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Vol. 90, Issue 24 | Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

.com

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GREEK LIFE

Amnesty International jams out

Pi Kappa Alpha suspended for nine violations Fraternity could be reinstated in 2014 BY ALYSHA KHAN NEWS EDITOR

T

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

FOR A CAUSE: Junior Isabella Douzoglou paints a UM student’s face during Amnesty International’s “Jamnesty” on Wednesday night on the Rock. Jamnesty was the first annual human rights festival organized by UM’s chapter of Amnesty International. The event featured musicians such as DJ Fresca, Streetkind and NASA Committee, and artists such as Chelsea Rivera and Alejandro Valencia.

DINING

Uragano truck fills pizza void on campus Chartwells introduces roving truck as new dining alternative BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

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our next meal could be on wheels. Chartwells, in response to a request from Student Government (SG), unveiled its custom-designed new pizza truck, Uragano, on Monday. Uragano, which means ““hurricane”” in Italian, is the product of an evaluation conducted by the university’’s dining services, which determined that pizza is an important option to have on campus. ““We’’re excited,”” said Sandra Redway, the execu-

tive director of auxiliary services at UM. ““This is a new concept and it’’s not your run-of-the-mill food truck. It replaces the void left by Sbarro.”” Redway said that students have already given positive responses to the pizza truck. ““It’’s really good pizza,”” sophomore Natalia Rickards said. ““It tastes better than Sbarro.”” Planning for Uragano began when SG requested an alternative to Sbarro once it was replaced by the temporary Rathskeller.

SEE PIZZA, PAGE 7

he Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, also known as Pike, was suspended as a recognized student organization on Wednesday following an investigation by the Dean of Students Office. ““We are all very upset over the entire situation,”” Pike President Harrison Potak said. ““The chapter has had to take a step back and truly realize the repercussions of our actions.”” Two incidents involving Pike prompted the investigation. The first was an unauthorized, offcampus party during Labor Day weekend. The second is the initiation of ineligible members during the fraternity’’s spring 2011 semester. The Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines a student who is eligible for initiation as one who has a cumulative GPA of 2.50 and is enrolled in at least 12 credit hours during both pre-initiation and the time of initiation. Pike was charged with nine violations of university policy and pled ““responsible to all charges,”” according to information released by the Dean of Students Office on Wednesday. As a result, Pike is no longer a recognized student organization for the remainder of the school year. Next fall, however, the chapter will begin a probationary period during which they will be required to participate in educational programs. If all the mandatory requirements are met, Pike will be reinstated in the spring of 2014. Despite the suspension, Pike will remain a member of the Interfraternity Council (IFC), but will not be able to participate in any IFC events. ““We will help them in any way we can as they slowly get back into good standing with the school,”” said Brenden Kollar, president of IFC. According to Potak, Pike is eager to get reinstated as a student organization. ““We are making the necessary changes to move Pi Kappa Alpha in the right direction,”” he said. ““The entire experience has allowed us to better appreciate our brotherhood and strengthen the bonds that our fraternity is founded on.””


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STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Missed Wednesday’s event on the Rock? Amnesty International jammed out for a cause during their “Jamnesty” event. Hooked on books? Be sure to read Nicky Diaz’s story about the Miami Book Fair International. NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

MAKING A CHANGE TOGETHER: Protesters from the Occupy Miami movement occupy Downtown Miami on Oct. 15. The event took place early in the afternoon, and was held at Bayfront Park. Several children participated by making signs at the park.

Forum connects students in the 99 percent Occupy Miami comes to campus BY KYLIE BANKS SENIOR NEWS WRITER

A circle of college students sits on the university seal in front of the bookstore discussing education reform and the role of corporations in society. The students are members of the University of Miami Forum for Occupy Miami, which was started around the same time as the Occupy Miami movement. The forum has worked alongside the main movement to educate students about social issues, including income disparity in the U.S. and student debt. One of the ways the forum involves students is through direct action. Direct action involves students sharing how they relate to the movement. Students have been writing personal statements about how 2

NEWS

they are part of the 99 percent, an activity which is an important facet of Occupy Wall Street, according to graduate student Elizabeth Weintraub. Weintraub started the forum along with her roommate Lana Schissel. The forum also holds panels to discuss education reform and the philosophy behind the movement, among other issues relevant to Occupy Miami. The panels include professors from different university departments as well as Student Government members and alumni. ““[Our platform is] student debt, unemployment, education and the university governance issue. [It’’s about] reforming our stake in how money is spent,”” said Schissel, who is also a graduate student. The forum has echoed the concerns of the protesters in the Occupy Miami movement, which is currently facing the threat of eviction. City officials are planning to revoke Occupy Miami’’s permit on

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Friday, according to a press release sent out by the Occupy Miami movement. Protestors have been petitioning government officials and are planning to do a major demonstration on Thursday, tentatively at Government Center . ““[It’’s] supposed to be one of our larger protests,”” senior Ryan Williams said. ““One of the goals is to include different members of the community. We’’re trying to make it a more diverse group.”” Regardless of the outcome of the local Occupy movement, students feel that the movement has already made an impact by raising questions about American society. ““This shows that the American people are being awakened,”” junior Kristyn Greco said. ““We’’ve been able to turn around and actually voice our opinions.””

