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ULTRA WEEKEND

FEATHER WEATHER New student organization follows campus bird population. See page 2 for more.

TOP TIPS TO MAKE THE MOST OF ULTRA MUSIC FESTIVAL PAGE 9

MAKE A MOVE RHYTHM NATION DIVERSIFIES DANCES PAGE 12


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STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Society studies, watches campus’ feathered friends Members enjoy bi-weekly trek BY LAURA VANDER MEIDEN SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Sebastian the Ibis is no longer the big bird on campus. With the creation of a university birdwatching club this semester, all of University of Miami’s feathered inhabitants are getting a share of the spotlight. The UM Amateur Ornithological Society traverses the university grounds twice a week, observing and identifying the many types of birds they find. The club meets at 7 a.m. on Mondays and 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays in front of the Student Activities Center (SAC) . “We are blessed with a great birding environment,” said junior Eric Friedman, the club’s treasurer and co-founder. The amateur ornithologists are able to watch a variety of species due to the university’s mix of land and water habitats. Common birds seen around the lake include white-faced American coots, a variety of herons and the iconic white ibis. In the trees, students are most likely to encounter boat-tailed grackles and black and brown birds that are often mistaken for crows. Hummingbirds, blue jays and cardinals can all be found in the arboretum,

which is one of the best bird watching spots on campus. Club members identify these species and more as they walk throughout campus with their binoculars in hand. Some of their more interesting sightings are various birds of prey such as red-shouldered hawks, ospreys and kestrels. Club co-founders Levi Propst, who serves as the club’s president, and Friedman created the club as a way for bird enthusiasts of all levels to meet and learn from one another. Though the club is quite small at the moment, its members are a varied group with a wide variety of experience. Sophomore Kyle David, a marine biology major, is an active member of the club and attends many of the Monday morning walks. Before joining the club, however, he had never bird watched. “I had no prior experience, but I’m really into animals in general and it seemed like a very good opportunity to experience a natural aspect of Florida,” David said. Propst and Freidman weren’t always avid bird watchers themselves. Freidman’s interest began after taking an ecosystem science and policy course his freshman year that required students to record the birds they saw on their walk to class. He enlisted Propst’s help, and the two ended up continuing to bird watch once the assignment was over.

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“I realized it was a lot more interesting than I thought it was,” Propst said. “Once you can start looking at something and say the name of it, that’s when you get really into it.” Neither Propst nor Freidman plan on making a career out of ornithology; Propst is an electrical engineering major and Freidman a geology major. Still, both see bird watching as a lifelong hobby that could appeal to many students on campus. “Anybody who like animals, the outdoors, or learning new things will enjoy the club,” Freidman said. The birdwatching group, however, does not solely bird watch. In addition to planning some off-campus birding trips, including a recent trip to Crandon Park, the club wants to install bird feeders and nest boxes across the campus. “We want to make campus a more bird-friendly environment,” Propst said. Professor Donald Olson, the faculty adviser for the club, hopes that those interested in birdwatching and learning more about the species on campus will be inspired to add to and analyze data about these bird populations. “We are trying to put together 12 years of data to see if bird populations [on campus] have changed,” Olson said. For more information, visit the UM Amateur Ornithological Society’s Facebook page.

PHOTO BY YINGHUI SUN // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER TRINKET TAKEAWAY: Freshman Mallory Madfes browses through the Taudrey Trunk Show at the Tri Delta suite on Wednesday.

APRIL FOOLS DAY Canes Night Live and the Rat Advisory Board are hosting an April Fools Day event at 8 p.m.Tuesday at the Rat. The show will feature Brian B”Daht McLaughlin, a North Carolin radio station comedian and personality and other comedians. The show is titled The Freestyle Funny Comedy Show.

CREATIVITY SEMINAR UM will host the first international seminar on innovation for content creation from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. next Thursday at the Cosford Cinema. Mar-

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BIRD SIGHTINGS During the UM Amateur Ornithological Society’s trek Wednesday, club members saw varieties of the green heron family.

PHOTOS BY NICK GANGEMI // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

lon Quintero, a television producer and content creator, will conduct the seminar. Guest panelists include Ligiah Villalobos, writer for the NBC show “ED,” and Eric Foster, a music producer for artists such as Britney Spears and Whitney Houston. For more information, email infoseminar@cicmedia.tv.

LAW SCHOOL PLAYHOUSE The School of Law’s Equity Playhouse will present its production “1L in Wonderland: Fairy Tales Gone Law School” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Storer Auditorium. The play tells a law school story about final exams in the context of fairy tales. Tickets are required for admission. Student tickets cost $5, and general admission is $10. Tickets can be purchased at the School of Law courtyard near the brick

wall. All ticket proceeds will be donated to Project Knucklehead and Hilarity for Charity.

DAY OF SERVICE The Toppel Career Center will be hosting its first Day of Service from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Participants will include local employers, Toppel staff members and students. The group will travel to Key Biscayne for a beach clean up. To RSVP, email alrodriguez@miami.edu.

Alexander Gonzalez may be emailed at amartinez@themiamihurricane.com.


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PROFILE

Woodworker carves lasting impact on campus Model shop aids student projects BY SOPHIE BARROS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Adrian Villaraos, 63, comes to work every day to the smell of freshly cut wood and the sounds of classical music. He runs the School of Architecture’s (SoA) model shop and has had a passion for woodwork since he was a boy. All architecture students who need to build models of their designs for a class or personal projects can use the SoA model shop. Villaraos, the director, acts as a facilitator in this process, guiding students during their projects and suggesting particular skills he thinks they should develop. He serves as a teacher and a mentor, providing students with valuable advice and technique workshops. Villaraos says he loves doing something he’s done all his life. His father taught him to work with wood and optical fiber when he was 12, and had just emmigrated from Cuba, he said. “I grew up as a boat builder,” Villaraos said. “By the time I was 16, my father lied about my age and got me a job with Merrill Stevens [on Miami River], the oldest shipyard in southeastern United States.” As his boat-building job was seasonal, Villaraos started working with large local department stores, doing woodwork and furnishings. He also took on anything else that came his way. From stair-building to custom woodcarving, he began to master all the artistic and manual forms of working with wood, which eventually paved the way to getting a job in the architecture school six years ago. Villaraos loves woodworking, but he has a lot of other interests as well. “What I do for a living is woodwork,” he said. “What I do for fun is painting, sculpting and printing. I took lithography with the lady [Lise Drost] who today is the chair of the fine arts department at UM. I studied with her back when I was taking classes at Florida International University

SOPHIE BARROS // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER SMOOTHING OUT THE EDGES: University of Miami’s School of Architecture model shop director, Adrian Villaraos, works on his own project by woodturning what will become the handle for a cutting material on March 3. Villaraos has been working with wood materials since he was 12 years old.

