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Vol. 92 | Issue 45 April 7 - April 9, 2014

NICK GANGEMI // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

MIAMI BOXING A KNOCKOUT SUCCESS UM hosts men’s and women’s collegiate national championships, score four individual titles. Page 9


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RELIGIOUS LIFE

Hillel unveils transformation for fall 2015 Donors provide state-ofthe-art student center BY LYSSA GOLDBERG OPINION EDITOR

A $2.5 million gift to the University of Miami Hillel will transform the run-down Jewish student center into a state-of-the-art facility for Jewish and non-Jewish students alike. “It’s out of date and doesn’t reflect what Hillel is or what Hillel can be,” Hillel’s executive director Shana Kantor said. The renovation project is scheduled to begin in August and will conclude with a modernized building by fall 2015. Built in 1953, the Hillel Student Center has since been designated as a historical building in the city of Coral Gables. The walls that make up the outer frame will remain standing during construction, while everything inside will be built from scratch. “For this organization, it’s like a restart button,” Kantor said. “We get to redesign what Hillel will be, not just physically, but as an organization.” The new building will be named the Braman Miller Center for Jewish Student Life after the two primary family donors. The Millers are the family for whom the medical school is named, as well as the university’s Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies. The Bramans are also well-connected in South Florida’s Jewish community, according to Kantor.

The current building is plagued by problems such as leaks. “There aren’t a lot of reasons for students to want to come to this building right now,” Kantor said. “It’s dilapidated. … It rains inside the building. We have a lot of issues.” The final result will match the look of the modern architectural style of the Student Activities Center (SAC) and forthcoming UHealth facility, according to renderings provided to The Miami Hurricane. Junior Alex Rabhan, the president of the Hillel student board, said that giving the university’s substantial Jewish population an entirely new building is like a new opportunity for them. “I think it’s going to completely revamp Jewish student life,” he said. The completed Center for Jewish Student Life will feature a Kosher cafe, and the plan is to stay open late and offer free coffee throughout the day, according to Kantor. This would be the second Kosher dining option on campus. Oasis, the Kosher deli currently located in the UC, will be moving to the food court next year. The new building will also have a pool table and a space for students to hang out and study. Students will have open access to the second floor, and a third floor will be built, featuring a rooftop lounge, according to Kantor. “Jewish students and their non-Jewish friends can feel comfortable using this building, so that it’s not just a place for Jews, but a place that all students enjoy,” she said. “In some ways, it can be like a secondary SAC.”

NEWS BRIEFS

PHOTO COURTESY HILLEL

Rabhan said that, in the three years that he’s been a part of UM Hillel, there had always been talk of renovating Hillel. He saw the first designs around this time last year, but when the official news came of the plans for breaking ground, his peers at Hillel reacted with surprise and excitement. “It was like, ‘Oh my God, this is actually happening,’” Rabhan said. “Some of them said, ‘About damn time.’ Others, at first, were like, ‘Why? We’ve slept in here, prayed in here, cried in here.’ But then they saw the plans. Overall, it’s been overwhelmingly positive.” In the year without a physical Jewish student center located on campus, the organization will become a “Hillel without walls” and seek al-

FILE PHOTO BY CAYLA NIMMO WALK THE WALK: In 2012, the men who participated in Walk a Mile in Her Shoes donned read high heels and took a pledge promising to defend women by not letting ideas or actions that demean women pass silently. The event is used as a conversation starter to raise awareness about sexual assault, rape, and gender violence.

ARIANNA HUFFINGTON Arianna Huffington will visit at 5 p.m. Tuesday at the BankUnited Center. Huffington, the chair, president and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, will discuss her 14th book, “Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder.”

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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ternate locations for hosting holiday services and events, according to Kantor. “High Holiday services will be in the SAC next year,” she said. “We’re negotiating where Shabbat dinner is going to be. We’ll have an opportunity to be on campus more than we are and to integrate with campus as much as possible.” For Jewish students like sophomore Willy Chertman, who is excited for the changes in the long-run, this renovation will mean adapting in the meantime. “I’m mostly worried about people not knowing where the new [services] will be, and maybe getting less attendance because of that,” said Chertman, who helps lead Shabbat Unplugged, a Friday night service with singing and instruments.

