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SPRING 2018 | VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 2

FEATURED EXHIBITION: TELLING A PEOPLE’S STORY PAGE 13

PEOPLE OF MUAM: CAROLINE BASTIAN PAGE 7

DOCENT FEATURE: ANN DUNLEVY PAGE 9

UPCOMING: EXHIBITIONS PAGE 10


From the Editor

IN THIS ISSUE

Happy New Year to you and yours! It is with great excitement that we bring you the latest issue of Visual Arts at Miami featuring yet another great line-up of exhibitions and programs in the visual arts at Miami University. Inside this issue I hope you enjoy learning about our exhibitions and programs, meeting one of our many incredible docents and getting to know one of Miami’s students, and much more. Also inside this issue learn about some works by famous sculptors that can be found on the sculpture park grounds and throughout the campus and ponder with our Director the meanings and memories connected with monuments and their historical relevance. As with each issue, we are happy to provide an at-a-glance picture of the wide range of visual arts exhibitions, programs and events at Miami University. In fact, this semester the College of Creative Arts and the Art Museum have 15 unique exhibitions on view throughout campus gallery spaces. You also can attend 18 lectures plus 14 other special events including workshops, receptions and a conference. We kick the year off with the Chocolate Meltdown at the Oxford Community Art Center on Saturday, January 20! I encourage you to use the schedule to plan on attending something once a week, or more. Plenty of opportunities exist—ENJOY the Visual Arts at Miami and welcome to the new year! Sincerely,

SHERRI KRAZL, EDITOR MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS MIAMI UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM

From the Director About the Art Museum Chocolate Meltdown From the Collection: Giants in the Field People of MUAM: Caroline Bastian MUAM Education Updates Docent Feature: Ann Dunlevy Fall 2018 Exhibition Preview Art History Capstone Exhibition Telling A People’s Story Exhibition, Conference and Programming Hiestand Happenings: Hiestand Galleries In the Cage: Cage Gallery Contemporary Art Lecture Series McGuffey Moments Exhibitions & Programs at a Glance

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About the Magazine Visual Arts at Miami (VAAM) is a bi-annual publication of the Miami University Art Museum (MUAM) showcasing visual arts at Miami University for members and the arts community. Distributed in print inside the Journal News and Oxford Press prior to the Fall and Spring semesters, Visual Arts at Miami also is available digitally through the companion blog at blogs.MiamiOH.edu/VisualArts. Check the back cover for a map detail, contact information and hours. Editor, Sherri Krazl Graphic Design Assistant, Julia Henkel On the cover: Collage of works (details) from books featured in Telling A People’s Story: African-American Children’s Illustrated Literature.

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Visual Arts at Miami


From the Director Monuments and Memory There are many public memorials to the problematic history of race relations in the United States. Miami now has the 1964 Freedom Summer memorial on Western campus, the Myaamia artist Eugene Brown’s 2008 sculpture A Tribe Named Miami, A Surveyor’s Stake, A Town Named Oxford on the grounds of the Art Museum, and African American sculptor Mel Edwards’ 2003 stainless steel Transformations in the Light inspired by his “Lynch Fragment” series, on the south side of the Recreational Sports Center. These installations provide different entry points to understanding our nation’s racial history and its impact on the present. This past August, Ann and I took our 13-year-old granddaughter on an American history vacation. Our first stop was Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello, outside of Charlottesville, Virginia. I reserved a house tour for midmorning, followed by the Slavery at Monticello tour. Our second guide told the story of the African Americans at the Monticello plantation from the perspective of the enslaved, drawing upon original letters, reports and reminiscences. Weeks earlier it had been announced that Jefferson’s mistress Sally Heming’s living quarters at the main house had been discovered by Monticello archaeologists. A slave cabin between the garden, horse stable and main house had been reconstructed as well, with the locations of several others clearly marked. The result was a vivid re-telling of the story of race and social inequality in Jefferson’s America.

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Unable to stop for lunch at the famed 18th century Michie Tavern due to a road closure, we wound our way back towards Charlottesville, finally spotting a public park next to the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library midafternoon. With our cooler and picnic supplies in hand we trudged up the slope to an empty park bench. It was then that we noticed the equestrian statue of Robert E. Lee about 30-40 feet uphill from where we were eating. People were gathered in hushed clusters. Some left signs, written messages and other spontaneous offerings at the edge of the flowerbed surrounding the large bronze. They were dedicated to Heather Heyer, a counter-protester (“If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention.”) killed during a white nationalist rally held on August 12 protesting the proposed removal of the sculpture. Days later I located the article, “Robert Edward Lee (sculpture)” on Wikipedia. It ended with this sentence: “During the rally, counter-protester Heather Heyer was killed and 19 injured by a car ramming attack.” I added, “Within days the base of the equestrian statue was covered with cards, flowers and other keepsakes in honor of Heather’s sacrifice. Makeshift signs unofficially renamed Emancipation Park the Heather Heyer Memorial Park.” Fourteen hours later my addition was removed by an editor. The reason given: “Not notable.” Which raises an important question. What facts do we remember and what do we choose to disregard as we examine our past and make it relevant for our present? I encourage you to approach our current exhibition with this and similar questions in mind.

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The Miami University Art Museum, completed in 1978, was designed by Walter Netsch of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Chicago, and is situated on three acres of scenic sculpture park grounds. It houses five galleries of changing exhibitions and a growing permanent collection of more than 17,000 artworks. MUAM is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) and is a proud member of the North American Reciprocal Museum Association (NARM).

Where is the Art Museum on Campus? For starters, you can’t miss the large, industrial red sculpture on the front lawn. MUAM is also just an 8-minute walk from the Armstrong Student Center, diagonally across from Tappan Hall, at the intersection of S. Patterson Ave. and Chestnut St., right when you enter Oxford off of State Route 27.

What can the Art Museum do for Students? Lots of things! MUAM is a great place to see diverse exhibitions and explore outstanding works of art. You also can work, intern, volunteer, join the Art Museum Student Organization (AMSO) and attend lectures and social events.

What can the Art Museum do for the Public? The Art Museum and Sculpture Park is FREE & OPEN to ALL and is an excellent venue for exploring arts and culture from around the world. Membership in support of programs and exhibitions is available at varying levels. Each offers a higher level of engagement with the museum via special-invitation-only events and special programs. More information on the member program is available on our website via the Members link.

Hours

Museum Staff

Tuesday–Friday: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. Saturday: 12–5 PM Closed: Sunday, Monday, national holidays, university closures, and during installation (more info on website.) Closures: March 17 & 24

Dr. Robert S. Wicks, Director

FREE & OPEN TO ALL!