(FIU). This means I can understand the artwork.” Before coming to UM in 2008, he held a similar position as a model shop director at FIU. Now that he has been at UM for six years, Villaraos acknowledges that he made the right decision and would never go back. “This is a great place to work,” he said. “You are surrounded by intelligent students. They are more cosmopolitan and have a wider world view. They’ve gone places, they’ve done things. Also the faculty is more experienced. They are professional and have been doing this for a long time.”

Joseph Roy, a fifth-year senior, works at the model shop under Villaraos’ supervision and appreciates having him as his boss. “He is a character, a great guy to work with,” Roy said. “He knows literally everything, so when you come in here you actually learn a lot. The amount of things that he knows and the stories that he has … you can just learn so much from him.” Villaraos also likes helping students outside the architecture school. For example, he worked with the School of Communication’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Bateman Team to find a canvas for a public relations campaign.

“I was looking for a large wooden canvas for our PopMoney flash mob and asked my friend in the architecture school for help,” said Michelle Lock, PRSSA vice president. “She introduced me to Adrian, and he has helped me so much, even though I’m not even in the architecture school!” Villaraos’ close relationship with the students illustrates the "debt” he feels he has with the people who taught him everything he knows today. “They were old men when I met them and now they are all dead,” he said. “And I can never repay them for what they taught me, because what they taught me allowed me to earn my keep and

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feed my family. The only way I can discharge my obligations to them is to take what they taught me and to teach it to somebody else.” Villaraos said he tries to take advantage of every experience at UM and keep learning. “There’s a quote from ‘20,000 Leagues Under the Sea;’ it’s the motto of Captain Nemo – mobilis in mobili – you have to move with the movement,” Villaraos said. “In other words, you have to be constantly adapting. If you don’t constantly learn, your brain ossifies, it turns into a rock. And you don’t want to do that, you wanna stay forever young.”

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GRADUATE SCHOOL

CRIME AND SAFETY

Students juggle multiple roles

Departments join forces to solve crime

Undergraduates find comfort in graduate student teachers BY LEXI WILLIAMS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Anthony Salerno has learned that being a graduate student is like a quickchange artist’s performance. Before going to teach his marketing class, Salerno changes from his workout clothes to the more professional khakis and button-down shirt. As a Ph.D. student at the business school, he has learned that graduate school involves jugSALERNO gling research, teaching and academics. However Salerno, better known to his MKT 301 class as Tony, isn’t too fazed. “It’s a challenge to manage my time among all of those different things, but it is really no different from the schedule of a typical professor,” he said. Salerno isn’t alone. He is one of dozens of graduate students who are currently teaching undergraduate classes at UM. While teaching requirements differ by department, all graduate students have access to resources that train them to run their own classes. UM’s Preparing Future Faculty Program, offered to select graduate and post-doctoral students, provides opportunities to learn about faculty roles and responsibilities through workshops, seminars and hands-on activities. Additionally, groups such as the Graduate Teacher Learning Community exist on campus to help students with issues they may be experiencing in the classroom or in preparing to teach. While the marketing department requires Salerno to teach a course on his own before he graduates this semester, he enjoys doing so. But it is not always an easy road. Many graduate student professors, like doctoral student Ewing Medina, feel that they neither identify solely as a student nor as a professor. “When you are assumed to be a faculty member, but you aren’t really on the faculty, you don’t get those benefits; it’s very easy to be an invisible grad student,” said Medina, who is also the Graduate Student Association vice president. For undergraduate students, however, graduate student instructors are anything but invisible. “Being taught by a grad student is nice because they’re so much more relatable,” said freshman Erin Fischer, whose psychology class is taught by a grad student. “They’re not working for tenure; they’re working to build their future, just like the rest of us.” Students may relate more to Salerno and refer to him on a first-name basis, but they respect him and other graduate student professors as they would any established faculty member. “It’s easier to connect with them when they’re younger,” sophomore Leslie Baker said. “But there really isn’t a difference. They’re still our teachers.”

UMPD teams up with Gables Police BY STEPHANIE PARRA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The University of Miami Police Department (UMPD) and the Coral Gables Police Department joined forces and arrested two individuals linked to robberies involving UM students. The two defendants are specifically thought to be involved in the robbery that took place on March 16. The victim and the witness were walking to campus close

to midnight when one defendant took the victim’s purse from her hand. The other defendant served as the lookout when the robbery took place. The two then left the scene and were seen trying to use a stolen debit card at the 7-Eleven located off Miller Drive. On Friday, the two defendants confessed to robberies at the UMPD station. The two were asked to go to the station after members from both UMPD and the Coral Gables Police Department saw that their descriptions matched

PHOTO BRIEF

Taking center stage

YINGHUI SUN // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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the video surveillance from the 7-Eleven where the card was declined. According to the press release issued by the Coral Gables Police Department, both have been arrested and each have been charged with one count of robbery by sudden snatching without a weapon. They are both at the MiamiDade County jail. “UMPD immediately beefed up security after the arrests and continue to maintain a safe campus environment,” said Margot Winick, the assistant vice president of UM Communications.

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CROWNING GLORY: Senior and Miss University of Miami 2011 Victoria Humphrey, performed with the contestants during the Miss University of Miami scholarship pageant on Monday night in the SAC ballrooms. Senior Amber Butler, far left, won this year’s pageant. Butler will compete in the Miss Florida pageant this June as Miss University of Miami.


