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Vol. 96, Issue 24 | April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

THE BEST OF

M I AM I

EDGE // Pages 8-11

Graphic by Austin Lent // Art Director


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NEWS

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16 , 2019 - April 22, 2019

CAMPUS LIFE

What matters to Ken Jeong: Minority representation in film By Jaime Harn Copy Chief

South Korean actor, physician, and comedian Dr. Ken Jeong was invited to the Universit y of Miami to speak to st udents about the impor tant topic of race in f ilm as par t of the W hat Matters to U lect ure series, sharing his own personal experiences as a minorit y in the acting world. The event, held on April 11, was hosted by St udent Government’s St udent Engagement Planning Agency and moderated by Jack Camoratto, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering, and Winston Warrior, a lect urer in the School of Communication. Jeong has starred in many popular movies, including “The Hangover” and “Crazy R ich Asians.” He’s also had prominent roles in television sitcoms such as “Communit y” and “Dr. Ken.” Currently, Jeong has his own Netf lix comedy special, “You Complete Me, Ho” and ser ves as a judge on Fox’s “The Masked Singer.” But Jeong didn’t always want to enter the enter tainment industr y. He began as a pre-medical st udent at Duke Universit y and went on to obtain his medical degree from the Universit y of Nor th Carolina at Chapel Hill. “In many ways, I was kind of ‘Koreaned’ into being premed, and I’m not throwing my parents under the bus. It was me too,” Jeong said. “I did not grow up as a kid having any aspirations to do comedy or to do acting, so I act ually got bitten by the acting bug in college.” But Jeong said he felt obligated to f inish what he star ted and ended up doing his residency in New Orleans while taking up acting jobs on the side. It was only a few years af ter he married his wife, Tran Ho, that he

decided to give up medicine and pursue acting f ull time. “The day I decided to quit was a watershed,” he said. “I mean, I was scared. I did not k now what was going to happen, but I had the suppor t of my wife and my family.” However, Jeong’s

Something that Jeong discussed in his address to the crowd was how Asians are stereot yped in roles on television and in movies. In his show “Dr. Ken,” Jeong recalled “white, male writers” writing the role for Asians and how he would

said that there has been a big change in the enter tainment industr y since his 2007 role in “K nocked Up.” He cited “Crazy R ich Asians,” a blockbuster st udio movie with an all-Asian cast, as a good example of this progress. “It’s so rare,” Jeong said.

Hunter Crenian // Photo & Visuals Editor “THAT’S WHAT’S UP”: Actor, comedian and physician Ken Jeong speaks to hundreds of students about his experiences and insights as a minority in the world of entertainment.

journey to becoming a star af ter he quit his medical career wasn’t always easy. “If you are a minorit y pursuing a career in the ar ts, no one really kind of gives you a course of what to expect even if you’re a minorit y in the ar ts or a minorit y in comedy or the show business, and there is no magic one thing ‘If you’re Korean, you’re like this.’ There are always obstacles and instabilit y and uncer taint y,” said Jeong.

sometimes have to go back and rewrite par ts to por tray these characters more accurately. “It’s not like my wife would say, ‘Hey Ken. How’s your day?’ ‘Oh, it’s tough being an Asian American doctor in San Fernando Valley. How was your Asian American day?’ Some of the writing was getting to that level,” said Jeong. Overall, while Jeong said he thinks there are still not enough roles that accurately por tray Asian Americans, he

“I’ve already seen an evolution.” Overall, the event was a success. Keegan Gibson, a junior majoring in biomedical engineering and chair of the W hat Matters to U planning committee- which is now a par t of the new SG agency SEPA, said that over 800 st udents attended the event. “W hen we were f irst thinking about who we wanted and what these events would be, I don’t think any of us could’ve dreamed of an event that

