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The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 50 | Nov. 2 22 2-D De Dec. e ec c.. 1 c 1,, 2 20 2010 01 10 0

STUDENT NEWSPAPER O OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIA MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORID FLORIDA, D A, A, S SINCE INC IN CE E 1 1929 92 92 29 9

d e g g u l p n U

LimeWire Lim Wi is shut down, file e sharing persists BY STEPHANIE PARRA | CONTRIBUTING NEWS W WRITER ER

L

imeWire has been forced to stop squeezing revenues from the music business. The Web site was ordered to shut down on Oct. 26, after a New York federal court judge ordered a permanent injunction against the well-known file-sharing site. Founded by Mark Gorton in 2000, LimeWire has faced legal altercations with the music industry for the past four years. According to judge Kimba Wood, music industries “have suffered, and will continue to suffer, irreparable harm from LimeWire’s inducement of widespread infringement of their works.” From 1999 to 2009 U.S. recorded music sales fell from $14.5 billion to $7.7 bilMODELS: JOHN FARREY AND PIETRO BORTOLETTO GRAPHICS BY ALLISON GOODMAN

lion. lio File-sharing Web sites such meWire and Napster became as LimeWire inc asingly popular during this increasingly time tim period, and the suspected cau for such a dramatic decause cre e in revenue, as stated by the crease Recording Re ding Industry Association merica (RIAA), an organizaof America tio whose mission is to help the tion music mu business thrive. “II am absolutely happy when som hing that is destroying the something industry ind try is shut down,” said Seron Elton, assistant professor of rona music mu business and entertainment ind industries. “Illegal downloading is wreaking havoc in the music industry; ind the consequences are dir dire.” The RIAA released a statement me on Oct. 26, announcing tha the court will conduct a trial that in January in order to measure LimeWire’s Lim effects. SEE LIMEWIRE, PAGE 4

ACCIO ADVENTURE GET YOUR DOSE OF HARRY POTTER PAGES 7 AND 8

ACC FAILURE CANES LOSE CHANCE FOR CHAMPIONSHIP PAGE 9


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Cane Crawl offers discounts at Grove BY JENNY HAMILTON CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

This week three Miami residents want to make Black Friday a night to remember. UM senior Andy Rovira, recent alumnus Steven Rico and their high school friend Jesse Vazquez are organizing a bar crawl. “It’s a good way to meet new people and experience night life in the city,” Vazquez, a senior at Arizona State University, said about his bar crawling experiences in Europe. Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year, is the day after Thanksgiving and is known for early morning sales, aggressive crowds and overspending. “I would come home for Thanksgiving break and I wanted to see my friends and go out with them,” Vazquez said. “But it being Black Friday, people didn’t want to go out and spend money.” With this predicament, he recruited the assistance of Rovira and Rico.

Cane Crawl will take place in Coconut Grove and will tour bar favorites like Mr. Moe’s, Tavern, Barracuda’s, Sandbar, Crazy Pianos, Green Street and Bice Bistro. “We aim to make Cane Crawl a bar-hopping adventure,” Rovira said. “It is Black Friday, so who is going to want to spend money on drinks that night?” Other incentives include free shots and discounted drinks at some bars. Also, a unique addition to the Cane Crawl, is a scavenger hunt among the seven groups participating. “As a group leader, I am most worried about gaining control over everyone, guiding them safely from place to place and cutting back on those who are too drunk,” Rico said. He said no one will be allowed behind the wheel if intoxicated. Cab companies will be readily available and utilized. “We are really working hard to make it a night to remember and as college friendly as possible," Vazquez said. "Everything we plan is with the students in mind.” Participation requires wristbands which determine bar routes. Students may obtain a wristband

Matilda St

Students organize holiday bar crawl

Sandbar

Bice

Grand Ave

Barracudas Moe’s

Tavern

y

n

ai

Hw

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Green Street MAP BY DEMI RAFULS

BAR HOP: The above map shows the bars Cane Crawl will tour. (the color being determined by whether you are single or in a relationship) by purchasing them in the School of Communication Courtyard Monday and Tuesday at $5 for men and $2 for women. Those interested are welcome to pay the night of at a higher price: $10 for men and $5 for women. The class of 2007 from Belen Jesuit Preparatory School

in Miami will get in free, a perk of being friends with the founders of Cane Crawl. For more information, check out the Facebook event “The Cane Crawl” or become involved on the Web site, canecrawl.com. Jenny Hamilton may be contacted at jhamilton@themiamihurricane.com.