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Read more about the Occupy movement in the staff editorial on page 11.

IF YOU GO WHAT: UM Forum for Occupy Miami panel discussion about education reform and university governance WHEN: UC Ballroom C at 5 p.m. The panel will include Professor Josh Diem from the School of Education, Professor Amelia Moore from the College of Arts and Sciences, alumna and social activist Alyssa Condari, Provost Thomas LeBlanc, and David Moyer, an SG representative.

Check out Patrick Riley’s recap of the women’s basketball team’s loss to Tennessee. Can’t get enough of football? Be sure to take a look at David Furones’ matchups. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com. TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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ACADEMICS

CRIME

Thefts from ACS leave students alarmed, wary Multiple laptops stolen from organization’s office BY LYSSA GOLDBERG | ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR ALYSHA KAHN | NEWS EDITOR

COURTESY JASON FINKELMAN

DOWN AND DIRTY: Graduate students in an economic development class watch a CF Industries mining drag line during a trip to Hardee County over the weekend. The class studied how mining affects the land.

Class digs into effects of mining Graduate students visit Hardee County BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Graduate students in Richard Weisskoff’’s economic development class drove to Hardee County over the weekend to investigate the effects of mining on the environment. Weisskoff traveled with his students to tour local farms and CF Industries’’ mining plant. Located in central Florida, Hardee County is known for its rich agricultural resources. However, it may soon face the same fate as Polk County to the north, where acres of land have been destroyed after years of phosphate mining. Phosphate is a nutrient used in fertilizer, which allows for agricultural production that feeds people around the globe. Weisskoff and his class, which is part of the Department of International Studies, studied the potential damage of mining first-hand. ““It seemed pretty important to Professor Weisskoff that we go there and make the three-hour trip to see what’’s going on,”” senior Grace Clement said.

The two main mining companies in the county are CF and The Mosaic Company. Recently, Mosaic, which is the world’’s leading producer and marketer of concentrated phosphate, purchased land in Hardee County. The company has plans to mine the area. However, local landowners are unhappy about the destruction of the land, according to senior Bunny Sandefur, a student in Weisskoff’’s class. Weisskoff, who has been studying mining in Hardee County for three years, believes the area is faced with a dilemma. It is a poor county that lies over rich, lucrative deposits of phosphate, but its natural fertility also supports major agricultural endeavors. ““If they allow the companies to mine the phosphates, they will destroy the land, which is a source of jobs for the next 100 years,”” he said. The students visited the facilities of CF Industries, a smaller-scale company, because Mosaic would not allow anyone on their property. Weisskoff said he thinks that Mosaic has ““a lot to hide””. CF employees gave an hour-long presentation, outlining the process of strip mining for phosphates and demonstrated operation of the machinery.

Students asked the CF representatives about how safe it is to mine the land and what happens to the land afterward. ““They had an answer for everything,”” Clement said. ““We were told by our professor that they would probably have an answer for us and appear very trustworthy, but they’’ve been doing this for a very long time.”” Students were left with an unexpected feeling after visiting areas of land that were restored to the way it was before mining. ““It was surprising to see how good it looked because we all expected nothing to be able to grow after it was strip mined,”” Clement said. They had planted trees to try to bring it back to its natural state, Sandefur said. Clement said that she was most impacted by the contrast she saw between the ““vast”” industrial machinery at the mining plant and the ““small-town mentality”” of the farmers. ““My goal was really just to get their feet wet,”” Weisskoff said. ““If they came back with curiosity, that’’s good.”” The trip raised many questions for the students, who remain concerned about whether this type of economic development benefits the community or hinders long-term sustainability.