was that successf ul and that went that well,” said Gibson. Many st udents who attended the event were also pleased with the outcome. Jasmine Or tiz, a freshman majoring in contemporar y music, said she heard about the W hat Matters to U series through a digital f lyer. She said she went to see Jeong speak because of his work in “The Hangover” series and “Crazy R ich Asians.” Or tiz said her favorite par t was “the advice he had to give regarding following your tr ue passions and f inding your path in life through trial and error.” Andrea Wright, a senior majoring in marine science and geological sciences, said she really enjoyed the topic of the event. “It was interesting to hear him talk about diversit y and the por trayals of Asians in Hollywood, especially his views on the roles he’s acted in that some criticize as ver y stereot ypical,” said Wright. “I liked hearing his rationale and his intent behind the characters he’s played.” St udent Juliette van Heerden, a freshman majoring in microbiolog y and immunolog y, decided to attend the event af ter taking par t in the f irst seminar with Bill Nye. “It went so well, I was excited to go to the second seminar to see Ken Jeong too,” she said. “I think the way he balances his intellect with his f unny acting career is admirable, especially when he blends the t wo together to display his opinions on impor tant topics.” As someone who has always been interested in the topic of minorit y representation in the media, van Heerden said she “loved his take on it and how he could relate his perspective to his personal life stor y and his experiences.”


THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16 , 2019 - April 22, 2019

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NEWS

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16 , 2019 - April 22, 2019

CAMPUS LIFE

Construction on intramural fields elicits mixed student reactions By Natalia Rovira News Editor

The intramural f ields located behind the University of Miami’s Patti and Allan Herbert Wellness Center have served as an open space to students for several years. Sports teams such as soccer, ultimate frisbee, spikeball, f lag football and many others come together on these f ields, providing students with the opportunity to stay active and interact with their peers. Freshman Ryan Appleby, a business management major, has played intramural soccer for the past two semesters. “I enjoy the team aspect and playing with friends,” he said about the sport. “Winning is nice too.” Appleby said he hopes to continue playing IM soccer as he continues his college career at U M. However, constr uction crews have replaced soccer teams on the f ields and forced all IM sports to a halt. In honor of the 20th anniversary of the Herbert Wellness Center in 2016, the f ields are currently undergoing a major, multimillion dollar renovation that

Hunter Crenian // Photo & Visuals Editor TURF TUNE-UP: Intramural sports teams were kicked off of the IM fields after a multi-million dollar construction project began earlier this month to correct problems with the field.

aims to enhance the eff iciency, safety and overall experience of the space while still preserving its basic purpose. “This is the f irst time the outdoor f ields behind the [Herbert] Wellness Center will be completely renovated,” said executive director of the Herbert Wellness Center, Scott

Levin. According to Levin, the upgrades are not only meant to improve various aspects of the f ields but to also make way for the next phase of U M housing: the Centennial Village, which is supposed to replace Hecht Residential College by 2024. The project aims to correct some major operational

The Miami Hurricane 2015 POTTER PRATICE: The UQuidditch team, along with a variety of other sports teams, regularly uses the Intramural fields for practice and tournaments against other school teams.

problems of the f ields, altering its topography in hopes of preventing the collection of rainwater in low areas, allowing for better drainage and providing a more organized irrigation system. Along with these changes, the current f ield lights will be replaced with energy-eff icient LED lights, cutting the Herbert Wellness Center’s energy usage by up to 50 percent. “All of this means a safer environment, less downtime and more opportunities for maximizing usage for our intramural and club sport programs,” said Levin. Crews will also replace the f ield’s sod with the same turf that is used on the U M athletic f ields. This grass is designed for humid temperatures and constant play and is scheduled to be installed in mid-July, Levin said. But not everybody is happy about the renovations. Some people who regularly use the f ields are upset that the constr uction has disr upted their ability to play IM sports. Senior Dan Abrams, a math and physics double major and

president of the r ugby club, said the constr uction has been detrimental to his team. He said his team was not well-informed about when the constr uction would occur or how it would affect their practice schedule. “I wasn’t given any specif ics or updates once April came around, so whenever we practiced, we had to be very on the ball because we never knew when constr uction was starting,” he said. “Eventually, one day we were practicing and got kicked off the f ield for constr uction even though there was none taking place that day.” Abrams said his team has not been given any practical alternatives as to where they can play r ugby while the f ields undergo constr uction. Nonetheless, site work is already underway and “the new f ields will be ready to play on Labor Day,” slightly after the beginning of fall semester but just in time for the start of fall outdoor intramural and club sports season, Levin said. Although the site contractor has taken into consideration possible delays in the constr uction schedule, “it is critical that the new sod has time to become rooted before we begin playing sports on the f ields,” Levin said. “The more time, the better for the long term.” Sean Griff in, a junior majoring in biochemistry who participates in IM ultimate frisbee, said he believes that “the updates are much needed for the IM f ields. Putting turf on the f ields would greatly improve their quality.” Appleby agrees that the renovations will provide necessary improvements to the f ields but said, “I’m very skeptical of turf. I’ve never been a big fan, but if it works, then I’m okay with it.” Similar to Abrams, Appleby sees the constr uction as somewhat inconvenient. “I do wish they didn’t start now as I would still like to use the f ield.”


