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Vol. 89, Issue 1 | Jan. 20 - Jan. 23, 2011

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

COURTESY MINNIE MAASS

HELPING: Aid workers survey the damage in Haiti after the 7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12, 2010. A year after the disaster, some of Haiti remains under rubble.

Haiti: One year later The School of Medicine, the School of Communication and the UM community come together Students, faculty and staff all over campus are making important contributions, from the department of geological sciences studying the movement of tectonic plates to the Miller School of Medicine organizing health centers in Haiti. As the first from UM to react to the disaster in Haiti, the Miller School of Medicine continues to be one of the biggest sources of aid by helping Haiti’s

ill or wounded through Project Medishare. Project Medishare consists of a team of faculty from the UM schools of medicine and nursing who have treated more than 75,000 patients since the earthquake, providing the country with its only CAT scan, critical care center, pedriatic and neonatal intensive care unit, and spinal cord injury unit.

SAY NO TO NEW YEAR’S

SATURDAY AT SMOKE’T

THE GOLDEN YEARS

WHY MAKE PROMISES TO YOURSELF THAT YOU CAN’T KEEP? PAGE 9

CATCH UM BANDS AND BARBECUE FAVORITES PAGE 12

ONLY TIME WILL TELL IF NEW FOOTBALL COACH WILL SUCCEED PAGE 16

BY ALEXANDRA LEON | ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

After one year, the University of Miami has not forgotten its commitment to rebuilding Haiti. In the midst of political instability, health epidemics and a crumbling city structure, Haiti is still reeling from the effects of the 2010 earthquake that affected the country’s capital, Port-au-Prince, as well as the cities of Leogane and Jacmel.

SEE HAITI, PAGE 3


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Historic apartments demolished UM buildings to be restored BY JONATHAN BORGE STAFF WRITER

Now enclosed by green wired fences, six buildings located in the apartment area of campus have been inundated with bulldozers and construction workers for the past month. The site is home to UM’s latest construction project, the demolition and restoration of the historic Foster, Allen, Smith, Railey, Brunstetter and Grosvenor apartments. The fences were originally placed in early December, and demolition took place during winter break to reduce its impact on campus functions.

“We’ve completed two buildings so far, buildings 22 and 23,” said Eddy Lopez, project manager for the apartment demolition. Building 22 is the Brunstetter apartment and 23 is the Grosvenor apartment. Demolition of building 41, the Railey apartment, is underway, and the entire restoration process is scheduled for completion in late March. According to UM spokesperson Margot Winick, the buildings have been slated to be demolished since 1992, but permits and land ordinances were only recently granted by the City of Coral Gables. Completed in 1948, the apartment area was originally designated to house married veterans and their families. After World War II, the buildings were used for stu-

dent housing and administrative offices. These buildings, Winick said, have outlived their usefulness as student housing standards have developed. The area will be landscaped and treated as open space once the buildings are demolished. Building apartment complex 29 includes the Hughes, Rhodes, La Gorce and Pentland buildings; these will be preserved as a historic cluster and will remain in use. The Hughes and Rhodes buildings along with School of Architecture buildings 48 and 49 are currently used as administrative offices and classrooms. Students and employees working near and within the complex have not been negatively impacted by the project. “I asked one of the construction workers what was happening

because I was curious, but the construction hasn’t really impacted me,” said Annie George, project director for the Back on Track Study in the Psychology Department. George has worked in the Rhodes house for 13 years. Although immediate restoration plans will introduce greenery, trees, walkways and irrigation, UM’s master plan considers this area the future site of both academic and housing buildings that will meet the needs of today’s students. “I was sad to see them go, but they were kind of really old though. And I know some others weren’t as nice as ours,” said senior Katharine Woodward, who used to live in the apartments. Jonathan Borge may be contacted at jborge@themiamihurricane.com.

Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. CIVIL RIGHTS EDUCATION: Jasmine Holmes, a freshman studying accounting at the University of Miami, explains the Civils Rights Exhibit at The Rock on Wednesday. At the exhibit, students were able to walk through a bus set up in order to learn about Mrs. Rosa Lee McCauley Parks and the events that took place on Thursday, Dec. 1, 1955. That day, Parks took a stand for civil rights by not changing seats on a bus in Montgomery, Ala. The United Black Students Association is leading a number of acivities this week in order to celebrate MLK Day.

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Sarah B. Pilchick has the scoop on the new movie “Made in Dagenham,” a story about women’s rights. Read her review. Want to see more of Haiti? Check out Minnie Maass’ photo slideshow of her trip after the earthquake. UM art graduate of Class of ‘76 reminisces on the old art buildings. Read her letter to the editor. Miami, are you credit wise? Find out in Maya Buten’s column. Have a chocolate craving? Nancy Oben has a preview of Fairchild’s Chocolate Festival.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Martin Luther King Celebration WHEN: Jan. 20- “A Dream Continued” benefit concert at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 23- Church service; meet at Stanford Circle at 8:30 a.m. Jan. 24- Unlearn/BOND Forum: What is the measure of a man? 7:30 p.m. in Stanford Master’s Apt. Jan. 28- Leadership Summit; 9 a.m. in UC Lower Lounge Jan. 28- Male Oratorical Speech Competition at 6:30 p.m. in Shoma Hall

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Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Missed last night’s basketball game? Ernesto Suarez has a recap. For all your relationship needs, turn to V on Twitter. Follow @dear_v.

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

January 20 - January 23, 2011

Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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HAITI FROM PAGE 1

Aid for Haiti continues a year later “It is the link between international health in the Caribbean to this campus,” said Dr. Enrique Ginzburg, a UM professor of surgery and a member of Project Medishare. “It has given me more purpose and direction as a physician, provided me expertise and experience in international health care.” Support from other areas of the school abounds. History professor Dr. Kate Ramsey, for instance, has been involved in circulating news through the Haiti Research Group listserv. Dr. Louis Herns Marcelin from the department of anthropology is greatly involved in education and research through the Port-au-Prince-based Interuniversity Institute for Research and Development (INURED). Furthermore, professors like Dr. Guerda Nicolas in the School of Education have participated in discussions covering higher education and mental health among earthquake victims. But despite the variety of efforts made by members of the UM community, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. “It seems like everything is just slow down there. It might take 10-15 years for Haiti to be back, for the old Haiti to be back,” said senior Melissa Chamblain, president of the Haitian Student Orga-