Students can visit tinyurl.com/huffingtonatUM to register and obtain tickets. Students must use the password Huffington2014 for tickets and are only eligible for one free ticket.

BONE MARROW DRIVE The fourth annual Get In the Game, Save a Life Bone Marrow Drive will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday on the Green. The drive is sponsored by UM’s football team and Delta Epsilon Psi Fraternity in collaboration with the Be The Match Foundation.

DRAGOUT 2014 SpectrUM will be hosting a drag show, DragOut 2014, at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Rathskeller. The event is designed to raise awareness

and support for the LGBTQ community and its diversity. The event is free of charge for university students, faculty and staff with a valid Cane Card. Nonuniversity visitors will be charged $20 admission. Proceeds will benefit SAVE Dade.

WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES Walk a Mile in Her Shoes will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday on the Rock. The walk is an international men’s march to stop rape, sexual assault and gender violence. Students may register at the Counseling Center or at tinyurl.com/UMiamiInHerShoes. All proceeds will go to Safe Space Women’s Shelter. Ashley Martinez may be emailed at amartinez@themiamihurricane.com.


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PHOTO BRIEF

Model UN meets at UM PUTTING ON THE RITZ: A group of high school students took part in the Miami Invitational Conference for the Simulation of the United Nation (MICSUN) on Sunday at the Business School. Set during the American Civil War, the simulation Joint Crisis Committee Union Cabinet group responded to actions from the opposing Confederate Cabinet. The cabinet made military, economic, social and political decisions as well as request support from foreign states in managing the rebellion. YINGHUI SUN // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

ACADEMICS

Program provides chance for customized majors Option available to group of five students in the fall BY CRISTINA LONDONO SENIOR NEWS WRITER

College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) students can create their own major beginning fall 2014. The Faculty Senate approved the proposal for an independent major in January. The program is only offered for CAS students. Maria Stampino, senior associate dean for CAS, said the idea came from “two independent sources.” The first was directly from CAS Dean Leonidas Bachas who had known about a similar program in the University of Kentucky where he was chair of the chemistry department.

Stampino also thought of the idea when she was working on a committee to select a student speaker for commencement. The Faculty Senate originally proposed the idea in November 2013. “I started talking to a former senator in the [Student Government] Senate, and he explained that the Student Government had been trying to create a ‘Design-Your-Course’ but was presented with many challenges … at that point we were able to push it through the levels of approval,” said Stampino, who is also a member of the Faculty Senate. Students in their sophomore year may initiate the process by meeting with a faculty member with whom they will design the specific coursework for the major. To start the program, students must be juniors and have a 3.25 GPA or higher. The program will be regulated on different levels, beginning with guidance

committee chairs who will closely work with the student to develop the major and the coursework. An advisory committee will then review each major proposal and monitor students’ progress annually. As outlined by the Faculty Senate, only five students will initially be selected to complete the program and will graduate with either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Once students complete their degrees, an internal review supervised by an associate dean will examine the success and viability of the program. The major will consist of at least 30 credits of coursework in addition to the university’s general requirements. Six of the 30 credits will involve a capstone project or a thesis, which will be completed during the student’s last two semesters.

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Some students, like senior Sergey Vikhlyantsev, think the program should be expanded beyond CAS. “I would have liked it as part of the School of Engineering so I could do a mix of mechanical and electrical to make a robotics-centric major,” he said. “I do think it’s a good idea; I wish it came sooner.” Students like sophomore Joseph Miano, however, are not as convinced. He believes that future employers would appreciate a more standardized curriculum. “I would be interested in computational neuroscience, but even if I created a major related to it, there would be no class specific to it,” he said. “In the real world, is an independent major respectable when compared to more standard majors?”

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OPINION speak UP IF YOU COULD CREATE A MAJOR, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

“Major in applied science because mostly sciences here are taught with the notion of going into medicine, but that’s not always the case.”

REBECCA LIGHT FRESHMAN

ASH SAMPATH SENIOR

“I would do a cake decorating major. I’m intrigued. I like the creativity and the food.”