THEMIAMIHURRICANE

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April 16 , 2019 - April 22, 2019

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THEMIAMIHURRICANE

OPINION

Opinion

The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

EDITORIAL

NEWSROOM: 305-284-4401 editor@themiamihurricane.com BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rebecca Goddard MANAGING EDITOR Ben Estrada SENIOR EDITOR Naomi Feinstein NEWS EDITORS Natalia Rovira Anna Timmons

DESIGNERS Beverly Chesser Jeremy Augustitus BUSINESS MANAGER Ryan Yde ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER Austin Furgatch

EDGE EDITOR Jordan Lewis

SALES REPRESENTATIVES Diego Torres Maxi Bonito Russie Tselentis

SPORTS EDITOR Josh White

FACULTY ADVISER Tsitsi Wakhisi

COPY CHIEF Jaime Harn

FINANCIAL ADVISER Steve Priepke

OPINION EDITOR Kay-Ann Henry

PHOTO / VISUALS EDITOR Hunter Crenian

SENIOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANT Demi Rafuls

ART DIRECTOR Austin Lent To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. The Miami Hurricane is published weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Miami Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Miami Hurricane are located in the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Miami Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten to the Student Activities Center, Student Media Suite 200, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, Fla., 33124-6922. Letters must be signed with a copy of your Cane Card. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1330 Miller Drive, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200. The Miami Hurricane is published on Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed for free on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Student Activities Center Student Media Suite 200, by end of the business day Friday for Tuesday print. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Association and Florida College Press Association.

WANT TO WORK FOR US? Visit themiamihurricane.com/apply or email editor@themiamihurricane.com.

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

Why are student media outlets still being censored? It’s been a tough couple of years for journalism. Many things have been happening as the industry undergoes changes to move into the digital age. Unfortunately, one of these major changes has been the laying off of thousands of dedicated journalists at well-known media companies such as Huff Post and Buzzfeed. The American press has also come under attack by our current president, who regularly tries to portray the media as an enemy to democracy, when in fact, it’s an ally. And lastly, but surely not least, journalists have been faced with the threat of censorship — a threat that has risen over the past years. The work journalists are doing to uncover truths and to service their country can sometimes cost them their lives. According to a report by Reporters Without Borders, 2018 was the worst year on record for journalists being killed. The murder of Jamal Khashoggi by the Saudi Arabian government and the shooting of unarmed journalists at the Capital Gazette, a newspaper based in Maryland, both happened last year. The work of journalists is more important than ever, but they are being targeted for it. This extends to student journalists as well.

Often we talk about censorship on a bigger scale and fail to scrutinize it within colleges and universities. Though this is where we’re supposed to have more freedom in everything we do, student media outlets are still being censored. In cases of American colleges, administrations have threatened retaliation

student journalists faced these same challenges as administrators subsequently f ired two journalists and then re-hired other people for the positions they stated would be eliminated. Even more surprisingly, the dean of the School of Communication at Liberty, Bruce Kirk, reportedly told the new staffers, “Your job

“ Journalism that only aims to paint society in a positive light isn’t really journalism. Journalism that ser ves authority and institutions rather than the people isn’t journalism.” against advisors and students for news that might portray their schools in a negative light. Some publications have been subject to “prior review,” which means administrators have to sign off on content before the paper gets published. In 2018, Liberty University’s

is to keep the LU reputation and the image as it is… Don’t destroy the image of LU. Pretty simple. OK? Well, you might say, ‘Well, that’s not my job, my job is to do journalism. My job is to be the First Amendment. My job is to go out and dig and investigate, and I should do

For more opinion columns, visit

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anything I want to do because I’m a journalist.’ So let’s get that notion out of your head. OK?” There is an unwritten oath of ethics and morality that journalists accept when they begin their careers. Journalism that only aims to paint society in a positive light isn’t really journalism. Journalism that serves authority and institutions rather than the people isn’t journalism. Student journalists should be able to write and publish stories that serve their community. Free student press is a key component of a college education and the act of censoring student journalists is robbing them of the full experience. We must continue to f ight against censorship for those who have been silenced in the line of work. Our democracy, and our future, depends on it. Imagine if the Miami Hurricane staff wasn’t able to freely call out our administration in editorials or if our opinion writers couldn’t voice their thoughts on controversial topics such as abortion or hazing. We can’t, and no one should have to. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.


