classic is a match play event, featuring four ball, foursomes, and singles matches. The Wolverines lost each of their matches, as they were defeated by the University of Texas (four ball), the University of Georgia (foursomes), and the University of Washington (singles). “For the most part, everyone on the team is so young that they need experiences like this to grow,”

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Collecton River Collegiate, March 6th – 7th, 2013 (Hilton Head, South Carolina)

“I think we have a great base and incredible facilities to attract and develop talent,” Whitten said. “Our on-campus Alister Mackenzie course is an outstanding resource. And we just opened a 10,000-square-foot allseasons practice facility for winter training.”

C&F Bank Intercollegiate, March 24th – 26th, 2013 (Williamsburg, Virginia)

He added, “Our recruiting has taken off and I think the future could be very sustainable.”

said Whitten. “We took Washington to the very last holes in the final individual matches, which will give us momentum for the spring.”

Improve. Build Confidence. Compete. Looking back, Whitten is proud of his young team’s performances and is eagerly awaiting the upcoming spring season. With strong individual performances from freshmen and sophomores, the team’s future appears to be bright. Freshman Chris O’Neill led all scorers last fall, with a seasonal average of 73.75. He was followed by seniors Miguel Echavarria and Matt Alessi, who averaged 75.33 and 76.08, respectively, and Brett McIntosh and Noori Hyun, who averaged 76.33 and 77.82, respectively. Furthermore, Whitten has announced that three newcomers have signed National Letters of

University of Michigan Wolverines Spring 2013 Schedule

Hoosier Invitational, April 6th – 7th, 2013 (Bloomington, Indiana) Big Ten Championship, April 26th – 28th, 2013 (French Lick, Indiana)

Intent for the 2013 – 2014 season. Bryce Evon, the number one player in the 2011 Golf Association of Ontario Juvenile Order of Merit, Reed Hrynewich, Michigan’s number one ranked junior, and Tom Swanson, Montana’s number one ranked junior, will all be eligible to play next fall.

As Coach Whitten prepares for the Spring 2013 season, his goal is clear – the team should improve upon its Fall 2012 results in order to compete with the nation’s most talented teams. “My personal goal for the team is that we work daily to improve our skills, build confidence, and compete as hard as we can,” said Whitten. “We can’t control what our competition does. We can only control the quality of our preparation. That’s where our focus is.” Such preparation will allow the team to continue to build upon its recent momentum.

© Eric Bronson / Michigan Photography

“We’ve had great momentum in the past four years, with two top-10 NCAA finishes, and we’re capitalizing on that with new facilities on campus,” said Whitten. “We have an opportunity to write a very special chapter for our program in the coming years and we’ll do it with teamoriented players who love Michigan. For further information about the University of Michigan’s wide variety of athletic programs, please visit www.mgoblue.com. - MG -

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Yes, Michelle, There is a Difference! By Bill Shelton he 2012 marketing campaign of the LPGA was built around the slogan, “See Why it’s Different Out Here.” Four 30second television ads feature Paula Creamer, Morgan , Michelle Wie,

Jackie Barenborg plays in th Daytona Beach Invitational at LPGA International, Duramed Futures Tour, April 2010. 26

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added 5 new tour stops in 2012 and an additional $6 million in tour purses. Having covered both LPGA and PGA tournaments for the Michigan Golfer, in my opinion there are clear differences both between the older version of the LPGA and the current PGA. Michael Whan, LPGA Commissioner since 2010, has done a masterful job in repositioning the women’s tour as both a business enterprise and entertainment organization. Though a wide gap still exists between the two major professional golf tours, the LPGA has moved steadily toward offering a

© Gregory Shamus / Getty Images. Photo courtesy of LPGA

© Scott A. Miller

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and Suzanne Petterson answering fan questions about shoes, tweeting, personal quirks and nicknames. LPGA Chief Marketing Officer, Jon Podany, explained ìthe campaign allows us to showcase the unique and compelling aspects of the LPGA, and most importantly, our players. The up-close-and-personal snippets earned a nomination for the 2011 “Best Television Commercial Series” at the 19th annual ING Industry Awards.  Is it marketing hype or a legitimate departure from both LPGA’s past and men’s professional tours? While the impact of  the campaign may be difficult to quantify, the LPGA

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Michigan’s Allison Fouch plays in the 2008 LPGA State Farm Classic •

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more viable option for golf enthusiasts in terms of following, identity and support. Realizing that my observations are generalizations and there are always exceptions, I would note the following differences:

• A World Tour. The LPGA has emerged as the first and purest version of a world professional golf tour. Of the official 27 stops on the 2012 LPGA schedule, more than a third were played outside the United States. Australia, Kuala Lumper, Brazil, Canada, Korea, Singapore, France, Britain, Japan, and Thailand hosted LPGA events and, in many ways, may have represented the salvation of the womenís tour. With the accompanying explosion of nonAmerican players competing on the LPGA, international media coverage and fan support are increasing exponentially. This year an existing tour stop in France, the Evian Masters, will become a designated major on the LPGA Tour.

educational and improvement programs for the membership. At the 2012 Jamie Farr Toledo Classic, I was impressed with both the amount of fan interaction and the seemingly genuineness of the players when talking with fans and signing autographs. There is not the invisible barrier that seems to exist on the PGA tour where players walk down the fairway in a robotic trance never acknowledging fans except with a mechanical tip of the cap. The LPGA actually talk to the fans!

• Personal Appearance and Fashion. The two major tours seem to be going in opposite directions as to players’ personal appearance on and off the golf course. Increasingly scraggily facial

hair, unkempt hair, either extremely bland or extremely bizarre clothing are seen regularly on the PGA Tour. The trend is reminiscent of the metamorphosis that occurred in men’s tennis a decade ago. For the LPGA, the exact opposite has occurred. Attention to personal appearance and fashion on the LPGA has never been greater. Tour events are fashion extravaganzas. Pride in appearance is clearly evident in the players. Whether this is the result of an organizational directive or individual desire, it has surely improved the tour’s image.

• Atmosphere. While the players on both the LPGA and the PGA are highly competitive, the atmosphere on the course is much more

• Player/Fan interaction. It is probably fair to say that the LPGA has always encouraged interaction with the fans, even if just for tour survival. However, apart from a few professionals such as Nancy Lopez, earlier players may have been willing in spirit but lacking in personality or interactive skills. The primary focus was proving their legitimacy as professional golfers by concentrating on and honing their golfing skills. Clearly the emphasis is now on celebrity status as well as golfing prowess. Paula, Michelle, Annika, Natalie, and Suzanne and others are sought by companies to endorse their products from cars to watches to personal products. The Tour not only emphasizes the human dimension but also provides MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE • MARCH/APRIL

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© Scott A. Miller

average, many LPGA players hit their shots significantly longer than most amateurs—but, at least, we are in the same hemisphere! Amateurs would be indeed be blessed if they could emulate the LPGA slogan, “I swing like a girl!”

Laura Crawford relaxed and congenial on the LPGA. The players interact often with each other on the tee box and walking down the fairway. On the practice tee at the Jamie Farr, six or seven players were standing together, talking, laughing, and obviously enjoying the camaraderie. Many PGA players seem to have tunnel vision and function in a vacuum during a tour event. Although some level of camaraderie exist on both tours and competitiveness is keen on each, it appears that LPGA players experience more enjoyment with the process and not purely driven by the financial outcome. As LPGA purses continue to grow, it will be interesting to see if more competitiveness and less camaraderie will become the new order of the tour.  

• A More Identifiable Game for Amateurs. While 28

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watching the PGA players propel drives in excess of 350 yards and often only hit irons for the second shot on seemingly unreachable par 5’s, most of us experience “shock and awe” disbelief. As impressive as their play may be, most amateurs have great difficulty (if their egos allow them to admit it) translating their game to that level. Many PGA players typically hit drives that are longer than most par 4s we play at our home courses. They play a game of which we can only dream. On the other hand, we believe (often unrealistically) that our tee shots and approach irons are similar in length to LPGA pros. At a recent LPGA event, I overheard a member of the host club remark to his buddy that a tee shot from the LPGA pro landed about where his shots usually did. In all probability, if that was true, he was hitting from a forward tee! On

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The differences cited represent positive directions for the LPGA but, in fairness, there are still major challenges that threaten the tour. Being a global tour has increased the number of tournaments, but with it has come a significant increase in travel and the associated costs. How long will the tour stars continue to endure endless airplane rides and countless time zone changes to compete on the international circuit? Even with the additional of several new tour stops in 2012, there are still numerous multi-week openings in the 2013 schedule. Though there has been an improvement in sponsor commitment, the LPGA Commissioner has to continually monitor the “care and feeding” of event sponsors. Television coverage has stabilized to a degree with the involvement of The Golf Channel but related revenues from media coverage continues to lag. Finally, though some improvement, the “women’s minor tours” are not as mature or integrated as the comparable men’s tours. The biggest need for both the LPGA and the PGA is creativity— new ways to capture and retain their audiences, event hosts, and sponsors. Michelle, I have an idea. How about men and women playing in the same tournament, maybe using different tees? Would you be willing to give it a try?   - MG -

