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The Miami

Vol. 92, Issue 40 | March 20 - March 23, 2014

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HURRICANEAvenue STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FL A., SINCE 1929

Show addresses issues relevant to young adults BY KATE STANTON CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

BECCA MAGRINO // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER REHEARSING FOR THE LAUGHS: Ian Silverman, who leads in QuantUM’s production of “Avenue Q” as Princeton, practices one of his scenes at rehearsal on Monday.

During the final rehearsals for QuantUM’s upcoming show “Avenue Q,” a racy satire that mixes live actors and puppets, students performed song and dance numbers while operating colorful, toddlersized puppets. Even offstage, cast members gestured and laughed, puppets still in hand, as though they were a part of the conversation. The actors didn’t always operate their furry friends with such ease. In fact, students auditioned without the puppets and only began working with them once rehearsals were underway, using puppets they obtained from the company that owns “Avenue Q.” “It’s hilarious right now because [the student puppeteers] have no idea how to use them yet,” Stage Manager Megan Stephens said during an early rehearsal. “They move the puppet’s mouth when they’re not talking and shut it while they sing.” QuantUM has chosen to adapt the hit Broadway musical, which is about a recent college graduate who moves into a shabby New York apartment on Avenue Q, for their spring show. It is set to premiere March 27 and run until March 30. Though for many the thought of puppets brings up images of children’s shows like Sesame Street, this play deals with issues relevant to young adults such as life after graduation, jobs, relationships, sexuality and racism. SEE AVENUE Q, PAGE 7


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GREEK LIFE

Fraternity implements alternative initiation process SAE eliminates pledging period BY MARLEE LISKER EDGE EDITOR

The eight to 10-week pledge period for aspiring members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) Fraternity was cut short. The UM chapter initiated members Wednesday, which is a few weeks earlier than the scheduled date because of a new mandate. On March 7, SAE’s national branch announced the decision to eliminate the eight-week pledge period, requiring all chapters to initiate potential members immediately. Those interested in joining a fraternity must go through recruitment to earn a bid, which confirms the fraternity’s interest in him. Potential members then begin the pledging process, an eight to 10-week period when they learn about the fraternity’s history and the brothers themselves.

SAE will replace this pledge period with “The True Gentleman Experience,” a new program that emphasizes a holistic learning experience that spans new members’ time in college rather than the condensed, eight-week period. “The goal is to help to address some of the issues that face not only our fraternity, but all fraternities,” said Brandon Weghorst, associate executive director of communication of the national organization. “‘The True Gentleman Experience’ rethinks the educational experience for undergraduate students.” According to an article published online by Bloomberg News, hazing was one of the reasons for reaching this decision. Hazing is a national problem for all fraternities and not just in SAE. Many instances of hazing occur during the pledging process. This action, in part, hopes to lessen those issues and reform the viewpoints some hold of Greek life and SAE, which was named “the deadliest U.S. fraternity,” Bloomberg News reported.

NEWS BRIEFS

SAE identifies itself as a non-hazing fraternity. According to Brad Bradshaw, SAE brother and Interfraternity Council president, UM’s chapter has not had issues with hazing since their official reinstatement on campus in 2004. SAE recolonized its chapter at UM in 2001 and later received its charter in 2004. Steven Priepke, who is the assistant dean of students and director of Greek life, said that he thinks the policy change is a positive one that UM’s SAE chapter will take in stride. “Obviously, it has an operational impact on the chapter here,” said Priepke, who helped reestablish the UM chapter in 2001. “I don’t see that it has a huge impact in terms of the quality of the chapter or really their ability to build a great brotherhood.” “The True Gentleman Experience” is comprised of three parts. The first year is focused on loyalty, the second two on friendship, and the final year on honor. Bradshaw added that these pillars not only introduce students to SAE but also “how Greek life works.”

DRUG WARS Alma Guillermoprieto is a Mexican journalist who has written extensively about Latin America. She will be presenting “The Drug Wars the ‘War on Drugs’ Created” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the CAS Gallery. Guillermoprieto will be speaking about the billions of dollars spent on the “War on Drugs” and how it has led to the expansion of the drug trade. The event is open to the public and free of charge.

ARIANNA HUFFINGTON Student tickets to see Arianna Huffington will be available at 1 p.m. Thursday at tinyurl.com/huffingtonatUM. On April 8, Huffington, chair, president and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, will visit campus to discuss her new book with UM President Donna E. Shalala at 5 p.m. at the BankUnited Fieldhouse.

BEST OF MIAMI The Miami Hurricane will report results to the annual Best of Miami poll on April 7. Students can participate in the poll by visiting tinyurl.com/bestofmiami. Voting will close March 28. PHOTO BY YINGHUI SUN // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER MAGIC FLUTE: Doctoral student Daniel Velasco performed with other Frost School of Music students in the Arboretum on Wednesday evening.

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March 20 - March 23, 2014

Bradshaw, like Priepke, does not believe that “The True Gentleman Experience” will impact the fraternity in any major way. “In regards to our chapter I don’t see it making a huge change in the way we select our new members, the way that we grow, and the way that we operate,” Bradshaw said. According to Bradshaw, a fraternity’s education involves life skills as well as knowledge of the organization. These skills include learning to properly shake someone’s hand, tie a tie and network. “There’s resources on campus that provide these,” Bradshaw said. “But sometimes those messages are better coming from your peers, from your colleagues, and that’s one of the things that fraternities help to facilitate.” SAE is not the only fraternity on campus to make such a change. The Sigma Phi Epsilon and Zeta Beta Tau fraternities have also eliminated the pledge period, Bradshaw said.