COMMENTARY

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

OPINION

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There is more to America’s diabetes problem than meets the eye R a c i a l disparity in the United States often echoes the trials of social injustice that framed A me r ic a n history. The same issues by By Daniela Perez exposed Staff Columnist leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr. still render African Americans paralyzed today. Even as a new decade approaches, African Americans are still struggling with unemployment, education, poverty, the criminal justice system and most menacingly, health. A disease that’s often been overlooked both in larger society, but specifically black communities, is diabetes. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention national survey data, AfricanAmericans are 77 percent more likely to be diagnosed with

diabetes compared to nonHispanic Caucasians. The complications that accompany diabetes also hit African American communities harder than others. Diabetic retinopathy is 46 percent more prevalent in African Americans than nonHispanic whites, and they’re 2.6 times more likely to have end-stage renal disease, amputations and fatal complications due to diabetes than Caucasian Americans. The factors that attribute to racial disparities in diabetes are attributed to a variety of factors that already disproportionately affect black communities including obesity, neighborhood segregation, poverty, depression, education and unemployment. To put it simply, diabetes in African American communities is not only a symptom of pancreatic failure but a symptom of the inherently racist institutions that haunt them every day. And the problem is gradually getting worse.

The average diabetic patient requires insulin medication to mimic the insulin hormone that is normally produced by the pancreas and that regulates the amount of glucose in a user’s blood. The patient needs to inject the product either because their pancreas doesn’t create insulin on its own or because the body has become resistant to the insulin their body produces. With approximately 7.5 million Americans relying on the drug, the pharmaceutical industry is now booming with a $27 billion global insulin market, and insulin prices are skyrocketing. With the United States not having a market-based economy for prescription drugs, the average diabetic is shelling out between $250 to $1,500 for vials of insulin, according to wholesale acquisition cost data from Elsevier’s Gold Standard Drug Database. In order to best reduce the prices of insulin, policymakers have explored several ideas in

order to best solve this problem. The ideas ranged from seizing drug patents to creating generic competition. However, what policymakers didn’t explore was the fact that the economy for prescription drugs is not market-based. As the Los Angeles Times puts it, it’s shamebased. And behaviors such as seizing drug patents and creating generic competition is an example of peak capitalism in the United States. A recent study in the Journal of American Medical Association found that a quarter of people with diabetes are rationing their insulin because of cost. This can lead to a variety of serious complications, including blindness, amputation and death. Given the statistics, the impact of staggering insulin prices is felt in African-American communities the most. According to 2017 Census population estimates, 22 percent— or 9 million— of African Americans fall below

the poverty line. This is a major factor contributing to racial disparities in health insurance coverage, as highlighted in a 2017 study that stated that African Americans had persistently lower insurance coverage rates or no insurance at all compared to other communities. Our society upholds covert racist values that sneak up on African American communities in the most sinister way by echoing them in their health. When the statistics of poverty and health connect and staggeringly work to harm black people in America, we need to realize that the problem is, in fact, institutional racism. This is not only an issue of racism but also an issue of greed. When we allow vital medicine to cost nearly $2,000, what does that say about our society? We don’t value the lives or health of black folks or anybody else for that matter. Daniela Perez is a junior majoring in journalism and political science.

COMMENTARY

We need to talk about the problem with contemporary cancel culture

By Jonathan Buckley Contributing Columnist

It is b e c o m i n g more and more common to see the public “ c a n c e l ” musicians, a c t o r s and other celebrities due to their past actions and statements, either recent or

distant. A notable example would be Kevin Hart, a comedian who was set to host February’s Academy Awards but had to step down after homophobic tweets and jokes from 2010 and 2011 resurfaced. While he did eventually issue an apology, he initially refused to do so, stating, “If you don’t believe people change, grow as they get older, I don’t know what to tell