Four Loko gets a healthy makeover FDA takes action to ban popular drink BY NICOLETTE ROQUE SENIOR NEWS WRITER

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced last week that many caffeinated alcoholic beverages posed a public health concern and could not remain on the market in their current form. One beverage the FDA will be regulating is the controversial drink Four Loko. If Phusion Projects, the company that produces Four Loko, does not reformulate their recipe, the beverage could face seizure under federal law. According to CNN, New York, Washington, Oklahoma, Utah and Michigan, among others, have already made efforts to stop Four Loko shipments to the states’ liquor store shelves. With the recent wave of publicity about the dangerous bever2

NEWS

age, many Four Loko consumers worry that Florida could be next. “I think the ban is stupid,” senior Marcel Ferrer said. “I really like Four Loko in moderation. It’s unfortunate that kids drink five cans and ruin it for everyone.” The possible ban on the “blackout in a can” beverage has spurred curious reactions from Miami consumers. Facebook events hosting “RIP Four Loko” parties are described as one last hurrah to fight the government ban. “The FDA can have my alcoholic energy drink when they pry it from my cold dead hands,” said one woman on a Miami Four Loko party event page. But that’s not the only reaction to the FDA’s statement. In New York, mourners held a candlelight vigil for the banned beverage. On Twitter, the hashtag #fourlokoingredients was a trending topic for over four hours one day. On Facebook, Web sites like fourlo-

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Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

kostories.com were “liked” by over 16,000 users. “What’s the difference between Four Loko and a rum and coke?” UM graduate student Al Brown said. “We all know not to drink a thousand rum and cokes because the outcome wouldn’t be good.” However, there is a difference between Four Loko and rum and coke, and not every consumer of the cheap $3 brew is a responsible one. A single can of Four Loko contains 12 percent alcohol and undisclosed amounts of guarana, taurine, caffeine and wormwood. The powerful mix is the equivalent to almost four beers and two cups of coffee- a dangerous recipe for heart health. Phusion Projects has already agreed to drop caffeine, guarana and taurine from its recipe, which the FDA said is a step in the right direction. Media attention to the drink’s health risk has been provoked by news of nine students hospitalized after drinking Four Loko

November 22 - December 1, 2010

at an off-campus Central Washington University party, as well as a number of other students throughout the country in Four Loko-related deaths and heart attacks. News blogs like The Daily Beast and The Huffington Post shared the video “Belligerence Canned: The Four Loko Experiment.” The popular video featured a man drinking Four Loko for ‘science’ and attempting to recite a Shakespeare soliloquy. At UM, the alcohol awareness organization Pier 21 distributed a pamphlet titled “Lowdown on Four Loko: By the Numbers” to increase student awareness about the potentially dangerous brew. “I’m okay with the ban,” senior Jennifer Del Toro said. “I know the effects and wouldn’t expose myself to that. The fact there is caffeine and alcohol in one drink is scary.” Nicolette Roque may be contacted at nroque@themiamihurricane.com.