Three laptops were stolen from the office of the Association of Commuter Students (ACS) on the second floor of the University Center (UC) on Tuesday. Few details about the theft are available because it is under investigation, but the University of Miami Police Department (UMPD) is inspecting video footage to catch the thief. UMPD was not available to comment before the time of publication. However, Margot Winick, the assistant vice president for UM’’s media relations, said that the thief may have been an outside intruder on campus. ““It’’s a terrible act that someone committed against not just our organization, but to the university as a whole,”” said senior Liliana Oyarzun, the president of ACS. One of the laptops stolen belonged to sophomore Bryanna Nuñez. ““My life is on it,”” Nuñez said. ““I have exam notes, I have papers on there, my job information, personal information, everything.”” Nuñez kept her laptop in the cubbies of the office, where the other two were also stored. The ACS office serves as a home away from home for many commuter students and its doors are often left open. ““I’’ve left it there since my freshman year and never had a problem,”” Nuñez said. ““It’’s a false sense of security that you get lulled into.”” Nuñez thought she wouldn’’t have a problem keeping her laptop safe in the ACS office since students are always in the International Lounge on the second floor of the UC. Freshman William Herrera is disappointed that someone would steal personal property from the ACS office. ““It bothers us that someone would go out of his or her way to hurt us,”” Herrera said. ““I want to still feel safe because ACS is a home away from home.”” On-campus laptop theft has been a constant problem. Last year’’s ACS president, UM alumna Jennifer Del Toro, had her laptop stolen from the Department of Orientation’’s office on the second floor of the UC last year. Senior Claudia Cruz, the president of La Federacion of Estudiantes Cubanos (FEC), said that she remembers a laptop being stolen from FEC’’s office in the I-Lounge her freshman year. In addition, signs are currently posted in the Richter Library warning students of recent laptop thefts. Oyarzun said that this is the first time ““something of this magnitude”” has occurred in the ACS office during her four years at UM. ACS’’s executive board is currently brainstorming protective and preventive measures to keep their office safe, Oyarzun said.

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ENTERTAINMENT

ASU student to include Hurricanes in gambling site Website targets college gamblers BY ELIZABETH DE ARMAS STAFF WRITER

Poker fans, it’’s time to put your chips on the table and go all in. HurricanePokerClub.com, which will launch Dec. 1, is a subscription-based legal site that will allow students to enjoy the thrill of gambling without losing their cash. Chandler Bator, a junior at Arizona State University majoring in finance, is the founder of Your College Poker Club, the parent site for HurricanePokerClub.com. ““I did a lot of research and asked students what their motivation was to go on to these sites and the biggest reason wasn’’t money, but the thrill of playing poker and winning,””

Bator said. ““I felt I could definitely recreate that experience in a safer environment.”” He was motivated to create this entertainment site his freshman year when a close friend of his lost approximately $10,000 on Full Tilt Poker, a well-known gambling website. ““I walked around campus and noticed that a lot of other students had similar stories and were losing amounts of money on these gambling websites, which even back then were illegal in the United States,”” Bator said. ““A lot of students were being targeted by these sites so I thought there had to be a better way for students to get that experience with poker that a lot of them were craving.”” Gambling sites that allow individuals to deposit infinite amounts of money with a potential risk of losing

it all are illegal in the U.S. However, Your College Poker Club is a subscription based website that allows students to access the game room and win cash and prizes based on their performance. Bator had a lawyer overseeing this project step by step to ensure the legality of the site. College students will have to pay a monthly fee of $19.95 in order to stay subscribed to the site and access the various gaming activities. There are 160 universities throughout the country that were selected by Your College Poker Club to participate based on the population of the school, standing of the school within the sports realm and school spirit. Each university has its own individual poker club site. The monthly membership fee will give students access to the site’’s game rooms, private matches with

anyone in the country, a weekly $10,000 prize giveaway in the World Series of Poker tournament and the ability to place virtual dollars on any major sporting event with Sports Book that will pay off the top 10 performers. ““We have a certain amount of money that comes out of the subscription fee that is allotted to the prize pool. So the more students that join, the more creativity and things we can bring in,”” Bator said. ““As we grow we will see what these students are interested in and tailor the prize pool to their wants and needs.”” Students will have employment opportunities with this entertainment site. Bator hopes to hire 25 students per university to work for the company and take ownership of the site. ““Each school is different and the students at the school would have the best idea of what their student popu-

lation is looking for,”” Bator said. ““Students that are in college are one of the hardest hitting demographics to get jobs right now. So I think providing income to these students will be a great accomplishment.”” Some students believe that losing money in poker is part of the game’’s charm. ““I think it would be a bad idea because losing money is part of the game so it won’’t be as exciting as real online poker,”” freshman Cern Metin said. Others feel that money is just an extra feature in the game. ““I believe that poker doesn’’t have to be about money,”” sophomore Joey Flag said. ““The act of winning or the stint of losing can still be fun without losing all your money in a bet. A system that students play online poker with each other would be good.””

PHOTO BRIEF

Henna helps charity PRETTY PAINTINGS: (Above) Junior Saramati Narasimhan creates a henna design for senior Karen Hernandez Wednesday afternoon. (Right) Narasimhan draws a Sebastian henna design for junior Chris Bates. Narasimhan founded her one-woman organization, “Art for a Cause,” to draw henna, paintings, tattoo designs, graffiti and any other art with all the profits going to charity. All the proceeds will benefit St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. “It’s my one-woman mission to save the world,” said Narasimhan, who started the organization after she was diagnosed with chronic pain disorder. “It’s sending out good vibes, art makes people happy and this helps kids get help … why not do this for other kids?” 4

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PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO


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NEWS BRIEFS RA SELECTION Students interested in developing leadership skills and programming for groups should consider becoming a residential assistant (RA). To qualify, complete the online application by Nov. 30 for spring 2012 openings and Jan. 22 for fall 2012. Applicants are required to attend an information session at one of the residential colleges. Group interviews and recommendations are also required. Candidates will be notified on Dec. 9 for spring 2012 and Feb. 24 for 20122013. For more information, visit miami.edu/housing or email reslife@miami.edu.