you.” Hart’s case is not isolated. Roseanne Barr was kicked off the reboot of her show after making a racist joke on Twitter, and Kanye West has complained that his public support of Donald Trump has caused him to be canceled as well. In response, many Internet users have criticized this new trend of ending careers based on moral objections, seeing it as a form of censorship and an overreach of political correctness. This begs the question: Is cancel culture real? Is it truly possible to cancel artists? In many ways, cancel culture is indeed real. In today’s age, it is becoming more and more impossible to truly remain invisible, and seemingly minor things from a long time ago can have consequences that are anything but minor. The boycotting of people

and institutions is nothing new, but this phenomenon, like every other form of human interaction, is amplified in the age of social media. Also, peoples’ definitions of what is and isn’t offensive have broadened. In a time when sexual assault wasn’t taken as seriously as today, the highly profitable TV shows of Bill Cosby, Matt Lauer and Bill O’Reilly would never have been canceled. In fact, cancel culture in a way ref lects the free market. Nobody just decided one day that X, Y and Z are offensive, so anyone guilty of saying those things should have their careers ended. People gradually decided certain things were offensive and, in the examples mentioned, executives decided eliminating controversial people was a more profitable route than keeping them around, despite

the extraordinary revenue. At the same time, not everybody who gets canceled ever really fades from the spotlight. In most cases, people are symbolically canceled rather than literally canceled. The canceling Kanye described regarding his support of Trump came from people who objected to his opinion, but he hasn’t truly been canceled, as evidenced by the fact that he continues to release music that debuts high on the Billboard charts. Logan Paul, despite his January 2018 blunder of making light of suicide, still makes YouTube videos and boasts 19 million subscribers. So what are the implications of cancel culture? Is it dangerous or is it just increased awareness of what is good and what is not? Most would agree that canceling rapists like Bill Cosby and pedophiles like R.

Kelly, to name a few, is totally acceptable. I do too. The same extends to people who have said outright racist or bigoted things. However, cancel culture is a dangerous game. Definitions of what is and isn’t offensive are highly objective, and there’s no universal definition that can set the rules. If the trend of artists being canceled over their personal opinions grows, it will be a dire threat to free expression and make the arts dull. Celebrities will have to walk on eggshells to avoid harming their careers. Comedy would be hit the hardest because pushing the envelope is often crucial for good and meaningful material. So maybe it’s time to cancel cancel culture. Jonathan Buckley is a freshman majoring in political science.


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BEST OF UM

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

BEST OF MIAMI

Hunter Crenian // Photo Editor

HEALTHY FOOD: PURA VIDA

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

PLACE TO RELAX: UC POOL

Hunter Crenian // Photo Editor

With its newest location only a short walk from Mahoney-Pearson, it is no surprise that UM students have fallen in love with Pura Vida. In love might even be an understatement, with 49 percent of our Twitter voters and 52 percent of Instagram voters calling it the best healthy food option, beating out Rice Mediterranean Kitchen and Diced. The menu can get a bit pricey, with meals ranging from $10.95 to $16.95, but with just one bite, you can tell you’re paying for fresh ingredients and ample nutrients, two things missing from most of our diets. Whether you’re in the mood for a salad, wrap, smoothie, or juice, Pura Vida has you covered. And with the Coral Gables’ location offering a value meal using Cane Card swipes, there really is something for every pallet and budget.

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

BEST OF UM

What’s the most “Miami” part of campus? Definitely the UC Pool, aka the perfect place to do absolutely nothing except work on your tan. There’s no need to worry about finals while you’re basking on the pool deck— this is one of the rare parts of campus that’s all about relaxation. And when the Miami sun gets too hot, you can take a dip in the refreshing pool, cooling down as the water washes away your worries. We all deserve a break, so next time you have a few spare hours, take full advantage of your free time and enjoy UM’s most relaxing amenity. Just don’t forget your sunscreen. Hours: Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 12 p.m.-5 p.m.

Hunter Crenian // Photo Editor

PHOTO OP: LAKE OSCEOLA

9

UM’s campus is filled with Instagram-worthy scenery, but Lake Osceola is one of the most picture-perfect views in all of Coral Gables. With fountains, palm trees and an incredible view of the student center, the lake is always the perfect place to stop and snap a photo. Stand on Fate Bridge to watch the sunset and capture your next profile picture as the sky becomes a watercolor canvas. Or, pose on the steps in front of the SSC and wait for a real-life ibis to wander into frame. Your options are endless, with scenery that matches any moment and possibilities that are only limited by your imagination. These are the photos that will decorate your dorm for years to come. These are the memories that will last a lifetime.