Ashley Martinez may be emailed at amartinez@themiamihurricane.com.

STATE OF THE U Student Government President Bhumi Patel will address students in the annual State of the U speech Thursday at 5 p.m. at the Rock.

The Miami Hurricane (@MiamiHurricane) will be live-tweeting throughout the event, #StateoftheU. TMHtv will also feature a full video of the speech on themiamihurricane. com/tmhtv Friday.

Free food and drinks will be provided.


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COMMUNITY

Professor takes different approach to elementary math After-school program helps with research BY MONICA HERNDON PHOTO EDITOR

A new after-school program that aims to make math education more effective and enjoyable has reconnected UM with a local elementary school. Jennifer Langer-Osuna, a School of Education professor, is working on a research project at West Lab Elementary School that looks into how kids work together to solve math problems. The School of Education wanted to rekindle the relationship with West Lab after a few years of inactivity. After months of development, the first weekly session for the math club was held Feb. 18. Langer-Osuna provides the students with complex math problems that come from the Learning Math through Representations (LMR) curriculum. This curriculum takes the emphasis off the traditional means of learning math, and involves more physical activity. “It makes math more interesting. It makes math more social,” she said. Langer-Osuna, a professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning, adjusted the curriculum to focus on interaction between the students. The group work is structured for each student to have a specific role in the problem solving so no student misses out or is neglected by the group or the teacher, regardless of skill level. “So all kids see themselves as having something to say mathematically, and they see each other as having something to say,” she said. Langer-Osuna started as professor in residence at West Lab this fall. The school is located on the edge of campus behind Mahoney-Pearson Residential College. It serves 278 students in kindergarten through sixth grade. When teachers work at West Lab, they have specific projects. When they leave the school, they take their projects with them, and neither the project nor the relationship continues. Langer-Osuna is now rekindling that relationship as the school’s professor in residence. According to Beth Harry, the chair of the Teaching and Learning Department in the School of Education, the student teacher program resumed placements at West Lab this year as well. Education doctoral student Edwing Medina is working with Langer-Osuna on the project. He is excited to work with the West Lab students.

MONICA HERNDON // PHOTO EDITOR MOVING WITH MATH: School of Education professor Jennifer Langer-Osuna leads a session of her after-school math club at West Lab Elementary School on Tuesday. UM reconnected with the nearby elementary school when Langer-Osuna took on the title of Professor in Residence and began her math club research project.

“So often in academia we’re stuck in the theory and then the schools, day to day, are stuck in the practice, so the lab schools allow you to kind of merge the two,” Medina said. According to Langer-Osuna, education schools across the country often have laboratory schools where innovative teaching models are tested and new teachers are trained. The West Lab School is a special case because it’s a public school, and the students are held to the same standards as the rest of Miami-Dade County. After about three years of development, Langer-Osuna would like to be able to offer suggestions to regular teachers about her more effective math education model. Medina looks forward to applying the program to more diverse populations. “There’s a great need for young children to learn math in settings other than the classroom and to participate in math-focused activities that are fun as well as educational,” Harry said. MONICA HERNDON // PHOTO EDITOR RECOGNIZING STRENGTHS: West Lab student Iban Tolba, 10, completes an exercise at the math club lead by Jennifer Langer-Osuna. The students were asked to write out what makes them good at math.

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ACADEMICS

Education graduate program aims for global well-being Vision for students to impact society BY MONICA HERNDON PHOTO EDITOR

To finish her master’s degree, UM graduate student Jasmine Rosa will pack her passion for making a difference and head off to Macedonia, a Balkan nation off the beaten path. In about seven months, she will head overseas in the Peace Corps as part of a recently developed School of Education graduate program. The master’s in Community and Social Change, which is part of the Department of Educational and Psychological Studies, is a manifestation of Dean Issac Prilleltensky’s vision when he arrived at UM more than seven years ago. The program combines concern for multidimensional well-being by improving community-based organizations to better impact society. When Prilleltensky came in August 2006, he found the School of Education divided into three distinct departments. He sought to unite the departments with one common goal. “I’m very interested in helping our school integrate different perspectives on well-being,” Prilleltensky said. “We have a department that looks after educational well-being, another one dealing with physical well-being, and a third one with psychological well-being.”

Although the term well-being typically refers to the physical aspect, the dean says it is “multidimensional” and encompasses the entire human experience. “The master’s program trains people who would be practitioners to improve well-being, whether it’s individual, relational or community organizational well-being,” said professor Laura Kohn-Wood, the former director of the master’s program. “So it’s really focused on applied work and training people to become leaders in human service organizations or NGOs [non-governmental organizations].” The 30-credit program requires a threecredit practicum. Through a partnership with UM, some students do their practicum with the Peace Corps. Others complete the requirement by working at nonprofits more suited to their own goals. The students who go into the Peace Corps actually end up with two master’s degrees: one from the Community and Social Change program and the other from the Master’s International program. According to Kohn-Wood, the program applies the academic discipline of community psychology to human service work. Community psychology focuses more on the systems and institutions that affect individuals than the individual’s own actions. “There’s something very empowering in knowing that your problems are not just your problems,” Prilleltensky said. “That usually,