AF SELECTION Applications are available for students interested in becoming academic fellows (AF). AFs guide first-year students in learning to manage academic responsibilities and take

advantage of the resources offered on campus. Over the course of a year, AFs work 10 to 12 hours weekly, coordinate programs and hold office hours. There will be 26 positions available across Hecht, Stanford, Mahoney and Pearson Residential Colleges.

working, several workshops and a keynote speaker. Registration at the UC begins at 9:30 a.m. Topics range from hip hop to social activism and leadership in a multicultural environment. For more information, email the Butler Center at leadandserve@miami.edu.

Applications are available Nov. 28 and are due Jan. 27. Candidates will be notified on Feb. 24. For more information, email hechtadvising@miami.edu.

DANCE MARATHON

TALENT SHOW To mark the end of the first ever Diversity Week, a student cultural talent show featuring dance, song and spoken word will be held Thursday at 7 p.m. on the UC patio. The event is hosted by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs and Unity Roundtable.

Dance the night away and support a good cause along the way. Dance Marathon is a philanthropic event, which will help provide financial and emotional support to families and children of Miami Children’s Hospital, part of the Children’s Miracle Network. The 2011 marathon will take place in the Wellness Center from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Online donations are accepted at helpmakemiracles. org. The goal is to collect $10,000.

LEADERSHIP RETREAT

For more information, email club president Alejandro Rengifo at a.rengifo@umiami.edu.

On Saturday, the Diversity Leadership Retreat will give an opportunity to discuss diversity and its impact.

OPERA

Other events include student and faculty net-

The Frost School of Music and the Department of Vocal Performance present Visions of

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Orpheus. There will be three shows at Clarke Recital Hall in the L. Austin Weeks Center for Recording and Performance from Thursday to Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and another show at 3 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is free and tickets can be reserved online. For more information, visit miami.edu/ frost/index.php/frost/frost_events/.

BEN & JERRY’S Co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, Jerry Greenfield, is having a talk at the BankUnited Center on Nov. 30 at 7 p.m. He will discuss his success and the business’ focus on creative approaches and social responsibility. A Cane Card is required for entrance. Hurricane Productions will host the event. For more information, visit hurricaneproductions.org. Alexander Gonzalez may be contacted at agonzalez@themiamihurricane.com.

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Students follow new Uragano truck around campus PIZZA FROM PAGE 1 ““We wanted to make some quick fixes for the fall semester,”” she said. ““Chartwells initiated the pizza concept because it’’s a staple for students.”” The truck was created specifically for the university and John Cook, Chartwells’’ executive chef, oversees the operation. Uragano’’s menu currently features 11 different pizzas, ranging from the basic Margherita pizza to the ““U Bomb,”” which includes bacon, sausage and pepperoni, among other toppings. The truck also offers three sandwich varieties and focaccia dippers. The roving truck will make stops at the Memorial, Miller and Stanford Circles, as well as the Hecht/Stanford towers and the University Village (UV). Memorial Circle is located

CARISSA HARRIS // The Miami Hurricane

PIZZA CRAZE: Students wait in line at Chartwells’ new Uragano pizza truck by Memorial Circle on Tuesday afternoon. in front of the McArthur Engineering Building, and Miller Circle is in front of Gusman Hall.

Tentatively, it will be stationed Monday through Friday at Memorial Circle from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

and Miller from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The truck will move to either Hecht/Stanford or the UV in the late evening. ““We want to make sure that we put it where people need it,”” Redway said. ““Hours and locations will remain fluid. The schedule requires testing, trial and adjustment.”” Chartwells’’ marketing staff will monitor the truck to determine where to place it to meet the demand throughout the day. Junior Angelica Navas ordered a pizza while it was at Memorial Circle on Wednesday. She is pleased with the convenience and quality the truck brings to campus. ““I am excited because I just came out of class and it’’s a great thing to have right outside,”” she said. ““It creates more diverse food options on campus, so we won’’t get sick of the same things.”” Although many students have

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given Uragano positive reviews, others are not satisfied with the menu. ““I am disappointed that there is no gluten-free pizza on the menu,”” sophomore Casey Epstein said. ““If they were going to add a new dining option, I would have preferred that it be compatible with all diets.”” Redway said that Chartwells intends to accept Cane Cards as payment at the pizza truck, but that they are currently ironing out a few bugs in the system. For now, cash and credit cards are accepted. ““This is just another initiative to enhance dining on campus,”” she said. ““It’’s one more effort for convenience.”” Uragano will update students on its location through both Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, students can send a tweet to @UraganoUM to suggest locations for the truck to stop.

