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The Miami

Vol. 92, Issue 30 | Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

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HURRICANE

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STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FL A, SINCE 1929

Through programs like UGenerations and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), students at the University of Miami have been taking the time to connect with the older generation in Miami. UGenerations is a new on-campus organization that aims to raise awareness about making connections between students and senior citizens. OLLI provides a space for members, aged 50 and older, to continue learning. It also welcomes volunteers to help prepare and set up classes. For full coverage of the UGenerations and OLLI, see pages 2 and 3 and the staff editorial on page 5.

HALLEE MELTZER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER POLISHING PERFECTION: During the UGenerations visit to the Floridean Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on Saturday morning, junior and vice president of UGenerations, Gabriela Lins, gives resident Gladys Martinez a manicure.

Organization visits nursing home weekly to connect with residents, share stories BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ NEWS EDITOR

On Saturdays, University of Miami students paint nails, trade jokes and shake up the otherwise routine nursing home activities at Floridean Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Little Havana. These students are members of UGenerations, an organization that is dedicated to interacting with the older population in Miami. Beginning this semester, members volunteer at the Floridean Nursing and Rehabilitation Center each Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon.

Junior Gabriela Lins, vice president of UGenerations, and her team organized a makeshift nail salon in the dining and activity room, the hub of social life at Floridean. Volunteers gave manicures, laughed and shared stories in the dining hall and residents’ rooms with some of the 90 residents who call Floridean a temporary home. “We’re trying to bridge that age gap,” Lins said over a noisy game of dominoes, a pastime for Floridean residents. Lins and senior Caroline Williams, who serves as the UGenerations president, were inspired by their grandmothers to start the club. They were close to them and wanted to share that connection with students at UM.

SEE GENERATIONS, PAGE 2


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Organization unifies generations through service GENERATIONS FROM PAGE 1

The club officially began during the fall of 2013. COSO approved the organization nearly a year ago. “I realized that other grandchildren at UM must feel the same way,” Williams said. Service learning is also a component of UGenerations’ mission. Williams wanted to raise awareness about geriatric health issues and prevent senior citizens from being “forgotten by society.” But Williams stresses that UGenerations is more than a service opportunity – it’s about forming significant connections with older generations. HOME AWAY FROM HOME Right off Flagler Street on 32nd Place, the Floridean is a facility for those who seek rehabilitation and care after leaving the hospital. “It’s just like being home,” said Anais Ballate, the Floridean’s activities and restorative director. She makes sure that residents, who range in age from 60 to more than 90 years old, are comfortable and are not bored during their stay. Also a nurse, Ballate has been working for nearly 5 years at Floridean. Compared to her previous posts at Kendall’s Harmony Health Center at Greenbriar and Heartland Health

Care Center, the Floridean has been her favorite place to work because it is “family-owned.” Kelley Rice-Schild is the executive director of the Floridean and is a descendant of the original owners Jack R. Rice and wife Julia. According to the Floridean’s website, the nursing home is the oldest in Miami and a “rarity” among chain-operated nursing homes. Rice-Schild was not available on the day the student organization went to volunteer. Ballate joked that she is “great” but “sometimes too involved.” Ballate organizes the residents’ schedule of activities that include dinners for all occasions like Valentine’s Day and the Super Bowl, field trips to local parks such as Matheson Hammock Park and Beach, and gardening and cooking classes. Despite all the distractions, residents still look forward to a simple conversation, especially with younger people. “It makes their day better,” Ballate said. “They remind them of their grandkids. They give them an assimilation.” CONVERSATIONS AND CONNECTIONS Just sitting by a few members and residents, each conversation was a window into a life, 80 and 90 years in the making. Ramona Faceda has stayed a month at Floridean, and already knows the ins and outs of residents and visitors alike. She is glad to be part of this small but “caring” community.

NEWS BRIEFS

“They give the best attention,” she said in Spanish about the staff and UM students at Floridean. “They’re marvelous.” Faceda emigrated from Cuba and has been living in Miami for 40 years. Now, at age 80, she continues to enjoy showing visitors the fruits of her labor. Faceda took up gardening as a hobby. She plants tomatoes and green peppers in Floridean’s fountain plaza as part of her physical rehabilitation. She came to Floridean after undergoing a cardiac catheterization, which involves inserting a thin tube to check for heart conditions like clogged arteries Junior Rongrong Wu met with Chinese resident Viola Chen who had only been at Floridean for three days. Wu got Chen to smile for the first time in a while, Ballate said. Wu initially joined UGenerations to learn more about Miami’s local culture. Many of Floridean’s residents have been in Miami for more than 20 years, and a large number are Cuban exiles. Upstairs, before heading back to campus, Lins and members went to visit Judith Warner. They met with her in the improvised beauty salon with photos of Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe hanging on the walls. Originally from Stone Lake, Wis., Warner came to Miami 15 years ago to be closer to her daughter who bought her a condo in the outskirts of Homestead. Lins was surprised to

PHOTO BY ASHLEY MCBRIDE // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CELEBRATING CULTURE: Volunteers at the Black Awareness Month Day of Service, hosted by United Black Students, surround Jamar, 8, during the final round of musical chairs. The annual event was held at the SAC. The day began with UM student volunteers tutoring the the kids in math and reading. They then enjoyed a small carnival that featured games and knowledge of Black history.