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Golfing for California UniversityPennsylvania

Phto courtesy of Uniontown Country Club

By Mike Duff

Uniontown Country Club id you know there is a California University in Pennsylvania? I didn’t until this past August when the “golfing Wilbury’s” Bob, Bob, Bob and I signed up to attend and take part in a golfing fundraiser in Uniontown, PA. The event was held to help raise funds for the CalU athletic program. Uniontown seemed like a long way to go just to play golf, but our group of four traveling buddies all agreed that this would not only be fun but allow us to play golf in a different part of the country. The event was held on Friday August 24 at the Uniontown Country Club, a private club that promotes a traditional country club experience in an intimate small town setting.

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We first heard of this event from Ron Hughes, an alumnus of CalU and formally vice president of scouting for the Detroit Lions, now in the same capacity with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Ron was good enough to take us on a tour of the Pittsbrugh Steelers practice and corporate office facilities. What a treat. Ron lives in Michigan and convinced us that this golf outing was something very special. So we took him up on the opportunity. We decided to allow an extra day or two to visit Pittsburgh and the surrounding area while we were there. Uniontown is about an hour south of Pittsburgh so we decided to find a hotel located in the Pittsburgh area. One member of our group, Bob Walker, was born in

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Pennsylvania not far from Pittsburgh, so he was familiar with the area and knew what to expect. The other three of us had never been to Pittsburgh. Needless to say, we were extremely impressed. The city’s history is well known. Pittsburgh has always been noted for steel and it is the home of Iron City beer, one of the favorite choices for visitors and locals as well. Even though we did not play golf in Pittsburgh I went online to see what the golf landscape looked like. On golfmax.com I found over 98 courses list in the area with a variety of locations to choose from. If looking for tee times then Golfnow.com is a site which can help you make tee times.

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city. Driving in this city of bridges and freeways caused a lot of frustration for us. I pride myself on being able to figure out the driving patterns in nearly every location I have ever visited, but Pittsburgh drove me nuts. And I wasn’t the only one. The others in the group felt the same way as we all struggled to find our way around even with the help of a GPS. We did manage to play 27 holes during this four day trip. Nine holes at the Summit Inn and 18 at Uniontown CC. The Summit Inn Resort in Uniontown is listed on the “National Register of Historic Places” and is magnificent with its

old world charm and unique atmosphere. The nine hole golf course is nothing special but is in good shape. This article sounds like a travel ad for the greater Pittsburgh area - and in some ways it is. You won’t be disappointed in what you find in Pittsburgh because it one of the nicest city’s anywhere in the US. There is a lot to see and do in the Pittsburgh area and golf is just one of them. Others might include the Zoo, Andy Warhol Museum, Carnegie Museum of Art, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens and of course Mount Washington. - MG -

Phto courtesy of Mike Durr

The city seemed clean and esthetically appealing. The riverfront was spectacular and the view from Mount Washington overlooking the city and the converging three rivers was breathtaking. What is not always so noticeable in large cities are the ethnic communities. Geographically, Pittsburgh is divided into many different ethnic groups. Not the least of which are large populations of German and Irish ancestry. There are hundreds of exceptional restaurants scattered through the city and surrounding area. We had lunch in a restaurant at the top of Mount Washington overlooking the city and I think I counted thirteen bridges leading to and from the

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A Flower in the Rough– Yarrow

Photo by Mike Duff

By Mike Duff

Yarrow Golf Course

n one of the most beautiful fall days I can remember with the brilliant fall colors bursting like exploding fireworks, the “golfing Wilburys” as I like to call ourselves made our destination golf stop at Yarrow Golf & Conference Center. Yarrow is located on 300 acres of natural beauty in Augusta, Michigan approximately 10 miles from Battle Creek. The four of us found this to be an extraordinary golf experience. Most golfers know or have heard about the nearby Gull Lake courses, which

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are very popular for groups looking for a golfing experience that combines four or five courses in one package. For many years I was part of a golf group that played the Gull Lake courses and enjoyed what they had to offer but Yarrow was never included in our package. Granted, Stonehedge, Gull Lake and Bedford Valley offered their own individual and unique qualities however, I consider Yarrow to be extraordinary and a hidden gem. In our opinion, Yarrow is one of the best courses in Michigan. All four of us gave Yarrow