Mark DeGennaro, Preparator/ Operations Manager

Website MiamiOH.edu/ArtMuseum Location & Contact 801 S. Patterson Ave. Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-2232 ArtMuseum@MiamiOH.edu

Debbie Caudill, Senior Program Assistant/Security Cynthia Collins, Curator of Education

Sue Gambrell, Program Associate Sherri Krazl, Marketing/Communications Jason E. Shaiman, Curator of Exhibitions Laura Stewart, Collections Manager/ Registrar

/MIAMIUNIVERSITYARTMUSEUM

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@MIAMIOHARTMUSEUM

Visual Arts at Miami


LOOK FOR OUR BOOTH AT

Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 1-5 p.m. Oxford Community Arts Center 10 S. College Ave. ~ Oxford, OH A creatively delicious fundraiser and friend-raiser to help support the Oxford Community Arts Center and the Miami University Art Museum. Children’s Activities | Chocolate Tastings & Sales Bake Contest | Art Exhibit Educational Information | FUN FOR ALL AGES! TICKETS: $7 in advance | $10 at door

(Ticket includes admission plus 5 coupons for sample tastings.)

Children 12 & under are admitted free

(Coupons for sample tastings are required for children 12 & under.)

Tickets are available online, at the Oxford Community Arts Center (info@oxarts.org, 513-524-8506), or at the Miami University Art Museum.

ChocolateMeltdown.com Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

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Giants in the Field FROM THE COLLECTION LAURA STEWART, COLLECTIONS MANAGER/REGISTRAR

While there are many large-scale objects in the Art Museum collection, some are more visible than others. For example, For Kepler, the bright red, steel sculpture directly in front of MUAM, marks the spot where great art is housed on campus. This piece by Mark di Suvero (American, b. 1933, Shanghai), is but one artwork the Museum holds; it also remains a part of the landscape, accessible to all who find themselves at the corner of Chestnut and Patterson in Oxford, Ohio. For Kepler, 1995, was gifted to the Art Museum by Thomas W. Smith. Mr. Smith has recently donated another highly distinctive public art piece to the University, Heart in Hand, by Ursula von Rydingsvard (b. 1942, Germany). Its permanent home is in the Schiewetz Fine Arts Plaza near the Art Building and the Center for Performing Arts, visible to faculty and students as well as prospective Miami families as they visit the new admissions offices in Shriver Center. Now based in Brooklyn, New York, von Rydingsvard received her MFA from Columbia University in 1975, and is primarily known for working with large-scale sculpture made of cedar. Heart in Hand, 2014, is a cast bronze creation which, while somewhat abstract, nonetheless suggests both human and natural forms. With this gift, Miami University joins the company of many notable museums which boast a von Rydingsvard in their collections. Walking around campus near the Recreational Sports Center, one will likely encounter yet another large-scale public sculpture. Completed in 2003 by American artist Melvin Edwards (b. 1937), the stainless

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steel Transformations in the Light was commissioned in 2000 by members of the Art Department and Art Museum upon receipt of the University President’s Millennial Series for the Arts Fund award. In a conversation about the work at Miami, Edwards indicated that he selected specific forms to refer to the chains imposed on Africans and African Americans as well as a mirror-like circle on a diagonal, able to refract and reflect light and thus suggest transcendence. Speaking of circles, the Art Museum’s sculpture park also contains Folded Circle, Two Squares, a bronze sculpture by Miami class of 1995 alumnus Fletcher Benton (American, b. 1931). This public sculpture is part of the artist’s series of works exploring how simple geometric forms, such as a circle, can be used to describe space in new and exciting ways. Folded Circle, Two Squares graces the front entrance of the Art Museum designed by Walter Netsch, complementing the architect’s “field theory,” which capitalizes on basic geometric shapes, including the triangle. Public sculpture and architecture communicate with the space in which they are sited as well as with the community they engage. Star Crossed, 1978-81, by Nancy Holt (American, 1938-2014), is a groundbreaking sculpture epitomizing the 1970s earthwork movement that sought to defy traditional museum spaces and materials. The Art Museum is indeed fortunate to steward Star Crossed and several other unique sculptural objects that are part of the permanent collection and always on view in MUAM’s Sculpture Park. Miami University, likewise, benefits from outdoor sculpture on campus, places where passers-by can benefit from daily encounters with public sculpture. The works mentioned here not only tower above us, their makers are likewise giants in the field.

Visual Arts at Miami


Yoruba peoples, Dance Mask of Gelede Cult, 20th century; Wood, 13 3/4” x 23 7/16”; Gift of Ralph (‘65) and Barbara Drake (‘68) Bresler

Caroline Bastian PEOPLE OF MUAM SHERRI KRAZL, MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS

A Junior from Orange County, California majoring in Art & Architecture History with a co-major in Arts Management and a Minor in Museums and Society, Caroline Bastian knows she wants to work in the museum field. She discovered a desire to become a curator in the summer of her Junior year of high school when she took an AP Art History class. Also that summer her family, who frequent museums, took a trip to France and Italy where she got to see all of the art she had studied. There was just something that fascinated her and got her thinking about the way the works in the exhibitions were ordered and the storylines that were built by the museum’s curators that helped guide her to where she is today. She chose Miami after visiting with Dr. Andrew Casper, Art History professor, during a Make it Miami visit with her parents. She was not only impressed with the mass of opportunities for research and hands-on learning, but she also really liked the campus and the fact that Miami has it’s own accredited art museum that is finely integrated into the curriculum. One of her specific areas of interest is African Art which coincidentally helped land her first internship opportunity here at the Miami University Art Museum as a curatorial

Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

intern helping with the Spring 2018 exhibition, Telling a People’s Story. Even before her first internship began, Caroline visited the museum often for coursework and pleasure. Currently she is managing the Art Museum’s student blog [www.blogs.MiamiOH.edu/artmuseum] as part of her year-long Arts Management internship where she also is working with Collections Manager, Laura Stewart. Caroline also studied abroad at Miami’s Luxembourg Campus last Spring where she once again took full advantage of the opportunities to frequent museums and travel every weekend. “That was also an amazing experience and Miami made it so accessible and affordable.” Heading into her Senior year next fall she is looking forward to continuing her research on the topic of African Art and the unknown and anonymous artist. She will also be participating in the Art History Capstone, which will bring her right back to the Art Museum. The Spring 2019 Capstone Exhibition is a class co-curated exhibition developed during their Fall 2018 course, along with special programing. Her advice to her peers and future Miami students is to seek out opportunities and “don’t think you are too young or too inexperienced to do something.” She applied for her first Art Museum internship as a freshman, which has allowed her to be involved at the museum for the majority of her Miami undergraduate experience.