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ADMINISTRATION

Administrator elected to national post Whitely comments on position’s impact on campus BY ALINA ZERPA COPY EDITOR

Pat Whitely, vice president for Student Affairs, has become the first University of Miami administrator to be elected chair of NASPA’s (Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education) board of directors. She assumed her new post March 18 and will serve a one-year term. Founded in 1919, NASPA is an association dedicated to the advancement, health WHITELY and sustainability of student affairs. It is comprised of 13,000 members in all 50 states, 25 countries and eight United States territories.

The Miami Hurricane spoke with Whitely about her new position and what it could mean for UM and schools nationwide. The Miami Hurricane: How do you think your position at UM can help with your new one with NASPA? Pat Whitely: I’ve been working at UM for 18 years, and I’m the longest standing vice president as well. It’s a blessing to be given this position, and I hope to be a good and effective leader. My experience with [UM] President [Donna E.] Shalala and the student affairs program here is what I think can help me with the new position. TMH: How do you think UM will benefit with you as the chair of NASPA? PW: It gives the opportunity to have a national presence. NASPA is in charge of having a voice when public policy and federal laws are made concerning school. Too often, laws and policies have been formulated without our voice, yet our campuses view us as the experts. NASPA works mostly with the federal government so UM won’t be able to see a direct change in its student body.

TMH: What are problems in student affairs that you believe need to be given immediate attention? PW: There isn’t one single problem that needs attention; it’s more of having a voice for many problems such as mental health, technology, online learning and graduation rates, to name a few. We want to make sure our outcomes are good ones and that students are graduating. NASPA is in charge of making sure we have our voice in the federal place so these problems are kept in mind. TMH: You have spoken about how the support of community colleges can make significant contributions to higher education. How can the local colleges in the Miami area impact UM and NASPA? PW: I think we should pay more attention to them. Many students at UM are transfers from community colleges for financial reasons. It’s important to foster this relationship because students are coming from these colleges, and we want to make sure they graduate with a good outcome. Community colleges in general have improved, and we can’t leave them out either when it comes to decision-making that will impact schools.

CAMPUS LIFE Before spring break, The Miami Hurricane featured different ways students were planning to spend the week off. A group of graduate students traveled to Guatemala to film documentaries related to social justice issues. Meanwhile, UM Alternative Breaks took students across the United States to do service work for various causes.

Students spend time serving communities BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR 1. Sophomore Neela Persad digs a hole to plant a tree using a bucket as a frame at Harvest Farms, an addiction recovery center for men in Wellington, Colo. “It was kind of calming because I would do the work silently by myself and think about things in my life or think about what someone of the rehabilitation facility just told me and just reflect upon their story,” sophomore Neela Persad said. Photo courtesy UM Alternative Break 2. First-year motion picture graduate students Robert Taylor, Fnu Mingtian, and Kafayat Adegbenro document a woman washing laundry on the shores of Lake Atitlan in Guatemala. The students were part of a motion pictures trip to the country that was tasked with shooting short documentaries on local social and health issues. “It definitely opens your eyes to tell stories for a different number of people, you meet more characters, you see their culture, so you have more information to describe worlds or people that you want to tell stories about,” said Zulena SegarraBerrios, second year graduate student. Photo courtesy Robin Canfield from Actuality Media 3. Professor Ed Talavera and motion picture graduate student Zulena Segarra-Berrios shoot a HIV/ AIDS activist in an HIV clinic in Guatemala City. “You realize that you don’t have to have the giant crew and the big budget that sometimes you can make interesting and thought provoking stories with very little and a small crew,” said Ronnie Khalil, firstyear M.F.A. student. Alysha Khan // Contributing Photographer DESIGN BY JASSENIA RODRIGUEZ

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OPINION tweet UP WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE GENRE OF MUSIC?

@MiamiHurricane POWER METAAAAAL! #TMHtweetup @KiwiTurilli

@MiamiHurricane I’m in the minority here, but country #TMHtweetup @SethFurman

@MiamiHurricane Trance! Nonstop pure beats, beautiful rhythm, & happiness that fills the heart #TMHtweetup #TranceFamily @peteydamann

Follow us on Twitter at @MiamiHurricane and look for our #TMHtweetup question with answers featured in print every Thursday. Compiled by Lyssa Goldberg.

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OPINION

Contributing columnist, Rebecca Garcia

poll students on what is troubling them. Though this may not be feasible before students register for classes April 7, the university should begin to plan for spring 2015 and beyond. April will mark the third time students use CaneLink without noticeable improvements. Although CaneLink introduced a few features to facilitate course registration – like the “shopping cart,” allowing students to select classes before their registration appointment time, and the ability to be on a wait list – it has introduced more complications than not. For a system implemented to centralize services online, university employees still use myUM to view paychecks. (MyUM was the perfectly functional student portal we were forced to abandon for the glorious promise of CaneLink.) Still another frustrating feature has been that not all majors and programs have requirements on Cane-

Link. Likewise, some classes are not reflected as fulfilling requirements for certain degrees. The major issue for students is the lack of listed prerequisites. This wasn’t even a feature at first, leading students to register for classes they didn’t belong in. Some courses now list prerequisites, but not enough. Beyond these issues are technical errors. How many times did you refresh your screen after a “login failure” notice? How about when CaneLink doesn’t let you add a course you’re absolutely eligible for? UM paid Oracle PeopleSoft to create CaneLink. Although it’s too late to revert back to myUM, the university should develop services with students in mind. That doesn’t seem to be the case here, given the learning curve it takes to register for courses – a counterintuitive process for an educational facility. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Everyone can work for social change e college students serve as spectators to a time of rapid societal transformation. But in these turbulent times of social, economic and political discord, the conventional wisdom that dictated the times of our grandparents does not necessarily hold up any longer. In order to enact effective soREBECCA cial change, college students must GARCIA be civically and politically engaged CONTRIBUTING to the fullest extent. We must make COLUMNIST the shift from mere spectatorship to active participation. If we do not take hold of our own destiny, it will be taken care of for us. It’s important to realize that one does not need to save the world nor take on Herculean tasks. Social change is actually very simple. It’s a matter of courage. To undertake the grand manifesto of social change, we must possess the idealism and initiative to do so. I have already heeded this call. Motivated by an incessant and unyielding quest for justice, I was fervently engaged with Students Toward A