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an 8-9 on a scale of 10 based on playability, beauty and condition. Yarrow was designed by the international golf architect Raymond Hearn, who has designed courses all over the world. In Michigan, courses like The Majestic at Lake Walden in Hartland, Moose Ridge in South Lyon and Quail Ridge in Ada are just a few examples of his work. He has also designed courses in Egypt, France, Mexico and Russia. Yarrow is named after a perennial flower abundantly found in this

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Picking a signature hole on this course was difficult. The fifth hole and the number #1 handicapped hole is believed to be their signature hole. It does not give you a lot of landing area for your drive. A pond on your left and trees to your right force you to hit a near perfect shot to the fairway. A long iron off the tee is probably the right choice of club. You could be in a lot of trouble with an errant drive. A 352 yard par 4 from the middle tees (Knotty Pine) follows the pond on your left all the way to the green. The fairway is narrow and bends around the pond forcing you to relay on the accuracy of each shot. Bunkers line the right side of the fairway and leave very little room for error. I can

available. The resort features 45 recently renovated guest rooms. For information contact Steve Helmer or Tony Hilton at 800-563-4397 or email www.yarrowgolf.com. - MG -

Photo by Mike Duff

The course is an 18-hole, championship par 72. It has five sets of tees, with such names as Black Oak, Evergreen, Knotty Pine, Red Maple and Yellow Birch ranging from 7005 to 5005 yards. It has something for all golfing abilities. One thing that stands out is its beauty. Every hole is different. Every hole is uniquely framed by flawless tree-lined fairways and manicured bent grass greens. The fairways are wide and the rolling greens offered a distinctively groomed feel. The greens are lined with high fescue and strategically place bunkers. The depth of the greens ranged from 23’ to 49’. Hearn was careful to respect the natural beauty of the area and he certainly accomplished that. The linksstyle course is surrounded by pine trees, hardwoods, wetlands and notably spectacular views.

see why this might be considered the signature hole, but I would vote for number 14. All I can say is “wow”. From the tee box you are looking at a 321 yard par 4(middle tees) that offers an expansive fairway surrounding a couple of good size bunkers and a green which is lined by a row of maples and hardwoods with an opening in the middle framing a beautiful calm, crystal clear lake in the background. A green side bunker protects this narrow green on the left requiring a perfect shot. It was a magnificent view. If you can stay to the right and clear the bunkers on your drive, this number 12 handicapped hole is set up to reward you with a good score. Every hole is framed differently, as I said above, which all of us kept saying is what makes this course so charming. We all agreed that we would play Yarrow again and again. Golf packages and lodging is

Photo by Mike Duff

region. The “poultice” (oil) of the flower was used in the Civil War to help heal gunshot wounds, infections and control hemorrhaging.

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Redcoats, White House, a By Bill and Brad Shelton


and Green Fairways


Photo by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Congress. Six years later the city was burned by invading British troops, only to rebuild and then be torched again less than a hundred years later by retreating Confederate troops. During the Civil War, Richmond served as both the state Capitol and the Bill and Brad Shelton Capitol of the Confederacy. The or the historian who enjoys Confederate White House is still golf or the golfer who enjoys standing and is open to the public. history, there may be no better Today the city is an economic powerplace to satisfy both than a fifty-mile house, home to six Fortune 500 comsection of the Virginia Peninsula panies, and a metropolitan population from Richmond to Jamestown. of almost 1.3 million. Adding to the pleasures of the colloquially termed “Southern Neck,” the After spending some time in region’s coastal climate produces exploring the historical sites in some of the best wines on the eastRichmond, some leisure activities— ern coast. With a subtropical cliperhaps golf and sharing some fine mate, the best time for a trip to the wine—are most appropriate. area is fall and late spring, although Although there are ample venues for the winters are typically mild and both in the Richmond area, a twenoffers some reduced price packages ty minute drive east from Richmond for lodging and golf. The summer on I-64 brings you to a relatively months serve as an excellent family new Rees Jones course, The Club at vacation destination with area theme Viniterra. Located adjacent to the parks and water sports. New Kent Winery, the 18-hole championship course is quickly The journey begins in Richmond, emerging as one of the “must play” the Capitol of the Commonwealth of treks in the Piedmont region. Virginia. Founded in 1737, the site Located in an upscale residential alongside the fall line of the James community of 300 home sites, a River had served as an English settlewinery, vineyards, and equestrian ment in 1609. Richmond played an center, the course opened in 2009 important role in both the and, though planned to become a Revolutionary War and the Civil War. private club, is currently open to In 1775 Patrick Henry delivered his daily fee guests. famous “Give me liberty or give me death” speech advocating that Virginia Known as the “Open Doctor” participate in the Continental