XIAOYANG FAN SOPHOMORE

SPEAK UP ANSWERS ARE EDITED FOR CLARITY, BREVITY AND ACCURACY. CHECK OUT VIDEO SPEAK UPS AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM. COMPILED BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ

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Independent majors lack breathing room This fall, students can begin creating independent majors, but they should not jump at the thought of majoring in underwater basket weaving just yet. Given the dozens of existing departments and hundreds of courses offered in the College of Arts and Sciences, there are definitely new options that have never even been considered. However, the breadth of program options will ultimately be limited by the expertise of faculty and spectrum of courses available on this campus. Pursuing an independent major will require either an aboveaverage familiarity with the university and its faculty, or the drive to navigate through the bureaucracy of departments and figure it all out. Next year, only five students will be able to start pursuing an independent major, and the university is wise to set that limit.

To handle an independent major, you need to be independent. Most sophomores don’t know enough about the faculty and resources at UM, or have a strong enough grasp of their professional ambitions, to be able to craft their own program of study. Consider an independent study class. To take such a course, a student, at the very least, needs to have established a strong enough relationship with a professor for him or her to be interested in being a mentor throughout the semester. The student also needs to be imaginative enough to come up with something new and know that the course has never been taught before. Now multiply the preparation level for that potentially three-credit course, by 10. A 30-credit independent major will take a lot of planning and persistence.

Students may also encounter courses that are offered on a limited basis. Some professors choose to teach a class only in the fall or spring semester, or even on a whim. Unless there’s a way to guarantee when a class will be available, it’s a bad idea to incorporate it into your study track. We don’t recommend this for everyone. Students should be certain enough about their majors so that a change of heart doesn’t throw them off track for graduation. You have to know what you want and be sure of it. You also have to know how to get it and be ready to go after it. But for those who are up for the challenge, we are eager to discover what creative study paths you can come up with. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Be realistic in financing future hen I envision my future, it isn’t lavish. “Live comfortably” is how I typically describe my financial goals. Such vague terminology allows me to assume that I will be happy no matter how much money I make, as long as I am satisfied with my lifestyle. AMANDA But sometimes an ambiguous WOOD target is more harmful than helpful. SENIOR Though quality of life is arguably COLUMNIST more important than the quantity of money, without a measurable standard of what we want, there is no way to track progress toward our goals. Instead, we aimlessly worry about money, with no end to our frantic efforts at saving in sight. The best way to deal with economic woes is to first think about what kind of a life we want, and then figure out how much money we need to get there. This can be difficult when much of the future is uncertain, but I’ve outlined strategies to help students like myself plan our finances. Having more money would seem to correlate with peace of mind in spending, but I know plenty of people with more money than I have who still fret over every

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“Eating delicious food and describing how it is and then giving suggestions to food makers because I love eating.”

The Miami

You have to know what you want and be sure of it ... for those who are up for the challenge, we are eager to discover what creative study paths you can come up with.

purchase. This illustrates an important lesson: There is no perfect amount of money that brings a complete peace of mind in spending. Knowing this, I’ve realized that agonizing over making as much money as possible isn’t an effective way to prepare for the future. First of all, we must acknowledge that debt is inevitable. Accepting this allows us to view the future realistically. Secondly, we need to determine what kind of lifestyle we want. I’ve learned it’s impossible to plan without goals in mind. It’s also essential to understand that reaching these goals will take time. Extra costs arise without warning and bills pile up. In time, security will come by paying off debt in small increments and slowly increasing savings. Finally, we must learn to be content with our current finances. This shouldn’t stop us from earning. Rather, it simply suggests that we appreciate what we can afford and focus on what we need. The idea is to improve upon some unknown goal, not to constantly look ahead to it. Call it naive, but I think that looking at everything – even personal finances – from a positive perspective can make life a little brighter. Amanda Wood is a junior majoring in ecosystem science and policy. April 7 - April 9, 2014