HILLARY CLINTON TICKETING Distribution of tickets to see Hillary Clinton’s speech on campus will begin on Monday across all campuses. Only one ticket per Cane Card will be allowed. Student tickets for undergraduate, graduate and law students on the Coral Gables campus will be dis-

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

find out that Warner worked as a teacher in a Native American reservation. “I used to be known as the ‘Albino Indian,’” Warner said. Warner moved to the Floridean because she could not continue to stay alone. She felt “therapied out” from the multiple rehabilitation treatments that were required after each of five spinal surgeries. For Lins, young people should have the opportunity to “tap into wisdom” from individuals like Warner. “We wanted for the elderly and young people to communicate,” Lins said. Aside from Saturday visits to Floridean, Lins hopes the club can expand their reach to students. She applied and received funding from the Butler Center to organize a Valentine’s Day event from Feb. 10 to Feb. 11 at the University Center breezeway.

FOR MORE INFORMATION WHAT: UGenerations first general meeting WHERE: Student Activities Center, Iron Arrow Room WHEN: 8:30 p.m. to 9:30p.m. Monday For more information, email umugenerations@gmail.com or visit the Facebook page at on.fb. me/1bOqrfw.

tributed from the University Center Ticket Window starting at 8:30 a.m. The ticket window will be distributing tickets as long as they last. It is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Medical students at the Miller School of Medicine will receive emails from Student Government with instructions for reserving tickets for pickup at the Miller Campus. Ticket distribution for non-employee graduate students on the Miller Campus will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the Office of Graduate Studies located in Room 650, RMSB, Suite 1128. Graduate students at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science will be able to pickup tickets from the Graduate Student Office located in SLAB 130 beginning at 9 a.m.

an information session 4:30 p.m. on Monday at the Toppel Career Center. They will be speaking about the Content Associate Program. There will be an information session about Omnipoint at 12:30 p.m. at Toppel to learn about the company. The “Work It” Fashion event will take place 11 a.m. on Wednesday in the UC Patio. The event will demonstrate how to work professionally at interviews and networking events.

TOPPEL

Ashley Martinez may be emailed at amartinez@themiamihurricane.com.

The Production and Stats and Information Groups from ESPN will hold

LOWEDOWN February’s LoweDown event will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday. The theme will be “Viva l’Amore!” and will feature a tour of the Kress Collection of Renaissance and Baroque art. The event is free for Lowe members, and admission is $10 for non-members.


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COMMUNITY

Institute provides atmosphere for lifelong learning Volunteer experiences community kindness BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

Qinran Pan had never experienced a Lunar New Year like this. About 8,000 miles away from her home in China, Pan, a second year master’s student in the School of Communication, spent her birthday and the Lunar New Year surrounded by members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). They ordered Chinese food and sang happy birthday in English, Spanish and French, and one member, Albert Fine, attempted to sing in Chinese. “I was really moved,” Pan said. “It’s different, but I think it’s very meaningful to me because I’m alone here, but I feel I’m in the family and they really care about me.” The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is a community of members, aged 50 and over, who seek to continue their education on topics like history, literature, economics, performing arts and computers. Pan came to work at OLLI when looking for a job through MyUM. She was interested in the student assistant position because it involved working with seniors. “I like to work with seniors because I grew up with my grandma, and I think it’s always good to be surrounded by seniors because they are willing to give you their experiences,” she said. Originally the Institute for Retired Professionals, OLLI began in 1984 to give adults the chance to continue learning through social and cultural opportunities. The institute was renamed the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Miami (OLLI at UM) after receiving a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation in 2005. “Our members come for different reasons,” said Adrianne Rondon, administrative assistant at OLLI. “Some of them come because they do want to keep learning and want to keep thinking, some of them just come because they want to socialize or have some fun or learn something new.” The institute has more than 800 members and 50 classes per week, according to Rondon. The six-week class typically meets once a week for an hour and 45 minutes. According to Maki Burgess, administrative assistant at OLLI, UM President Donna E. Shalala and her mother, Edna, are among the students enrolled. The topics and courses are determined by a committee made up of volunteers who