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Docents Become Miami University Ambassadors The Miami University Art Museum Docents participated in the University’s Bridges Program during the Fall semester. The program gives high-achieving high school Seniors from historically under-represented populations the opportunity to visit campus overnight. Students from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply to Miami. During their visit to Miami students may choose to visit departments related to their disciplines of interest. This year, the College of Creative Arts invited the Art Museum to offer a program for students interested in art history, studio and media art. Docents were pleased to offer tours for the students. Following the tours, students participated in a hands-on activity in hopes of stimulating their own creativity. Students represented states across the US, including Arizona, Nevada, Illinois and Ohio. Students accepted into the Bridges Program will enroll for Fall 2018 and will be eligible to receive a Bridges Program scholarship as well. We continue to recruit individuals who are interested and enthusiastic about the appreciation of art. No prior experience or previous training is required. We ask that volunteers have a genuine interest in art of all kinds and enjoy working with people of all ages and backgrounds. Volunteers are required to become members of the Art Museum and must make a commitment to complete seminars that introduce learning theories and outline methods to engage with and look at art. For additional information, please contact Cynthia Collins, at Collinc5@miamioh.edu or call (513) 529 -2243. Ms. Collins will be pleased to meet with you and review the requirements and assess your interest in the program.

Bree Cole behind the scenes Working behind the scenes most of the time in the Art Museum’s library, you will find Breanna (Bree) Cole, a sophomore, from Springboro, Ohio. Bree, a studio major, attentively plans and prepares the art and craft projects for kids ages 3-5 who attend the monthly Art Explorers Program. Bree’s artistic skills have been invaluable and useful in the museum’s informal educational setting for children. The Art Explorers program is designed specifically to stimulate children’s interest in self-expression and art. Children visit the museum with their parents. A representative from the Lane Library comes to the museum, shares stories, plays games and teaches the children songs. During the second half of the program the children spend time creating diverse crafts with an array of supplies, including clay, a variety of paper sources, recycled objects and mixed media. Following the hands-on activities parents spend time with children looking at artwork in the galleries. Our goal is to create a memorable experience and spark the children’s interest in art – both looking and making.

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Visual Arts at Miami


Dunlevy Counselor Turned Docent DOCENT FEATURE CAROLINE BASTIAN, ARTS MANAGEMENT INTERN

For the past 13 years, Ann Dunlevy has been a docent at the Miami University Art Museum. Ironically enough, Ann was hesitant to join because she thought her lack of art-based knowledge left her unqualified. Assured that she would learn all the information necessary by a persistent neighbor, Ann tried it out and ultimately fell in love with learning about art. She believes that it is important for kids to enjoy museums. Ann, a Chicagoland native, attended Middlebury College in Vermont and studied American Literature. While in school, Ann took psychology classes which inspired her to major in and pursue a career in student counseling. She received a Masters Degree from Northwestern University. Ann moved to Oxford, Ohio, in 1980 when her husband, Jim, joined the Economics faculty at Miami University. Ann retired from working at Miami Student Counseling Services. In her 15 years working there, she conducted special career development programs, supervised Miami students who helped in the career development center and saw individual students for career and personal counseling. Ann loved working with students.

When Ann is not traveling, she participates in her book club, which she admits is great when she keeps up with her reading, but often struggles to finish in time. Away from the museum and art, Ann loves music. She plays the piano, enjoys opera, often goes to the symphony, and has sung in her church’s choir since she was seven. During her time with MUAM, Ann has especially enjoyed getting to research and give presentations to ILR classes. Her favorite exhibition was myaamiki iiši meehtohseeniwiciki: How the Miami People Live. This exhibition was special to Ann because her grandmother was a kindergarten teacher among the Cherokee and was incredibly passionate in sharing knowledge of Native Americans. Her favorite piece within this exhibition was the Eugene Brown sculpture, A Tribe Named Miami, A Surveyor’s Stake, A Town Named Oxford. Though Ann likes many pieces within MUAM’s collection, her absolute favorite work is Picador et Taureau, a print by Pablo Picasso from 1959 (pictured below). When Ann visits a museum, she always asks herself what pieces she really likes, reminding herself that she is there to enjoy it, not to only read the text panels and object labels.

Ann and Jim have two children: a son who lives in Chicago and a daughter who lives in Falls Church, Virginia. Their daughter has two sons aged 9 and 12. After getting bit by the travel bug during a business school summer program in Austria with her husband, the couple began traveling the world, visiting between 30-35 countries since 1988. This list includes a summer business program Jim conducted in Austria. Ann explains that Jim loves to do the planning, buying books about cities and researching the most interesting things to see and do there. “We don’t want to be in big fancy hotels,” Ann says. They prefer to stay in small places and bed and breakfasts in order to experience a more “authentic” cultural experience. Her favorite place to travel to is a small town at Lake Lucerne in Switzerland. The couple has stayed there around 12 times, taking steam boats out on the lake and hiking. Next summer, the couple is headed back and taking their daughter and her family with them.

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Miami University Art Museum Exhibitions

COMING FALL 2018 Lonesome Traveler (Douglass Gallery) Lonesome Traveler features 18 prints by Rockwell Kent from MUAM’s collection. This selection of Kent’s work presents the solitary world of figures rendered by the artist in response to both personal reflection and his views on Transcendentalism. Some depict the lone figures in acts of separation from the rest of the world, as if attempting to escape into solitude. Kent’s approach to rendering the figures draws attention to an introspective search for one’s self.

I’m In The Wrong Film (McKie Gallery) Hans Gindlesberger’s I’m in the Wrong Film is a consideration of our troubled relationship to the marginal places that exist in the national landscape. The title of the series is a colloquialism used to indicate a speaker’s disorientation in regard to physical surroundings that have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In this series of staged and performative photographs, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective loss of identity that permeates the rural and post-industrial landscape of America.

Comfort Zones: The Crossroads of Urban & Rural (Farmer Gallery) A sense of place and a moment in time. These are the connections that unite the artistic creations of Chicago-based urban painter Mary Phelan and Southwest Virginian rural painter Eldridge Bagley. Each paints from life experiences, expressing an admiration for their roots, while offering nostalgic recollections and commentaries on the present. Both artists allude to the poetics of everyday life, finding beauty in the conventional and idiosyncratic dynamics of their respective stomping grounds.

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An Art History Capstone Exhibition Open January 30-June 30 The transfer of engraved images, first in clay and stone, onto another surface is an art form with utilitarian origins dating back to ancient Mesopotamia. Over the millenia, Asian artists began to use wood for printmaking in an effort to transfer images onto fabrics. In ancient Greece and Rome, artists carved lines into metal for the decoration of armor and ritual objects, an artform that continued well into Medieval times. These developments paved the way for the German innovation of intaglio printing techniques in the 1430s. For the past six centuries, artists have practiced various forms of intaglio printmaking— principally engraving and etching. Drawing from MUAM’s extensive collection of printed works created by artists including Rembrandt, Goya and Whistler, the 2017 Art History Capstone students offer an exploration of the use of space as represented in intaglio prints produced from the early 1500s to late 1800s. This course was taught by Professor Andrew Casper with assistance from the staff of the Art Museum.