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Parra

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger

MANAGING EDITOR Margaux Herrera

SALES REPS Frankie Carey Carlos Parra

ART DIRECTOR Carlos Mella

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Erika Glass

PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon

AD DESIGNER Adam Berger

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Nick Gangemi

ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero

NEWS EDITOR Alexander Gonzalez

DESIGNERS Emma Deardorff Sarbani Ghosh Jassenia Rodriguez

OPINION EDITOR Lyssa Goldberg EDGE EDITOR Marlee Lisker

ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan

SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Kristen Calzadilla

ASSISTANT EDITOR Ashley Martinez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot

COPY EDITORS Emily Dabau Sherman Hewitt Monica Sabates Alina Zerpa

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Steve Priepke

WEBMASTER Morgan McKie

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2014 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Miami Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Miami Hurricane are located in the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Miami Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten to the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, Fla., 33124-6922. Letters must be signed with a copy of your Cane Card. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1330 Miller Drive, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed for free on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and noon Friday for Monday’s issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Association and Florida College Press Association.

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Engage in community involvement

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ithin all of us exists a need to contribute something to humanity that extends beyond the uninspired path of mediocrity. You might know that you’d like to do something great, but on a university campus, you often find yourself shielded from real HUNTER WRIGHT ACADEMICS life. Perhaps you hear yourself say COLUMNIST “maybe next year” and “someday,” but next year comes, and you have to spend even more time managing a busy schedule and focusing on your GPA. If your classes keep you too busy for regular community service jobs and you can’t bring yourself to wake up early for a park cleanup on your one day off, there are is another option. Civic engagement courses are now offered at UM, and as the university’s website states, such courses “allow students to put theory into practice and understand the complexities of practical problem solving in real-world situations.” Working within the community enables a student to take on the role of active participant rather than passive onlooker. These courses apply hands-on learning and have an impact on not only those affected by the success of specific projects but also the individual’s psyche and the shaping of future goals. One example of a civic engagement course offered in Fall 2014 is ENG 306, The Literature of Incarceration. Through a series of written exchanges with locally incarcerated writers, students in this class will learn to question their assumptions and “rethink the

fundamental models that have shaped our concepts of justice, criminality and imprisonment.” The class aims to make its students lucid, eloquent writers, but beyond this, Professor Joshua Schriftman is opening a door for students to gain new understandings of themselves, each other and the strangers with whom we share society. We can truly think outside the box when our learning is extended beyond the classroom, and we develop critical thinking skills when class becomes a conversation rather than a lecture. By engaging in a dialogue, we learn to challenge our own preconceived notions and develop empathy, which is the gateway to social change. There is a great Mark Twain quote about not letting his schooling interfere with his education. Let’s apply this to our own lives. Classes that measure capability only on the basis of test scores have always felt like drudgery to me, because they affect no one but myself. When I get out into the community, however, I begin to glow. I see my skills put to use, and believe even more so than before that one should not have to wait until after graduation to do something worthwhile. Community involvement shouldn’t just be a memory from high school, nor should it be a shortlived phase that enables students to log required hours into a spreadsheet. Civic engagement courses help us develop a long-term strategy: using one’s capabilities and passions to better the world. Hunter Wright is a sophomore majoring in creative writing.

A visual commentary on what’s happening on campus.