in most cases, the organizations, the systems surrounding you, play a big role in your wellbeing or in your ill-being. We have to change those systems.” Rosa, the student bound for Macedonia, joined the program because she wanted to start her own nonprofit and make a difference in the community. She said that the group of selected students is small and tight-knit. “If we all work together, we could have a great big impact,” she said. Each year, the master’s program, now under the direction of professor Courte Voorhees, includes about 13 to 15 students, with about a fourth of them following the Peace Corps track. According to Kohn-Wood, in the last couple decades there has been an “explosion” of nonprofits and NGOs, but the world’s social problems have not been solved. Society now needs people who can effectively lead these groups to make a larger impact. The program aims to produce graduates who can change how business is done within human service organizations both nationally and internationally. “One of my goals was to feel like I could be a true change agent in society,” said Erica Myers, a 2012 graduate of the program. Myers is now a program coordinator at Educate Tomorrow, a nonprofit based in Miami. According to their website, Educate Tomorrow works to help disadvantaged reach

The masters program trains people who would be practitioners to improve well-being, whether it’s individual, relational or community organizational well-being. Laura Kohn-Wood, Associate professor of psychology

independence through college education. Virginia McNaught, another graduate of the same program, co-founded the organization. Three other graduates of the program also work in their office, including Myers, CEO Brett McNaught and program coordinator Sara Camacho. There are not many other programs in the United States like UM’s. While a number of schools have programs in community psychology, they do not emphasize the application of those concepts to social problems. Although the master’s program is only four years old, the school has also developed an undergraduate major in human and social development, as well as a recently approved Ph.D. program.

PHOTO BRIEF

SOULFUL TUNES ISLAND BEATS: Zach Deputy looped and layered chord progressions, bass, beat boxing, drum sounds, vocals, and guitar at the Rathskeller on Tuesday night. Deputy is best known for his style of island-infused drum and bass gospel ninja soul music.

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March 20 - March 23, 2014

VICTORICA MCKABA // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER


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OPINION tweet UP WHICH UM BUILDING DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE AT THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD?

@MiamiHurricane Cox science and half of my classes are there. #TMHtweetup @RobDollface

@MiamiHurricane I’m glad I’ve never had a psychology class, because the Flipse Building is at the opposite end of everything. #TMHtweetup @Tatianademes

@MiamiHurricane I live right by the Mark Light Baseball Field so anything beyond that (so everything important) is a journey. #TMHtweetup @11val11

Follow us on Twitter at @MiamiHurricane and look for our #TMHtweetup question with answers featured in print every Thursday. Compiled by Lyssa Goldberg

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

Staff editorial, The Miami Hurricane

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Campus should consider convenience The Writing Center moved to LaGorce House near the freshman dorms during the fall 2012 semester. The Toppel Career Center re-opened behind Pavia Garage this semester. The Student Health Center will eventually make its way across campus to the border of Ponce de Leon Boulevard when the new UHealth facility opens in 2016. Intentional or not, there seems to be a trend of decentralizing offices on campus. As the university pushes these departments farther from the heart of campus, a simple errand becomes more and more of a struggle. When the Miami heat and humidity hits, walking across campus can be downright exhausting. The Miami Hurricane proposes expanding the Hurry Cane shuttle service to include convenient access around campus for both residents and commuters. Otherwise, when essential services are moved to the outskirts of campus, it discourages students

from actually making the trek over to the office, and these services can become under-utilized. Is that resume critique really worth the humid walk over to Toppel? Do any sophomores, juniors or seniors take advantage of the Writing Center? How long can a student survive without giving in and getting a new Cane Card? While we cannot expect to receive everything in neat packages, a centralized location for campus services is crucial to meeting students’ needs. For example, the Study Abroad Office moved closer to the center of campus near the Office of Financial Assistance. Odds are that students will visit the Study Abroad Office and then walk next door to consider their financial situation for that trip. The University of Miami as a private institution should base its decisions entirely on customer satisfaction – aka student satisfaction.

Part of choosing the right college campus is looking at the school’s resources. Prospective students should consider accessibility and usability as the most important factors when choosing a university, aside from evaluating academics. Of course, the campus cannot quickly change how accessible certain services are. It’s also not likely that the decentralization trend can be easily reversed. For the departments located along Ponce, especially like Cane Card services at the McKnight Building next to Titanic Brewery, it’s a hassle to walk or drive out to the main street. The administration should take another look at the existing shuttle routes and revise them to account for the changes to campus that have been made recently. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Housing should be guaranteed to all students

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@MiamiHurricane @sideorderofcam Went to freshman advising just so he could find the Levante building. #lostseniors #silveralert #TMHtweetup @dereksheldon48

The Miami

The administration should take another look at the existing shuttle routes and revise them to account for the changes to campus that have been made recently.

he University of Miami attracts students from all over the globe, as well as from varying socioeconomic backgrounds. Although living on campus can be expensive – especially when you add in a mandatory meal plan – for some students, it may be the best option. Every year, we have a lottery TAYLOR DUCKETT system in which students hope to STAFF be chosen for housing. This year, COLUMNIST an email sent out by the Department of Housing and Residential Life said that 91 percent of students on campus were given housing, but nine percent would be waitlisted. Something must be done to ensure that those who want and need to live on campus are able to do so. To live within a reasonable distance of campus, rent can range from $1,000 to $1,600 per month, not including utilities, depending on living accommodations. Some students can afford to pay this, but others cannot. Additionally, some students have scholarships that