Check out Sean Leonardo’s coverage of Reveal the Unseen, a benefit concert. Ali Kitenplon has the scoop on this year’s Holiday Hope Tree. Read about the charitable cause in her story. Check out Jasmine Henderson’s column about making your voice heard by getting involved. See what Niloufar Abae has to say about freshman study habits in her column and learn why you shouldn’t put everything off until the last minute. Twelve years after the first of the Harry Potter book series was released, the first part of the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows film has been released. Read Christina De Nicola’s commentary. Didn’t make it to the football game? Don’t miss a play with Lelan LeDoux’s football analysis. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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Grants allow RSMAS to monitor oil spill effects Professors observe environmental damage in the Gulf of Mexico BY CHRISTOPHER WATSON CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico f lowed for weeks over the summer. Contaminating ecosystems and disrupting communities along the Gulf Coast, it was the largest accidental marine oil spill in history. Though Miami and most of Florida were spared from the immediate damage, three professors at UM’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), Nick Shay, Rod Zika and Villy Kourafalou, are concerned with the disaster’s lasting effects as well as how to prevent future spills. With $1.4 million in BP funds distributed by the Florida Institute of Oceanography, the RSMAS researchers are investigating solutions through three extensive studies. Shay’s research will consist of mapping the distribution of oil below the surface. The project will not be able to predict spills, but can improve ocean models for coastal areas that may be in harm’s way after an oil spill. The research will involve the usage of satellite imagery and sensors deployed from an aircraft to generate real-time maps. “The ocean is constantly moving, and sometimes things end up where it’s a puzzle to all of us,” Shay said. “It’s important to understand where these spills could potentially end up, given the importance of the loop current and its energetic eddy system in the Gulf of Mexico.” Zika and his team are trying to find out where in the ocean the oil is hiding. Ph.D. candidate Wilson Mendoza, Zika’s research assistant, explained how they will use scanning f luorescence, as well as other analytic methods, for the study. Mendoza, who wrote the proposal for the project, emphasized that not all oil is the same and all decomposing organic matter gives off f luorescence. Mendoza’s team is developing an impression from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill using samples collected during trips to the Gulf of Mexico. The f luorescence imaging technique will shine light at different wavelengths on the samples. The data collected from scanning the samples with light will help determine if the f luorescent matter is oil from the spill. “The Florida Department of Environmental Protection gave us samples

COURTESY WILSON MENDOZA

RESEARCH: Wilson Mendoza, RSMAS professor Rod Zika’s research assistant, prepares a mixture of fluorescents from water samples collected in the Gulf of Mexico. This method will be used to study the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. additional samples of oil from the rig,” Mendoza said. The research will be extensive because for each sample there are 5,000 f luorescents to be examined. “There are so many questions we cannot answer because the spill happened so deep under water,” Mendoza said. “When oil that deep mixes with water, it is subject to changing form because there are so many variables acting on the organic material.” Kourafalou is studying water current and circulation patterns in the gulf that inf luence where the oil will end up. Using high-powered computers, she will generate models that show potential pathways of the oil. The data will be compared with research from the University of South Florida and Florida State University. “Its hard to know, I’ve never experienced something of this magnitude,” Kourafalou said. “We need to be prepared scientifically. A lot of research is the best way to measure and predict the outcome.” Christopher Watson may be contacted at cwatson@themiamihurricane.com.

COURTESY VILLY KOURAFALOU

FLOW CHART: The map above shows how the sea floor was affected by the spread of the oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Dated July 12 through July 22, this illustration is an example of RSMAS professor Villy Kourafalou’s work. November 22 - December 1, 2010

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LIMEWIRE FROM PAGE 1 “For the better part of the last decade, LimeWire and Gorton have violated the law,” said RIAA, according to The Wall Street Journal. “The court has now signed an injunction that will start to unwind the massive piracy machine that LimeWire and Gorton used to enrich themselves immensely.” LimeWire also posted a notice on its Web site announcing that it was under court order to cease music distribution. “We are extremely proud of our pioneering history and have, for years, worked hard to bridge the gap between technology and content rights holders,” said George Searle, LimeWire chief executive, according to The Wall Street Journal. “However, at this time, we have no option but to cease further distribution and support of our software.” Although many opt to download music off illegal sites without a second thought, the RIAA said, “piracy is bad news... when you go online and download songs without permission, you are stealing. The illegal downloading of music is just as wrong as shoplifting from a local convenience store- and the impact on those who create music and bring it to fans is equally devastating.” Even though illegal music downloading is losing the U.S. economy 71,000 jobs a year, legal music downloading seems to be the direction the industry is headed. “Clearly all of the downloading has immensely affected the music industry, but the old way of doing business wasn’t going to last forever,” said Lolo Reskin, owner of Sweat Records, an independent record store in Downtown Miami. “Sales are down and CDs are going the way of the dinosaur.” Luke Blanco, a musician from a local band, agreed and believes legal downloading is practical. “As a musician, it affects me in more ways than one. I can’t hope to make money the way people have in the 20th century,” said Blanco, singer and guitarist of local band Courtesy of Paco. “On a happier note, I can distribute my music easier. There is no middleman for an independent musician, and the Internet is a great medium for file-sharing.”