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HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

CaneLink needs a facelift A year ago, the University of Miami launched CaneLink – just in time to throw students for a loop as they registered for the upcoming semester’s classes. Students expressed dissatisfaction with the portal when it came out, and have continued to do so, but it seems that little has changed. The supposedly improved registration software has done everything but improve the student experience. The poorly designed user interface is still confusing to navigate. Scrolling through strangely sorted drop-down menus or poking around for a hidden button is our only solution so far. A permanent fix would be to redesign the website – and, if that’s not possible, perhaps consider another model altogether. We propose that students take an active role and voice their concerns with the university’s Information Technology (IT) Department. And at the same time, IT should gather the necessary research and

The Miami

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@MiamiHurricane #TMHtweetup tie between trance and hip hop (breakbeat) @Dasblackman

Devote time and energy to worthwhile social causes. Regularly exercise your right to vote in political elections. Stay informed on current events.

New Democracy (STAND) in a two-year unionization campaign for campus food service workers employed under Chartwells. We wanted to help provide them with equitable wages and improved working conditions. Social change is empowerment in itself, and it originates with agency. Most individuals fail to realize that agency cannot be attributed to the politically powerful or ascribed to those of a particular socioeconomic status. It’s not solely a tool for the dominant or the wealthy. Rather, it is a quality that is ubiquitous in nature. It is a tool that is far more potent and effective than any counter-action undertaken by a government institution or business corporation. It is the most valuable asset we possess. Rise above the fatalistic apathy and indifference that seemingly devours so much of society. Become aware of your privilege. Be sympathetic toward those that are suffering and in need. Do not feign ignorance, for it is never bliss. Devote time and energy to worthwhile social causes. Regularly exercise your right to vote in political elections. Stay informed on current events. We are all capable of becoming incredible agents of social change. One merely needs to take the first step. Rebecca Garcia is a junior majoring in international studies.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Parra MANAGING EDITOR Margaux Herrera ART DIRECTOR Carlos Mella PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Nick Gangemi NEWS EDITOR Alexander Gonzalez OPINION EDITOR Lyssa Goldberg EDGE EDITOR Marlee Lisker SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITOR Ashley Martinez COPY EDITORS Emily Dabau Sherman Hewitt Monica Sabates Alina Zerpa WEBMASTER Morgan McKie

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger SALES REPS Carlos Parra Frankie Carey MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Erika Glass AD DESIGNER Adam Berger ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero DESIGNERS Emma Deardorff Sarbani Ghosh Jassenia Rodriguez ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Kristen Calzadilla ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Steve Priepke

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2014 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Miami Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Miami Hurricane are located in the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Miami Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten to the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, Fla., 33124-6922. Letters must be signed with a copy of your Cane Card. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1330 Miller Drive, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed for free on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and noon Friday for Monday’s issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Association and Florida College Press Association.


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SG wraps up the year D ear Canes,

What a year it’s been. Just about one year ago, Justin, Robby, our executive board and I took office. Through the hard work and dedication of the entire Student Government (SG) team we’ve completed initiatives and done our best to repBHUMI PATEL resent you. It has been an honor SG PRESIDENT and a privilege to serve as your SG president. We began our term by improving the internal structure of SG to better meet your needs. We worked throughout the summer to get a head start on our initiatives and in the past year we’ve completed many of the projects that we campaigned on, such as building an outdoor fitness court, bringing smoothies to the dining halls, starting shuttles to Dadeland, adding outdoor seating in the dining halls and starting a freshman walk at football games. With only a year in office, however, it’s impossible to do everything. We’ve made significant progress on some of our bigger initiatives such as providing Metro passes to students who need to travel to the medical campus and bringing “Greek Street” to the bookstore. As we transition to the new executive board, we are updating them on the status of these projects and ensuring that the progress continues throughout the next term. To my fellow SG members: Thank you for constantly challenging me to be the best I could. Thank you for your support. Thank you for working so diligently throughout the year. Thank you for your service to our university. Four years have passed more quickly than we could have ever imagined. While I am sad to be closing this chapter, I am excited for what the future brings. To the class of 2014: We’ve spent our days running from classes to work to meetings and we’ve spent our evenings and weekends exploring the city that surrounds us. Our peers have become our family, and our professors and administrators have become our mentors. In just a few short weeks, our time as undergraduate students will be over, but the memories we’ve made, the relationships we’ve created and the lessons we’ve learned will live on forever. We are members of the U family and we are Canes for life. Thank you for everything. Bhumi Patel Student Body President, 2013-2014 P.S. Let us know what SG can do for you by stopping by the SG Office in SAC 210 or finding us on online at facebook.com/UMiamiSG, twitter. com/UMiamiSG and miami.edu/sg. Bhumi Patel is a senior majoring in exercise physiology.

SAT requires preparational changes iaphanous, ephemeral, hackneyed, ignominious – once known (and dreaded) as “SAT words,” these arcane adjectives are now just, well, words. Or so they will be when the College Board releases the revised SAT in 2016. The new SAT, according to the College Board website, will ask students to interpret ALEXA LANGEN “relevant words,” such as “empiriLANGUAGE cal” or “synthesis,” based on conCOLUMNIST text. Students will no longer be required to define “obscure words, only to forget them the minute they put their test pencils down,” creating, overall, an exam “more focused and useful than ever before.” This redesign is based on fundamental misconceptions. Apparently, an extensive vocabulary is not a solid store of knowledge developed through an intimate understanding of the English language. Instead, it is a temporary condition only useful for racking up points on a standardized examination. It would seem, also, that the only words worth knowing are those that regularly appear in day-to-day life. If I’m never going to see the word “munificent” ever again (and it’s true, I haven’t encountered it once since taking the PSAT in 2008), why should I be expected to know what it means, when doing so would only require hundreds of wasted hours poring over flashcards? If, as the College Board suggests, students really do forget the meanings of these “obscure words” the