are specifically allotted for on-campus room and board. For those students who don’t get housing and cannot afford to live anywhere else, having to find affordable housing adds an unneeded source of stress. This has led students to complain about the lack of on-campus housing. Each year, some freshmen move into the “upperclassman” dorms, and it’s not unusual to hear about students being temporarily housed in the Holiday Inn at the beginning of the year. The obvious solution is to build more housing. However, it’s not that simple. In order to build new housing, extensive planning has to take place. As things stand now, something should be done to make sure that the students who need to live on campus, whether for financial reasons or otherwise, are able to do so for as many years as they need it. Even if it means shrinking the size of the incoming freshman class, or changing the requirement that all freshmen live on campus, new measures must be put in place. Students have enough to worry about. Housing shouldn’t have to be one of them.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Parra MANAGING EDITOR Margaux Herrera ART DIRECTOR Carlos Mella PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Nick Gangemi NEWS EDITOR Alexander Gonzalez OPINION EDITOR Lyssa Goldberg EDGE EDITOR Marlee Lisker SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITOR Ashley Martinez COPY EDITORS Emily Dabau Sherman Hewitt Monica Sabates Alina Zerpa WEBMASTER Morgan McKie

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger SALES REPS Carlos Parra Frankie Carey MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Erika Glass AD DESIGNER Adam Berger ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero DESIGNERS Emma Deardorff Sarbani Ghosh Jassenia Rodriguez ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Kristen Calzadilla ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Steve Priepke

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2014 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Miami Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Miami Hurricane are located in the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Miami Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten to the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, Fla., 33124-6922. Letters must be signed with a copy of your Cane Card. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1330 Miller Drive, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed for free on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and noon Friday for Monday’s issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Association and Florida College Press Association.

Taylor Duckett is a junior majoring in economics. March 20 - March 23, 2014

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Study what brings you happiness

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ne of the most common questions on the playground when I was a child was, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” The answers ranged from ballerina to policeman, astroHUNTER WRIGHT naut to actor. We all saw ACADEMICS COLUMNIST ourselves being anything we wanted to be, and success was our only perceived outcome. It’s true that not a lot of kids playing in sandboxes know how to say “phlebotomist,” let alone desire to be one, but as we get older and are exposed to new things, we lose our old aspirations in exchange for more practical ones. Beyond practicality, we often decide to pursue careers based on the paths that will please those who love us. But when you’re a people pleaser, it’s easy to forget about yourself. At some point, someone tapped us on the shoulder with reality, teaching us to think about income, opportunity and stability. At some point, someone must have gently pointed out to me that ballerinas should be a little bit taller – and good dancers. While there are many people who, because of true passion for these professions, choose to plunge their hands into biology even though

it’s bloody, or sink their teeth into finance even when it’s fatiguing, there are also a lot of people out there who are pursuing jobs that don’t necessarily please them. They made seemingly necessary “adult” decisions, guided by authority, and often funded by authority’s bank account. I met a pre-med student the other day who, when prompted with what type of doctor he wanted to be, replied “I don’t know – I’m just going to med school because I have to and I guess I’ll figure it out when I get there.” I was reminded of a friend who always wanted to be a teacher but wasn’t allowed to pursue anything outside the medical field. We don’t pursue prescribed goals for the sake of attaining happiness; we pursue them for the sake of avoiding disapproval. It becomes a case of internal satisfaction versus projected satisfaction, and the former is lacking. We renounce what we really want because we become anxious about failing to uphold the expectations of those who believe in us. If you’re unhappy with your major, don’t let the weight of your conscience sink to your feet and prevent you from making the trip to your academic adviser’s office. The proudest we can make our parents is to show them we’re thriving. And we can only thrive when we’re happy. Hunter Wright is a sophomore majoring in creative writing.

Milkshake line must shorten ince 1989, Mark Light shakes have been a staple at Hurricanes baseball games. For many students, attending a game is merely the intermediate step to an ultimate end – consuming a dePAUL RYAN lectable milkshake. BUSINESS/ But it has gotten to ECONOMICS the point that obtaining COLUMNIST a milkshake at a Hurricanes baseball game is more of a hassle than an enjoyable experience. With waits that can span three innings, the amount of time necessary to get a milkshake has become increasingly frustrating, especially with this year’s price increase from $5 to $6 per shake. If the university wants to provide its fans with the best possible experience, changes must be implemented to expedite the process to purchase a milkshake. Last spring, I brought my family to a baseball game against the University of Florida (UF). Between the family-friendly environment of Alex Rodriguez Park and the allure of creamy milkshakes, I assumed this would be a great way to spend quality family time. What I failed to anticipate was the fact that “family time” would

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OPINION

include standing in the milkshake line from the end of the fifth inning until the last out of the game, while my family watched in the stands. When UF was once again in town last month, it was apparent that nothing had been done to resolve this issue. Although waiting in line for a milkshake may be a novelty for those who have never dealt with the grueling wait, this indoctrination into the Miami baseball fan club has long lost its appeal. What is so disappointing about the milkshake line at baseball games is the fact that the solution is astoundingly simple. If the Mark Light milkshake stand were to get a second register, a second soft-serve machine, and hire one or two more workers, I would venture that the wait time could easily be cut in half. This remedy would allow fans to see more of the actual game they came to watch. Mark Light Shakes are an important aspect of the baseball fan experience, but they should add value to fan satisfaction, rather than detract from it. Fans should demand more from the milkshake line at Alex Rodriguez Park. This starts with the university taking steps to improve the efficiency of the milkshake line, so that all can enjoy a shake in timely fashion. Paul Ryan is a junior majoring in economics and finance.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 20 - March 23, 2014