Exploring Space in Intaglio Prints~the Capstone Program TUES, Mar 6 | 5 p.m. (RECEPTION) | 6 P.M. (gallery TALK) ART498 capstone Students & Dr. ANDREW Casper Art History student-curators will share their experiences researching and curating this Capstone exhibition.

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Top: Albrecht Durer (German, 1471-1528), St. Anthony, 1519; engraving on paper, Miami University purchase, 1981.72. Bottom: The Capstone Class: Standing (L-R): Megan Fox, Anna Rentschler, Amelia Boo, Nina Church, Dr. Andrew Casper, Yilan Qiu, Chelsea Lodge, Yuying Ge, Olivia Keefer. Seated (L-R): Ries Yuellig, and Josh Dembicki.

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To join or learn more, visit www.Miamioh.edu/artMuseum, call (513) 529-1887, or stop in the MUaM at 801 s. patterson ave


MIAMI UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM

SPRING 2018 EXHIBITION

BENNY ANDREWS | NNEKA BENNETT | COLIN BOOTMAN | ROD BROWN | ASHLEY BRYAN R. GREGORY CHRISTIE | BRYAN COLLIER | FLOYD COOPER | MICHAEL CUMMINGS | LEO & DIANE DILLON | TOM FEELINGS | AG FORD | JAN SPIVEY GILCHRIST | EKUA HOLMES JOHN HOLYFIELD | LONDON LADD | JEROME LAGARRIGUE | E.B. LEWIS | FRANK MORRISON | KADIR NELSON | BRIAN PINKNEY | JERRY PINKNEY | ANSEL PITCAIRN JAMES RANSOME | AMINAH BRENDA LYNN ROBINSON | JAVAKA STEPTOE | JOHN STEPTOE | SHADRA STRICKLAND | DON TATE | ERIC VELASQUEZ | CHARLOTTE RILEY WEBB | CORNELIUS VAN WRIGHT & YING-HWA HU | ELIZABETH ZUNON

JANUARY 30-JUNE 30, 2018

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ABOUT EXHIBITION JASON E. SHAIMAN, CURATOR OF EXHIBITIONS

Telling A People’s Story is the first major museum exhibition devoted to the art found within the pages of African-American children’s picture books. The exhibition emphasizes the strength of the illustrations as visual narrative representations of the African-American experience. While aspects of social justice are found throughout the three main galleries, the exhibition goes beyond providing a look into the struggles of African Americans. This project celebrates the complex and diverse African-American experience through a lens intended for children and young readers. The exhibition offers something for all viewers through the representation of familiar and lesser-known people and the contributions of African Americans to an American identity. More than 600 books, and over 14,000 illustrations, were reviewed during the development of this exhibition in search of a strong representation of events and milestones in the annals of African-American history. Themes and time periods include African Origins, Middle Passage, Slavery, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement. Other themes draw attention to historical figures in politics, music, sports, arts, and entertainment. The selection of approximately 130 works on display includes paintings, pastels, drawings and mixed media works. Featured are 33 artists, spanning nearly 50 years of creativity. Collectively, the many books created by authors and illustrators since the late 19th century contribute to an understanding of the African-American experience through two perspectives. First, is an internal look into the need for validation and the creation of positive self-images. Second, is to give an introduction to the African-American experience for those unfamiliar in order to better understand the cultural, historical and social makeup of African-American identity. Many of the artworks featured in the exhibition received top honors and honorable mentions from several major literary organizations. Now under the umbrella of the American Libraries Association, the John Newbery Medal (first awarded in 1922) recognizes authors, while the Randolph Caldecott Award (first awarded in 1938) is given to illustrators. The Coretta Scott King Award (first awarded in 1970) is the third major children’s book award, created for the recognition of African-American children’s books during a time when African Americans received little attention for their work. These three awards validate the exceptional contributions of African-American authors and illustrators to the world of children’s literature. A number of educational and experiential offerings are scheduled throughout the duration of the exhibition. Several illustrators featured in the exhibition will engage in programs created specifically for Miami University classes, Oxford and surrounding communities, King Library and Lane Library Oxford, and Kramer, Bogen and Marshall elementary schools. A conference will be held April 20-21, devoted to dialogue on the central topics expressed in the exhibition. Speakers include many illustrators featured in the exhibition, along with a librarian, and Miami University faculty. Information about the conference, and registration, are found on the Art Museum’s website.

Visit www.MiamiOH.edu/ArtMuseum for more information. FREE & OPEN TO ALL | Schedule a Tour | Attend a Program Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday Noon-5 p.m. 14

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EXHIBITION CONFERENCE April 20-21, 2018 | Miami University Art Museum

FREE ATTENDANCE: REGISTRATION REQUIRED (LIMITED TO 100) Conference information and registration: blogs.miamioh.edu/tellingapeoplesstory Funding for the conference is provided by Miami University Art Museum’s P&G Fund.

SESSIONS: FRIDAY, APRIL 20 8:30-9 A.M. ~ Welcome and Introductions President Gregory Crawford & Jason E. Shaiman

3:40-4:40 P.M. ~ E.B. Lewis (Illustrator) Researching Identities ~ E.B. Lewis maintains a strong emphasis on research in order to best present the African-American experience.

9-10 A.M. ~ Keynote Speaker: Javaka Steptoe (Author/Illustrator) Radiant Child: Radiant Illustrator ~ In 2017, Javaka Steptoe became the first author/illustrator to win the Randolph Caldecott Medal and the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for the same book in the same year.

7-8 P.M. ~ Ty Greenwood (Grad Student, Choreographer) Dr. Tammy Kernodle (Professor, Pianist & Vocalist) Langston Hughes Program ~ This special program devoted to the powerful writings of Langston Hughes, includes the recitation of poems by Theatre students, and piano and vocal performance by Dr. Kernodle.

10:10-11:10 A.M. ~ Ekua Holmes (Illustrator) & Dr. Ann Elizabeth Armstrong (Professor) Fannie Lou Hamer: A Civil Rights Leader Explore the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a leading figure in Freedom Summer (1964) & the Civil Rights Movement.