SoC to discuss role of Haitian media BY ALEXANDRA LEON ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

COURTESY MINNIE MAASS

A KISS HELLO: Alumna Minnie Maass shares a moment with a Haitian boy last February. Maass worked with Dr. Barth Green, the head of neurosurgery at UM, for a month in Haiti. nization (HSO). “It’s a year after and you’re seeing the dead corpses still under the rubble.” Chamblain was in Portau-Prince last year on vacation for winter break when the earthquake occurred. “It was a strange experience for me,” she said. “I was just there to have fun and the earthquake just came out of nowhere.” After her experience, she has lead HSO in a number of community service and cultural awareness events

COURTESY MINNIE MAASS

TEMPORARY RELIEF: Two girls live in Project Medishare’s tent hospital in February. They later upgraded to a larger facility.

to raise funds for Haiti. The group is also planning a community outreach program by hosting weekly college workshops with elementary school students in Miami that recently arrived from Haiti. Junior Arielle Duperval, the HSO events chair, was also in Haiti during the earthquake. She visited the country again in October and agrees that there is still a long road to improvement. “Everything seemed almost the way I had left it, without the bodies and the injuries. The buildings were still collapsed, very little has been done to clear the wreckage and rebuild,” she said. “The most important way to contribute is to lend a physical hand, if that isn’t possible, to assist those who are able to go places some people can’t or won’t go.” Aside from repairing physical wreckage and tending to the sick or injured, Haiti needs to rebuild a solid infrastructure for development. According to Dr. PierreMichel Fontaine, an international studies professor at UM, this means making the Haitian government account-

able for its people, regulating building codes, reforestation, reestablishing a defense force and, most of all, prioritizing ending illiteracy. “The country needs to be reborn rather than being reconstructed,” Fontaine said. “We need to go back to the 1960s, before Haiti started collapsing, to be able to move forward.” Alexandra Leon may be contacted at aleon@ themiamihurricane.com.

HAITI: One Year Later WHAT: A free discussion on rebuilding Haiti. Speakers include the U.S. ambassador to Haiti and the Haitian ambassador to the U.S WHEN: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday WHERE: Studio C of the SoC January 20 - January 23, 2011

One effective way to help Haiti may be by just sitting down and having a conversation. This Saturday, School of Communication community members will discuss the role media need to play in Haiti’s future in a conference co-hosted by the Voice of America, an international news service that has been working in Haiti. “We’ve talked about the needs that have been present since the earthquake, but we haven’t really had a strong conversation about what it’s going to be like to rebuild,” said Ivette Yee, communications manager for the School of Communication. At the conference, journalism professors Yves Colon, Sallie Hughes and Tsitsi Wakhisi will present the research they have accumulated over the past two years on the use of Haitian media in Haiti and in Miami. According to Colon, journalists need to take a more proactive stance in implementing change. “Haitian media need to educate, not just show the country’s frailties, but focus on development,” he said. Aside from discussing media in Haiti, Saturday’s conference will feature the U.S. ambassador to Haiti and the Haitian ambassador to the U.S. Discussions will include topics such as reconstruction, politics and the media. The school’s Koze Ayiti will be covering the conference for the group’s multimedia Web site. Koze Ayiti, which stands for “Conversation Haiti” in Creole, is a community-building organization that connects Haitians with HaitianAmericans in Miami and focuses on allowing Haitians to create an educated society by giving them the opportunity to make their own news. “The most important thing is to allow Haitians to tell stories in their own voices,” said Tod Landess, the staff adviser and project manager for Koze Ayiti. Alexandra Leon may be contacted at aleon@themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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January 20 - January 23, 2011

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Forum discusses future of health care Panels debate the economic state BY ALYSHA KHAN ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Amidst the recent push by the GOP to repeal the health care reform bill passed last March, the University of Miami School of Business Administration hosted the Global Business Forum from Jan. 12 to 14. The overlying theme of the series was “The Business of Health Care: Defining the Future.” “From both a humanitarian and business standpoint, there is no better import or export than health,” said UM President Donna E. Shalala during the closing keynote session. The forum brought together 700 professionals from a variety of fields to discuss the state of health care in America, especially in light of the contentious health care bill, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, enacted last March. “With all the controversy, it’s something that needs to be discussed and hashed out,” said Krizia Giambanco, a volunteer at the

School of Business event. Keynote speakers included Secretary of the U.S. Department of Human and Health Services Kathleen Sebelius, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg and chairman and CEO of General Electric Jeffrey R. Immelt. “Health care is very personal,” Sebelius said. “The challenge is connecting people to the system in a way they understand.” She emphasized the need for better and more efficient health care, a recurring theme throughout the three-day conference. “America continues to lag behind in health results,” Sebelius said. “We live sicker and die younger than we should. Too few of us get to watch our grandchildren grow up.” The forum featured 32 panels totaling 150 speakers and panelists presenting on a wide variety of topics. The panels were divided into six “tracks”- aging, economics, innovation, health care delivery, global issues and wellness and prevention. “I liked the session on obesity and the South Beach diet one,” said

junior Jennifer Verdon, who attended the forum. Another major theme was the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach when tackling today’s health care problems. The forum included presentations from all 11 undergraduate schools and colleges at UM, as well as from the Arnold Center for Confluent Studies, The Launch Pad and the Lowe Art Museum. “With health care, it’s across all disciplines,” Verdon said. “It requires everyone.” Verdon was one of the 65 students who was able to attend the forum through a scholarship sponsored by VITAS Innovative Hospice Care. “The experience has been amazing,” senior Ronniba Pemberton said. “You get to interact with public and private officials. I’m trying to get into grad school so it’s important for me to hear these ideas.” The recipients also got the opportunity to speak with the CEO of VITAS. “It’s really great to be with all these health care people in one room and to have other students who are pursuing the same goals as

COURTESY UM SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

THE ECONOMY TODAY: Michael L. Ducker, COO of FedEx Express, speaks during the 2009 Global Business Forum opening session. you,” Pemberton said. This is the second Global Business Forum that UM has hosted. The inaugural forum in 2009 focused on the struggling economy and starred industry veterans like President and CEO of The CocaCola Company Muhtar Kent and Vice Chairman and CEO of the McDonald’s Corporation Jim

Skinner. This year’s Global Business Forum was one of the final projects by the Dean of School of Business Administration Barbara Kahn, who is stepping down after three years. Alysha Khan may be contacted at akhan@themiamihurricane.com