have meetings to determine what classes would be most interesting to members. Roger Shatanof, a former school principal, has always enjoyed learning and has not missed a session since he began attending in 1995. He has also taught a class on a volunteer basis about travel adventures, taking members on different trips. He believes that having not only UM professors come here, but members themselves teach makes the institute strong. “It’s a very nice atmosphere,” Shatanof said. “It’s great. There’s no homework, no reading assignments, no grading, and if you want to cut a class, the visiting teacher isn’t coming after you.” While the members come to learn from the classes, the majority stay to enjoy the sense of community, according to Pan. “If somebody is not showing up for a few weeks, they get very concerned about that and call each other to see if they are OK,” she said. “Here is like a big family, so they can come regularly and feel more active in their daily lives.” Pan experienced this sense of community firsthand as the members helped her adjust to life in America by offering tips and helping her with communication skills. They also took the time to invite her to dinner, took her to the national parks, and one member, Fine, invited her to his home for Thanksgiving. “I know that Thanksgiving is for family getting together and for me, I’m here alone,” Pan said. “I don’t have any family

MONICA HERNDON // PHOTO EDITOR TOP: Dolores Delgado and Joy Jurgensmeyer talk with their classmates before the start of the advanced acrylic painting class at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) on Jan. 22. OLLI offers classes for adults aged 50 and over at Founder’s Hall, which is located near the Newman Alumni Center. BOTTOM: Osher students mix paint to create secondary colors during the advanced acrylic painting class on Jan. 22.

members surrounding me, but I can be invited by a family and feel like being home and have a dinner together with the members or friends. It’s really sweet.” Membership is open to the public and members must be 50 or older and pay a $30 annual membership fee that lasts from Aug. 1 to July 31, which makes them eligiFeb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

ble to sign up for any classes. Some classes are free and others have a class fee that can range from $55 to $100. Classes are not available for credit, and there are no tests, homework or educational requirements. Students who are interested in volunteering at OLLI should email osher@miami.edu or call 305-284-6554. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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GREEK LIFE

Panhellenic Council plans for spring semester Members work to help disadvantaged groups BY MARLEE LISKER EDGE EDITOR

The Panhellenic Council, a group of women who serve as the governing body for eight of the University of Miami’s sororities, has formally initiated its new members. The group is working together to plan events for the spring semester. President Amy Halpern, a member of Alpha Delta Pi, zeroed in on a key ingredient of the Panhellenic community. “What is really unique about Panhellenic is our commitment to sisterhood,” said Halpern, who was elected president in November. “Each chapter has their own sisterhood, but there is also a special connection between all sorority women.” Though many events are still in the works, Halpern said there are plans to bring a member of the Dove Campaign

for Real Beauty to campus on Feb. 12 to speak to the Panhellenic members about body image and women’s empowerment. Panhellenic’s comprised of eight sororities including: Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sigma Delta Tau, Alpha Delta Pi, Zeta Tau Alpha, Delta Gamma, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta and Delta Phi Epsilon. Though each sorority has a specific philanthropic mission, all are based on the tenets of community service, philanthropy, scholarship and leadership. The council presides over these sororities and helps with the organization and execution of everything from recruitment to philanthropy. This year’s council members come from four of the sororities: Kappa Kappa Gamma, Alpha Delta Pi, Zeta Tau Alpha and Delta Gamma. Panhellenic members also extend a hand out to women around the world. Though each sorority has its own philanthropy, there is also the overall phi-

lanthropy for the entire community called Circle of Sisterhood. The Circle of Sisterhood aids women who are victims of abuse, trafficking or poverty through education. The sororities will team up to host events throughout the semester that will raise money for the cause. One of the new council members, Kiki Rossman-Reich, is a senior nursing student and member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. She has taken over as the council’s vice president of recruitment. Rossman-Reich, who transferred to UM from UCF, said Greek life played an important role for her as a transfer student. “I was new to campus, and I wanted to meet new people and get involved as soon as I could,” she said. “I wanted to find something that I could do for the next three-and-a-half or four years of my life to really get involved, and I love it.” In her position, she plans out the formal recruitment program at the start of spring semester.

Steven Priepke, assistant dean of students and director of Greek Life, said the Panhellenic community makes its mark in many ways, particularly of the important role of philanthropies. “One of the most significant impacts the Panhellenic community has is its philanthropic activities,” Priepke said. “They raise tens of thousands of dollars in an academic year.”

THE PANHELLENIC COUNCIL President- Amy Halpern VP of Communication- Peri Diamond VP of Philanthropy- Becca Singer VP of Administration - Stephanie Schwartz VP of Records- Brooke Homovec VP of Coordinators- Bettina Schumacher VP of Finance- Eryn Davis VP of Recruitment- Kiki RossmanReich

PHOTO BRIEF

Dates for donations CUTE AND CARING: Sophomore Marian Li and senior Jacinta Polobao stand onstage at Clarke Recital Hall during the Asian American Students Association (AASA) Date Auction Friday night. The proceeds from the auction went to a charity for the Philippines. A date with Li sold for $210. MONICA HERNDON // PHOTO EDITOR

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OPINION speak UP WHO’S AN OLDER PERSON THAT YOU CAN TURN TO FOR ADVICE?