CARTOON BY ARIELLE RAY

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Give baseball a swing ith March Madness’s finale upon us, many are struggling to fill the hole in their schedule as they cry about the atrocious series finale of “How I Met Your Mother” and laugh about the upcoming NBA Eastern Conference playoffs. (Prediction: the eighthDANNY NEW SPORTS seed’s win percentage will be ACOLUMNIST Rod’s batting average last year.) In order to fill this gap, I am prescribing a remedy that many Americans have abandoned over the last twenty years: baseball. You know, America’s past pastime? Let’s face it: While superior athletes have been juking on the gridiron and dunking on the hardwood, Major League Baseball has been slipping toward the bottom of the sports totem pole, somewhere between the WNBA and … actually, wait, that is the bottom. But let’s be fair here. It’s not baseball’s fault that baseball is baseball. Attention spans are dropping like pre-pubescent flies, and baseball requires nine innings to potentially end with only one or two runs. These days, most spectators expect at least one spinecrushing skirmish for some real entertainment value. Good news, though: Independent baseball leagues (i.e. the Atlantic League) are beginning experiments to shorten the game’s length, which could ultimately translate to the MLB. However, baseball actually has some stimulating qualities that should not be overlooked, and I suggest that everyone give it a chance again. First off, baseball is the most relaxing team sport. Every game promises warm weather, radiant sunshine, crisp sand and Puerto Ricans. Who doesn’t love a sport that’s basically South Beach? Football and basketball are intense. Every second is spent worrying whether a player’s ACL will tear or a concussion is going to drop a player’s IQ back below 50. Meanwhile, the biggest fear in baseball is whether it’s going to rain. Also, when you watch baseball, you feel patriotic. Baseball is one of America’s finest traditions. No other major sport unites Americans to cherish classic story lines that have been accumulating since our President was named Ulysses. For example, we can all laugh at the Chicago Cub’s century-long World Series drought, or just hate the Yankees. There are no clothes-lining tackles or face-time jams, but just sit down, grab a milkshake and watch a baseball be pelted at 100 miles per hour and then clobbered 400 feet over a wall. That’s pretty exciting, and no one has to get hurt. I’m not suggesting baseball is the best sport, because frankly, it’s not. However, during the spring and summer, when other sports are dwindling, tuning to the diamond can be just as satisfying. So, after this miserable semester concludes, try catching a few innings of America’s original pastime. At least until the World Cup starts.

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Danny New is a freshman majoring in broadcast journalism.


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BY LUISA ANDONIE SENIOR EDGE WRITER

Picking up after “The Avengers,” Marvel’s latest film “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” has big boots to fill. Yet the sequel to the first Captain America flick doesn’t just fill them – it redesigns them. With Star Trek-like gadgets, James Bond espionage and “Mission: Impossible” sleekness, this blockbuster steps up from its 2011 beginnings, captivating audiences like never before. Starring Chris Evans, Samuel L. Jackson, Anthony Mackie and Scarlett Johansson, this film moves into new territory entirely. While the first movie exposes the innerworkings of Captain’s character, this one fleshes out the makings of his world. This movie grounds itself in

the present, contrasting with the period drama style of the first one. The film starts as a political thriller as Captain America, played by Evans, criticizes the lack of transparency in the S.H.I.E.L.D. agency and the secrets kept within the organization. Jackson and Robert Redford serve as the S.H.I.E.L.D. leaders who pressure and test Captain America. From there, it quickly evolves into an action film, as Captain (or Steve Rogers, as he’s known by his friends) must act on his convictions. This transition to action glides smoothly thanks to the stable wiring of Captain’s character. From the very start of the movie, the camera focuses on Captain’s eyes, capturing his tenderness. His caring eye-rolls and his concerned stares work in unison with the script to establish him as a conflicted hero. His tenderness shines when contrasted with Black Widow’s sassiness and Falcon’s lightheartedness. Yet, the power of the performances by Evans, Johansson and Mackie legitimizes all of their characters equally. Then, when they risk their safety to fight for their values, their actions act as credible extensions of their beliefs. The

fighting in this film progresses away from the primitiveness of WWII combat towards a sci-fi, martial arts mix. Choreographed in cross-disciplinary fighting styles, the action scenes are more exciting than those of other films. The reason it works is thanks to the innovation of the film’s directors, Joe and Anthony Russo, the same brother duo who directed “Arrested Development.” Using handheld cameras, they track the action directly. Not only does this make the film more action-packed – it makes it more dramatic. The Russo brothers pushed the envelope in this film, proving that superhero movies are not just visual comics – in the right hands, they are a cinematic experience of their own.

DESIGN BY SARBANI GHOSH

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OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING For Fall 2014? 8 T H A N N U A L

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING & ROOMMATE FAIR Speak with Leasing Managers, furniture vendors, real estate agents, and more!