Holy shark! UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL: Senior Trista Burch, a marine science and biology major, swims with sharks during the MBF-514 Tropical Marine Biology trip in Bimini Bay, Bahamas. “I really enjoyed how hands on the class was. We would learn about the different organisms and ecosystems and then go visit the specific ecosystem that same day,” Burch said. “I also loved that we got to go snorkeling every day. It was really awesome to be able to snorkel with sharks in their natural habitat.” The program was 10 days and16 students studied at the Bimini Biological Field Station (BBFS). BBFS is owned by shark biologist Dr. Samuel H. Gruber and offers internships for students and other research opportunities. COURTESY LAURA ROCK

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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Debating drop dates Deadlines prove to be consistent BY NICKY DIAZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

During the hectic transition into a new semester, students only have a short period of time to make important decisions about which classes to keep, drop or add. The drop and add dates for courses were set by the faculty senate 20 years ago. The legislation states that a class must be dropped by the 12th class day so as not to receive a withdrawal. “I don’t think the dates are unreasonable,” freshman Brandon Rosenberg said. “I’m sure if there was a major flaw in the dates, the administration would change them. It’s difficult to please everyone.” The last day to add a course this semester is Jan. 26 and the last day to drop a course is Feb. 2. The last day to drop a class is also the last day to receive a refund for

the cost of the class. This date is set by the Office of Student Account Services each semester. The deadlines allow students to test drive a course before students on the wait list are allowed to register for a seat. “I haven’t had an issue with the deadlines,” freshman Caroline Helmers said. “Some of my friends have had problems though. I think the deadline to drop a class without a W is too early.” However, some professors, as well as many students, think the deadline is reasonable. “I have no issues with the deadlines since I teach larger classes,” said Dr. Malancha Sarkar, a professor in UM’s department of biology. “The deadline is just two weeks though, so professors have not put in much effort for the students yet, like reading papers and grading exams.” The dates UM has set for dropping and adding classes are generally consistent with other schools: The first seven class days are set aside to add courses and

Renovation update Gym close to completion BY STEPHANIE PARRA STAFF WRITER

Wellness center renovations are ahead of schedule and are due for completion on Feb. 24. “The addition will give the university one of the best facilities in the country based on square feet per student,” said Norm Parsons, director of the wellness center. “We are thrilled to provide the expanded Herbert Wellness Center to our students, employees and extended university family.” The renovations, which consist of an 18,000-square foot expansion, include an increase of an additional 6,500 feet to the fitness room with the implementation of new, stateof-the-art fitness and cardio equipment. There will also be an in-

crease in cardio machines from 60 to 120 pieces, and an addition to the second floor that includes two multipurpose rooms for more group exercise and instructional classes, a new cycling studio with updated audio and visual equipment and a Pilates studio with five reformer machines. Additional restrooms are also a part of the renovations. The first phase of the construction began in early February of last year. “The construction has made work a little bit of a hassle. Working long shifts hearing all the noise and smelling the paint was a little annoying and we have had to rearrange some of the ways we run things,” wellness center employee Laura Sarmiento said. “But overall, it hasn't been too bad.” Stephanie Parra may be contacted at sparra@themiamihurricane. com.

the first 12 class days to drop. Students at Duke University are allowed to add and drop courses without a withdrawal until the 10th class day of the semester. On the other hand, the University of Florida has a much shorter time frame. UF’s period for dropping without a withdrawal and adding courses is within the first five class days. Despite having an average time frame, some students still feel the crunch. “I remember that on the last day to drop, my friend went on myUM to drop a class and it didn’t let her for some reason,” senior Kristina Torres said. “I was dropping the same class and it let me. She ended up having to take it up with the dean of students.” Although students and professors might have issues with the deadlines, finding dates that would accommodate all students and stay consistent with other schools may be difficult. Nicky Diaz may be contacted at ndiaz@themiamihurricane.com.

NEWS BRIEFS UMTV PAIR IN MTV CONTEST

RED LIGHT CAMERA FINES

UM seniors Scotty Braun and Alexandra Cotoulas are among the finalists for mtvU’s Oscars Correspondent Contest. The winners will be correspondents at the Oscars on Feb. 27. To vote, visit oscars.mtvu.com before Jan. 28.

Effective Jan. 1, Miami drivers caught running a red light will automatically be fined $158. The city will not issue warnings as other cities have done, but the fines will not increase for repeat offenders. The citations will not add points to drivers’ records so insurance costs will be unaffected.

US-ISRAEL CONFERENCE

A city contractor and a police officer will review video clips and photographs from street cameras to issue the violations. Drivers will have the option of paying the citation and viewing the video and photos online. If the notice is not paid or appealed within 30 days, the offender will have to pay a larger fine that may include court fees. Cameras are installed at more than a dozen locations and intersections including Southwest 37th Avenue and US1, Southeast 26th Road and Brickell Avenue, and Northeast 36th Street and Biscayne Boulevard.

The Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies and the Scholars for Peace in the Middle East hosted the Fifty Years of the Special US-Israel Relationship (19622012): Walt-Mearsheimer in Perspective conference from last Sunday until Tuesday. The conference examined United StatesIsrael relations over the past 50 years and related issues facing college campuses today. It featured several speakers including Israeli ambassador Michael Oren and former U.S. ambassador to Israel Samuel Lewis.

HELPFUL WEB SITES FOR THE NEW SEMESTER

Alysha Khan may be contacted at akhan@themiamihurricane. com.

cramster.com Offers a library of resources and experts to answer your homework questions. gradefund.com Links students with sponsors who will pay for good grades.  ratemyprofessors. com Provides a database of student reviews of professors. mint.com Not financially savvy? This site can help you budget your money. campusbooks.com Compares textbook prices across the Web.

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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OPINION speak

STAFF EDITORIAL

UP!

What is the wildest thing you did over winter break?

CHRISTOPHER WATSON Junior “I nearly got deported from Jamaica on an expired passport.”