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because of his redesign works on numerous US Open venues, Jones was given complete freedom by the property owners to route the course and utilize the best terrain. The result was a course that can play at 5210 yards or be stretched to over 7700 yards. According to Jones, the layout offers wide open fairways on the par 4’s so “you can swing away on the tee” but “dramatic” par 3’s which will require accuracy off the tee. The course routing meanders through rolling terrain and no hole borders another. Consistent with the name, players will notice vineyards adjacent to holes on the back nine. A generous practice area offers a complete facility for pre-game warm-up or post game corrections. A temporary building currently serves as the clubhouse but plans call for a spacious, multipurpose facility with décor consistent with the property theme. And, a real bonus is that daily use fees are very reasonable! A trip to the Club at Viniterra should be planned soon as it is quickly gaining the attention of the golfing community. Just outside the entrance to the golf course is New Kent Winery, the “best 19th hole in golf ” according to Rees Jones. Opened in 2008, the 17,000 square foot facility is an architectural rarity using bricks from the civil war era. In 2011 the winery was awarded the Virginia Governor’s Cup for its Reserve Chardonnay. Thirty minutes east on Highway 64 brings the golfer-history buff into Williamsburg. Founded in 1632, it Photos, preceding page and right: Golden Horseshoe Golf Club, courtesy of Golden Horseshoe Golf Club.

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ties, the public is invited to participate in “digging for relics” from the original settlement. When a break from touring is needed, the Golden Horseshoe Golf Club offers 45 holes of golf on the perimeter of Colonial Williamsburg. The two 18-hole courses, the Gold and Green, have been cited among the “Top 100 Resort Courses in America.” Opened in 1963, the Gold course was designed by Robert Trent Jones, Sr. who calls it his “finest design.” The Green course, opened in 1991, was designed by Rees Jones. Though longer than his father’s design, the course is consid-

ered more forgiving and playable for the average golfer. The Spotswood course designed by the elder Jones has been called “the best short ninehole course in the country” by GOLF Magazine. Though there are many quality courses in the area, a combination of the Club at Viniterra and the Golden Horseshoe trio can easily fill a week’s trip to one of America’s most historic areas. For your favorite foursome—or maybe a family vacation—this Virginia peninsula is definitely for “lovers” of golf and history. - MG -

Photo courtesy of Golden Horseshoe Golf Club

served as the capital of the Virginia Colony for almost a hundred years and was a political center during the American Revolution. Colonial Williamsburg is a part of the Historic Triangle along with Jamestown and Yorktown. The second-oldest university in America, The College of William and Mary, was established in 1693 and retains many of its original buildings. Daily re-enactments of events leading to the American Revolution are performed by volunteer residents of the Williamsburg community. Only a short drive from Williamsburg is historic Jamestown. In addition to viewing some reconstructed facili-

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Slice of Life Twenty-five Years of Golf Shows . . . and Counting Photo courtesy of Terry Moore

By Terry Moore big portion of my life has been oddly devoted to golf shows. It’s a career path I never expected to pursue after graduating Terry Moore from the University of Michigan with a history major and a psychology minor. But after cofounding Michigan Golfer magazine in 1982 and helping to make the magazine grow and prosper, I decided to branch out and start the West Michigan Golf Show in my hometown of Grand Rapids in 1989.

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After recently celebrating the Silver Anniversary of the West Michigan Golf Show with my friends and colleagues at ShowSpan Inc., the company that purchased the show from me in 2001 and for whom I’ve worked and consulted ever since, I decided to write down some lessons and observations learned over these past 25 years. Besides, I needed a column.

Trust your instincts—Never having any training in planning and putting on a golf show, I just trusted my instinct, my gut, on what exhibitors and patrons would want in a golf show. I figured if it appealed to me it should appeal to the average golf fan. In watching Carolyn Alt, the whip-smart and current Show Manager, I notice she

does the same. All in all, it’s worked out pretty well.