Fad diets compromise health he Atkins, Paleo and South Beach diets, to name a few, are diet fads that have run through our society at unfathomable speeds. They each have FAIZAH SHAREEF NUTRITION guidelines by COLUMNIST which the dieter must abide, and to stray from the rules is to jump into the deep abyss of guilt and self-loathing. These diets create a plan that is meant to serve as a temporary fix to a persistent problem. They lure in individuals with promises of quick results and solid weight loss backed by “groundbreaking” nutritional research. But in reality, these promises do not always deliver. A short-term diet isn’t a long-term solution. Diets are restrictive and temporary. They are formulated only to last a specific set of days and achieve the goal of weight loss. But the price paid may not be worth the outcome. Many of us have struggled with our weight or our self-image. Diets, in our definition, are restrictive regimens, for a period of time, to do something about this problem. However, when individuals have to restrict food items that may be beneficial for them, such as fats (healthy fats are needed for survival because

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they construct the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial electron transport chain), their bodies respond by slowing metabolism as a means to fight the “starvation” and stress it is undertaking. In some cases, the diet is so restrictive that the dieter begins to suffer from malnutrition and eating disorders. In addition, the pounds lost are mainly from lean muscle mass because of its calorie burning capabilities, and the body sees it as a detriment in time of need. Pounds are ready to pounce back on. When the diet ends, they add on more weight. There is no reason individuals should suffer through diets that can harm their bodies. A diet should be a lifestyle plan. Nutrition is a gradual long-term commitment that removes processed carbs, trans fats and refined sugars, and replaces the empty calories with nutrient-rich vegetables, fruits, lean meats, beans and other forms of protein, coupled with exercise, adequate sleep and sweets in scarcity. It takes 21 days to break a habit and retrain taste buds. Eventually, your body will crave the nutrients it needs, and the once-silent health-conscious voice inside you will talk you into a lifetime approach to healthy, happy living. Faizah Shareef is a freshman majoring in biochemistry and nutrition.

– Peter Travers,

“Bad Words is a

TOUR DE FORCE

of comic wickedness. Jason Bateman makes a KILLER

DIRECTING DEBUT.”

JASON BATEMAN

In Select Theaters March 21 • Everywhere March 28


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Managing puppets AVENUE Q FROM PAGE 1

QuantUM leaders say they have been looking to do “Avenue Q” for a while now and are excited that it is finally becoming a reality. “Last semester we settled on ‘Avenue Q’ because we wanted to do a lighter show after the emotionally heavy play ‘Spring Awakening’ that we did last semester,” said Alli Sheahan, the organization’s chair. QuantUM members had the chance to put their own mark on the “Avenue Q” story, as the play is entirely put together by students. “There’s a lot more freedom to do things how we want,” Stephens said. “And a lot more chaos.” The show is irreverent and silly, with crazy song titles that range from “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist” to “The Internet is for Porn.” Yet these songs, along with the puppets, add to the show’s satirical treatment of life in the “real world.” All the actors were enthusiastic about their experiences as a part of the cast. “My favorite part of theater is the adrenaline rush you get once you perform in front of an audience and the pleasure to know that your hard work helped make someone laugh, cry or applaud,” said freshman Ian Silverman, who is playing Princeton in the show. “It’s a special feeling that isn’t caused by many things.” Sheahan said the puppets will bring a fresh perspective to the stage. “The puppets add a whole new element of acting because you can’t just focus on what you’re doing,” she said. “You have to focus on what your hand operating the puppet is doing.”

PRINCETON IAN SILVERMAN

NICKY RYAN TOWNSEND “He’s fun – he’s the cutest puppet in the show, for sure, but it’s been difficult learning how to move the hand and breathe to sing … It’s been challenging thinking of how to breathe as a singer and meanwhile articulating with my hand and my mouth at the same time.”

KATE MONSTER

ROD

“This is actually one of my favorite shows. I saw it when I was little on Broadway with my parents and grandparents, which was awkward. But I love the show so much and this was one of my dream roles, actually, to play Princeton.”

ALLI SHEAHAN

ERIC MCCONNELL

“The show’s really fun because it’s like a lot of irreverent humor, but I think it’s very relevant to college students because it follows the story of a young kid who is just graduating and doesn’t know what to do with his life, which I feel like we all are kind of in the same boat.”

“Adding the puppet onto it has just been really rewarding and very exciting just because you can do so much more with the puppet than you can with yourself.”

Meet the Actors LUCY THE SLUT

The actors talked to The Miami Hurricane about their experiences with the show – and what it was like working with puppets.

VERONICA O’BRIEN “Learning how to act through your arms – like this inanimate object, make it come alive – has really taught me a lot about acting and expression. I use my dancing to kind of help bring her to life because she’s also a cabaret singer and dancer. It’s nice to be able to connect with the inanimate object.”

FEMALE BAD IDEA BEAR, MRS. THISTLETWAT EMILY DAVIS “You have to learn to do all the expressive body movements that you yourself would do as an actor onstage if you were that character – but instead use a puppet.”

“AVENUE Q”

TREKKIE MONSTER

WHO: QuantUM WHERE: Hillel Auditorium WHEN: 8p.m. March 27, 11 p.m. March 29 and 8 p.m. March 30. COST: Free

JOSHUA STRONE

BECCA MAGRINO // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

MALE BAD IDEA BEAR ADAM BORNSTEIN

“Because he’s such a big puppet and takes two people to operate, he has a very big presence when he’s onstage. That’s really seen in some of his songs like ‘The Internet is for Porn,’ which has been a really fun song to work with.”