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STUDENT ORGANIZATION

PHOTO BRIEF

Canned food donations help community

Veterans gather to honor Vietnam

Movement helps to feed families in need BY PERI DIAMOND CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

To get into the Thanksgiving spirit, two construction-related service projects are promoting student involvement all while helping the community. On Friday at 12:30 p.m., the School of Architecture and the Center for Urban and Community Design (CUCD) will be participating in the University of Miami’’s own version of the national ““Canstruction”” movement, a non-profit organization that collects canned food donations and helps spread awareness about issues involving hunger. Teams around the school will compete in a timed, building competition, in which members will replicate and build structures out of the canned food donations. After the competition is over, all donations will then be given to Camillus House, to help feed families in need. ““I am very excited about ‘‘Canstruction’’ this year,”” said Lauren Stark, an architecture teaching assistant who helped organize the event. ““It is a great way for UM to get involved and give back to its community.”” The building craze does not stop there. Student Government developed its own version called ““Can U Build It?””. Teams of students are asked to collect as many canned goods throughout the week. On Monday, the teams will then use the cans to build the largest and most creative ““Can Castle”” on the Green. Groups of students and student organizations can form teams. Cans will be donated to the Food Banks of South Florida. Registration must be made prior to competing by emailing Executive-at-Large External Melissa Guller, m.guller@umiami.edu. The winning team, up to ten members, will receive $20 gift certificates to the Rat. Greek organizations that collect over 100 cans will obtain written letters of their participation in an on-campus philanthropic event. 8

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NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

RAISE YOUR FLAG: Zachary White, a Vietnam veteran participates in the annual Veteran’s Day Parade in Coconut Grove on Friday. White was enlisted in the Airforce from 1982 until 1987 and handled the aircraft maintenance in Okinawa, Japan.

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WELLNESS CENTER

Popular zumba workout mixes dance, muscular toning On-campus classes in high demand BY ARIELE GALLARDO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Getting in shape is just a dance step away. Zumba is a trending workout routine that involves choreographed dance steps to international music. Its main goal is to help burn fat. Depending on various physical factors, such as sex and body weight, this can mean an average 400 to 600 calories per hour in class. The routine increases cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular toning and overall flexibility. ““It is a fun way of exercising because you get to do something you love to do like dancing, but you’’re working out at the same time,”” said

junior Tara Reaves, who attends the classes. A typical zumba class begins with a selection of Latin genres like salsa or merengue. The styles then begin to switch as the instructor may use a more modern track to shift to wall pushups or squats. ““I love the high energy of the instructors and the class as a whole,”” said freshman Laurel Zaima, who tries to attend a couple of times a week. ““The loud music and fun dance moves really make you break a sweat.”” Zumba has become one of the most popular classes at the Wellness Center. In order to be attend the class, participants arrive anywhere from one to two hours in advance in order to receive a number that guarantees them a spot. The classes take place in Multipurpose Room B, which can hold at most 55 people. ““We always have to turn people away and the numbers run out way before the class

starts,”” said Sandra Diaz, a senior student employee at the Wellness Center. People have been known to sneak in to the class even after it has reached maximum capacity and dance in the hallways next to the classrooms. The fitness program managers (FPM) remain in the class for the first ten minutes to ensure that people don’’t sneak in but many will after the FPMs leave. ““Students, faculty, and staff love their zumba and not just Hispanics but people from multiple backgrounds and even guys,”” Diaz said. Instructor and Assistant Director for Group Exercise and Instructional Programs, Melisa Jurado does, however, recommend

that zumba novices should gradually learn the moves. ““Watch the feet, and learn the foot movements first,”” Jurado said. ““Then you can do the hips and the arms.”” Because zumba uses dance moves and not complicated exercise terms, first-timers can quickly learn the ropes. Zumba instructors are certified to teach using body language and vivid motions. ““It’’s a fun way to get in my cardio and I don’’t really feel like I’’m working out,”” freshman Katie O’’Brien said. The full schedule of classes can be found at miami.edu/sa/index.php/wellness_center.

DANIELA SANTAMARINA// The Miami Hurricane

RHYTHM: Everybody dances and claps at the rhythm of zumba, a workout that incorporates International music and dancing. It also enhances flexibility.

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speak

UP!

What is your favorite DIsney character and why?

JORDYN COHEN Freshman “Pluto, because I love dogs, he’s adorable and he has the best time at Disney, just like I do.”

ANDREW WIEMER Director of the Butler Center for Service and Leadership “Mickey, because he is the icon of Disney and he’s cute.”

KEVIN ROMAN Sophomore “Mufasa, because I’ve been told that I look like a lion with my hair down.”