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BEST OF UM

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

NIGHTCLUB: LIV

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

Source: Facebook, Wynwood Walls

Fruity drinks, f lashing lights and a pounding 808 beat. Where are you? Probably LIV, Miami Beach’s hottest nightclub. At least that’s what 37 percent of the people who voted in our Twitter poll called it when they crowed LIV the best club in Miami. Located in the famous Fountainbleu Hotel, LIV is the perfect place for a wild night— it’s loud and crazy and tons of fun. With 18,000 square feet of lounge and dance f loor space, there’s plenty of room for your whole crew to party until the sun comes up. So put on your coolest outfit and head towards South Beach for a taste of the night life that made Miami famous. It won’t be a cheap outing, but it’s guaranteed to be a fun one. Address: 4441 Collins Ave Miami, FL 33140 Hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 11 p.m.-5 a.m.

FREE ACTIVITY: WYNWOOD WALLS Source: Facebook, Club Liv

The artsiest part of Miami is also becoming one of the city’s most expensive neighborhoods, quickly filling up with shops, clubs and restaurants that cater to Miami’s wealthiest hipsters. Luckily, the best part of Wynwood can be enjoyed for free: the Wynwood Walls. Enter the maze of murals without paying a single cent and enjoy a variety of unique illustrations. You might have to deal with crowds of camera-wielding tourists, but the vibrant colored walls will make everything but the art seem insignificant. For even more free fun, venture outside of the walls and explore the other art that Wynwood has to offer. Murals cover nearly every building exterior, and many galleries throughout the area are free to enter. Address: 2520 NW 2nd Ave, Miami, FL 33127


THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

BEST OF UM

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DATE PLACE: FROST SCIENCE Hunter Crenian // Photo Editor

The Monkey Jungle. Taco Tuesday. El Patio Wynwood. The Venetian Pool. Trust me, we’ve weighed our options, and the Miami Hurricane staff has decided that the Frost Science Museum is the best place for you and your special someone to spend a romantic night. Now approaching its two-year anniversary of opening, this 250,000-square-foot facility combines a planetarium and aquarium, along with unforgettable interactive experiences and anything else you can imagine, all while still being situated in the middle of Miami’s beautiful skyline. Though a bit on the pricey side for a college student’s budget, the Frost Science Museum is sure to wow your date. And, who knows, you may even learn something. Address: 1101 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132 Hours: Everyday 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

BRUNCH SPOT: GREENFOLD CAFE Conveniently nestled within all the buzz of Coconut Grove, a 79 percent of our Twitter voters and 69 percent of our Instagram voters agree that Greenstreet Cafe is Coral Gables’ best place for brunch. With reasonably priced breakfast staples ranging from f luffy French toast and pancakes to nutritious omelets, Greenstreet has something for everybody. A wide selection of beers, cocktails, and other alcoholic drinks are the cherry on top of this already delicious sundae. The wait here can sometimes be long, especially on weekends, but exploring all of the surrounding shops is a perfect way to kill time. Address: 3468 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove, FL 33133 Hours: Sunday-Tuesday 7:30 a.m.-12:20 a.m., Wednesday-Saturday 7:30 a.m.-2 a.m.

Source: Facebook, Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science


12 SPORTS

THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

BASEBALL PROFILE

Van Belle takes unique route to starring at Miami By Maxwell Trink Senior Sports Writer @MaxwellTrink

Hurricanes redshirt junior pitcher Brian Van Belle is an unconventional arm in Miami’s rotation. The Pembroke Pines, Florida native is not a natural f lamethrower like his counterparts on the starting staff. Rather than lighting up the radar gun, Van Belle uses command and movement to get outs. And just like his pitching style, Van Belle’s journey to the University of Miami was different from those of his teammates. Van Belle attended Archbishop McCarthy High School, one of the many powerhouse baseball schools in South Florida. Yet, he had to work his way up to even play at the varsity level. “I wasn’t the type of kid to start on the varsity team since freshman year,” Van Belle said. “I kind of made my way through the ranks and then just learned about the culture of the team.” When Van Belle reached the varsity team, he had only one goal on his mind—receiving a scholarship from an NCAA Division I university. However, Van Belle’s physique was a major roadblock. “He was a twig,” former Broward College Seahawks coach Ben Bizier said. “He was scrawny and not developed.” Van Belle stood at 6 feet tall and only weighed 140 pounds, scaring off many collegiate programs. In the end, Van Belle received just two scholarship offers, both from junior colleges. “We sold him on how we could change him and make sure he was on the mound,” Bizier