Legal downloading options online are not limited to one source. “Legal downloading is a very good thing,” said Serona, who also established Cane Records as a self-sustaining student-run record company at UM. “It basically lets you make more music portable than ever before.” Despite LimeWire’s shutdown, many believe illegal downloading is still growing in popularity and will continue. “I don’t think that LimeWire/FrostWire being shut down is going to change too much as people will switch to a different method,” Reskin said. “Do you see anyone still mourning Napster’s demise? Not so much.” Although not many admitted that they illegally download their music, others argued on behalf of legal music downloading. “I too hope to one day become an artist. When I was younger I also frequently used LimeWire because it was a free and easy way of getting the music that I enjoyed listening to. I could not afford it,” said sophomore Janmarco Santiago, a music engineering major at UM. “But as I got a little older and I started getting more serious about my music, I realized that as an artist, although what I want is for people to listen to my music, I still want to benefit from the sale of my music. If not, I would’ve chosen another career.” The RIAA claims that according to the global music trade body IFPI, now more than 10 million licensed tracks are available on over 400 different services worldwide. Basically, there is no excuse for illegal downloading. “I feel that if you are interested in an artist and his or her music you should be willing to buy the music rather than just downloading because by buying it you are supporting that artist you claim to appreciate,” said Chris Hernandez, a freshman and musician. “Downloading an artist’s album is essentially stealing their product, and stripping them of recognition.” Stephanie Parra may be contacted at sparra@ themiamihurricane.com.

ALTERNATIVE OPTIONS Last.fm Grooveshark.com Maestro.fm Half.com

Emusic.com Cdbaby.com Bandcamp.com

To read more about what the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has to say about piracy and illegal downloading, visit riaa.org.

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

November 22 - December 1, 2010

NEWS BRIEFS STUDENT ART EXHIBIT NELSON DELLIS, The University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences will partake in Art Miami, U.S. MEMORY with student works being displayed at the CHAMPION art fair from Dec. 1 to 5. Art Miami kicks off at the Miami Midtown Arts District the first week of December with thousands of collectors, dealers, curators, and artists. For more information call 305-284-2542.

Come see Nelson Dellis, the U.S. World Memory Champion, on Monday at 7 p.m. in LC 140. He will be climbing Mount Everest to raise money and support for Alzheimer’s diseases. Refreshments at the sesision will be served.

RELAY FOR LIFE Relay for Life is teaming up with Vineyard Vines to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Stop by the Rock on Tuesday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. to donate.

Compiled by Parker Davis who may be contacted at pdavis@themiamihurricane. com.


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speak

UP!

“During this holiday season, what are you most thankful for?”

WALTER LOMAX SENIOR “For study abroad and the people I’ve met here in America.”

NICOLE TAYLER SENIOR “That Four Loko hasn’t been banned yet.”

The Miami Hurricane

The Miami

HURRICANE

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com

OPINION

We don’t have all the money in the world to spend on music and most agree that it’s better and easier to get it for free.

Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Just another day as a P2P user Following a four-year legal battle against the record industries, LimeWire was officially shut down last month. LimeWire, like many musicsharing programs before it, was charged with “massive scale of infringement” because it purposely allowed users to share millions of unauthorized music tracks and movie clips. U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood of New York issued a permanent injunction stating that LimeWire must disable the “searching, downloading, uploading, file trading and/or file distribution functionality” of its Web site. With the growing amount of people downloading music for free and the problems it has caused, authorities have decided to finally try to tackle this issue. However, what we need to understand is that this injunction follows the trend of the demise of other popular peer-to-peer sites such as Napster, Kazaa and Grokster. But no matter what authorities do to try and prevent pirated content from floating illegally on the Web, the trend of stealing music will continue. The loss of LimeWire does not mean the Internet is evolving towards a safer Web. Instead, it means that people will simply switch to a different method in order to get their music. Similar to past P2P sites, LimeWire had its glory days.

Additionally, shutting it down does not mean that pirated content will be eradicated from the Internet for good. Instead, more sites will inevitably develop to take its place, and the pattern will persist. As we all know, P2P sites are lucky if they stay online for more than a year, but eventually these sites will end up being shut down. Due to the sudden disappearance of LimeWire, some students have not only been surprised, but also disappointed. The question commonly asked is, “where will I get my music from now?” But with technology a step ahead, we are still capable of downloading music from YouTube and listening to music sites such as Pandora. We all are aware that sharing pirated content is illegal and immoral, but that does not stop us from doing it. At this point in time, we don’t have all the money in the world to spend on music and most agree that it’s better and easier to get it for free. So, to the 50 million sad users of LimeWire: No need to mourn over LimeWire’s demise. Another P2P site is bound to appear. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

EDITOR IN CHIEF Christina De Nicola

BUSINESS MANAGER Jacob Crows

MANAGING EDITOR Laura Edwins

PRODUCTION MANAGER Brian Schuman

ART DIRECTOR Brittney Bomnin

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

NEWS EDITOR Alexandra Leon

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers

PHOTO EDITOR Lindsay Brown

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

ACCOUNT REPS Isabel Gonzalez MIsha Mayeur Jack Whaley

EDGE EDITOR Danielle Kaslow OPINION EDITOR Kyli Singh

WEBMASTERS Ivan Rocha Nicole Collazo

COPY CHIEF Alexa Lopez

GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow

ONLINE EDITOR Steve Pierre ASST. NEWS EDITOR Parker Davis ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Adrianne D’Angelo DESIGNERS Daniel Cepero Allison Goodman Demi Rafuls

COPY EDITORS Amanda Gomez Stephanie Parra Sagette Van Embden

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami

I’M STUCK IN A COMIC!©

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221.

CHRISTIAN GALLO SENIOR “For my friends back home in Garden City.”

LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school.

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

DAVID MEGIDA GRAD STUDENT “That this semester is almost over!” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. Compiled by

Evan Peskin

POLL RESULTS: What do you think about MyUM’s course registration? It could be updated with more userfriendly features.

37%

I don’t love it, but I don’t hate it. I’ve never had a problem registering for classes.

30%

It’s simple to use.

27%

Horrible!

6%

Total Voters: 33

WITHOUT LIMEWIRE, WHERE WILL YOU GET YOUR MUSIC FROM? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

November 22 - December 1, 2010

ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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November 22 - December 1, 2010

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Ooh la la! Take advantage of the last few days of French Week Miami, a series of events showcasing French culture. Log on to Frenchweekmiami.com for more information.

edge

Top four tips to get your wizarding fix BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA EDITOR IN CHIEF

ORLANDO, Fla. – In “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1,” which was released this past weekend, fans find Harry, Ron and Hermione away from Hogwarts grounds. Luckily for Muggles, you can still get your fix of the School for Witchcraft and Wizardry as well as the neighboring village of Hogsmeade. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, a 20-acre park inside Islands of Adventure at Universal Orlando Resort, opened this summer. Here are four musts for any Potterphile in need of a magical fix. PHOTOS COURTESY UNIVERSAL STUDIOS ORLANDO AND CHRISTINA DE NICOLA

1.

2. Drink a glass of butterbeer

3. Buy a wand (Price: $29.95)

The most popular attraction within Wizarding World is Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey. But better than the actual ride might be the line, which weaves its way through iconic locations from both the books and movies. Visitors make their way through the Herbology greenhouses and Albus Dumbledore’s office. At the Defense Against the Dark Arts classroom, Harry, Ron and Hermione explain how Floo Powder will allow Muggles (nonmagical people) to join them on an adventure. Talking portraits line the walls and provide entertaining banter.