“I think the oddest part about working with puppets for us is how commonplace it’s become. We’ve gotten to the point where we’re coming in and picking up these brightly colored puppets and just talking with them –sneezing with them – in perfect sync like nothing’s even strange in the slightest.”

March 20 - March 23, 2014

DESIGN BY SARBANI GHOSH

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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MUSIC

Conference features week of music madness from Bromance Records’ producers such as Brodinski, Gesaffelstein, Busy P, Club Cheval and others.

BY FRANK MALVAR SENIOR EDGE WRITER

Spring break may be over, but fear not. Winter Music Conference is right around the corner. On its 29th consecutive year, the Winter Music Conference is a musical extravaganza that attracts over 100,000 visitors a year. There are many events to choose from, whether it’s a club, pool party, lounge or even a yacht. Admission varies from a simple free RSVP to a wallet bruising table at LIV. The opportunity to experience so many different events and to see producers laying down their newest tracks is what makes this event such a unique musical experience. The Miami Hurricane found five WMC events you won’t want to miss:

Grand Central is located at 697 N. Miami Ave. The event is 18+ from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Tickets are $25.

GRAND CENTRAL LAUNCH PARTY Tuesday Join the Circus Records crew at the exclusive album launch party for the Grand Central, which is a 11-track compilation with Circus Records producers. They take over with a massive lineup including the Flux Pavilion, Doctor P, Cookie Monsta, Lets Be Friends, Mizuki and more surprise guests to be announced.

BROMANCE AND FRIENDS

Located at Grand Central. The event is 18+ and is from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Tickets for this event are available online for $30.

Monday If you’re searching for a night filled with heavy techno music, look no further. The French producers take over Monday night at Grand Central for Bromance and Friends. Get lost in the beats

Wednesday A night full of dancing, booty bass and booty in general is what the soldout HARD Miami: Rump Shaker is. The event returns to Grand Central again with Boys Noize, Zeds Dead and RL Grime spinning. It’s recommended to stretch before the show so as not to not pull a muscle from the nonstop dancing you’ll do at this event. Located at Grand Central. The event is 18+ and from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Tickets for this event are sold out.

FOOL’S GOLD RECORDS March 28 What makes this event worth going to? A-Trak, Tchami, Destructo and Nick Catchdubs and other Fool’s Gold record producers spinning for free at Grand Central. A full WMC experience wouldn’t be complete without catching a Fool’s Gold Records event. Entrance

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Learn more at one of our next events. To register, visit bus.miami.edu/MastersPrograms

8

EDGE

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 20 - March 23, 2014

UKF POOL PARTY March 30 If you’re over 21 and don’t attend a pool party, then you aren’t experiencing WMC to its fullest. Pool parties on South Beach are a must. Don your flashiest bikini or nicest swim trunks for the UKF Pool Party and jam to drum and bass and dubstep. Dirtyphonics, Emalkay and Buku are just some of the producers spinning at the party. The Clevelander Pool & Patio is located on 1020 Ocean Drive, Miami, Fla. The party is 21+ and is from noon to 10 p.m. Tickets are $25.

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For more information: • Visit Graduate Business Programs in Room 221, Jenkins Building • Call 305-284-2510 • Visit bus.miami.edu/MastersPrograms

Located at Grand Central. The event is 18+ and is from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. RSVP at foolsgoldrecs.com/miami.

Programs Begin Fall 2014

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SPORTS

The Miami baseball team was on the road Wednesday night to face Florida Gulf Coast. For coverage of that game, visit themiamihuricane.com.

BASEBALL

Canes have no answer for Knights’ Olson in Tuesday loss

NICK GANGEMI // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR FEELING DOWN IN DEFEAT: Senior Brad Fieger kicks the dirt in frustration during Tuesday’s 9-2 loss to the University of Central Florida. Miami has lost five of its last six games.

Fielding miscues again becoming problematic BY NEIL DWYER SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The Hurricanes came into their midweek games against the University of Central Florida and Florida Gulf Coast University ranked 25th in the Baseball America poll, but couldn’t shake the doldrums from the weekend series at Georgia Tech. Miami lost a Tuesday night showdown with the UCF Knights 9-2 at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field. Knights starter Tanner Olson pitched a brilliant eight innings, striking out four and walking none through 104 pitches. Canes starting pitcher Danny Garcia

did not fare well against the Knights. In the first inning, Garcia faced seven batters, giving up the first two runs of the game on a sacrifice fly and an RBI single. Through two innings, the Knights already had eight hits. The Hurricanes showed a sign of life in the bottom of the third. Dale Carey and Garrett Kennedy were on second and third, with Tyler Palmer at the plate. Kennedy scored on a wild pitch from Olson after Palmer lined out to third, and freshman Willie Abreu flew out to end the inning. That was about all the Canes could muster. Garcia only lasted four innings on the hill. Subsequently, Enrique Sosa was called in the fifth and gave up two more runs in the sixth. The backbreaker came when a chopper to shortstop Brandon Lopez was bobbled, turning a possible inning-ending double play

into what later amounted to a 5-1 lead for UCF. AJ Salcines, who has had the roughest season of all Miami’s relievers with a 18.00 ERA, came into the seventh with two on and no one out, and again couldn’t clean up the mess Sosa left. Salcines let two more runs (credited to Sosa) cross the plate in the inning. Zack Collins hit his third home run of the year just off the top of the left-center field wall in the bottom of the seventh, but by that time the game was long out of reach. Even though Miami has gone 1-5 in its last six games, coach Jim Morris still maintains a positive outlook for his squad. “These guys have worked hard, I’ve said it all year long [that] they’ve worked hard,” Morris said. “They gotta keep battling and work hard, or fold up their tent and go home. March 20 - March 23, 2014