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instant they close their exam booklets, then they’ve been going about their preparation all wrong. Rote memorization is by no means the only way to build one’s vocabulary. Just like a phone number is easier to remember because it’s broken in three chunks, words also tend to stick a lot better when perceived not just as a random string of letters, but as individual blocks of meaning. Even someone who has never seen the word “indefatigable” should still be able to sense a connection to the word “defeat.” If students were taught such basic logical strategies, the SAT language portion wouldn’t be that difficult – nor would it seem so pointless. After all, language is all about making connections. The new exam’s Relevant Words in Context section will presumably test the same skill, but the fix is like placing a Band-Aid on your finger when the real wound is closer to your chest. The failing exists not in the current SAT Language section itself, but in our perception of it as a waste of time. The exam does not ask students to perform impossible feats; it simply holds them to standards that are often higher than the school system has prepared them to meet. As it stands, students facing the SAT may feel like they’re being asked to make a pocket watch with a hammer. Perhaps the educational system should aim to provide them with the proper tools, rather than simply replacing the intricate system of gears and dials with a rusty nail and a block of wood. Alexa Langen is a sophomore majoring in English and history.

Experience Ultra before leaving Miami

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hen I first came to Miami, I had honestly never heard of Ultra Music Festival (UMF) and I had no idea what it was about. I didn’t really listen to electronic dance music (EDM) before college, and when my friends started buying their tickets to the music festival, I held off. Did I really need to spend that JAMIE SERVIDIO much money for a genre of music I CULTURE/ didn’t care about? ENTERTAINMENT For those of you who have COLUMNIST experienced the unique crowds, intricate sets and community of love, you know the greatness that this weekend holds. For the rest of you, here’s why you should experience Ultra at least once before leaving Miami. During my freshman year, spring rapidly approached, and my knowledge of EDM was still pretty basic. But I’m a music lover, so I caved. I decided that I would buy day passes from people rather than drop the hundreds of dollars I certainly did not want to spend. I recommend this to anyone uncertain about buying a ticket. Buying one-day tickets from a friend – or even a stranger – will save you money but still give you the experience Ultra-enthusiasts rave about. The crowd that Ultra attracts is every people-

watcher’s dream. You will never see this many different types of people from all over the world in crazy outfits, dancing around and singing. Frankly, this was almost as much entertainment as the music itself. The people at Ultra will teach you that sometimes strangers show you kindness that you will never be able to repay. Complete strangers have saved me from crazy crowd surfers and picked up my friend’s phone when it fell out of her pocket. It’s moments like these that give you hope for humanity. The best part of Ultra, though, is being in a seemingly infinite crowd of people connected by a beat. If you don’t understand what I’m talking about, you are exactly the type of person I’m writing this for. A crowd of thousands, singing and dancing to the same song, isn’t something you can read about and understand; you must experience it. Sure, there will be people who say that they’re “boycotting” Ultra this year because of the increased price, or who insist that the crowds that mob Bayfront Park don’t care about the music, just the party. But if you’re like how I was, a freshman torn between going or not, consider it. Most of us don’t stay in Miami after college, and UMF is a staple of Miami’s culture that you don’t want to miss. Jamie Servidio is a sophomore majoring in journalism.

March 27 - March 30, 2014

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OPINION

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DESIGN BY SARBANI GHOSH BY STEPHANIE PARRA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Ultra Music Festival (UMF) is just around the corner. If you’re lucky enough to have scored a three-day pass, you should take advantage of your ticket. The Miami Hurricane has put together some tips to make the most out of your experience. STAY INFORMED UMF has an application available for download for your phone or tablet. It features key information, including a site map, lineup times and news. Need to get in touch with friends? The app also has a “Group Me” function for you to be able to create groups with your buddies and stay in contact. DRESS ACCORDINGLY Ravers usually like to dress with the fewest amounts of clothing possible, but be sure to check the forecast for the day before getting your gear ready. Prepare for rain or shine. Pack

a poncho to stay dry (seriously, put a small one in your neon fanny pack – nothing looks worse than daises stained with mud) or wear sunblock to avoid that awkward tan. Take some toilet paper (like a miniature portable roll – sold at local drug stores) in case you need to use the restroom and the port-a-potties are all out (which they always are). STAY SMART UMF welcomes thousands of people during the three days. Though additional cellphone towers have been implemented on festival grounds in the past, service is scarce. Demand for the charging stations (at select locations in the park) can get pretty high as the day goes on. Be sure to memorize a few of your friends’ numbers and have a designated meeting place in case someone strays from your crowd. Once you’re lost at Ultra, you might not see each other again until the end of the night. TAKE CASH While many vendors accept credit cards, it’s important to take cash to pay for the Met-

ro ride or for drinks and food. There’s nothing worse than going up to buy a bottle of water and realizing the vendor doesn’t take your Platinum Amex. KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN Numerous DJs (even if they aren’t on the lineup) and celebrities attend this event, so keep your eyes peeled. In the past, celebrities like Paris Hilton, Slash (from Guns N’ Roses) and Madonna have made appearances. DJs and celebrities share special bonds, so don’t be surprised if any of the headliners comes out to play with a random celebrity. Also, don’t disregard the smaller stages. DJs originally not on the lineup have been known to play sets on less popular stages (like Skrillex, who performed at the small UMF radio stage in 2012). So make time to welcome the newer, emerging DJs. ARRIVE LATE, LEAVE EARLY Run on Miami time to avoid wasting time. Purchase your Metro card before Friday to avoid long lines Friday afternoon. Get to the March 27 - March 30, 2014

site about two to four hours after the event has started to avoid an unnecessary lengthy and crowded commute. Leave a bit earlier than the last sets finish to avoid a longer trip back home – Miami’s Metro Rails are often delayed due to the high number of travelers this weekend.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? The Miami Hurricane will be covering Ultra Music Festival – for updates, follow @MiamiHurricane on Twitter, or pick up Monday’s paper for additional photos and coverage. Still don’t have a ticket? Tickets to the event are still available at ultramusicfestival.com. Visit the site for links to all of its social media outlets. CAN’T MAKE IT TO ULTRA? View the live stream on youtube.com/user/UMFTV or listen to UMFRadio at umfradio.com. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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REVIEW