SARI LIBBIN Sophomore

Haiti should remain in our hearts It has been one year since a catastrophic earthquake struck Haiti at its core, leaving about 250,000 people dead, three million people in need of emergency aid and more than a million homeless. In the first few months after the earthquake, the world was quick to provide medical aid and other recovery efforts. The immediacy of the international community’s response to this excruciating natural disaster not only captured media attention but also our hearts and minds. The outpour of sympathy from people in the United States and around the world led many to contribute millions of dollars to non-profit organizations and pushed many to become activists. However, reconstruction is only the beginning. Today, Haiti is still in the process of digging itself out from under the rubble. Despite the world’s immediate aid and help, there are still more than a million displaced people living in tents and under tarpaulins. Additionally, Haitians are dealing with a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 2,000 people. Haiti needs to achieve the following: develop and implement strategies for housing, health care, government reform and agriculture, obtain clean water and access to medical care, clean up more rubble, house the displaced and promote jobs. Drifting in and out of the media spotlight, Haiti’s plight can easily be thought of as old, outdated news. After a certain time

“Organized a road trip with some friends at 5 a.m. on New Year’s and hit the road by 9 a.m.!”

frame and an overwhelming reaction by the media, this horrific disaster has been pushed out of the public’s consciousness. With that said, both the pace of humanitarian relief and democratic recovery in Haiti recently has been disappointing. We must remember that just because the earthquake occurred a year ago, the struggle in Haiti is not over. Even after a year, the University of Miami has not forgotten its devotion to reconstructing Haiti. Students, faculty and staff from across the school have done much to contribute to relief efforts. To get Haiti back on its feet, we must ask ourselves, “What is the most fundamental thing that needs to be restored in Haiti and how can I help out?” Whether it’s donating money, volunteering or simply becoming an advocate, we can all help alleviate the suffering of the Haitian people and contribute to the restoration of the country. Clearly, the trail of devastation left in Haiti is going to be a tough obstacle to overcome and it will take many years. But if we sit back and show no interest in improving life in Haiti, who will this resolve the economic and health problems that this country is facing? Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

To find out more about UM’s efforts in Haiti turn to page 3.

I’M STUCK IN A COMIC! ©

ALI GRANA Junior “Bungee jumped off a cliff in Puerto Rico!”

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

PAUL BOUSQUET Sophomore “New Year’s in Miami!” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy.

POLL RESULTS: What’s your initial reaction following Al Golden’s press conference? Here come the “Golden” Years!

compiled by

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OPINION

44%

Only time will tell

39%

Where did he come from?!?!

14%

He’s Randy Shannon Pt. 2

3%

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT BEING BACK TO SCHOOL? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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The Miami

...in every life experience I’ve had, the best moments are the ones that are spontaneous and unplanned.

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Jenny Hamilton, Staff Columnist

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

New year, no resolutions

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tend to take a very skeptical and cynical look at life. I have found that pessimism can make things easier than disappointing and JENNY HAMILTON unfulfilled optiSTAFF mism. Crucify COLUMNIST me for saying it, but I honestly see no way that the government can be less corrupt nor that world peace can exist; I even see being alone for the rest of your life as welcoming, not as miserable. Also, in the spirit of the season, I made no resolutions for the year 2011. I find the numbers illogical and unattractive to look at. However, here is my reasoning behind a no resolution year: Besides seeing resolutions as pointless, they bring disappointment and become a laughing matter at the end of the year. For example, I had the resolution last year that I would not miss class and that I would make all As and Bs. Feasible for most, but not for me. I can work my butt off, but it usually comes down to how the professor wants to grade my essays on exams and how they feel about me as a person that result in whether I will get a B- or C+.

No, this year I want to be surprised. I want to take on the year and let it slap me in the face. I don’t want to look back at the end of the year and say, “Well, I haven’t changed and I definitely didn’t lose those love handles like I had intended.” No, let this year, 2011, as terrible as it sounds, be the year that wows me and brings new experiences. Let opportunity knock and allow me to choose whether or not to take it, instead of trying to satisfy a resolution that says to take every new opportunity just because it is good to try new things. If I do not want to try something new, then why should I? Plus, in every life experience I’ve had, the best moments are the ones that are spontaneous and unplanned. The best are the ones for which I’m not looking or pursuing simply because I promised myself to meet my resolution quota. Therefore, call me a sour puss if you prefer, but upon reflection at the end of 2011, I hope to say that I did exactly what I did, not led by a senseless, inconsiderate New Year’s resolution. Jenny Hamilton is a junior majoring in broadcast journalism and sports administration. She may be contacted at jhamilton@themiamihurricane.com.

Budgeting our defense

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hope the Pentagon’s recent budget cuts are the first step in a series of austerity measures that JOSH KORNFIELD might clip SENIOR the wings of COLUMNIST the country’s military-industrial complex. The United States’ sophisticated military is expected to provide more than national defense. It gives the United States the capability to coerce or cajole allies and adversaries into doing its bidding. Our navy and international bases give us the capacity to wage war anywhere. No other country has a similar capability. On the other hand, the United States’ military is overextended and politicians lack a mandate that would empower them to redeploy the military to another battlefield. President Obama’s trip to Asia exposed America’s weakness at effectively negotiating her interests abroad. The day when the United States is eclipsed by China appears to be inevitable. It is more important than ever that

the United States make investments in sectors that might sustain future development. Our main concern must be education spending and infrastructure development. One of the reasons that our military is the best in the world is because we have led the technological arms race for years. Now other countries are finding ways to finance research and development spending in new military technology. If America loses its lead in the technological arms race, our desperate levels of defense spending today will mean little tomorrow. They call it defense spending. Nevertheless, our definition of defense is considerably different than a definition that simply allows for protecting one’s territory. We must pick our battles carefully in the future. We no longer have the capacity to play sheriff. Devoting natural resources to these battles undermines America’s ability to repair the crumbling infrastructure and education system. Josh Kornfield is a junior majoring in international studies and political science. He may be contacted at jkornfield@themiamihurricane.com.

Candace & Cassie

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To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year.

ALEXA ABALLA // The Miami Hurricane

January 20 - January 23, 2011

AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Can’t wait for Ultra? Check out the longest-running electronic music festival in the United States at the Frost School Thursday through Saturday. It’s free and open to the public.

BY STEPHANIE PARRA CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

It’s a new year, it’s a new decade, so why not make plans for a new you? Year after year we all make New Year’s resolutions that go undone, so why not resolve to set attainable goals this year, rather than drastic promises? Make a list of priorities and resolutions and stick it in a visible spot in your dorm or on your refrigerator.