said. After contemplating his options, Van Belle committed to Broward College in the late fall of his senior year of high school. But it was clear that attending a “JuCo” was not the ideal situation for Van Belle. “I wouldn’t say it was rock bottom, but it’s very gritty,” Van Belle said. “You can’t take anything for granted. My freshman year, I will never forget every day before practice. We had to pick 12 weeds out in the outfield before the day started. You had to fix the mound yourself. Nothing is done for you.” Instead of stylish Adidas jerseys and jackets, Van Belle wore a plain Hanes T-shirt that read the word “Broward” on it. Being a pitcher at a junior college was never lavish, but things got worse for Van Belle. “I just threw a pitch and noticed that my elbow had popped,” Van Belle said. “I knew I had to get surgery, and from then, I knew it was going to be a grind.” The right-hander had Tommy John surgery and was forced to sit out his first two seasons with the Seahawks. All Van Belle could do was patiently wait and support his teammates, but there was a light at the end of the tunnel. Through his recovery and training, Van Belle came back for the 2018 season better than ever. In 11 starts, Van Belle finished 5-1 with a 4.15 earnedrun average and 48 strikeouts to lead the Seahawks to a Southern Conference Championship. With his redshirt sophomore performance, Division I schools gained interested in Van Belle. “We heard a lot about him from high school coaches and background checks,” Miami associate head coach and pitching

Josh Halper // Staff Photographer PITCHER PERFECT: Brian Van Belle fires a fastball against the UMBC Retrievers March 3 at Mark Light Field. Van Belle gave up one run and struck out nine in five innings in Miami’s 20-1 win.

coach JD Arteaga said. “We liked the arm action, we liked the body and what he brought to the table.” Receiving an offer from UM was a dream come true for Van Belle. “Out of high school, if you would have told me I would’ve been playing at the University of Miami in three to four years, I would’ve said, ‘You’re joking,’” Van Belle said. “I knew this is where I wanted to be.” From day one, Van Belle was determined to make an impact on the Hurricanes’ pitching staff, and his hard work paid off. Firstyear head coach Gino DiMare and his staff elected to put

Van Belle in Miami’s weekend rotation. When Van Belle heard the news, he was stunned. “When I found out I was the Sunday starter, I was ecstatic,” Van Belle said. “I called my parents up right away, and I just knew this was an opportunity given to me, and nothing is set in stone.” Van Belle owns a 5-2 record and leads the Hurricanes’ starting rotation with a 3.28 ERA. He has struck out 53 batters through his first nine starts, helping Miami rank as the second-best pitching staff in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Van Belle continues to thrive in the rotation for Miami and uses one major lesson he learned at Broward College: get better today. “Every time we would ask Brian how he was doing, he would say, ‘Just trying to get better,’ and he still has that attitude,” Bizier said. Van Belle aims to improve with every outing, every out and every pitch. The Hurricanes look to extend their winning streak to six games when No. 23 Miami hosts Florida Gulf Coast Tuesday at Mark Light Field. First pitch is set for 6 p.m.


THEMIAMIHURRICANE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

SPORTS 13

TENNIS PROFILE

Achong acing competition during her freshman season By Maxwell Trink Senior Sports Writer @MaxwellTrink