‘Supermodel’ lacks memorable singles upbeat indietronica and unapologetic lyrics – this time more angsty than ever. According to Billboard, Foster said he wanted to bring forth the social issues that come with capitalistic greed. He rocks it well, maintaining angry, biting lyrics and animalistic imagery well veiled by the dance-y synth-music playing in the foreground. In the song “A Beginner’s Guide to Destroying the Moon,” Foster sums up the album’s theme of sticking it to The Man with the line “we’ve changed the dreamers and the preachers and the wise men on the hill – to concrete stepping smilers terrified to lose their power and control.” If you’re not in the mood for tortured souls, tune in anyway because the catchy tunes definitely distract from the heated lyrics. However, Foster strips down (instrument-wise, ladies) for the tracks “Goats in Trees” and “Fire Escape.” In these tracks, he sticks to bare-bone guitar and real voice, with no synths to divert from the fact that he has a wonderful tone and crazy vocal range.

BY MAGGY TORRES-RODRIGUEZ CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

After more than 20 collective award nominations for their three big hits, “Pumped Up Kicks,” “Houdini,” and “Helena Beat,” the indie pop band Foster the People is roaring back with a new album called “Supermodel” that’s already leaving its mark. No, really – a giant mural of the album cover was painted along the face of a building in downtown Los Angeles, a block away from where front-man Mark Foster lives. Foster told Rolling Stone Magazine that he wanted to create something tangible, “independent from the music.” The mural features a ‘supermodel’ bending over and throwing up some quaint poetry while the paparazzi take pictures of her from all angles. A time-lapse video of the mural being painted was released in January coupled with the song “Coming of Age,” the record’s first single. Not unlike “Torches,” Foster the People’s first wildly successful album, “Supermodel” retains their signature sound of

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To be fair, the sexy West African influence in the song “Are You What You Want to Be?” rightfully spearheads the album as the most magnetic track of the bunch. “Supermodel” is certainly a genrespecific album and might not be your cup of tea. It definitely is an acquired taste, which might take more than one listen to be fully appreciated. Although the songs tend to blur together if you’re not looking at the track listing, they’re smooth enough for that not to matter.

SUPERMODEL PHOTO COURTESY OF RSVLTS.COM

In truth, “Torches” was a much stronger album, though “Supermodel” was far from a sophomore slump. It is a promising record, though it’s disappointing that not a single song was particularly memorable. You will definitely be dancing along with every track, but no particular one will be stuck in your head later.

You can catch Foster the People at the Big Guava Festival in Tampa from May 2 to 4. For more information, go to fosterthepeople.com. “Supermodel” is available now on iTunes.


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THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS HOLDING ELECTIONS FOR

EDITOR-INCHIEF

BUSINESS MANAGER

FOR FALL 2014 SELLING POINTS POSITIONS AVAILABLE TO FULL TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN GOOD STANDING POSITIONS OFFER GREAT MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE IN ADDITION TO A GENEROUS STIPEND ALL APPLICANTS WILL BE PRE-SCREENED THROUGH AN INTERVIEW PROCESS WITH THE ADVISERS THE WEEK OF MARCH 31ST.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE ON FRIDAY MARCH 28th THE ELECTION WILL TAKE PLACE ON APRIL 10th

TO APPLY APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP IN THE STUDENT MEDIA SUITE FROM ISABEL VICHOT

QUESTIONS ABOUT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CONTACT FACULTY ADVISER, BOB RADZIEWICZ bobr@miami.edu QUESTIONS ABOUT BUSINESS MANAGER CONTACT FINANCIAL ADVISER, STEVE PRIEPKE spriepke@miami.edu March 27 - March 30, 2014

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SPORTS

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The women’s golf teams combined score during the second round of the SDSU Farms Invitational in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

WELLNESS CENTER

Rhythm Nation shows off diverse productions President encourages new dance styles BY LEE EISEN CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

Junior Kenthia Farmer remembers falling in love with the world of theater and dance before she could stand. Her parents are paid to dance at events, and her father once strutted his stuff on the 1980s TV show “Dance Fever.” But Farmer never saw herself getting involved with a campus production company until one day during her sophomore year when the idea came up while messing around with friends. “It all started when I was joking around with my friends,” Farmer said. “I don’t remember exactly what we were talking about, but I came up with the idea of starting my own performing arts organization. At first I didn’t think it was realistic, but then last April I just went for it.” And thus, in 2013, Rhythm Nation, a production group that puts on original skit-like dance performances set to professional and student-produced music, was born. Since then, with Farmer as president, the organization has put on various semi-annual shows, won an International Dance Challenge-sponsored competition last November, and performed at halftime of a UM women’s basketball game. Rhythm Nation has become a valuable addition to the Wellness Center’s diverse club sports program. “Rhythm Nation is one of four dance clubs under the Wellness Center,” said the group’s adviser, Connie Nickel. “On top of our dance clubs, we have various martial arts, we have scuba club and other unique options. We try to give students a wide range of options.” Though the club isn’t even a year old and already has an impressive list of accomplishments, Farmer continues to work hard to organize weekend practices and performances every semester as well as numerous club activities. “Kenthia is the core of the club,” Rhythm Nation dancer Sonny Huynh said. “She organizes pretty much every event from scratch, and she dedicates a lot of her time doing behind-thescenes work including paperwork and connecting with other organizations. Also, she makes most of the choreography that we do. Not sure what we’d do without her.” Farmer has been developing her work ethic, an impressive talent for creating choreog12

SPORTS

HALLEE MELTZER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER INNOVATION: Junior Kenthia Farmer (second from left) dances with Rhythm Nation at an event in December on the Hecht-Stanford Bridge. Farmer, the club president, is responsible for organizing and choreographing the group’s productions.