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It’s time to sharpen your pencils (and study skills) this semester and focus on what’s truly important- the new you. Are you sick of making that same promise to yourself year after year to get better grades and study harder? This year, force yourself to get all your reading done the night the professor assigns it (or at least over the weekend), and avoid putting off all your reading until last minute. This could allow you to study the material beforehand and gives you ample time to ask your professor any question that may have come up during your reading. Also, be sure to take neat notes in class. Once you pay attention and process all the information the professor is lecturing on the topic, your study time will be reduced by more than half. After class each day, be sure to review your notes and fill in with any material you remember from that day. Above all, keep yourself organized and be sure to manage your time wisely. If you plan to study beforehand rather than put off all your studying to the last minute, you’ll surely shrink your stress and magnify your GPA. DESIGN BY ALLIS ON GOODMAN

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Making the grade

The more you see the list, the more likely you are to stick to your resolutions and remind yourself of your 2011 goals. Success is simple once you use positive projection and envision yourself as successful. Below are a few simple tips to make your New Year’s resolutionmaking a bit easier and get you back to basics this semester:

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5? h ma n 1 ose fres ou have th g n ti a y mb nd Sti ll co s away a ourself in is month t y k e a g re b to Spr ing h time g u o n e an r. more th eachwea ainers, ape for b professional tr d 20 h s t n e c de g to diet an Accordin e is 80 percent the p oing to a g h s in r than e ra o th a F staying . R e . a t ho m xercise e h c t n n e lu rc r th pe R a er you lmonds. r t, pack food cou e a handful of a d r in k lots of av E, snack, h ing for an ICE e g y m. ch nd hit th a A re . d n te a th d ra d stay hy water an

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Saving money

The recession is still hitting hard, so try these tips to help ease its effects on your wallet. Try packing your own lunch as often as possible. This will save you about $25 per week. Ride your bike or walk when traveling short distances. When it comes to buying school supplies this semester, keep in mind that renting textbooks is a feasible, much cheaper option and will surely save you a decent amount of money. Stephanie Parra may be contacted at sparra@ themiamihurricane.com.

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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Grab dinner and a show

RESTAURANT REVIEW

Get Whisked away

BY CAREY GOLDENBERG STAFF EDGE WRITER

With the first week of school behind you, what could be better than kicking off the weekend with barbecue, beer and live music? Maq, a band comprised of UM students, will have all the answers for you at Smoke’t Southern Kitchen and Tap this Saturday. Maq’s leading men are Quinn Carson and Matt Alderman, who started the band in their sophomore year. Although they met and started playing together in high school in Illinois, Maq wasn’t formed until 2007. Alderman, originally an economics major at the University of Illinois, “discovered his love for music when we started playing together,” Carson said. While the duo was spending time writing music and playing together in Illinois between semesters, they decided to independently record and produce their first EP in Carson’s basement. “We made about 1,000 copies of the EP, and now it’s on iTunes,” Carson said. Eventually, Alderman transferred to UM and is now studying economics. “We like to say that our music is ‘upbeat acoustic pop/ rock’- it’s energetic, light, bright and fun. Matt comes from a pop/country direction, whereas I bring aspects of rock, jazz and funk,” said Carson, a media writing and production major in the Frost School of Music. The band draws from a number of influences, including Guster, Maroon 5, The Eagles and Tom Petty. Although Maq’s songs are written primarily by Carson and Alderman, their band includes John Splithoff on bass, David Lukens on keyboard, Eric Lemberg on lead guitar and Quinn’s younger brother, Neil Carson, on drums. Michef, the opening act of the evening, includes UM students Erik Anderson, Paul Murray and Matt Carroll. Maq and Michef may be the first bands to play at Smoke’t this semester, but they certainly will not be the last. Robert Richardson, barkeeper and event planner at Smoke’t, started a weekly live music series every Thursday and IF YOU GO Saturday. An WHAT: Michef and Maq eclectic mix of at Smoke’t bands are lined up to play in the WHEN: Saturday coming months, TIME: Michef 10 p.m., and audiences Maq 11 p.m.-1 a.m. are eager to listen, especially WHERE: 1450 South Dixie with two-forHwy., Coral Gables, FL one draft beers 33139 and well drinks FOR MORE INFORMATION: every night from Visit maqmusic.com 9 p.m. to close. Rumor has it that Smoke’t could be the new student hangout of choice- especially with beer pong Mondays, karaoke Wednesdays and live music weekly. With the conveniently close location, drink specials, delectable food and entertainment from Maq and Michef, you won’t want to miss this event. Carey Goldenberg may contacted at cgoldenberg@themiamihurricane. com 12

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PHOTOS BY JESSICA HODDER // The Miami Hurricane

ABOVE: Diners beat the lunch rush before noon at Whisk on Jan. 17. LEFT: Two of their most popular dishes. BY CASSANDRA GLENN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Some say bigger is better, and in the case of Whisk Gourmet Food & Catering this rings true. The lucky ones who experienced their tiny location on Le Jeune are thrilled the owners made the move to a bigger space near Sunset. Once only a place to grab lunch or an early dinner on weekdays, Whisk now features expanded hours and is even serving up food on Saturdays. With these new changes, my roommate said, "We're going to get so fat this semester!" In a place where Arnold Palmers come in glass mason jars you can expect classic dishes done with culinary expertise. They offer daily specials that can be viewed online along with a more than satisfying standard menu that offers an array of appetizers, salads, sandwiches and entrees. Specialties include fried green tomatoes, pork lechon burritos and buttermilk-fried chicken atop organic spinach salad. Frequenting Whisk, it's hard to not be tempted to order the same dish every time. For me, the roasted turkey sandwich on grilled multigrain bread is hard to resist. Featuring fresh turkey stacked with Brie cheese, cranberry mayonnaise, vine ripened tomato and arugula, this is not the same turkey sandwich your mom used to make.

January 20 - January 23, 2011

On the side, you can order up their housemade potato chips dusted with parmesan and cracked black pepper. After sampling just a few of these, I knew I could never go back to crinkle-cut Lay’s again. Other winners are the bacon-wrapped gorgonzola stuffed medjool dates, crispy chicken wings and savory skirt steak. Every Friday they have a burger special that is almost certain to sell-out by mid-afternoon. But never fear, you can call ahead in the morning to reserve one and trust me, it's worth it. If you're not too full after all that, chef Brendan's "famous" key lime pie is almost impossible to pass up. In a city where so many claim to have the "best pie in town," Whisk might actually take home the prize. If key lime does not tickle your taste buds, they also have an array of freshly baked cookies, blondies and Misha's cupcakes. Even though they now boast more seating, you can still expect a wait at this location any time of day. We were lucky enough to be seated at a high-top table that let us peek into the kitchen and watch the busy chefs at work. I tried not to drool all over the table while awaiting my meal but sometimes, it is just unavoidable. Cassandra Glenn may be contacted at cglenn@ themiamihurricane.com.