“My parents are the oldest I would speak to if I had any problems. My mom because I’m really close and I love her so I would ask her.”

NICK PATSY SENIOR

JASMINE PATTANY FRESHMAN

“My dad. I’m most comfortable with him. I’ve lived with him since I was born.”

The Miami

As time goes on, we’re separating ourselves and losing touch with the older generation. And that means we’re missing out on valuable life lessons.

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

Staff editorial, The Miami Hurricane

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Older generations offer unique perspectives For about nine months out of the year, we’re surrounded by thousands of other 18 to 20-something-year-olds with whom we interact. But we can also find ourselves in the company of an older generation – professors, administrators and community members whose experience and wisdom are there to supplement our own. Instead of looking outward, our age group tends to seek out advice and companionship from peers of the same age. As time goes on, we’re separating ourselves and losing touch with the older generation. And that means we’re missing out on valuable life lessons. While other cultures place greater value on the wisdom of the older generation and encourage their involvement in civil society, we’ve been raised with the notion that it’s strange or wrong

to be friends with people who aren’t around our age. Naturally, we turn to peers for advice when we’re going through problems. But how much do our friends really know? That’s why programs such as the Holocaust survivor pairing internship and organizations like UGenerations, exist to bridge the age gap and give us the opportunity to learn from older individuals. Rather than feeling sorry for the older generation’s longing for yesteryear, looking down on them for being out of touch with modern technology, or even holding on to a sense of distant reverence that actually leaves us disconnected, consider instead what we have to gain. If your grandparents immigrated to the United States, for example, they have an elabo-

rate story to tell – about the way things were in their native country and about the lessons they’ve learned from the sacrifices they had to make. We should be pushing to reach out to people who are older than us, and this extends beyond grandparents. Professors on campus, your high school teachers, even respected adults in the workplace, have all had experiences that we haven’t. Ask a former professor to join you for lunch. Socialize more at the office. Talk to an older relative at your next holiday meal. Let’s access the untapped wisdom of the older generation while we can. They understand a lot more than we think they do. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Technology in class distracts from learning “Definitely my mom. We are living very far apart now, which kind of sucks, but I can always ask her if I need advice.”

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LAUREN BARTINI FRESHMAN

SPEAK UP ANSWERS ARE EDITED FOR CLARITY, BREVITY AND ACCURACY. CHECK OUT VIDEO SPEAK UPS AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM. COMPILED BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ

hen syllabi are distributed, the first thing many students look for is the boldfaced headline, “Electronics.” Our stomachs clench as we read that “Laptops are not permitted for note taking, and cell phones must be turned off prior to the start of class.” The purpose of technology is ALYSSA JACOBSON to promote discovery and to share STAFF information with individuals worldCOLUMNIST wide. But when technology distracts us from the knowledge we should be gaining, it becomes an obstacle rather than a tool. Some students may have the multitasking abilities to simultaneously absorb class material while Facebook chatting about a recent Grove rendezvous and reading up on the latest Kardashian mishap, but many are not as capable. Students complain that their classes are not meaningful and that professors drone on as each torturous minute ticks by. However, if an individual does not actively listen to a lecture or participate in class, then this disinterest, which hinders learning, is his or her own fault.

We benefit more from the class when we are fully engaged, whether through our fascination with the subject or simply by asking questions for our professors to delve into a related topic. Developing the ability to actively listen can help you engage in the material and form relationships with your professor. It’ll be a necessary life skill for years to come. There are students who use laptops for more detailed note taking, so some may question whether these technology-banning policies inhibit their learning. But the most important concept may be one that is long forgotten with the days of chivalry and Aretha Franklin songs: respect. If the professor requests that you turn off your electronics, it is a matter of courtesy toward that individual. You pay tuition to learn from these acclaimed professors, so you may as well make the most of your education. Disconnect from your electronics for a mere hour of the day. I promise that online shopping will still be around and Miley Cyrus will still be the same train wreck she was an hour ago. Alyssa Jacobson is a junior majoring in advertising and political science. Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Parra

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger

MANAGING EDITOR Margaux Herrera

SALES REPS Carlos Parra Frankie Carey

ART DIRECTOR Carlos Mella

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Erika Glass

PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon

AD DESIGNER Adam Berger

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Nick Gangemi

ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero

NEWS EDITOR Alexander Gonzalez

DESIGNERS Sarbani Ghosh Jassenia Rodriguez

OPINION EDITOR Lyssa Goldberg EDGE EDITOR Marlee Lisker

ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan

SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Kristen Calzadilla

ASSISTANT EDITOR Ashley Martinez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot

COPY EDITORS Emily Dabau Sherman Hewitt

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

WEBMASTER Morgan McKie

FINANCIAL ADVISER Steve Priepke

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2014 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Miami Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Miami Hurricane are located in the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Miami Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten to the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, Fla., 33124-6922. Letters must be signed with a copy of your Cane Card. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1330 Miller Drive, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed for free on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and noon Friday for Monday’s issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Association and Florida College Press Association.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Tuition affordability should be prioritized s tuition goes up, it seems like financial aid packages and grant funding goes down. Coupled with a tough job market, student debt has exacerbated, and the government is not doing enough to help. Tuition at UM for the 2013-2014 TAYLOR DUCKETT school year was $41,580 with fees STAFF of $1,272. This is up from $32,422 COLUMNIST and $730 respectively, in 2007. On average, students see their tuition increase by $1,240 each year. University tuition is steadily increasing across the board. At the same time, nearly 60 percent of college students in the United States have to take on loans, with those under the age of 30 with the highest percentage of debt. The current amount of outstanding student loan debt is between $902 billion and $1 trillion. Every generation has struggled with college tuition and financial aid, but if tuition continues rising at this rate, with aid falling, it won’t be long before the top universities are made up of not necessarily the best students, but instead only those who can afford it. Recently, the university sent out an email informing students that the Florida Residential Access Grant (FRAG) was being reduced by $33. The reason stated was that “The reduction is necessary to ensure that the program expenditures do not exceed the amount budgeted for the program but the Florida legislature through the budget process.”

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It may be a small amount, but this is an increasingly common trend within federal and state governments. When the budget needs to be cut, education is the first to see the effects. The same people cutting financial aid, however, are the ones espousing views of empowering the next generation to succeed. If they keep reducing our financial aid, which in turn hinders our ability to finish, or even begin higher education, how can we realistically do so? Our elected officials cannot continue to be inconsistent. They cannot continue supporting education only with words. It is time for their actions to follow. Students who graduate from private, nonprofit universities graduate with an average of $29,000 or more in debt. There are students at UM who currently take out approximately half of their tuition in loans. At the end of four years, they will have almost $100,000 in debt before graduate school. Due to high levels of undergraduate debt, some may defer or forgo graduate school altogether because they can no longer afford to pay for it. There is no perfect solution to this problem, but something has got to give. Either legislators should find other ways to reduce spending, or universities should find a way to keep costs manageable. Both parties are responsible for helping the next generation succeed when they leave college. It’s time that they step up to their responsibilities. Taylor Duckett is a junior majoring in economics.

All people deserve nutritious meals erusing the aisles in Whole Foods, I can’t help but feel blissful as I practically skip past the variety of healthy eating options on every shelf. For once, I don’t have to worry about whether a pack of fruit snacks will give me cancer or if the milk I pour into my cereal may give my future children JAMIE SERVIDIO diseases. ENTERTAINMENT/ CULTURE My enthusiasm took a turn for COLUMNIST the worse, however, when I saw the total cost at the cash register. In today’s world, eating healthy comes at a price. But it shouldn’t be this way. If college students can’t afford to eat well, how can people living below the poverty line expect to? For college students, it’s common to sacrifice health for the sake of money, convenience and taste. Now, if college students paying tens of thousands of dollars on tuition have a hard time affording healthy food, imagine the life of a mother working a minimum wage job to support her family. Hypothetically speaking, this mother works a 12hour shift and maybe even overtime at a minimum wage job to support her three children. She is exhausted from working and doesn’t have time to grocery shop or even cook for that matter. She can only afford McDonald’s. Fast food restaurants are not only more common than healthy fresh vendors and grocers, but also way

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more affordable. When a person does not have the financial means to provide his or her family with meals other than junky fast food, a connection emerges between obesity and low income. It is important to consider the notion of dietary convenience for those who live in poverty, those who live meal-to-meal, and those who sometimes don’t know how they are going to feed their families for the week. To them, fast food and processed foods are lifelines. Though it is unhealthy and unnatural, these options are the difference between going hungry and filling the empty stomachs of starving families. Processed food that can be made cheaper have changed the dynamic of malnutrition, as the most inexpensive way to feed the hungry directly correlates with food that is detrimental to a healthy physique. Do you think someone who gets paid minimum wage, scraping by to pay rent, cares about whether his or her food is filled with nutrients? The fact of the matter is, it is innate for humans to resort to whatever means they must in order to survive. Health is, and always will be, compromised for cost. Looking back at history, being overweight was a sign of wealth and luxury because it was a blatant indicator of excess. We must expand options when it comes to affordable, nutritious meals – before obesity transforms into society’s sure-fire sign of poverty. Jamie Servidio is a sophomore majoring in journalism.

Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

Alternative medicine aids in well-being

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or many, a visit to the doctor tends to conclude with some sort of prescription pharmaceutical that has been tested in hundreds of labs to ensure functionality and effectiveness. But some doctors nowadays not only prescribe us medication, but also guide us through meditation, yoga, acupuncture and many other techFAIZAH SHAREEF niques complementary to the generic HEALTH treatment. COLUMNIST This integration is known as CAM, or complementary and alternative medicine, and a decent number of doctors have incorporated these methods into their practices. But there should be more yoga posing, deep breathing physicians out there. To understand why integration is not nearly as prevalent as the conservative view, one needs to understand what alternative medicine is. Alternative medicine is considered any form of medicine that is said to have healing capabilities but has not been scientifically tested, such as homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture. Alternative medicine as a whole focuses more on the mind-body entity and on the idea that thoughts do influence well-being and health. It emphasizes the development of healthy long-term habits as opposed to long-term prescription use. When this approach is integrated with the conventional, state-of-the-art treatments, it becomes integrative medicine. Many strict conventionalists are against this combination due to the lack of empirical evidence supporting alternative medicine. They see it as a pseudo-science, one that is out to drain bank accounts and turn people into present-day hippies (which is not too bad if you ask me). Although it is true that alternative medicine is expensive and difficult to quantify, one cannot disregard the fact that the umbrella of alternative medicine is vast, ancient and holistic. It has been around for centuries in the Indian and Chinese civilizations, to name a few, and has brought to the forefront the concept of preventive medicine. Patients in integrative settings are encouraged to stop the problem before it arises through nutrition, exercise and mental well-being. This would not only aid in swifter rehabilitation, as was shown when cancer patients underwent integrative treatment, but would also bring about a realm of preventive habits that would dampen the chances of future health issues. Integrative medicine makes the patient aware of the entire body as a connected functioning unit, which leads to more conscious decision-making about health-related choices. In this age of technology and progress, we tend to forget our past in the quest to build a more advanced future. But by completely disregarding what our ancestors created, we lose the valuable history that constructs the backbone of our present. This concept most profoundly influences modern-day medicine. By throwing away centuries of experience, even if it is not research-based, about the beneficial effects of integrating alternative medicine into our conventional mental construct, we are discarding a vast basin of knowledge that can transform the face of treatment today. That transformation can lead to a healthier, preventive and more comprehensive approach to today’s healthcare. Faizah Shareef is a freshman majoring in biochemistry and nutrition.


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‘That Awkward Moment’ flips gender roles, reflects rising generation Zac Efron comments on his first production BY LUISA ANDONIE SENIOR EDGE WRITER

The new film “That Awkward Moment” pushes beyond the expectations of a romantic comedy, delivering a refreshing take on the dynamics of relationships. Inverting the female “best friends forever” formula, the film tracks the love lives of three best buds, played by Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan, who make a pact to live the bachelor dream after one of them gets dumped. Zac Efron, who was also executive producer for the first time on this film, admitted his bias against the traditional romantic comedy at a press day in Miami Beach. “Romantic comedies ... felt like the only thing I could bring something to, yet I didn’t want to, because I didn’t like the way so many of them had been made recently.” Reading Tom Gormican’s script for “That Awkward Moment” ended Efron’s four-year search for a film worth producing. “I recognized something in it that was authentic to guys now, to this generation, that I hadn’t seen before,” Efron said. “Tom found a really cool movie. I recognized a lot of my own life in it. I recognized a lot of values that I saw in my best friends, so I knew that if we found the right guys to play the best friends, I could help do something special.” Though the film avoids the typical romantic comedy cliches, everything from its casting to its production fell into place like movie magic. Gormican met Teller at a bar at the birthday party of a mutual friend who introduced them. At the bar, Gormican witnessed Teller in action, with “shots

and hitting on girls.” He called Teller the next day to offer him the role. Teller was happy to support independent filmmaking – an experience he calls truly “collaborative” – but most importantly, he believed in the script. “I thought it was really funny, and I thought it had a lot of heart and I’ve done some comedies that didn’t have the heart in it,” Teller explained. Gormican, who in addition to writing the script also served as the film’s first time director, had his work cut out for him. “If you’ve seen anything about these three guys, just wrangling them is part of the challenge. They’re all fantastic actors, but they’ve got a lot of energy,” he said. That energy is the product of the natural chemistry the actors share on and off camera – one that makes the movie appear heavily improvised. Yet, surprisingly, 99 percent of it came from the script, according to Efron, who finds that in better movies the script is followed closely. “But there are moments that you can’t deny that good actors give you gifts and with these guys,” he said, pointing to Jordan and Teller. “You can’t help it. You just react naturally.” Part of the lack of improvisation was due to the film’s tight time schedule. It was shot entirely in 24 days. Though it is primarily a comedy, the film deals with contemporary issues. It challenges gender roles, moving away from chick f lick stereotypes. Instead of the heroine mooning over her love interest, it is the male character eating his feelings in a tub of ice cream (albeit with whisky) and Facebook stalking to determine if she’s still single. “One of the things that this movie tries to do is say that these gender-spe-