SESSIONS: SATURDAY, APRIL 21

11:10 A.M.-12:10 P.M. ~ R. Gregory Christie (Illustrator) ~ Activism & Promoting Diversity in Children’s Picture Books ~ As an illustrator, R. Gregory Christie’s art brings stories to life by combining inspirational imagery to an author’s text in support of diversity. 1:30-2:30 P.M. ~ Jerry Pinkney (Illustrator) Legacy and Longevity ~ For more than five decades, veteran illustrator Jerry Pinkney has experienced many developments in the changing face of multiculturalism in children’s books. 2:40-3:40 P.M. ~ Dr. Paula Saine (Professor) and Markayla Washington (Undergraduate Student) Moving Beyond Single Stories: Using African America Children’s Literature to Disrupt Mainstream Narratives ~ African American Children’s Literature can and should be integrated into the classroom, as traditional mainstream curriculum omits or scarcely mentions contributions of marginalized groups. Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

9-10 A.M. ~ Sam Bloom (Librarian) Who Can Tell A People’s Story? ~ We have seen many discussions about #OwnVoices and accurate representation in the children’s book world of late. But how can we go beyond these conversations to actually bring about positive change in a field in which white, patriarchal, heteronormative standards fuel so many decisions at every level? 10:10-11:10 A.M. ~ Dr. Yvette Harris (Professor) Mothers as Literary Agents in the Lives of Their Children ~ This presentation investigates how African American mothers use literacy, especially books which contain depictions of AfricanAmerican children and families, as ways in which to cultivate a sense of identity, both cultural and self, for their children. 11:10 AM-12:10 P.M. ~ Shadra Strickland (Illustrator) Positivity and Fulfilling the Dream ~ Strickland works to promote self-affirmation and validation for African-American children in order to encourage positivity and teaching children how to live their dreams. 1-2 P.M. ~ Guided Tour of Freedom Summer ART MUSEUM Memorial (Weather Permitting) Western Campus

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SCHEDULE GLANCE NOTE: GALLERY HOURS ARE EXTENDED DURING ANY PROGRAM HELD AFTER 5 P.M. WED, FEB 7 | 5:30 P.M. | It’s All About Telling A People’s Story | JASON E. SHAIMAN, CURATOR OF EXHIBITIONS SAT, FEB 17 | 10:30 A.M. & WED, FEB 21 | 2:30 P.M. | Eye of the Beholder Workshops | KATE LUCEY, EDUCATION LIBRARIAN, KING LIBRARY MON, MARCH 5 | 10 A.M. | Black Power No More – Transmutation of An Idea | NISHANI FRAZIER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, HISTORY & BLACK WORLD STUDIES TUE, MAR 6 | NOON BROWN BAG | Building Temples for Tomorrow: Langston Hughes & the Shaping of the Political Consciousness of Black Women Artist-Activists | TAMMY KERNODLE, PROFESSOR, MUSIC WED, MAR 7 | 5:30 P.M. | Don Tate: My Art Journey | DON TATE, ILLUSTRATOR THURS, APR 19 | 1:15-2 P.M. | Radiant Child: Radiant Illustrator | JAVAKA STEPTOE, ILLUSTRATOR FRI-SAT, APR 20-21 | Telling A People’s Story Exhibition Conference MON, APR 23 | 6:30 P.M. | Meet the Illustrator: An Evening with R. Gregory Christie at Lane Library TUE, APR 24 | 2:50 P.M. | The Long March Toward Civil Rights | RODNEY COATES, PROFESSOR, HISTORY & BLACK WORLD STUDIES ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE & OPEN TO ALL AND HELD AT THE ART MUSEUM (UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE)

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801 S. PATTERSON AVE. OXFORD, OH

MIAMIOH.EDU/ARTMUSEUM | (513) 529-2232

ART MUSEUM

PARTNERS Art Museum Membership Association College of Education, Health & Society, Miami University Department of Teacher Education, Miami University King Library, Miami University Lane Library, Oxford Martha Holden Jennings Foundation Miriam W. Howard Art Museum Fund Office of Institutional Diversity, Miami University Office of the President, Miami University Oxford Community Foundation (Tolerance Fund) P&G Art Museum Fund Riffe Gallery of the Ohio Arts Council Norman A. Schoelles Art Museum Fund

Visual Arts at Miami


EXHIBITION PROGRAMS ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE & OPEN TO ALL & HELD AT THE ART MUSEUM (UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE)

It’s All About Telling A People’s Story WED, FEB 7 | 5:30 P.M. JASON E. SHAIMAN, CURATOR OF EXHIBITIONS Join us for a gallery talk and gain insight to the exhibition’s focus and how it all came together through a collaborative effort of faculty, students and scholars.

Eye of the Beholder Workshops SAT, FEB 17 | 10:30 A.M. & WED, FEB 21 | 2:30 P.M. KATE LUCEY, EDUCATION LIBRARIAN, KING LIBRARY Join us for an engaging workshop. Participants will have the chance to see and discuss different images from children’s books telling stories about African-American characters and experiences. Co-sponsored with King Library.

Black Power No More – Transmutation of An Idea MON, MAR 5 | 10 A.M. NISHANI FRAZIER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, HISTORY & BLACK WORLD STUDIES Join us for an explanation of the embrace and cooptation of black pride. Black Power energized the Civil Rights Movement and gave African Americans a new sense of pride.

Building Temples for Tomorrow: Langston Hughes & the Shaping of the Political Consciousness of Black Women Artist-Activists TUE, MAR 6 | NOON BROWN BAG TAMMY KERNODLE, PROFESSOR, MUSIC Explore Hughes’ collaborative projects with singers and composers and how these efforts resulted in the formation of narratives of resistance that parallel the direct action activism that defined the the civil rights struggle of the 1960s. Co-sponsored with Association of Black Faculty and Staff (ABFAS)

Don Tate: My Art Journey WED, MAR 7 | 5:30 P.M. DON TATE, ILLUSTRATOR Overnight success does not always happen overnight. In fact, for Don Tate, overnight success took thirty-plus years to attain. This selfdescribed “Longest-coming upand-comer” will share his journey from reluctant grade-school reader to published illustrator, and then on to becoming an award-winning children’s book author. Funded in part by a grant from the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation.

Radiant Child: Radiant Illustrator THUR, APR 19 | 1:15-2 P.M. JAVAKA STEPTOE, ILLUSTRATOR In 2017, Javaka Steptoe became the first author/illustrator to win the Randolph Caldecott Medal and the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for the same book in the same year. Hear Steptoe talk about his career and what it means to be an illustrator of African-American themed books. Co-sponsored with the Department of Teacher Education.

Meet the Illustrator: An Evening with R. Gregory Christie LANE LIBRARY MON, APR 23 | 6:30 P.M. Join R. Gregory Christie, five-time recipient of the Coretta Scott King Honor Award in Illustration and 2017 Caldecott Honor recipient, for a discussion of his critically acclaimed work. Reception, book sale and signing will follow.