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Fashion

4Word: Building your Wardrobe BY DANIELLE KASLOW SENIOR EDGE WRITER

Spring cleaning Usually the term applies to household chores, but instead take inspiration from the yearly ritual and make sure your closet is appropriate for 2011. So read on for some helpful advice on how to take stock of your closet, add a few key additions and look fabulous this spring.

Back to basics Whether you are a fashionista or a casual collegiate, you need the basics in your wardrobe. Search through your closet for solidcolored tees and sweaters. Be sure to have the basic colors covered: black, white or ivory, red, blue and of course orange and green… but be sure the tops are fitted, not some baggy Tshirt

you got for free somewhere (those should be banished to your gym clothes drawer. I am talking to you, gentlemen.) These basics are the foundation of your new look, which you can build upon with fun accessories.

The denim blues Invest in a good pair of jeans. They don’t have to be an expensive, flashy brand, but set aside time to try on a variety of brands, styles and fits. Find what looks good on you now, not what was hip four years ago when you bought your jeans in high school. Steer towards darker denim; it is more versatile and can be worn from day to night.

Every girl needs a LBD If you are a girl and do not already own an “LBD” (little black dress, obviously), then something is amiss. This is the most useful and important piece of clothing a girl can own, so step into your closet and take a closer look at yours. Ask yourself: Is the cut flattering? How well does it fit? Do you feel invincible in this dress? If the answer is no to any of these questions, then head to the department store.

Don’t forget the details Since spring is approaching, seek out resort-inspired accessories and jewelry. Bracelets with a splash of color give outfits an extra pop (check out Kate Spade’s line of bangles, cute and only $42 each), or make an outfit with a bright, playful scarf. Make the most of your fashion investment and be sure you can still wear it from January to May.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Art Director MODEL: Sophomore Samantha Sutton

Danielle Kaslow may be contacted at dkaslow@themiamihurricane. com.

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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Queering music PALPABLE PUNK: Joe King of the punk trio The Queers performs at Churchill’s Pub last Saturday. The Queers, formed in 1982, are originally from Atlanta, Ga. At their gig, they played a 38song setlist to an excited and sometimes rowdy crowd. Some of the songs included “Punk Rock Girls,” “I Can’t Stay Mad at You” and “I Think She’s Starting to Like Me.” King, who calls himself “Joe Queer,” described himself as a “drug addict and an alcoholic” during a break between songs. UM senior Jessica Hruska called the energy in the crowd “palpable and tremendous, enough to power a fleet of motor vehicles.” ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

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January 20 - January 23, 2011


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2004

the last time the women’s basketball team was ranked in the ESPN Coaches Poll

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the number of games in a row Durand Scott has scored in double figures, tied for the sixth-longest streak in the nation

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Team starts strong but struggles in ACC Scott leads team to win over BC BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

It’s time for a strong ACC run for the Miami Hurricanes. As the ACC season continues, the Hurricanes will have their sights on finishing with a winning conference record and getting back into the NCAA Tournament. The Canes picked up their first ACC win of the year when they won on their home court against Boston College, 7271. Sophomore guard Durand Scott led the Hurricanes with 19 points and the orange and green made stops down the stretch to seal the win. But the Hurricanes have had ups-and-downs over the winter break. The Hurricanes let a 10-point halftime lead slip away against Central Florida, as sophomore guard Marcus Jordan, son of Michael, scored 23 points and led his team to a 84-78 win over the Canes at the Orange Bowl Basketball Classic at the BankAtlantic Center. The loss ended the Hurricanes’ five-game winning streak, which included a 79-76 win against last year’s Final Four team West Virginia. The Hurricanes went on to win their next four games, including a trip to Las Vegas where Miami defeated Oral Roberts, Rice and Akron. The Hurricanes were on the road for their first ACC game of the season when they squared off with the Duke Blue Devils, defending national champions. Despite fighting foul trouble, redshirt sophomore forward Reggie Johnson tied his career high with 22 points for

the Hurricanes and had nine rebounds in 27 minutes. However, the Canes struggled from the 3-point line. Miami missed 14 of 17 3-point attempts and shot 37 percent for the entire game, which cost them a shot to upset the champions, ultimately losing 74-63. “It’s kind of demoralizing when you have those bunnies around the hoop and you don’t make them,” Coach Frank Haith said after the loss. “We missed a lot of those in the first half. We had some open looks there at the end. Guys who normally make shots and we just didn’t knock them down.” Six days later the Hurricanes were on the road again, this time in Death Valley, where they dropped their second consecutive ACC game to Clemson, 79-72. The Canes got within 74-71 after Scott hit a banker with 1:16 remaining, but Clemson buried a floating jumper as the shot clocked expired. Scott finished with a game-high 24 points, his seventh career 20-point game and fourth of the season. “They were making some tough baskets,” Scott said after the game. “We just tried to fight as hard as we can and try to stay in the game. The most we can do is stay together.” All year, three key players have led Miami. The Hurricanes are the only team to have two scorers among the ACC’s top 10 and three scorers among the ACC’s top 20. The back court is lead by Scott with 14.2 points per game and redshirt junior Malcolm Grant with 15 points per game. Johnson averages 12.1 points per game and is third in the ACC with 9.6 rebounds per game. Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

LOOSE BALL: Sophomore guard Garrius Adams defends a Boston College player during Miami’s 7271 victory last Saturday at the BankUnited Center. It was the Hurricanes’ first ACC win of the season. January 20 - January 23, 2011

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FOOTBALL

Al Golden brings back the buzz about the U New coach could help team regain relevance BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

The way in which 2010 ended for the Hurricanes football team was one that many in South Florida are hoping to forget. The Hyundai Sun Bowl was hyped up as a rivalry renewed, a matchup between Miami and Notre Dame that was supposed to show improvement by the Canes and give the team momentum heading into 2011. Instead, it was an old school beating, with the Irish taking a 33-17 victory that wasn’t even that close. It was fitting that the game took place on Dec. 31, as one year, one era ended, and a new one began. With the end of the Sun Bowl came the beginning of head coach Al Golden’s reign at the helm of the University of Miami football program. In the 20 days since Golden took over, there has been quite a buzz around the team, one that wasn’t seen