Though the recipe has yet to be released, consumers have described butterbeer as tasting like a mixture of cream soda, caramel and butterscotch. Two types are sold in 16-ounce cups: frozen ($3.99) and liquid ($2.99). Souvenir cups hike the price up to $9.99. They can be purchased at the Three Broomsticks or at the butterbeer cart located outside the restaurant. A word of caution: One drink is enough. Think of it as dessert in liquid form that helps ease the Florida heat and humidity.

A wandkeeper helps an up-andcoming witch or wizard find a wand with the help of special effects, much like the scene in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” The line at Ollivanders wand shop to take part in the interactive experience can take about two hours because only eight people are allowed in at a time. Only one person is chosen to have a wand select them. For those who don’t have the patience to wait in line, the back section of Dervish and Banges, a store connected to the Owlery, sells various wands. Buyers can choose between character wandsHermione’s is the most popular- or one that corresponds to their birthday.

Walk through Hogwarts (Average wait: one hour)

(Average wait: 10-15 minutes)

November 22 - December 1, 2010

4.

Interact with the actors (Frog choir performances: five times a day; Hogwarts Express conductor: times vary; Triwizard Spirit Rally: times vary) In the other areas of Islands of Adventure, there isn’t as much attention to detail. At Wizarding World, however, “students” wear their Hogwarts robes despite the Florida heat. They also speak in British accents. Ask them about a football game or how to use a modern device such as a camera and they’re clueless. And completely in character. Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane.com. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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‘Deathly Hallows’ shifts tone, explores book’s darker themes it treats the novel’s more emotional scenes with appropriate gravitas, unlike in some of the earlier films. The Harry Potter series boasts one of the finest Perhaps the most important thing to know about casts ever assembled, and the two notable additions, Bill “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1” is that Nighy (Minister of Magic Rufus Scrimgeour) and Rhys it is a vast, marked improvement over the last film in Ifans (Luna's dad, Xenophilius Lovegood), are incredthe series. ibly strong. Standouts in this It is the first of the films film include Ralph Fiennes that actually feels epic, and as Voldemort and Imelda ‘Deathly Hallows’ also the first to feature a palStaunton as Dolores Umpable sense of dread. Dark and bridge. While it would be fudifficult times do not just lie tile to comment on the acting ahead; in the vivid, beautifully of the lead trio, it can at least be realized world told through the STARRING: Daniel Radcliffe, said that Daniel Radcliffe and eyes of director David Yates, Rupert Grint have improved, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson they are already here. and Emma Watson has toned Despite the film series’ down the “eyebrow acting.” DIRECTED BY: David Yates habit of trimming down the The wizarding world has plots of the novels, doing the definitely shifted in tone since same with “Deathly HalMPAA RATING: PG-13 the first film. This world is inlows” would have been imposcredibly bleak and in the future sible and an affront to readers. looms the final battle between Therefore, much of the film the forces of good and evil. The sets up the action for the second part (to be released July film captures this atmosphere fantastically, and it is ap2011). propriately dark and joyless without ever becoming dull. While many of the most important plot points of For both die-hard fans and casual viewers, July 2011 the novel made it onto the screen, it is mostly exposition cannot come soon enough. that establishes the context of Harry Potter’s final showdown with Voldemort. The film adheres far more close- Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@ ly to the plot of the novel than any of the other films, and themiamihurricane.com.

Music Minute:

Thanksgiving edition BY NICOLE ADLMAN SENIOR EDGE WRITER

BY SARAH B. PILCHICK SENIOR EDGE WRITER

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EDGE

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

November 22 - December 1, 2010

face with Before you stuff your h these wit d iPo turkey, stuff your r ride ca or t igh fl the cool tunes for nce da ge of home. This hodgepod keep you uld sho di music and new Kid Cu ily all fam the d un (somewhat) sane aro weekend.

1.