The Long March Toward Civil Rights TUE, APR 24 | 2:50 P.M. RODNEY COATES, PROFESSOR, HISTORY & BLACK WORLD STUDIES The long road toward freedom started with the first African that was forced to board a ship to a distant land. Join Coates to gain perspective in this journey on a road that we continue to tread.


HIESTAND HAPPENINGS NORTH GALLERY | SPRING 2018

DEC 15, 2017–FEB 10, 2018 2018 MIAMI UNIVERSITY YOUNG PAINTERS COMPETITION FOR THE $10,000 WILLIAM AND DOROTHY YECK AWARD Juror: Michelle Grabner, is an artist, writer and curator, based in Wisconsin.

APR 2–11 E.J. BROWN, MFA THESIS EXHIBITION, SCULPTURE: SO-AND-SO

Through the generous gift from William (‘36) and Dorothy Yeck of Dayton, Ohio, Miami University has a unique opportunity to provide students and the community at large to develop a critical understanding of painting in the 21st century. The competition winner will be awarded the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award and the painting will become part of Miami University’s permanent collection. This year’s competition focuses on non-representational painting. 2018 Juror: Michelle Grabner, is an artist, writer and curator, based in Wisconsin. She is the Crown Family Professor of Art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she has taught for twenty years. In addition, Grabner has also held teaching appointments at The University of Wisconsin-Madison; Cranbrook Academy of Art; Yale Norfolk; Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts - Bard College; Yale University School of Art; and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine. Grabner co-curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial and curated the 2016 Portland Biennial. Grabner’s works are represented by James Cohan Gallery in NYC; Green Gallery, Milwaukee; Gallery 16, San Francisco, Rocket Gallery, London; and Anne Mosseri-Marlio Galerie, Basel. 2018 Finalists: Christopher Charbonneau, New Bedford, Massachusetts; Jeane Cohen, Chicago, Illinois; Thomas Dahlberg, Baltimore, Maryland; Erica Luedtke, Los Angeles, California; Meredith Laura Lynn, Terre Haute, Indiana; Sarah H. Reynolds, Chicago, Illinois; Gabrielle Roach, Hamilton, Ohio; Shalen Stephenson, Chicago, Illinois; Jon Weary, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Tom Wixo, Knoxville, Tennessee.

My work is about voice, but not my voice alone. I am the conductor of an orchestra of ghosts- a chorus of unnamed voices that have been lost, ignored, destroyed and forgotten. These voices are my work: that they may be found, heard, rebuilt and remembered. [byejbrown.com]

JUROR LECTURE THUR, FEB 1 | 5:50-6:40 P.M. ART 100 RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS FRI, FEB 2 | 4:30–5:30 P.M. AWARD CEREMONY FRI, FEB 2 | 5 P.M.

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HIESTAND GALLERIES

Visual Arts at Miami


GALLERY HOURS: MON–FRI: 9 A.M.–4:30 P.M. Other hours available by appointment GALLERY CLOSURES: DURING EXHIBITION INSTALLATION AND JAN 1-5, JAN 8, 12, 15, 19, 22 & 26; MAR 19–25. SEE NOTE*

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ROBERT E. & MARTHA HULL LEE GALLERY | SPRING 2018 DEC 15–FEB 10 BLAKE MORGAN RECENT WORK

APR 18–27 CASEY DRESSELL, MFA THESIS EXHIBITION, PAINTING I am interested in the intersection between painting, installation, and utilitarian objects. I think of paintings as protective and offering the viewer safe harbor. I make paintings that are portable and modular, and believe composing from what is around you is freedom. [caseydressell.com]

MAY 3–10 B.F.A. CAPSTONE EXHIBITION Department of Art senior studio majors participating in the semester long Capstone course feature their latest visual investigations. RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS TUES, MAY 8, | 4:30 – 5:30 P.M.

Blake Morgan, the 2017 winner of the William and Dorothy Yeck Young Painters Competition shares his latest studio works in this exhibition of Recent Works. Morgan’s paintings in this exhibition were created from direct observation over many three to four hour sessions. The big changes in the landscape that occur in the hours and weeks that pass become an opportunity to choose moments and connect the paintings together in abstract ways. The paintings become an accumulation of moments that parallel the experience of being immersed in time and the landscape. [blakenmorgan.com] GALLERY TALK FRI, FEB 2, | 3:30 - 4:30 P.M.

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RECEPTION 4:30 – 5:30 P.M.

ALL RECEPTIONS ARE IN THE LOBBY OF HIESTAND GALLERIES 401 MAPLE ST, OXFORD, OH 45056 | GALLERIES LOCATED ON 1ST LEVEL MIAMIOH.EDU/HIESTAND-GALLERIES | (513) 529-1883 ANN TAULBEE, DIRECTOR | TAULBEAE@MIAMIOH.EDU *ROBERT E. AND MARTHA HULL LEE GALLERY, WILL BE OFF-LINE FROM FEB 15– HIESTAND GALLERIES RENOVATIONS..

Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018 APR 6 FOR LIGHTING

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IN THE CAGE

CAGE GALLERY Alumni Hall, Lower Level 350 E. Spring St. Oxford, OH 45056 MiamiOH.edu/cca/academics/arch-id

JAN 29–FEB 9 REDACTED FASHION This exhibition explores the intersection of feminism, fashion, and perception. Or might they just be collages from magazines. The exhibit will include human scaled collages by Samantha Perkins.

FEB 26–MAR 2 A STUDENT RESPONSE TO A CRISIS This student exhibition presents interdisciplinary research examining refugee camps’ variety and evolution to reflect the lifestyles of the individuals living in the camps. Although each response may be unique to the refugee camp, the work presented explores the possibility of a refugee camp vernacular shared between camps.

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CAGE GALLERY

Visual Arts at Miami


MARY ROGERO, INTERIM CHAIR Department of Architecture + Interior Design 101 Alumni Hall | (513) 529-7210 ArchID@MiamiOH.edu

SPRING 2018

MAR 5–16 COCKROACH This exhibit contains over 70 separate framed works by Brian Delford Andrews. There are up to 20 different projects represented in the exhibit. The drawings/ projects have been executed over the last 10 years and include a series based on architectural interventions in the Inland Empire, as well as a sequence based on the Charles Starkweather murders, done as an architectural exploration while Andrews was the Hyde Chair at the University of Nebraska. The drawings continually explore a connection between image and text as a way of describing a place.

MAR 26–APR 13 WE ALSO PLAY Collected visual examples of faculty work will be in this exhibition. The work includes responses to poetry, landscape, spaces for human habitation as well as others.