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too often under former coach Randy Shannon. Over the past four years, both fans and media were quick to mention just how reserved the program was. Press statements seemed too rehearsed, interviews hardly answered questions and interaction between the team and the fans was at a low point. It eventually reached a point where Shannon even banned his players from having a Twitter account. Now, not only are some players back on Twitter, but Golden and his coaching staff have embraced the media platform as well, posting updates on coaching changes and interacting with their followers. Listening to the coach speak, you can hear in his voice that he believes in what he is selling, that UM will be a nationally relevant powerhouse once more. Even those individuals who interacted with Golden back at Temple University would agree. “Al Golden is a pretty media savvy guy; he handles himself well,” said Brian Dzenis of the Temple News, the weekly independent newspaper. “He is an intimidating guy, but he has this salesman vibe to

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January 20 - January 23, 2011

him where he wants you to believe in him, his program.” One major concern among Hurricanes supporters was that recruiting was going to take a major hit this year. With all the late coaching changes and insecurities going on at the last minute, it looked to be a rough point for the program. But so far Golden has rebounded from all those uncertainties and has put together a decent recruiting run. Beyond reestablishing ties with local high schools and drawing recruits at the last minute, one aspect that should help Canes fans get excited is Golden’s commitment to establishing a new bridge with former football alumni. He aims to involve them with the team once more. It’s too early to tell whether all of these changes will make a difference in the end. Right now, Canes fans can only hope. Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@ themiamihurricane.com

COURTESY PAUL KLEIN // Temple University

THE GOLDEN AGE: New football head coach Al Golden could be a fresh start.


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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

Tough defense dominates Hoping for

next season After three disappointing years, one junior looks to the future

the ball over. The Canes forced Boston College into 31 turnovers on Sunday afternoon. Offensively, the team is anchored by juniors Riquna Williams and Shenise Johnson, currently ranked No.1 and No.2 in the ACC in scoring, respectively. Both are making their case as not only team MVP, but also as some of the best players in the country. As it stands, the Canes are in a position to make it to their first NCAA tournament in team history. After last year’s run in the NIT, the team knows it and isn’t shying away from it. “Pretty much we’re unstoppable now,” said Williams following the victory over Boston College. “Teams can’t be sleeping on us now.” It’s a good start for the Hurricanes, but there isn’t much room for them to get comfortable. The team travels to Tallahassee to take on Florida State on Monday, and then faces North Carolina State and Georgia Tech at home before a road trip to No. 3 Duke, who have a 17 game winning streak of their own to boost. The next few weeks could go a long way in determining just how far this squad has come.

Walking out of Sun Life Stadium after Miami’s loss to Virginia Tech was tough to swallow. Another football season down, absolutely nothing to show for it. But Miami’s fate was sealed well before the Nov. 20 loss to the Hokies. Ohio State showed the Hurricanes Faithful that its beloved team ADAM BERGER SENIOR SPORTS was not championship ready and WRITER the game against Florida State was a completely one-sided contest. Miami wasn’t even ACC-Title ready. Certainly there was no shock or feelings of crushing defeat following the loss to VA-Tech, the final home game of my junior year. My friends and I took it in stride. We would all be back home for Thanksgiving the following weekend when Miami would lose to USF and eventually fire then-head coach Randy Shannon. Still, slowly making my way to the parking lot in November I couldn’t help but reflect on three fall semesters of disappointment. I remembered being a freshman, coming to the U with a football recruiting class that was supposed to bring the Hurricanes back to the “promised land.” In the middle of that 2008 season the young group actually had a chance to play in the ACC Championship game. But then came a trip to Georgia Tech and a game that stopped being competitive some time in the second quarter. I remembered the beginning of my sophomore year, when Miami started off the season with impressive victories over Florida State, Georgia Tech and Oklahoma. When, for a month, it was impossible to turn on SportsCenter and not see Hurricanes highlights and headlines proclaiming, “The U is Back.” How wrong they were. How wrong we all were for buying into the hype. Walking through the parking lot now, we struck up a casual conversation with a group of older Hurricanes fans. They had been wearing orange and green well before any of us were in diapers. I realized then that my disappointment couldn’t really compare to theirs. What struck them most about 2010 was how much the team had digressed from one season to the next, which was unacceptable and ultimately what did Randy Shannon in. “Well, there’s always next year,” a friend said somewhat sarcastically while slamming the trunk shut. Whether he meant it or not, he was right. There’s always going to be another season, and we’re always going to come back to watch, to hope. So, here’s to the ‘Canes becoming relevant again, sooner rather than later. To Al Golden having a successful run as head coach. And to no current freshman writing a similar article to this one two years from now.

Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@themiamihurricane. com.

Adam Berger may be contacted at aberger@themiamihurricane. com.

ADRIANNE D’ANGELO // Photo Editor

TAKE IT TO THE HOOP: Junior guard Riquna Williams dribbles to the basket during Miami’s 65-53 victory over Boston College Sunday afternoon at the BankUnited Center. Williams averages 20.9 points per game.

NCAA tourney on the horizon for a team that can’t be beat BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

While most students spent their break unwinding from the stress of the last semester, there was one team on campus who spent most of it climbing. The women’s basketball team is working their way into NCAA tournament discussions, currently riding a 17-game winning streak to a No. 22 ranking in the ESPN/ Coaches Poll. The ranking marks the first time the Canes have been mentioned in the top 25 since May 2004. Under head coach Katie Meier, the team is reaching higher levels than any team before it. After making it all the way to the NIT finals last season, the Canes have continued their hot streak, sweeping their first four ACC games for the first time since they joined the conference back in 2004. There aren’t any secrets as to how the team is doing it, either. Employing a full-court defensive set that harasses opposing teams the moment they touch the ball, their mindset on the court is to frustrate offenses into turning

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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CLUB SPORTS

Athletic options for spring Getting involved with intramurals BY DARCI MILLER ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

The end of the holidays means the start of the spring intramural season, which gives everyone lots of opportunities to dive back into campus life. There are a number of leagues to choose from. The basketball league, flag football and softball are always extremely popular, according to Tom Soria, assistant director of intramurals. Wallyball is also an option, as is sand volleyball, which is more laidback. “Intramurals can get very structured,” Soria said, “but with sand volleyball, you come out and have a good time.” There are men’s, women’s and corecreational (co-ed) teams, so anyone that wants to play is able to. In addition, there are various