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

Raymond La, Contributing Columnist

HURRICANE

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Protesters not making progress Occupy Wall Street and its sister movements around the country have been a fixture in the news for the past few months. Due to a general lack of progress, protestors have continued to camp out in public places for extended periods of time, and many camps are now dealing with restrictions placed upon them by outside entities. In Miami, the Occupy movement suffered a setback last week when Miami-Dade County revoked the permit issued to the protestors for sitting in at Government Center. The Miami New Times reported that a spokesman for the county said that the protestors are not getting kicked out of the area; rather, a crane will be moving in to that spot for construction work. The movement will apparently be able to reapply for a permit when the crane leaves. Similarly, in New York City, Occupy Wall Street is facing intense opposition from the police in recent weeks. Protestors are no longer allowed to use tents or generators at their camp, and police arrested more than 200 people in a surprise raid. BBC News reported that Mayor Michael Bloomberg said this was carried out because of public health and safety concerns. A New York City judge ruled that the First

The Miami

com

OPINION

Golden wouldn’t have as much of an opportunity to create a name for himself if he left for Penn State.

Amendment to the United States Constitution does not entitle protestors to camp out indefinitely because of reasonable time, place and manner restrictions. Bloomberg believes that protestors are endangering the public and, because they have been taking over public spaces, this is a legitimate possibility. The Occupy movement has no real organization. There is no leader and no concrete goal. While this country was built on the principle of free speech, we are only free to act and express our ideas as long as we don’’t infringe upon the rights of others. Participants of the Occupy movements, while generally nonviolent, are preventing others from using property that they have a right to use and disrupting the operations of nearby businesses. Everyone has the right to let their voice be heard, Occupy protestors included. However, the movement seems to be all bark and no bite, with little to nothing being accomplished. It is unreasonable for them to remain where they are for an indefinite period of time while essentially being ineffective. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Gonzalez

MANAGING EDITOR Kyli Singh

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman

ACCOUNT REPS Cristian Benavides Melissa Castillo Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger

PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers

NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan ASST. NEWS EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg OPINION EDITOR Darci Miller EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz

COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz Tasha Giuda DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Demi Rafuls ONLINE EDITOR Amilynn Soto

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page.

Golden faces inevitable Penn State speculation While at Penn State, Al Golden was a threeyear letter winner, twoyear starter at tight end, a team captain, RAYMOND LA CONTRIBUTING and later the COLUMNIST linebackers coach and recruiting coordinator. In the middle of the Penn State scandal, the media has deemed Golden a candidate with the perfect roots to replace recently-fired head coach Joe Paterno. However, it would be in Golden’’s best interests to stay at UM. Sure, Golden may seem to have all the right reasons to take interest in the vacant position up north in Happy Valley,

but he has far more reason to stay put in Coral Gables. Aside from the allegations unfolding at Penn State involving Paterno’’s former assistant, Paterno is a legend in college football. With more than 400 victories as head coach of the Nittany Lions, Paterno was synonymous with Penn State over half a century. Golden wouldn’’t have as much of an opportunity to create a name for himself if he left for Penn State, as he would be coaching in the shadows of a legend and the recent scandal. Would a good architect abandon his current job for another after drawing up only half the blueprints? Would a good plumber install half of the plumbing system for a house and disregard the rest? The same theory applies for a good

coach. A good coach would not leave an unfinished job for another. Golden has made significant progress in the Hurricanes’’ football program by developing a sense of integrity, sportsmanship and teamwork on and off the field. However, the job is not finished; Golden acknowledges that and will stay on as the coach of the Miami Hurricanes. The speculation regarding Golden coaching at Penn State after Paterno’’s firing is just that: speculation. In the end, he will remain down here in Coral Gables, leading the Miami Hurricanes onto the field, and we surely would love to have him here for many years to come. Raymond La is a freshman majoring in microbiology.

Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

©2011 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Sex should stay out of the stacks O tto G. Richter Library, a.k.a. Club Richter, is our university's main library in the center of campus. The library’’s purpose is for people to study and research. However, some stuTAYLOR DUCKETT CONTRIBUTING dents use the library for COLUMNIST other purposes. What makes people decide that it’’s a good idea to have sex in the stacks at Richter? For those who aren’’t familiar with the stacks, they are five f loors full of rows and rows of old, dusty books. Are people seriously turned on by that? Have some respect for yourselves and, for crying out loud, get a room. No one wants to be studying in the stacks only to hear two people in the heat of the moment; that’’s just wrong. Also, no one wants to find empty condom wrappers when they show up for work the next morning. It would be awkward for you if you found out that someone was having sex where you work, so why do it to someone else? Not to mention the carvings on the wall showing how many people have had sex up there. Some say people have sex in the stacks for the adrenaline rush because there is always the possibility that someone will catch you. However, if you need an adrenaline rush that badly, there are so many other ways to do this, like rock climbing, go-cart driving, etc. Or if it’’s because the books are such a turn on for you, take them home. You can check out books for a month. Respect yourselves, respect the library and respect the people who have to work there.