Thursday April 10, 2014 11am - 2pm UC Lobby 8

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SPORTS

When I’m fighting I zone out. I hear my coach and I hear my dad. I hear my dad saying, ‘Leave it, Jillian, leave it.’ - JILLIAN KERNAN, UM junior

CLUB BOXING

Four Miami boxers earn national titles Legendary broadcaster impressed by fighters BY ALEJANDRO NARCISO CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

Three days, 23 schools, 128 boxers. Teams from across the country gathered in Coral Gables this past week to compete in the 2014 National Championships of Men’s and Women’s College Boxing. Fans filled the Wellness Center as fighters took the ring for what was a physically and emotionally draining tournament, sanctioned by the U.S. Intercollegiate Boxing Association. Elimination matches on Thursday and Friday determined who would compete for gold on Saturday. UM’s success on those first two days sent four boxers to fight with a chance to claim a national title. One of those four triumphant fighters was first-year law student Ralph Longo. As Longo stretched and talked to his teammates, his parents anxiously waited for the championship fight against University of Michigan’s Maxwell Gomez. “I have three boys who play sports,” Longo’s father said. “But there’s something about boxing and watching your kid get hit that makes you nervous … I’m just happy he loves it.” Longo is a passionate boxer, but he has also tried his hand at another nuanced craft: writing. Three years ago, he became a featured columnist for the popular website, Bleacher Report. Over time, Longo has written 260 articles and gained more than 1 million page views. Miami boxing coach Mickey Demos took in Longo last year and introduced him to the team, who he now sees as family. “There’s a very close relationship between a boxer and a coach that’s indescribably close,” Demos said. “This is one of the most difficult sports in the world, and these boxers need all the support they can get.” After several long months of training, Longo can now add “national

NICK GANGEMI // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR ONE-TWO PUNCH: Junior Jillian Kernan (left) fights an opponent from West Point during an early round match in the United States Intercollegiate Boxing Association’s national championship tournament, which was held at the Wellness Center this past week.

champion” to his resume. The UM men weren’t the only fighters drawing crowds throughout the tournament. Jillian Kernan, a junior, was not ready to settle for anything less than a national championship. On Thursday she ended her match with a third-round technical knockout, and she didn’t stop there. Kernan wound up winning it all. Her victory was not meant for her, though, but for her father who’s currently fighting cancer. “I don’t fight for myself,” Kernan said. “I fight to make my family proud. They’ve given me everything in the world.” Her victory did not come easy. Kernan’s fight with Georgetown’s Janie

Rosales was tightly contested for all three rounds as fans from both schools cheered loudly around the ring. “Second round I was a little weary,” Kernan said. “But when I’m fighting I zone out. I hear my coach and I hear my dad. I hear my dad saying, ‘Leave it, Jillian, leave it.’” She stayed humble and grounded to get her title. “I fought with my heart, not my hands,” Kernan said. Al Bernstein, a longtime broadcaster who was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2012, was proud and impressed with all the athletes who competed in the tournament. “What these fighters are doing is truly remarkable,” Bernstein said. “I am committed to use any platform that April 7 - April 9, 2014

I have to tell people how extraordinary they truly are.” The Hall of Famer wants to televise the event next year to put a spotlight on collegiate boxing. Bernstein believes that as the sport gets more depth and attracts new boxers, its popularity will increase. For a club sport that is not sanctioned by the NCAA, collegiate boxers train as if it’s a varsity sport. “They train six days a week through blood, sweat and tears, manage a full school schedule and still drive across town for fights,” Demos said of his fighters. UM went undefeated on Saturday with Anna Benitez and Courtney “CJ” Jackson joining Kernan and Longo in the national champion crew. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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FOOTBALL

PHOTO BRIEF

Williams hurts ACL in practice, to undergo surgery this week Miami’s quarterback competition opens up BY SPENCER DANDES SPORTS EDITOR

Senior Ryan Williams injured his knee during the Hurricanes’ closed spring scrimmage Friday night. Chris Yandle, associate athletic director for communications, confirmed the news in a tweet on Saturday. “Miami senior QB Ryan Williams suffered an ACL injury to his right knee Friday night. He will undergo surgery next week,” it read. Williams had distanced himself in the quarterback competition throughout spring practice, and was expected to become Miami’s starter. He played behind Stephen Morris last season.