raphy and strong dancing skills, since she was little. “Dancing has always been a part of my life,” she said. “Both of my parents are dancers. I’ve danced since I was young, and I took advanced dance classes in middle school and high school.” In grade and high school, Farmer worked both backstage and onstage in an annual Black History Month production at a church in Memphis, her hometown. “I’ve been a dancer in the show, I’ve helped with props and set design and I’ve had lead and supporting roles,” Farmer said. “The skills I developed helped me learn how to organize a show and teach people how to dance and perform.” The church productions inspired her to make Rhythm Nation’s performances as innovative as possible. “I want Rhythm Nation to use as much

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 27 - March 30, 2014

original music and choreography as possible, just like the shows at the church did,” Farmer said. “I look at groups like STOMP and the Blue Man Group. We want to be different, original and creative like them.” Auditions for Rhythm Nation are held once a semester, but impromptu tryouts take place as needed. Farmer said all interested students are welcome to join Rhythm Nation, regardless of their talent level. She said she tries to inspire the club’s 20 members to step outside of their comfort zones and master multiple areas of performance. “Kenthia encourages club members to embrace their style of dance theater, and music, but also to open up their minds to new styles as well,” club secretary Shellby Johnson said. “We’re open to all areas of performing arts, and we like our members to enjoy multiple levels of production.”

Farmer and her group are currently working on a show for UM’s Tunnel of Oppression program, and they also have an original music video in the works. Farmer has lofty goals for the club. “I definitely want Rhythm Nation to be one of the biggest production clubs on campus,” she said. “When people think of the growing presence of performing arts on campus, I want them to think of us.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION  Club dues are $10 per semester. To get involved with Rhythm Nation, email Farmer at k.farmer1@umiami. edu or send a message to the club’s Facebook page.


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PHOTO BRIEF

Canes sweep NebraskaOmaha to extend win streak SEVEN IN A ROW: Junior Henrique Tsukamoto returns a serve during his 6-2, 6-3 victory over James McManus of Nebraska-Omaha on Tuesday. The Hurricanes won easily, 7-0, and improved their winning streak to seven matches. Miami now hits the road to face Virginia on Friday and Virginia Tech on Sunday.

PROFILE

Former UM star switches gears, finds success in business McClinton attracts three NBA investors BY ALEJANDRO NARCISO CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

Jack McClinton’s name hangs among a small group of UM legends in the rafters of the BankUnited Center, and the former basketball star is often seen courtside at Hurricanes games cheering on the orange and green. Despite his passion for the sport, McClinton recently came to a realization: his business savvy – not his basketball talent – would lead him the furthest. McClinton has always craved success. However, he has had to overcome a good deal of adversity to reach it. Growing up in Baltimore, Md., he played basketball in the inner city with dreams of making it to the NBA. “I would sneak out of my room at 1 in the morning and work out at the gym for three hours,” said McClinton, wearing a neon green tracksuit as he lay back in his Miami condo. “People say the gym was my second home, but it was actually my first home.” Coaches and media would tell the 6-foot, 185-pound athlete that he was too small, too risky and just not good enough to succeed on the court. McClinton managed to prove the doubters wrong by becoming the star of the University of Miami men’s basketball team.

A sharpshooter from 3-point range, he led the Canes to their first NCAA Tournament victory in almost a decade in 2008. Former teammate Lance Hurdle loved playing with McClinton. “That’s my brother,” said Hurdle, who plays for the Springfield Armor in the NBA Development League. McClinton was taken late in the 2009 NBA draft, and ended up playing basketball overseas. “I worked so hard to play in the NBA. I didn’t want to play overseas ... playing in Turkey was one of the hardest experiences of my life,” he said. “I had to be driven in a big bus everywhere in a place where I couldn’t even speak the language.” Although McClinton still wanted to make it to the league, he began to lose his passion for the game. Instead, he started focusing his attention on the business world. “I’ve always been an innovator and a thinker. I had so many ideas that I wanted to do in the business side,” he said. With the help of University of Central Florida alumnus Amara Thompson, McClinton got involved with a social media platform called CLIQ. The app, which is scheduled to launch in early April, allows a group of friends – or a “clique” – to create one profile page and share thoughts and images. As president of business development, McClinton showed passion and great energy when he discussed the potential of CLIQ.

FILE PHOTO BY THE MIAMI HURRICANE STAFF

“I know why God put basketball in my life,” he said joyfully. “All the connections I made in the basketball world were so I could succeed in this.” So far McClinton has raised more than $1 million with investments from NBA players Carlos Boozer, Dorell Wright and Ty Lawson. His involvement in CLIQ comes at the same time that McClinton is cultivating another interest: fashion. “I’ve always loved fashion,” he said. “I want to change the fashion world and add something to it that’s never been done before.” March 27 - March 30, 2014

McClinton, as ambitious and determined in business as he used to be in basketball, is set to release a resort wear line called Loaded Dock. He describes the line as “Tommy Bahama for the younger crowd.” After fighting to make it for most of his life, the Hurricanes legend whose jersey is immortalized above Miami’s home court has found his purpose. “I always had a chip on my shoulder,” McClinton said. “I knew that I could be whatever I wanted to be. My time is now.” THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

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V, DEAR V

I’ve been on a few dates with this guy I find really cute. The dates have gone well, and he has told me he wants to continue seeing me. Sounds great, right? But there’s one little problem – I can’t get him to kiss me. Through text he says he wants to, but then on date night, nothing. It’s a little frustrating. I get that he’s a little shy but come on! What should I do? Is he going to kiss me or not?

This guy may be kiss or miss ...

Dear Drew Barrymore, You’re in a particularly tricky situation. You could either go ahead and make the first move yourself, or you can wait around for him to do it. Choose the right one and you’ll be headed toward sunset and rainbows and all that fun stuff. But choose the wrong one and you’ll end up sad and embarrassed, perpetually waiting for Michael Vartan to come kiss you five minutes before the opening pitch. Let’s not be that girl. I could jump straight into some hasty generalizations and tell you that he’s probably gay and using you as a beard to cover his steamy relationship with his RA, but it’s very possible that that’s not the case. I’ll be honest – I’ve been screwed over one too many a time by questionable Betas and I’m a little bitter ... sue me. My gut feeling tells me that he’s just not that into you. And I’m not just saying that to quote a cheesy self-help book turned movie; it really seems like he’s not that into you.