E

Taylor Duckett is a freshman majoring in chemistry.

the word is mighty. I write to protect. I write to defend myself, others, my beliefs and the beliefs of others. I write to add weight to my voice. I write to learn. I also write to convey my perspectives and experiences, so others can learn from them. I also do it so others don’’t repeat my mistakes. Or do, depending on the situation. That’’s the main reason for my writing. And, if those reasons weren’’t enough, writing has one more function —— it makes me human. It connects me to the world. It lets me communicate. It adds a concrete framework to my imagination. It adds dimension to my reality. It embodies the spirit of freedom and all that is right with the world. And that’’s my story. Word.

ating disorders affect people of all ages, but they’’re especially prominent among college students. We are easily affected by these so-called skinny trends. We can see uncountable comJING XU CONTRIBUTING mercials about weight COLUMNIST loss drugs on TV, in magazines and newspapers, and on the Internet. Our media influences and misleads young people to believe that skinny equals beauty. However, due to this misleading information, more and more people are suffering from eating disorders. According to Massachusetts Eating Disorders Association, 15 percent of women between the ages of 17 to 24 have eating disorders; 40 percent of female college students have eating disorders; and 91 percent of female college students have attempted to control their weight through dieting. Eating disorders have become a big issue among teenagers and their families. The number of tragedies related to eating disorders increases year to year. It’’s time for people to start paying attention and caring about young people’’s health. But how do you know whether you have an eating disorder or if it’’s just disordered eating? You may have an eating disorder if you find yourself described below. Anorexia nervosa is a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss. You may have anorexia if you have missed your period, you obsess about being thin, or you skip meals and avoid food-related social situations. Bulimia nervosa is also a potentially lifethreatening eating disorder characterized by a cycle of binge eating and compensatory behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse or exercise in an attempt to compensate for binging. Binge eating disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder characterized by recurrent binge eating without the regular use of behaviors to try to make-up for the binge eating. The earlier these disorders are treated, the more likely it is that they will recover completely. Also, we are encouraged to do regular exercise, arrange a healthy diet and keep a positive attitude towards life to avoid eating disorders. Letting your friends and families realize the danger of eating disorders is important and necessary. Stop risking your health; the future will be bright.

Andrew Blitman is a senior majoring in marine affairs and biology.

Jing Xu is a junior majoring in public relations and economics.

ILLUSTRATION BY ALLISON GOODMAN

The power of expression through writing

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or many people, writing is a chore. But for me, it’’s an outlet for my creativity. It grants me the power to use language as a tool for helping myself and, most ANDREW BLITMAN importantly, for SENIOR helping others. It COLUMNIST allows me to articulate my thoughts on a platform for others to see. It enables me to visualize my ideas, so I can build on them in the future. It gives others the chance to see those ideas and build on them as well. For me, the written word acts as a time capsule. The tone captures the emotion at the heat of the moment, while the 12

OPINION

order and style of words represent the writer’’s stage of psychological development at the time of inscription. At the same time, the piece as a whole can say a lot about the writer’’s health and level of education. By looking at these signatures, I can follow my own growth as a person over the years. Self-reflection is important, especially for reinforcing empathy, maturity, morality and philosophy. Writing also works as a form of catharsis, or emotional release. I write because I feel a need to write. I write because I feel. I write to express myself in a way that’’s easy for others to interpret. I write to convey emotions. I write to convey knowledge. I write to inspire and to empower. I write because I don’’t believe that violence is a legitimate source or demonstration of power. I write because

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Eating disorders still prevalent among teenagers

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Ready to spice up your life? Check out French Spice, which runs through November and features prix-fixe menus at French restaurants around Miami. For more information, visit frenchspicemiami.com.

BY ROSA ORIHUELA CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

lfred Hitchcock’’s thrillers are known to keep audiences on the edge of their seats. The University of Miami will host Marnie Re-visited, an event that features a screening of ““Marnie”” and a discussion featuring celebrated Hitchcock experts Murray Pomerance and William Rothman. The two scholars have studied Hitchcock’’s work intensively. Pomerance is an author of various books, such as ““An Eye for Hitchcock,”” and a professor at Ryerson University’’s Department of Sociology. Rothman is a UM motion pictures professor and the author of numerous books,

including the prominent analysis ““Hitchcock - The Murderous Gaze.”” ““He is, for film, the equivalent of Shakespeare for theater,”” Rothman said. The film is about a thief, Marnie, who uses her beauty to rob her employers and then changes her identity. However, when Marnie sets her eyes on publishing mogul Mark Rutland, she gets more than she expected when he becomes obsessed with trapping her. Hitchcock’’s 1964 film has enjoyed much attention due to its complexity and interpretation of characters. ““Hitchcock is one of the greatest masters of the art of pure cinema," Rothman said. "He started his career in the silent period and for half a century made a long series of films, each one of which

was popular. Everybody enjoyed his films. They were understandable by everyone, nonetheless very deep." Hitchcock’’s films have remained popular even decades after their releases due to his distinctive take on directing. ““He masters every step of filmmak-