Content is important even in a golf show—Early on I wanted the golf show experience to be more than just an opportunity for a patron to pick up a resort brochure or buy the latest driver. I wanted some “content” to balance the “advertising” and “sales” side of the show. That’s why I went after well-known teachers to provide clinics and seminars at the Show. Luckily, I was able to take advantage of existing relationships with Aldila Shafts to land Hank Haney and Garland Resort to land ‘Big Cat’ Williams for the inaugural Golf Show. But before I went after them, I carefully prepared my pitch. And when speaking to Texan Haney, I didn’t bring up the Michigan weather.

Don’t engage in hype— When there were several golf shows in the state vying for attention and exhibitors, a few of them started inflating their attendance figures for marketing purposes. One nefarious Detroit show reported attendance of over 50,000 which was just plain puffery. Right then and there, I decided to take the Augusta National posture when it comes to attendance: “Sorry, we don’t discuss or release those figures.” I’ve been told by sources that Masters officials enacted this policy in the ‘60s due to similar inflated attendance claims by other professional tournaments.

By the way, the reported attendance figures at both the PGA Tour’s Phoenix event as well as the North American (Detroit) Auto Show are wildly inflated.

Stay consistent and be even-handed—It’s always tempting to make exceptions and bend the rules but it invariably leads to headaches and hard feelings. So I tried mightily to be fair and consistent with adhering to all of our show’s deadlines, pricing and guidelines. If it meant losing a few exhibitors then so be it. But most exhibitors were equally fair-minded and respected our policies. However, one maverick exhibitor didn’t like it when we enforced our booth guidelines at the show, pulling out in the middle of it. The next year as a nonexhibitor, he hired someone to paper the parked cars at the show with a sales flyer.

Try not to worry about the weather—In Michigan it can be a full-time job trying to figure out what the weekend weather will do. When asked, I described the perfect golf show weather as being “cold, snow on the ground but with clear roads.” The worst situation is a winter traveler’s advisory which we encountered several years. In the inaugural show, I quipped after an ice storm that “I held a golf show but a hockey game broke out in the parking lot.” On another Friday

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evening during a vicious winter storm that had authorities asking drivers to stay off the roads, I came up to a patron and asked him why he had come out to the Show on such a nasty night. “Well, I figured my chances on winning a door prize would be better.” That comment leads to.... page 2/23/13 4:11 PM Page 1 full pageme template_Full

There were few if any problems although one year I had to scramble fast when the sponsoring Scottish Travel company went bankrupt before the winners took their trip. Fortunately, I managed to find an alternate company to fulfill the prize.

Focus on improvement every year—We used exhibitor

Never underestimate the value of a door prize— Everyone wants to win something so I started a Grand Prize for the show. I worked with different properties and put together a nice air, golf, and hotel package. Destinations included Ireland, Scotland, Florida and Arizona. I devoted one TV commercial every year about the Grand Prize with the previous year’s winner introducing the new destination.

and patron surveys to gauge how we were doing and also ask for suggestions. On Sunday night after the Show we gathered at a local restaurant and read the evaluations and took them to heart or with a grain of salt. We would chuckle about some of the comments: “The Show slowed down in the last hour.” Yep, most people prefer not to pay and rush through a show at the end of

Ubiquitous Michigan Golf

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24/7/365

day! Another one: “When are you going to get Tiger Woods here?” Reply: When he owns the show!

Be ‘hands on’ when it comes to publicity and promotion—Not blessed with a big marketing budget, I learned to proactively reach out to the media and propose news and sports coverage of the Show. I did my own releases and followed up in person with various media and, as a result, I picked up a skill in media relations. It’s not only personal relationships that are key but also organization and timeliness and knowing the needs of the media. Incidentally, that first year with Big Cat Williams my press release about him said he was “going to drive a golf ball through a phone booth” instead of an intended phone “book.” A TV station promptly sent a camera out for that!

http://michigangolfer.com

It’s always a team effort—the good folks at ShowSpan plan and execute a quality show through a concerted team effort of individuals. Golf Show principals Mike Wilbraham and Carolyn Alt and their entire team are knowledgeable and hard-working and know consumer shows as well as anyone in the country. I appreciate that they let me impart some of my skills and experience in continuing the legacy of the West Michigan Golf Show. - MG -

40

MARCH/APRIL

2013

MICHIGAN GOLFER MAGAZINE

Michigan Golfer, March / April 2013  
Michigan Golfer, March / April 2013  

A quarterly publication about Michigan Golf courses, Michigan golfers and Michigan golf events.