“I Feel It All” by Feist (Diplo remix)

2. “I’m In The(feHoat.use” by Steve Aoki [[[Zuper Blahq]]])

juana,” 3. “MSoariDo pe” and

“Mojo “Trapped In My Mind” by Kid Cudi

py Up Here” 4. “Hykap sopp (Boys by Ro Noize remix)

5.

“The Time (Dirty Bit)” by Black Eyed Peas

FINISH READING AT E.COM THEMIAMIHURRICAN


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SPORTS

163

the number of rushing yards for redshirt freshman Lamar Miller on Saturday

0

the number of coastal division championships for Randy Shannon

FOOTBALL

Canes fumble chance at ACC championship VT win, 31-17, yields devastating results BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

There have been gloomy days as of late, but at least there is an opportunity for the clouds to part for the Hurricanes if they make it to the Sun Bowl. The only chance Miami has of going to Charlotte, N.C. is if they change planes en route to their bowl game. After Miami’s 31-17 loss to Virginia Tech on Saturday at Sun Life Stadium, the Canes were eliminated from winning the coastal division. With the Canes’ defeat, Frank Beamer and his Hokie squad won its ninth straight game and will be headed to the Tar Heel State to represent the ACC in the conference title game. Miami had six turnovers that proved costly and lost to a ranked opponent for the third time this year. “[Virginia Tech] capitalized on some big plays and we didn’t capitalize,” said Shannon who is now 4-9 versus ranked opponents in his four-year tenure. The story of the game was the amount of missed opportunities for Miami. Wide receivers Aldarius Johnson and Travis Benjamin dropped touchdown passes. Orlando Franklin committed a holding penalty that negated a big play. Matt Bosher missed a field goal. Damien Berry fumbled the ball on fourth-and-1 inside the red zone. Tyler Horn snapped the ball too quickly to Stephen Morris which caused a fumble. Missed tackles led to long runs and prolonged drives. The game plan was very good. Miami utilized its timeouts well, sacked Tyrod Taylor five times and let the run game take over. Horn may have summarized Hurricane nation’s thoughts in one quick sentence. “It’s heartbreaking,” Horn said. “I hate losing, everyone on this team does.” The sole positive from the game was the fact that Leonard Hankerson broke Michael Irvin’s record for most touch-

ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

SO CLOSE BUT SO FAR: Sophomore Virginia Tech running back Ryan Williams runs past Miami linebacker Olivier Vernon in the first quarter. Williams accounted for 142 of VT’s 251 rushing yards and scored twice in the 31-17 Virginia Tech win Saturday. downs in a single season with 12. But that quickly turned into a negative as soon as Tyrod Taylor mocked Hurricane fans by throwing up the U. “Right now it don’t mean anything,” said Hankerson, who broke the record that had been in existence for two decades. “If it had been a W it had been different.” What separates the good from the great is the ability to finish games. Morris threw three interceptions in the fourth

quarter and VT outscored UM 14-0. Virginia Tech has only given up six points in the fourth quarter in its seven ACC games. Miami looked like FAMU sporting its new Nike jerseys, and in the fourth quarter, they played like FAMU too. The process continues for the Miami Hurricanes. Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@ themiamihurricane.com. November 22 - December 1, 2010

ACC COASTAL DIVISION STANDINGS Virginia Tech (7-0, 9-2) Miami (5-3, 7-4) Georgia Tech (4-4, 6-5) North Carolina (3-4, 6-5) Virginia (1-6, 4-7) Duke (1-6, 3-8) THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Double digits SLAM DUNK: The Hurricanes’ sophomore forward Morgan Stroman drives to the basket and hits a layup against Miami University (Ohio) on Saturday. The Canes beat the Redhawks 96-64 at the BankUnited Center. Stroman finished with 16 points and was one of four players that finished with double figures in scoring. Junior guard Shenise Johnson tallied 24 points, 11 rebounds and five steals. Junior guard Riquna Williams notched her 1,000th point of her Cane career. The game was close in the first half but Miami opened up the floodgates in the second half by starting the second session on a 19-4 run. LINDSAY BROWN // Photo Editor