If we analyze this situation rationally and look at it from an objective perspective, it looks like he’s playing you. And he’s doing a good job at it too. You may as well be his little fiddle for all the twists and turns he’s taking you through. He might be shy, and that’s fine, but the skeptic in me says that he’s keeping you waiting in the wings because he’s off trying to pursue “something better.” I won’t go into a “men are scum” rant because that’s not why we’re here today, but I want you to consider this: One very wise person once told me that men go after what they want. If they want to date you, they make it happen, and if they want to kiss you, they’ll definitely make it known. So, go after what you want. Find yourself a man who wants to put his face on your face and forget about this “shy kid” who won’t come through in person. Running in circles is never a flattering look for a lady ... unless you’re running the track in the gym in your brand new Lululemon yoga pants. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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TheMiamiHurricane.com is back, rocking a brand new look. Check us out for new features and more stories than ever before.

Crazy about HTML and CSS? The Miami Hurricane is looking to hire a webmaster for fall 2014. To apply, contact online@ themiamihurricane.

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The Miami Hurricane is holding election for editor-in-chief and business manager for fall 2014. To apply, contact editor@ themiamihurricane.com

March 27 - March 30, 2014

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

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Mega Bash 'SJEBZ .BSDItQNt)FDIU4UBOGPSE#SJEHF Join PIER 21 and Housing and Residential Life on the HechtStanford Bridge from 9 p.m. until midnight! There will be free food, caricature artists, henna tattoos, airbrush novelties, and other giveaways for all! DJ Push Play will be spinning all night. Don’t miss out on this awesome event!

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar miami.edu/calendar Thursday, March 27 Rules of a Resume in 3 Easy Steps BNt5PQQFM$BSFFS5FDIOPMPHZ-BC A high-quality resume can effectively sell your skills to any organization! This program will teach you what essential components to include, how to format your resume, and how to create outstanding accomplishment statements.

Patio Jams ft. The Aaron Lebos Trio QNt4$$1BUJP4UBHF Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the live band! The Aaron Lebos Trio is a powerful, all original music group from Miami. Their music encompasses styles of jazz, funk, rock, R&B, latin, and world music.

UMIAMI Music Week #attherat QNt3BUITLFMMFS Come join the Rathskeller Advisory Board (RAB) and enjoy beats from student DJs which include DJ Steven Gizzi from 3:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. and DJ Vin Matta from 5 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. Be sure to follow the Rat on Twitter @UMRathskeller #attherat !

Toppel Information Session: MasTec INC. QNt5PQQFM$BSFFS-PGU MasTek is currently recruiting Staff

and Senior Internal Auditors, Program Managers, Business Analyst, and Staff and Senior Accountants for full time and internship opportunities.

La Cucina Italiana Cooking Class QNt)FSCFSU8FMMOFTT$FOUFS Let your taste buds travel to the country known as the little boot. We’re cooking Italian cuisine, come learn how to prepare it! The menu includes baked eggplant parmesan with homemade marinara sauce, roasted vegetable lasagna rollups with Bechamel sauce, and wild mushroom and asparagus risotto. The cost of the class, which includes cooking instruction, food tasting, and recipes is $20 for UM students and Wellness Center members; $25 for non-members. Bring a container for leftovers!

QuantUM Entertainment Presents: Avenue Q

Friday, March 28 Cosford Cinema Presents: ELAINE STRITCH: SHOOT ME QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

Karaoke #attherat QNt3BUITLFMMFS Warm up your singing voices and get ready to sing your favorite tunes #attherat. Singing gets you a FREE #attherat tank!

Cosford Cinema Presents: HONEY QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

Saturday, March 29 Miami Invitational Outdoor Track and Field

QNt6.)JMMFM QuantUM presents the Tony Award winning musical Avenue Q. Avenue Q is a laugh-out-loud musical that tells the timeless story of a recent college graduate named Princeton, who moves into a shabby New York apartment all the way out on Avenue Q. There, he meets many colorful types who help him finally discover his purpose in life.

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Be sure to check out other performances this week! Free admission.

Cosford Cinema Presents: HONEY

Spring Scrimmage Football QNt(SFFOUSFF

Cosford Cinema Presents: ELAINE STRITCH: SHOOT ME QNQNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

5VFTEBZ "QSJMtQNt3BUITLFMMFS The Freestyle Funny Comedy Show (#FFCS) is an entertaining mix of original stand-up, sharp improv, and amusing crowd interactive games. The #FFCS is accomplished by four of the nations fastest rising comedians: Brian “B Daht� McLaughlin ( NC 102Jamz WildOut Wake-up Show, Walter Latham’s Comedy After Dark ), Anthony “Chico� Bean ( MTV2 Nick Cannon’s WildNOut ) , Darren “Big Baby� Brand, and Demar “Osama Bin Drankin� Rankin.

QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB The Cinematic Arts Commission presents the second in a triliogy of films adapting the popular novel, The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. The adventures of Bilbo Baggins continue as he journeys with the Wizard Gandalf and thirteen Dwarves. They have successfully escaped the misty mountains, but Bilbo has gained the one ring. They all continue their journey to get their gold back off the Dragon, Smaug. Free with your Cane Card.

QuantUM Entertainment Presents: Avenue Q QNt6.)JMMFM Performance by UProv at 10:30 p.m.

Sunday, March 30 Cosford Cinema Presents: HONEY QNQNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

Cosford Cinema Presents: ELAINE STRITCH: SHOOT ME QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

QuantUM Entertainment Presents: Avenue Q QNt6.)JMMFM

[]_[] Relay 4BUVSEBZ "QSJMtBNt'PPUF(SFFO Come celebrate survivors, remember those we have lost, and fight back against cancer. The American Cancer Society Relay For Life movement symbolizes hope and our shared goal to end a disease that threatens the lives of so many people we love. If cancer has touched your life, participating in a Relay For Life event is a way to take action and help finish the fight.

Have an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 16

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Next week...

Belly Bust ft. The FreeStyle Comedy Show

CAC Presents: THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

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