APRIL 23–27 MATERIAL DIRECTIONS A presentation of new, innovative, and interesting materials and their uses.

Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

CAGE GALLERY

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CONTEMPORARY ART

T H U R S D AY S 5 : 5 0 – 7 : 0 5 P M | A R T B U I L D I N G , R O O M 1 0 0 (unless otherwise noted)

FEB 1 MICHELLE GRABNER: 2018 JUROR, MIAMI UNIVERSITY YOUNG PAINTERS COMPETITION Michelle Grabner is an artist, a writer, and a curator based in Wisconsin. She is the Crown Family Professor of Art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she has taught for twenty years. In 2009, Grabner and Killam opened The Poor Farm in rural Wisconsin. The Poor Farm is dedicated to annual historical and contemporary exhibitions, lectures, performances, publications, screenings and alternative free pedagogical programs.

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FEB 8 JACQUELINE WOOD: THE STRUCTURES OF MEDIA Artist C. Jacqueline Wood presents a short talk titled The Structures of Media exploring how she considers questions of form and content in her creative process. Wood lives and works in Cincinnati, OH. She is the founder and director of The Mini Microcinema in Cincinnati, and runs a small production company called Golden Hour Moving Pictures. Her film, video, and installation work has been shown in Ann Arbor, Cincinnati, Chicago, Grand Rapids, and Los Angeles. [www.projectplane. com]

FEB 15 MATT WEDEL: MATT WEDEL Using landscape as a platform to begin working, Wedel approaches creating as if the possibilities are limitless, weightless, and immediate. He works amongst this landscape both from imagination as well as from historical influences. Matt Wedel has an MFA from California State University, Long Beach. His work has been exhibited extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe. He currently lives and works in Athens, Ohio.

COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS

FEB 22 REBECCA MORGAN Rebecca Morgan is from central Pennsylvania, and her paintings, drawings, and ceramics emanate from stereotypes of rural Appalachia. Humorous, benevolent, and savage at turns, her characters touch on truths about poverty, addiction, and off-the-grid living, as well as idealizations of uncultured country life. As an on-and-off-again New Yorker, Morgan represents the ultimate insider/outsider pointof view, embracing and critically distancing herself from her origins. Her talk will include conversations about studio practice, decision making and navigating life as an artist.

Visual Arts at Miami


LECTURE SERIESSpring 2018 ART 281: CONTEMPORARY ART FORUM

MAR 8 MARK DEJONG: ARCHITECTURE, HOUSECRAFT, OR ART? Mark Dejong will revisit his journey both in art school and his residential construction career which equally informed the work he is presently making as a ‘house’ artist. The Swing House will be showcased as the logical marriage of this journey. Dejong was born in the Netherlands and raised in Southern Ohio.

Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

MAR 29 SHINJI TURNERYAMAMOTO: KUNSTKAMMER (CABINET OF CURIOSITIES)

APR 12 MELISSA VOGLEY WOODS: EXPERIMENTAL PATHS TOWARDS PAINTING

Shinji Turner-Yamamoto is a Japanese born U.S.based artist known for paintings, sculptures, and installations employing elemental materials such as trees, fossils, and minerals, creating profound viewer connections with nature. He works with identifiable imagery to encourage humanity to encounter the essential in nature and time in new and unexpected ways, and is committed to using historic and natural elements in his work as meditations on the environment. [turneryamamoto.net]

Melissa Vogley Woods will talk about her practice that takes experimental paths towards painting. From video to sculpture and back again to paint on canvas Vogley Woods’ work investigate themes of sexuality, power and the personal. Her work considers abstraction as the construct for both the images based work and gestural performative videos. [melissavogleywoods. com]

COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS

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JOIN, VOLUNTEER, SUBSCRIBE - LEARN MORE AT WWW.MIAMIOH.EDU/ARTMUSEUM

GALLERY HOURS: TUESDAY–FRIDAY: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. SATURDAY: 12–5 P.M. 801 S. PATTERSON AVE. OXFORD, OH MIAMIOH.EDU/ARTMUSEUM | (513) 529-2232

ONLINE MAGAZINE/BLOG: WWW.BLOGS.MIAMIOH.EDU/VISUALARTS WWW.BLOGS.MIAMIOH.EDU/ART-MUSEUM

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

/MIAMIUNIVERSITYARTMUSEUM @MIAMIU-ARTMUSEUM @MIAMIOHARTMUSEUM

28th Annual Performing Arts Wine Tasting Gala & Auction

Saturday, Feb. 3, 7-10 p.m., Millett Hall, Oxford, OH Taste over 200 wines, craft beers and rare vintages. Enjoy delicious food from Oxford’s MIA Restaurant & Studio. Reserve a Table in The High Rollers Club $380 Table of 4 | $760 Table of 8

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All In? Reserve Today! 513-529-6333 MiamiOH.edu/PerformingArtsWineTasting MCGUFFEY MUSEUM

Visual Arts at Miami


McGuffey House and Museum: A Portal to the Past & Present MCGUFFEY MOMENTS STEVE GORDON, ADMINISTRATOR

It is a laid-back Saturday afternoon on Miami’s Oxford campus. A group of friends, Miami alums, or perhaps a family decide to explore Oxford for a day visit. Or, it might be some curious Miami students who decide to venture out on a “day off” from classes. Destinations might include a swim meet, hockey camp or outdoor athletic event. After scrolling through Miami’s website, a search finds that both the Art Museum and the McGuffey House and Museum are open Saturday afternoons. Why not take in both? At McGuffey House and Museum, visitors are enthusiastically

welcomed the moment they enter the house. Each visitor receives a personal tour by trained student aides and docents. Rather than launch into a scripted lecture, each tour unfolds around conversations. History is not recited as a list of what happened but stories about what happened. The myriad intersections of Miami and Oxford history are interpreted through artifacts, objects and yes, some lore. Historians do not see the past as static. Rather, the past is ever present as interpretations of the past change or are slow to change. History serves as fragile, frequently complex tissue fibers connecting places, institutions and generations. Today’s visitors can learn about the relevance of McGuffey and

his Readers, the architecture of the house, and the rich history of one of the nation’s oldest public universities. For some, the sheer existence of the 185-year-old house and its collections amidst an everchanging campus is reassuring. Alumni feel a sense of stability when the buildings and places of their time at Miami are preserved. Beyond McGuffey’s legacy, visitors learn about Miami, its history and how it came to be in such a remote place in Ohio. The Myaamia, the neo-Georgian architecture, and student life are just a few of the topics discussed at McGuffey House and Museum. One of several enriching opportunities offered on a Saturday afternoon at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

McGuffey House & Museum Open Thur–Sat: 1–5 P.M. 401 E. Spring St. Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-8380 McGuffeyMuseum@MiamiOH.edu MiamiOH.edu/McGuffey-Museum Volume 6, Issue 2 | Spring 2018

MCGUFFEY MUSEUM

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VISUAL ARTS AT COLOR KEY: EXHIBITION | RECEPTION | LECTURE | SPECIAL EVENT

JAN 2018 –

2018 Miami University Young Painters Competition for the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award Hiestand Galleries, through Feb 10

FEB 1 2

– Blake Morgan Recent Work Hiestand Galleries, through Feb 10

Meltdown 20 Chocolate Oxford Community Art Center, 1-5 P.M.