Hurricanes coach Paige YaroshukTews expects commitment from every player. After all, winning more than 350 matches requires a team effort. And through her years of experience, Yaroshuk-Tews saw right away that freshman Daevenia Achong would dominate the court from the start of her University of Miami career. “She’s very much a team player,” Yaroshuk-Tews said. “She wants to see the team succeed. But she’s very much an individual in terms of her relentlessness and approaching this as her job every day.” Achong’s passion on the court stems back to her days in Geleen, a small town in the Netherlands. While just 3 years old, Achong went along with her brother, Gemayal, to his tennis practices and picked up the dropped balls. “The trainers said it was possible that she could start training at that age,” her father, Jerry, said. “And so Daeve’s tennis practices started. Soon, they saw she was talented and eager to learn and train and slowly started to play and train more.” Achong continued her tennis training, excelling on the court. She competed in tournaments across Finland, Kenya, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain and Sri Lanka. Achong secured multiple national tournament championships in her home country in both singles and doubles and won a Grade 4 singles championship in Kenya in 2016. She peaked at No. 224 in the ITF Juniors rankings in January 2017 and several university and professional coaches wanted Achong to join their team. But it was clear Achong wanted to receive an education while enhancing her game. So, she decided to attend the UM, which to her, was an easy choice. “It’s all so good between the coaches, the intensity of the training, the environment,” she said. “It’s like all in one.” Achong enrolled in January, and it became clear that she was ready to learn and get better in every practice. “What I like the most about Daevenia is how mature she is and how she takes criticism,” junior Estela Perez-Somarriba said. “I think

that’s very unique for a freshman and especially that she came in the spring.” Achong’s attention to detail and hard work has paid dividends throughout her early collegiate career. In just her first semester, Achong has been tabbed Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Week twice and ACC Freshman of the Week three times. “She’s been able to transition to college tennis so fast,” Yaroshuk-Tews said. “Being a spring admit and being able to gel and mix with these kids has really been able to catapult us.” The play can be very different in the United States compared to the Netherlands, especially since Achong is a part of a team rather than constantly focusing on her individual play. “I like the environment of a team,” Achong said. “You can support each other all the time in matches and training. I think that’s the key to a good result in a match.” While Achong is a team player, Yaroshuk-Tews still describes her as a “free spirit.” Every player on the team wears a visor during practices and games— Achong is the only exception. Instead, she wears a slick, black bandana across her forehead. “I’m used to playing with a bandana,” Achong said. “It’s a habit. I’ve always played with a bandana since I was 12 years old.” Though the individualistic spirit is there, Achong continues to focus on consistency and listening to her teammates on and off the court. Achong finished the regular season with a 15-8 record in singles action and a 16-4 mark in doubles play. Achong and senior Daniella Roldan form the No. 20-ranked doubles pair in the country. Although Yaroshuk-Tews recognizes Achong’s talent, she knows the Dutch phenom still has a lot of work left at UM. “She has that X-Factor,” the 18th-year head coach said. “She has a ton of variety in her game, she’s able to transition in the court, and her movement is unbelievable. She kind of possesses everything you need in order to be good. With her, it’s going to be about putting everything all together.” While the future is still undetermined, Achong’s father knows that she will be able to piece everything together. “Daeve is very dedicated, eager and focused with hard work to reach her goals,” he said.

Courtesy JC Ridley // Miami Athletics DUTCH DYNAMO: Freshman phenom Daevenia Achong celebrates against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish March 15 at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center.

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THEMIAMIHURRICANE

Dear V,

Have a question for V? Email

dearv@themiamihurricane.com.

V’S TAKE

April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

Balancing friends with finals

This semester has been rough. I’m super busy with school, work and extracurriculars, and I feel really overwhelmed all of the time. Because of that, I’m having a hard time balancing my responsibilities with my relationships. I’ve made a lot of new friends this semester, and while I’m super grateful for all of them, I sometimes feel like I’m hanging out with them at the expense of my grades. I hate saying no when to plans because I feel like I’m missing out, but it’s hard to enjoy a night out when I’m constantly worried about the work I should be doing instead. What should I do?

Dear Reader,

Finding a balance between work and play is something most college students struggle with, including me. In fact, I’m so bad at doing this that I recently found myself in a Denny’s at 4:30 a.m. on a Sunday night/Monday morning. I should have been studying for my upcoming exam or getting some much needed sleep— instead, I was eating pancakes and laughing with friends. I had a great time, but now I’m tired. It seems like we both are. I think we need to remember that relationships are best enjoyed when you’re feeling happy and healthy. That means you’re not

anxious about how unprepared you are for an impending exam, you’re not exhausted from weeks without a full eight hours of sleep, and you’re not constantly pushing all of your responsibilities toward some obscure future date. It’s important to prioritize relationships, but don’t underestimate the importance of taking time to focus on your goals and your health. You might have to turn down plans from time to time, but you’ll be an overall happier person and better friend if you’re well rested and stress free. So really, you’re friends will thank you in the long run. And you’ll thank yourself, too. Love, V

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April 16, 2019 - April 22, 2019

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