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one-time events for sport enthusiasts who wants to test their skills and have fun. There are several tournaments available this spring: basketball, softball, table tennis, ultimate Frisbee, and golf. The X-box 360 basketball tournament is a popular option with gamers. Tournaments generally include 12-20 teams, with each team guaranteed two games. There is also a bench press competition and the campus-wide tradition, SportsFest. Making its debut in the lineup this semester is the NFL combine event. Every college player wishing to get to the NFL participates in the combine. Now, everyone else gets the chance to do so as well. This event is the brainchild of Soria and junior Brandon Mitchell. “I thought it could be a cool idea to really get students involved and allow them to get a feel of what the combine is like,” Mitchell said. The event will include a threecone drill, shuttle run, 40-yard dash,

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vertical jump and broad jump. There will also be a skill-related drill for the running back position. For those who wish to compare their performances to those of NFL players, charts of those stats will be on display. “I’m working with the Miami Dolphins to try and get a player here,” Soria said. “If this is popular, we hope to have it every year.” Darci Miller may be contacted at asstsports@themiamihurricane.com.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED Pre-Season Basketball Tournament- Jan. 31 $20 Basketball LeagueJan. 31 $40 Flag Football Mini Season- Feb. 2 $20 Sign up at the Wellness Center.

January 20 - January 23, 2011

SPORTS BRIEFS TRACK AND FIELD The track and field team began the 2011 indoor season at the Clemson Challenge last Saturday. The women’s team swept the 400m dash. Tameka Jameson, the reigning ACC outdoor champion in the 400m dash, took first. For the men, Devon Hill placed first in the 60m hurdles, only .01 of a second away from the school record he set last season in his ACC title heat. The next meet is the McCravey Memorial Track and Field meet at the University of Kentucky Jan. 28-29.

SWIMMING AND DIVING In their first competition in over a month, the Hurricane swimming and diving team

(6-1) defeated FIU and Central Connecticut State on Saturday, winning 10 events. The team will conclude the 2010-2011 season this Friday, hosting FAU at the UC pool at 3 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL Head coach Nicole Lantagne Welch has announced that Barbara Blair Fuentez has signed to play for the Canes. Fuentez helped her Ridgewood (NJ) high school team to the NJSIAA Group 4 North finals. A setter and a hitter, she helped her club team qualify for the Junior Olympics and is currently listed as a senior aces top 150 player nationally. Compiled by Darci Miller, who may be contacted at dmiller@ themiamihurricane.com.


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Dear V: Is it costly to have a gay friend with benefits? Dear Frustrated Female,

Dear V, Gay guy friends are the best kind of guy friends for girls. As a straight single female girl, I really think my gay friend, who is also single, and I should become friends with benefits. Is this normal and or rational for our friendship? We both need some loving, even if I’m not his type. For some reason I find myself running around naked in front of him when we hang out drunk in my room, and he does not pursue sex with me. How do I approach him so that we can help each other out in this serious time of sexual needs? Sincerely, Frustrated Female

Being a college student on a campus with many attractive people lends itself to those not wanting to be tied down to one person and instead have fun with two, three or possibly more partners (I’m not judging). This leads to lots of random hook-ups, friends-with-benefits situations and who knows what else (like I said, I’m not judging). As students at the U, we are known for being hot, fun and a damn good time, so why not have a good time while we’re all young? However, my dear, I don’t think what you’ve got going on is appropriate for a friends-with-benefits relationship. And if I know anything about gay males, I’m willing to say that he shares my sentiment. I hate to shatter any sexual fantasies, but I can pretty much assure you that he will not be into any type of sexual relations with you. None. Zip. Nada. Please, please, do not doubt your sexiness or wonderfulness, but what you’re trying to sell your buddy is NOT buying. I don’t think in the history of time there has ever been an instance of a naked woman prancing around in front of a man that didn’t incite some sort of a reaction. If you ask any heterosexual man, and I mean ANY hetero-

dear ... sexual man, I can promise you he agrees. If someone I was attracted to starting running the naked mile around my bedroom, you best believe I would be all over it. While you are both perfectly desirable individuals, I am sure it doesn’t add up that you would desire each other. You are not the only person on this campus who is not being sexually satisfied at this moment. So go out there and find you a new man! I’m not advocating you go completely nuts and hop around like a bunny in heat, but you need to channel your energy away from this friend and to someone new. See if someone can set you up, join a new club or just spend some more time with other friends. Continue being tight with him, but instead of wasting time on an idea that isn’t going to happen, go out and have some fun! But be careful, my little bunny rabbit and don’t forget to cheer your friend on in his endeavors. Best of luck! With love, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane. com or on Twitter at @Dear_V.

Archie Monroe, University Trustee for More than 30 Years, Passes Away Archie L. Monroe, 79, who served on the University of Miami Board of Trustees for three decades, passed away on Monday, January 10. Elected to the Board of Trustees in 1979, Monroe was extensively involved with the University and served as chair of the board’s Audit and Compliance Committee. In addition, he was the founding chairman of the University of Miami Hospital Board of Governors. “Archie was an outstanding, deeply respected trustee,” said University of Miami President Donna E. Shalala. “His financial acumen ensured a rigorous review of the most complex of the University’s initiatives. He was a caring colleague and friend who will be deeply missed.” A resident of Naples who was born in Glenmora, La. in 1931, Monroe worked for Exxon Oil Company for 28 years and held several senior

executive positions before retiring in 1986. He had many interests over the years: He was an avid golfer, enjoyed duplicate bridge, gardening, and fishing and loved to barbecue with friends. Monroe is survived by four children, Lee (Christi) Monroe, David Monroe, Vicki Monroe (Peter Boehm), Gary (Carolyn) Monroe and their mother, Mary Louise Monroe; four stepchildren, Dr. Richard (Donna) Bronsteen, Peter (Alissa) Bronsteen, Nancy (Said Meserkit) Bronsteen, John (Lisa) Bellwin; and 15 grandchildren. He is also survived by two sisters, LaMerel Monroe Rhame and Eunice Monroe Daniel, two brothers and their wives, Bennie and Bobbye Monroe, and Ottis and Kathy Pringle Monroe and numerous nieces and nephews. Courtesy UM Media Relations

January 20 - January 23, 2011

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