PHOTO COURTESY GEEKEDOUTNATION.COM

cific roles are not that anymore,” Gormican said. “The lines are blurry if they ever were, and while that may sound like an obvious thing, it’s underrepresented in popular culture.” The prevailing comedy is so natural and unapologetic that the parts that are sentimental stand out nicely. “The hope is that people see a lot of different aspects of themselves and how Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

they deal with relationships, and each one of the characters is sort of representative of different things,” Gormican said. With its unpredictable script, natural performances and hilarious plot, “That Awkward Moment” digs past the noise, echoing the evolving and contradicting forces of our generation and making it a must-see this winter. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

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WHERE ARE YOU LIVING NEXT YEAR? Housing Sign-Up Dates

2014 - 2015

Jan. 24- Feb. 7

Resident students “opt-in” via CaneLink to participate in housing lottery. This is mandatory if you want to be considered for on-campus housing.

February 17

Lottery conducted (if needed) and results displayed in CaneLink. Residents not selected in the lottery can still apply for housing and be placed on a priority waiting list. Tutorials and appointment times for lottery winners will be made available as well. Keep the same assignment in University Village as well as “pull in” requested roommates/apartment-mates that meet the eligibilty requirements of 45+ credits to sign up and 60+ credits to move-in in August

March 18-20 March 22-23

Select a new apartment space in University Village as well as “pull in” requested rommates/apartment-mates that meet the eligibility requirements of 45+ credits to sign up and 60+ credits to move-in in August

March 25-27

Keep the same room in their residential college as well as “pull in” requrested rommates/suitemates

March 29-30

Select a new room/suite in the residential colleges as well as “pull in” requested rommates/suitemates

April 1-3

Late sign-up for any remaining available spaces in all residential areas/change a prior reservation/cancel a prior reservation. Beginning at 5pm on April 3rd, any cancellations will result in a $500 penalty.

May 31

Last date to cancel a housing sign-up reservation with only the $500 penalty being applied. After this date, full fall housing charges will apply.

When selecting a new room/suite/apt., please have an alternative choice in mind if your first choice is not available. The $250 housing prepayment must be paid online at the time of sign-up via credit card or electronic debit. Residents who do not sign-up for housing by April 3rd and apply later, will be placed on a waiting list and are not guaranteed housing. If you plan to live off-campus, we have a professional staff member who can assist you with your search.

(305) 284 - 4505 8

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housing@miami.edu THE MIAMI HURRICANE

miami.edu/housing Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

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SPORTS

1

number of tennis games sophomore Kelsey Laurente lost during her 6-1, 6-0 win against Sarah Means of FGCU. Miami cruised past the Eagles on Friday.

We played with fire out there today. We were high in energy, we communicated well and we played good tennis. Stephanie Wagner, sophomore women’s tennis player

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Four double-digit scorers lead Miami in win Canes beat Norfolk State to rebound from three-game skid BY PATRICK RILEY STAFF WRITER

After dropping three games in a row, all to Atlantic Coast Conference foes, the Miami Hurricanes were finally on the winning side of things again when they beat the visiting Norfolk State Spartans, 64-49 on Saturday. The victory marked the Canes’ first home win in 2014. “I thought the key to the game was switching to the man-to-man and putting Erik Swoope in,” Miami coach Jim Larranaga said after the game. “His activity to end the first half was terrific. As Donnavan Kirk mentioned, we went to our scramble defense and trapped them a few times and sped them up, and we were able to stop them and get some very quick baskets.” The Spartans (12-10, 6-2) hung with the Canes early on and even took a one-point lead with nine minutes left in the first half. It was then that Miami increased the pressure defensively and went on a 13-2 run before intermission. With Miami (11-10, 2-6 ACC) up 31-21 to start the second half it was more of the same for the Hurricanes as they pushed their lead to 22 points and didn’t allow the Spartans to score until the visitors hit two free throws six minutes into the half. “Yeah, it definitely caught us off guard,” said Spartans guard Pendarvis Williams when asked about Miami’s increased intensity on defense. “Like coach said, we had a couple turnovers toward the end – I threw a turnover – and they capitalized off it. And they were just trying to throw different things at us, because we were actually being successful a little bit with our offense.” Williams led all scorers with 21 points followed by Miami’s Rion Brown, who pitched in 15. The Canes, who played without forward James Kelly (out with an ankle injury) for the second game in a row, all shouldered the scoring load with four starters recording double-digit points. Senior guard Garrius Adams quietly had one of his best games of the season, netting a double-double with 12 points and 10 rebounds to go along with four assists and a steal. Norfolk State mounted a brief comeback midway through the second half when a Williams jumper cut the lead to 10 with six minutes left in the game. However, Miami continued its course of getting to the freethrow line frequently, making 16 of 18 in the second half.

MONICA HERNDON // PHOTO EDITOR GETTING BACK ON TRACK: Senior Rion Brown, Miami’s leading scorer this season, drives against a Norfolk State defender during their game Saturday afternoon at the BankUnited Center. The Hurricanes won 64-49 with 15 points from Brown.