A transfer from Memphis, Williams threw four touchdowns and one interception in his four 2013 appearances. He completed 68.8 percent of his passes for a total of 369 yards. It appeared that Williams would go head to head with redshirt freshman Kevin Olsen to determine the next Hurricanes starting quarterback, but coach Al Golden said Williams’ maturity and experience had just about secured the job. While there is not yet a timetable for Williams to return, it is clear that Miami will start the season with him on the sideline. That means Olsen will likely take over as the starter. Sophomore Gray Crow and incoming freshman Brad Kaaya may also see time as quarterback. Miami will play its Spring Game on Saturday at Sun Life Stadium. Here is a look at the Hurricanes’ depth at quarterback, as it appears on hurricanesports. com.

No. 13 Duke, No. 9 UNC overwhelm Miami

QUARTERBACK DEPTH CHART VICTORIA MCKABA // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

RYAN WILLIAMS

KEVIN OLSEN

GRAY CROW

QUARTERBACK SENIOR 6’6” | 225 pounds

QUARTERBACK REDSHIRT FRESHMAN 6’3” | 210 pounds

QUARTERBACK SOPHOMORE 6’3” | 224 pounds

ISAAC HOZA

MICHAEL WELCH

GARRISON LASSITER

QUARTERBACK REDSHIRT FRESHMAN 6’3” | 175 pounds

QUARTERBACK REDSHIRT FRESHMAN 6’3” | 218 pounds

QUARTERBACK REDSHIRT JUNIOR 6’2” | 208 pounds

PHOTOS COURTESY HURRICANESPORTS.COM

SPORTS BRIEFS ROWING

BASEBALL

The Miami rowing team traveled to the San Diego Crew Classic and participated in the Women’s Collegiate Invitational last week.

The Hurricanes swept Virginia Tech on the road this weekend. Miami, ranked No. 24, extended its winning streak to eight games and will face Central Florida on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m., in Orlando.

The Canes took home a secondplace finish in the 1V8+ race, its final competition. Gonzaga won the event. In the 2V8+ race, Miami’s crew finished sixth behind Gonzaga, Iowa, KSU, USD and Texas.

Spencer Dandes may be emailed at sports@ themiamihurricane.com.

Next, Miami heads to Clemson, S.C. for the Tiger Invitational on April 19.

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SPORTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 7 - April 9, 2014

NO CONTEST: Senior Omar Aly and his partner Wilfredo Gonzalez lost their doubles match 7-6 against Duke on Friday. The Hurricanes fell in consecutive home matches on Friday and Sunday.


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V, DEAR V

I went on a date with this guy and then he stopped responding to my texts for a few days. Then, about a week later, he texted me with a picture of a new purchase he made. Please, I don’t care about your new water purifier. If you have time to buy new crap, you have time to text me back. I don’t know what to do – should I give in and text him back or will that make me a doormat? Help, please!

Something’s telling me to let it go ...

Sincerely, Livin’ on a text message

Dear Meg Ryan, You are neither the first, nor the last woman, to go through this. It’s always a hassle and it always sucks. And I’m sorry. The easy answer is that he’s just not that into you and you should move on with your life. And I know I say that a lot but it’s true. We don’t have time to be wasting on people who aren’t interested in us. The tough answer is that you should call him out on his bullish*t. It might be a little early for the “where are we going” talk but still, if something that he’s doing bothers you, you should be up front about it with him. I don’t think you’ll become his doormat – especially since you’re just seeing each other. Plus, what kind of a hippie do you have to be to be excited about a water purifier? Maybe he’s just trying to start conversation because he realized he should be speaking to you.

On the other side of the same coin, since it’s early in your relationship, he really isn’t required to be texting you all the time. You’re at that point where you can give each other some room to breathe without feeling like you’re doing each other a disservice. What you have to do is ask yourself whether or not you want to keep seeing him. Just take it slow and text him back. You can wait a few hours and make him sweat a little bit just to keep the mystery alive. Meg and Tom went through their fair share of obstacles before becoming the happy, lovey dovey, rom-com couple that we all know and love. I have faith that you’ll find happiness with your own NY152 and if not, Shopgirl can always snuggle up next to a fire with a copy of “Pride and Prejudice” and dream about Mr. Darcy. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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April 7 - April 9, 2014

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 7 - April 9, 2014

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The Miami Hurricane, April 7