You got two choices, and we got a lot of season left … a lot of young players are talented, along with our other guys. They gotta keep battling and make it happen.” Of note in Tuesday’s lineup: David Thompson did not start. Morris said a spider bit Thompson and his arm was swollen. After a rough start to the season defensively, when the Hurricanes committed 15 errors in their first five games, the team began to even out last week in the homestand against Villanova and Boston College. But Miami is regressing back to early February. In the last six games, 11 fielding errors have been committed. Tuesday’s loss puts the Canes at 11-10. ACC rival Virginia, ranked No. 3, will be in town for a Saturday-Sunday-Monday series. All three games will begin at 7 p.m. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

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SPORTS BRIEFS

PHOTO BY YINGHUI SUN // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER TEAM EFFORT: Senior Omar Aly and Junior Wilfredo Gonzalez celebrate a point during Monday’s match against Wisconsin.

MEN’S TENNIS Miami defeated Wisconsin on Monday behind strong performances from its senior singles players. Omar Aly, Gabriel Flores and Diego Soto all won their matches after the Canes clinched the doubles point, so Miami notched a quick 4-0 win. “Wisconsin is a great program,” said Rincon. “They rattled us, but we

were able to stay on track. We knew it was going to be a tough match. I am proud of the team.”

the NCAA Tournament this season, it is the fifth straight year the Miami women will play in the postseason.

The Hurricanes host Wake Forest at 4 p.m. Friday, followed by N.C. State at noon Sunday.

With a win Thursday at the BankUnited Center, the Hurricanes will face either South Florida or North Carolina A&T in the second round.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Miami women’s basketball team missed out on the Big Dance this year, but there is still a chance for the Canes to make some postseason noise. The WNIT kicks off Thursday as Miami hosts Stetson for a first-round matchup at 7 p.m. Despite missing

WOMEN’S TENNIS The Canes won their eighth straight match, 6-1 over Princeton, on Wednesday. Miami has risen to No. 13 in the nation, and will look to continue its hot streak at home at 11 a.m. Friday against Syracuse. Spencer Dandes may be emailed at sports@themiamihurricane.com.

NOTICE TO ALL CANES REGISTER AND VOTE The student vote will decide the Floridian Medical Marijuana Amendment on November 4, 2014 Follow the “Florida MMBlog” weekdays starting 3/17/14 Sponsored by Florida Attorney David (Dave) Thomas of Florida First Medical Marijuana Business Consultants, L.L.C. Blog www.waltonlaw.org/blog

Website www.waltonlaw.org

Being informed is not a bad thing. 10

SPORTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 20 - March 23, 2014

E-Mail dave@waltonlaw.org


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V, DEAR V He’s got the goods but not the looks ...

I started dating this guy, but he’s not exactly Brad Pitt. (Don’t blame me – I was on Tinder while under the influence and I drunk-swiped right). Still, he’s got so much going for him. He’s nice, family-oriented, owns a business and is my age. Everything is perfect about him, other than the fact that he’s not quite the looker. He also has a severe case of halitosis. What should I do? I know I sound so vain, and I know I’m no Angelina, but I can’t help but be so choosy when my heart was broken the last time I went against my heart’s wishes and dated someone I ended up loving. If I had listened to my heart in the first place, it wouldn’t have ended up broken when the person I ended up loving turned out to be such garbage. I’m yelling (at) Tinder

Dear Toni Collette, Let’s take a step back here and look at it from a larger perspective. You’re rebounding. And that’s OK. Seriously, it’s your constitutional and moral right as a citizen of this great nation, to exercise your power as a woman to get jiggy with it. It’s all kinds of Rosie the Riveter type feelings that I won’t go into, but the main thing you should take away from this is that you shouldn’t feel ashamed of being on Tinder. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: Tinder is your friend. Tinder will get you laid. Tinder is the dating pool of the 21st Century and you should take full advantage of that. That being said, just because you’re in need for some emotional and physical stimulation doesn’t mean that you have to endure a repulsive sexual partner for an extended period of time. And I don’t mean to be shallow and tell you that you have to go out and find Adonis, but let’s be honest with ourselves here: That’s great that he’s a nice guy with a career and all, but if there’s no fire (and you constantly have

to turn your head away to keep yourself from smelling his egg breath – which, by the way, ew) then dump that guy and move on. I don’t care if you’re not perfect and I don’t care if you’re being choosy. You do what you want, when you want, how you want, and nobody gets to judge you for it. Unless you believe in some sort of higher power that would label you a courtesan and damn you to an afterlife in eternal hell ... but even if you do, screw ‘em. You’re young, you’re single and you have a broken heart the size of Texas. Mend it with some sweet, sweet lovin’ from that dude that lives in Brickell Key and wants to take you out for drinks. I don’t think you’re ready to fall in love again. So stop worrying about it; just live your life. After all, it’s always the unexpected shy guys that sweep you off your feet. You just have to stop looking for them. Speaking of, I just got a new match on Tinder so I gotta bounce. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

Rudy Magalde

Hair Salon

20% discount on all UM students with Cane cards. - Highlights - Full Service Salon - Haircuts for Men for $23 Women for $25, Manicure for $15 Pedicure for $20 plus 20% discount *promotion expires 4/20*

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DID YOU MISS US?