“I really wanted to get to the foul line,” Larranaga said. “In fact, in the last seven minutes of the game, I told them ‘I want layups and free throws,’ and we were able to do that.” The confidence boost comes at the right time for Miami with the No. 18 Pittsburgh Panthers traveling to Coral Gables for the first ACC matchup between the two on Wednesday evening. “That’s a good win for our confidence, too,” freshman guard Manu Lecomte said. “We lost a couple of games, so now that’s a very good win.”

UPCOMING GAMES

Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

WEDNESDAY vs. Pittsburgh (7 p.m. at the BankUnited Center) SATURDAY vs. N.C. State (2 p.m. at the BankUnited Center) FEB. 10 at Florida State (9 p.m. ESPNU or WVUM 90.5 FM)

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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PHOTO BRIEF

Hurricanes handle FAMU at home

SPORTS BRIEFS SWIMMING

WOMEN’S TENNIS

The women’s swimming and diving team fought hard in Tallahassee this weekend but came up short against rival FSU.

Miami had no trouble against Florida Gulf Coast on Friday, in a match that was delayed one day due to inclement weather.

The dual meet ended with the Seminoles on top, 174-113.

Despite the wait, the Canes breezed past the Eagles 6-1. It was Miami’s last match before heading to the ITA National Indoor Championships next weekend.

Miami’s two divers finished first and second in the 1-meter competition. Cheyenne Cousineau and Kara McCormack also placed second and third in the 3-meter event. Junior Heather Arseth, a transfer, notched another first-place finish for the Hurricanes in the 100-yard backstroke. Arseth won in 56.54 seconds, nearly a full second better than any other swimmer. Freshman Angela Algee came in second place in the 200-yard butterfly event, and junior Amy Wiley won the 100-yard breast stroke. NICK GANGEMI // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR DIALED IN: Junior Henrique Tsukamoto and sophomore William Albanese prepare to return a serve during their doubles match against Florida A&M on Sunday. Miami won 7-0.

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SPORTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

Miami’s next meet is the ACC Championships Feb. 19-22 in Greensboro, N.C.

Brittany Dubins and Stephanie Wagner, ranked 55th in doubles, shut out their opponents 6-0. No. 29 tandem Clementina Riobueno and Monique Albuquerque took their doubles match 6-1. The ninth-ranked Hurricanes had an easy time in singles too, posting quick wins across the board. The lone hiccup was a tough three-set battle that Dubins dropped to Candela Munoz Giron of FGCU. Dubins took the first set 6-2, but then lost the next two 6-2 and 10-8. Spencer Dandes may be emailed at sports@ themiamihurricane.com.


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V, DEAR V I ended the gig with a gag ...

Last night I went downtown with my boyfriend, and I’m not talking about the downtown with the Liberty Tower and Club Space – I’m talking about the one that has an address including the digits 6 and 9. I had never gone down that block before, but my man made it a requisite for me to go there before he watered my own front yard again. Everything was going well until I approached the gate of his yard. I threw up everywhere. I couldn’t contain how grossed out I was. And now I don’t know what to do. I threw up everywhere last night, picked up my stuff and left. I haven’t talked to him since. Any tips on how to handle the situation? Help! I still love the hose

Dear Pukey, It’s OK to be grossed out by man junk. To be honest, it’s not the most pleasant thing in the world to deal with. For the most part, if a guy is clean and well-kept, it’s usually fine, but I’ve found that some college men resort to not-so-daily showers and seem to think it’s acceptable to cover their post-pubescent stink with buckets of Axe body spray or that cologne they got for Christmas. With that being said, I don’t blame you for barfing all over his penis. I would hope you’re choosy enough to be with men who aren’t totally dirty, but it happens. Approaching this situation really depends on how far along you are in your relationship. If this is someone who you’ve been with for a really long time, then you can talk to him calmly and let him know that you were really drunk and life hap-

pens. If you’ve just started dating this guy, then maybe you should just walk away in shame and never talk to him again. But if he asks to see you again, he’s an angel and deserves much more than a blowjob. Don’t stress out too much about this; you’ll probably get a great anecdote for the next time you go out with someone – though if he’s mentioned it to his friends already, it’s out there. Good luck finding a date anytime soon. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

Not in the mood to read? Visit themiamihurricane. com/tmhtv to see TMHtv Now, a new online show that will highlight upcoming events on campus each Thursday.

Got an eye for photography? Interested in working for The Miami Hurricane? If so, email photo editor Monica Herndon at photo@ themiamihurricane.com for more information on the paid position.

Feb. 3- Feb. 6, 2014

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

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For more information: • Visit Graduate Business Programs in Room 221, Jenkins Building • Call 305-284-2510 • Visit bus.miami.edu/MastersPrograms 12

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Feb. 3 - Feb. 6, 2014

Programs Begin Fall 2014


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