VOLLEYBALL

Squad set up for success Team set for slot in NCAA tournament BY ADAM BERGER SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The University of Miami volleyball team is on a roll at just the right time. The Canes played like a squad determined to return to the NCAA tournament over the weekend, beating both Boston College and Maryland. “We have a really, really good shot at making it to the tournament,” said junior setter Katie Gallagher, who had 41 assists on Friday against Boston College and 32 assists on Sunday against Maryland. Both were match highs. The Hurricanes arguably played their best volleyball of the season over the weekend, competing with an intensity and efficiency that the Eagles and the Terps simply couldn’t handle. Boston College looked overwhelmed and outmatched on the court Friday night. The Canes’ offense was dominant and pounded the Eagles. The Canes won easily 25-13, 25-14 and 25-16. The case wasn’t very different on Sunday against Maryland either. Miami 10

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cruised by the Terps in straight sets, 25-9, 25-19 and 25-18. Miami, now 22-8 on the year with a 12-7 record in-conference, has won four matches in a row. It was only a little over two weeks ago that coach Nicole Lantagne Welch’s squad found itself in the bad habit of splitting weekend series against ACC opponents but the Canes turned things around in a timely fashion. With the two wins, they have all but locked up a slot to the NCAA tournament. The two victories were also the final home matches for the two veteran players on the Hurricane roster, senior middle blockers Ariell Cooke and Lici McGee. “It’s always special to talk about your seniors,” Lantagne Welch said. “The [best] thing in a coach’s career is to see the kids mature from their first year to the end.” Both seniors certainly hope that their season lasts longer than their final regular season match. Miami still has to play Florida State this upcoming Friday, and then they will wait for the NCAA tournament selection show on ESPNews, which is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Sunday according to NCAA.org. Adam Berger may be contacted at aberger@ themiamihurricane.com.

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dear ...

Dear V: Why do I repel boys? Single in Miami,

Dear V, I have a serious problem: I repel boys, and I’m not sure why. I think I have a decent figure, I am rather intelligent and there’s many people who are far worse off than I am in the looks department who have boyfriends. Basically, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with me. (I know it sounds like I’m vain, but really I’m the most humble person ever.) Anyway, when boys are first attracted to me and ask me for my number, I can’t seem to get to that first date. We’ll talk and text for three weeks, but then I don’t hear from them. That’s even after they call me “sweet” or “pretty.” Is there something I’m doing wrong? Why can’t I find a cute boyfriend who wants to spend time with me and go out on dates? Is that too much to ask for? Thanks V! Single in Miami

Well, firstly, I’d like to point something out to you: It follows that age-old saying that “misery loves company.” You are most certainly not alone in that notion. I’ve run into a countless array of loveless hopefuls that wish to jumpstart that broken-down poor excuse they call a love life. However, even the most optimistic person cannot simply wish that they’ll find that someone special or even a good-looking mister or miss to shag the night away. Why is this the case? Because your thought must influence your action! From what I can gather, you’re quite conditioned to waiting. Waiting for him to make the first move, waiting for him to set up a sultry social situation, waiting for him to express how he does or doesn’t feel. Well, let me assure you that many a hymen throughout history would have remained fully intact if women waited on the forwardness and directness of men. With that being said, I think it’s time that you rejoined the 21st century and realized that you are just as much at fault for letting an opportunity slip through your fingers.

Perhaps it is the case that the men you’ve recently run into have no desire to form anything more then friendship with you, hence a lack of effort on their part. It could also be the case that you attract what I like to call “worrisome-sons-a-bitches.” Meaning, quite simply, that they have a deep-seeded fear in making the first move toward anything substantial with a person whom they find attractive. While these timid individuals might take the reins further down the line, they have an onset internal quarrel centered around getting the ball rolling - in any general direction, just as you do it seems. So, I implore you to take hold of your own life and to stop waiting on sheer thought and wishful thinking alone. Turn your thought into action, tell him of your interest and it might render more ideal results. Wishing you success, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane. com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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