WILD ABOUT THE WEB?

TheMiamiHurricane.com is back from Spring Break, rocking a brand new look. Check us out for new features and more stories than ever before.

Crazy about HTML and CSS? The Miami Hurricane is looking to hire a webmaster for fall 2014. To apply, contact online@ themiamihurricane.

WANT NEWS ON THE GO?

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Don’t have time to pick up a copy of The Miami Hurricane? Sign up for email news alerts at themiamihurricane.com and never miss a story.

The Miami Hurricane is holding election for editor-in-chief and business manager for fall 2014. To apply, contact editor@ themiamihurricane.com

March 20 - March 23, 2014

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

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Canes After Dark: Willy Wonka 5IVSTEBZ .BSDItQNt4UVEFOU"DUJWJUJFT$FOUFS Join us in the SAC for this month’s Canes After Dark inspired by one of our favorite childhood movies! We are filling the SAC with everything sweet including, paint your own chocolate lollipop, a chocolate fountain, and cotton candy. Don’t miss your chance to be the lucky finder of a Golden Ticket!

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar miami.edu/calendar Thursday, March 20 Category 5 Golf Appreciation Day QNt6$3PDL Join us at the Rock and play some mini golf with Category 5! There will be free food and 5 holes for you to try and conquer! Come one, come all!

Patio Jams ft. Steep QNt4$$1BUJP4UBHF Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the live band! Steep formed in the summer of 2011 as friends pursuing and exploring their core, music. The flame ignited, and the group quickly transformed into a serious endeavor. Steep touches on a wide variety of styles anywhere from jazz-funk, to progrock epics, all of which are often painted with a colorful display of improvisation.

and the first 500 students will recieve a $10 food voucher that can be used at all concession stands! Be sure to claim your ticket. Come show support to our Canes as they look to move to the next round!

Meditation Class QNt)FSCFSU8FMMOFTT$FOUFS Namaste students! Are classes, social life, and work stressing you out? Take a break and meditate! You will develop mental clarity and discipline that will help you focus and improve concentration (great skills when it comes to studying). Instruction is free and open to everybody.

Friday, March 21 Hurricane Invitational Outdoor Track and Field "MM%BZt$PCC4UBEJVN

Rowing vs. UConn "MM%BZt.JBNJ#FBDI

Cosford Cinema Presents: CINEAST(E)S

Women’s Tennis vs. Syracuse

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Women’s Basketball vs. Stetson

Men’s Tennis vs. Wake Forest

QNt#BOL6OJUFE$FOUFS The Miami Hurricanes women’s basketball team earned its fifthconsecutive postseason berth and will matchup against Stetson in the first round. Admission for all students is free

Haitian Culture Week Presents: World Cup Soccer Tournament

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Planet Kreyol and the Organization for Jamaican Unity welcome all students to come enjoy a friendly soccer game on the Green!

Cosford Cinema Presents: NYMPH()MANIAC - VOLUME I QNQNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB

Saturday, March 22 Hurricane Invitational Outdoor Track and Field "MM%BZt$PCC4UBEJVN

Haitian Culture Week Presents: Planet Kreyol Service Day BNt4UBOGPSE$JSDMF Join Planet Kreyol as they give back to their community by spending the morning at the Little Haiti Community Garden. Free transportation and lunch provided!

Category 5 will be giving out custom baseball caps while supplies last! Arrive early and be sure to get one!

CAC Presents: FROZEN QNt$PTGPSE$JOFNB Frozen is this year’s “coolestâ€? Academy Award winner. When a prophecy traps a kingdom in eternal winter, Anna teams VQXJUINPVOUBJONBO,SJTUPòPOBO epic, musical journey to find Anna’s sister Elsa, the Snow Queen, and put an end to her icy spell, encountering mystical trolls, a funny snowman named Olaf, and magic at every turn. It’s Walt Disney Animation Studios at its best! Starring the voices of Kristen Bell & Idina Menzel. Free with your Cane Card.

Sunday, March 23 Men’s Tennis vs. NC State QNt/FJM4DIJò5FOOJT$FOUFS

Cosford Cinema Presents: SHORTSLAB MIAMI

Cosford Cinema Presents: NYMPH()MANIAC - VOLUME I

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Cosford Cinema Presents: NYMPH()MANIAC - VOLUME I

Cosford Cinema Presents: RED DESERT

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Baseball vs. Virginia

Baseball vs. Virginia

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Tunnel of Oppression

.POEBZ .BSDItQNt4"$#BMMSPPNT Come watch your favorite contestant compete for the crown and opportunity to represent the University of Miami at Miss Florida in June. Tickets are $7 in advance and $10 at the door; you won’t want to miss this! For more information, contact the Butler Center for Service and Leadership at 305-284-4483.

.BSDItQNt4UVEFOU"DUJWJUJFT$FOUFS#BMMSPPNT The Tunnel of Oppression is a 3-day long, sensory-based, multimedia program designed to expose participants to various acts of oppression taking place in society today. Tours run 4-10PM on March 24-26. Be sure to go through the tunnel! Its an amazing and powerful experience.

Have an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 20 - March 23, 2014

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Miss University of Miami 2014 Scholarship Pageant


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