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Redacted Fashion Cage Gallery, through Feb 9

30 Telling A People’s Story:

African-American Children’s Illustrated Literature, Art Museum, through June 30

30 Global Perspectives Art Museum, through June 30

30 Art History at a Glance

Art Museum, through June 30

30 Scratching the Surface:

Exploring Space in Intaglio Prints, Art Museum, through June 30

Blake Morgan Recent Work: Gallery Talk Hiestand Galleries, 3:30-4:30 P.M.

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Miami University Young Painters Competition: Reception Hiestand Galleries, 4:30-5:30 P.M.

2 7 8

30 The Charles M. Messer Leica

Camera Collection Art Museum, through June 30

Michelle Grabner: 2018 Juror, Miami University Young Painters Competition ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M.

Miami University Young Painters Competition: Awards Hiestand Galleries, 5 P.M. It’s All About Telling A People’s Story Art Museum, 5:30 P.M. Jacqueline Wood: The Structures of Media ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M.

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Matt Wedel: Matt Wedel ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M.

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Eye of the Beholder Workshop Art Museum, 10:30 A.M.

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Docent-led Walk-in Tours Art Museum, 1 P.M.

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Eye of the Beholder Workshop Art Museum, 2:30 P.M. Art Explorers (ages 3-5) Art Museum, 10 A.M.-12 P.M. Rebecca Morgan ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M. A Student Response to a Crisis Cage Gallery, through Mar 2

MAR Power No More – 5 Black Transmutation of An Idea Art Museum, 10 A.M.

5 Cockroach Cage Gallery, through Mar 15 Space in Intaglio 6 Exploring Prints: the Capstone Program Reception Art Museum, 5 P.M.

6 Exploring Space in Intaglio

Prints: the Capstone Program Gallery Talk Art Museum, 6 P.M.

6 Building Temples for

Tomorrow: Langston Hughes & the Shaping of the Political Consciousness of Black Women Artist-Activists Art Museum, 12 P.M.

Tate: My Art Journey 7 Don Art Museum, 5:30 P.M.

8 Mark Dejong: Architecture, Housecraft, or Art? ART 100. 5:50-7:05 P.M.

10 Docent-led Walk-in Tours Art Museum, 1 P.M.

26 We Also Play

Cage Gallery, through Apr 13

Explorers (ages 3-5) 29 Art Art Museum, 10 A.M.-12 P.M. Turner-Yamamoto: 29 Shinji Kunstkammer (Cabinet of Curiosities) ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M.


A GLANCE

Spring 2018

COLOR KEY: EXHIBITION | RECEPTION | LECTURE | SPECIAL EVENT

APR 2

12 14

E.J. Brown, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Sculpture: soand-so Hiestand Galleries, through Apr 11 Melissa Vogley Woods: Experimental Paths Towards Painting ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M. Docent-led Walk-in Tours Art Museum, 1 P.M.

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Casey Dressell, MFA Thesis Exhibition, Painting Hiestand Galleries, through Apr 27

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Javaka Steptoe: Radiant Child: Radiant Illustrator Art Museum, 1:15-2PM

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MAY 3 8

B.F.A. Capstone Exhibition Hiestand Galleries, through May 10 B.F.A. Capstone Exhibition: Artist Reception Hiestand Galleries, 4:30-5:30 P.M.

ART MUSEUM FRIENDRAISER SAT, JAN 20

Chocolate Meltdown Oxford Community Art Center, 1–5 P.M. ChocolateMeltdown.com

TELLING A PEOPLE’S STORY EXHIBITION CONFERENCE April 20–21 | Miami University Art Museum KEYNOTE: Javaka Steptoe, Illustrator/Author

Telling A People’s Story Exhibition Conference, Art Museum through Apr 21 Meet the Illustrator: An Evening with R. Gregory Christie Lane Library (Oxford), 6:30 P.M.

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Material Directions Cage Gallery, through Apr 27

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The Long March Toward Civil Rights Art Museum, 2:50 P.M.

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Art Explorers (ages 3-5) Art Museum, 10 A.M.-12 P.M.

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Faculty Speaker ART 100, 5:50-7:05 P.M.

Conference Speakers: Dr. Ann Elizabeth Armstrong (Faculty), Sam Bloom (Librarian), R. Gregory Christie (Illustrator), Dr. Yvette Harris (Faculty), Ekua Holmes (Illustrator), E.B. Lewis (Illustrator), Jerry Pinkney (Illustrator), Dr. Paula Saine (Faculty) and Shadra Strickland (Illustrator) For more information on the conference and registration: blogs.MiamiOH.edu/TellingAPeoplesStory


MUSEUM & GALLERY INFO Miami University Art Museum

McGuffey House & Museum

801 S. Patterson Ave., Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-2232 ArtMuseum@MiamiOH.edu MiamiOH.edu/ArtMuseum

401 E. Spring St., Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-8380 McGuffeyMuseum@MiamiOH.edu MiamiOH.edu/McGuffey-Museum

Gallery hours:

Museum hours:

Tuesday–Friday: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. Saturday: 12–5 P.M.

Thursday–Saturday: 1–5 P.M.

Hiestand Galleries

Cage Gallery

401 Maple St., Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-1883 sfagallery@MiamiOH.edu MiamiOH.edu/HiestandGalleries

101 Alumni Hall, Oxford, OH 45056 (513) 529-7210 archid@MiamiOH.edu Arts.MiamiOH.edu/architecture-interior-design

Gallery hours:

Gallery hours:

Monday–Friday: 9 A.M.–4:30 P.M.

Monday–Friday: 9 A.M.–5 P.M.

Profile for Miami University Art Museum

Miami University Art Museum - Spring 2018 - Visual Arts at Miami Magazine  

A publication of Visual Arts exhibitions, programs, and events at Miami University published by the Art Museum featuring McGuffey Museum, th...

Miami University Art Museum - Spring 2018 - Visual Arts at Miami Magazine  

A publication of Visual Arts exhibitions, programs, and events at Miami University published by the Art Museum featuring McGuffey Museum, th...

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