IF YOU GO WHERE: Cosford Cinema WHEN: Saturday from 2 to 6 p.m. PRICE: Free

ing, from writing, even if he does not write, to editing, lighting," said graduate student Nicolas Bordage, who is studying literature and romance studies. "He understands the deep psychology of cinema and knows the dark side of human kind. He also has a very British sense of humor.”” Hitchcock’’s style of directing is different from that of most directors. ““It is genuinely personal," graduate student Oscar Jubis said. "His style of directing reflects a personal vision.”” The screening, brought to campus by the School of Communication’’s Norton Herrick Center for Motion Picture Studies, will be followed by a brief intermission and a panel discussion at 4:30 p.m. For more information, visit cosfordcinema.com. ILLUSTRATION BY MARIAH PRICE

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MUSIC

LIFESTYLE

Band to take center stage at Design District BY TYLER COONEY CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Funk, jazz and rock fans: You no longer have to travel 870 miles to the Big Easy or pull out Grandpa’’s old Hendrix vinyl to listen to quality funk music in the 21st century. Papa Grows Funk, a New Orleans-based funk band who has garnered national and international attention, is coming to The Stage of Miami’’s Design District on Saturday for a night of smooth instrumentals, jazzy vocals and a ““Nawlins””-flared sound that is reminiscent of the funk of the ‘‘60s and ‘‘70s. Consisting of some of the best funk musicians in the country, Papa Grows Funk formed in 2001 out of the Crescent City’’s Old Time Bar and has become one of the city’’s most popular. Without a label, the band has managed to sell 30,000 copies of their four albums, with their fifth, titled Needle in the Groove, just being released locally. ““Funk”” leader John ““Papa”” Gros (whose nickname stemmed from a ““long night of drinking for a buddy to me that””) says that the album Needle in the Groove is different from all of their previous albums in that it is more of a collective effort, rather than each musician bringing in their own sounds into studio. In addition, outside help was brought in to give the album it’’s great sound. ““We now have outside producers who give their own opinion on what we should sound like. We had Tom Drummond……and Allen Toussaint……we totally respect what they do and they influence us,”” Gros said. The funk ““super group”” puts out music consisting of the grooving sounds of the Hammond, the sax, the guitar and a complete rhythm section that holds its own with or without lead singer’’s John Gros’’ vocals. Never creating set lists or rehearsing before shows, Funk puts out a unique concert sound at each venue. They put out around 100 shows a year, reaching notoriety from New York to France to Japan for their self-described ““booty shaking music”” that emulates a sliver of what Mardi Gras has become. Citing The Meters and Fats Domino as major influences, ““Funk’’s”” strength is in its soothing sax and exciting percussion, with the guitar and vocal s sealing its Orleans’’ sound. Gross says that the band is excited to play in Miami for only the second time. ““I know a lot of the people down there because they travel to see us. Looking forward to seeing familiar faces,”” Gros said. According to the band’’s lead, ““Funk”” loves playing on the road to see such familiar faces and New Orleans music fans. Expecting a full house, ““Papa”” tells Miamians to "be prepared to dance your butt off, because we are bringing the funk.”” The Stage’’s chic design and comfortable layout with its preoccupation with culture and the arts lends itself to Papa Grows Funk’’s non-mainstream style. For more information, go to thestagemiami.com or papagrowsfunk.com. 14

EDGE

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

RACHEL STEINHAUSER // The Miami Hurricane

TAKING THE SCENIC ROUTE: A kayaker enters the water from Maurice Gibb Memorial Park. Kayak rentals are an inexpensive outdoor option for the Miami adventurer. It costs $15 for a single kayak rental for the first hour.

Five things to do this weekend under $15 BY KARI SCHARF CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Finding cheap things to do on the weekend isn’’t always easy. Check out this list of five things to do under $15 this weekend.

1.

$15: Kayak Rental

Leave the car behind and explore Miami by kayak this weekend. At the Matheson Hammock Park concession, anyone can rent a kayak and paddle around the atoll pool, which is naturally filled by the tides from Biscayne Bay. After completing the aquatic jaunt, drink a beer on the pool’’s beach or explore the rest of Matheson Hammock’’s 351 acres. Cost for a single kayak rental is $15 for the first hour and $10 for each additional hour. Or grab a friend and rent a double kayak, which runs for $25 for the first hour and $15 for each additional hour. 9610 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables

2.

$13.50: World Erotic Art Museum

Looking for something unique to do this weekend? Look no further than South Beach’’s World Erotic Art Museum. This adult-only, 12,000-squarefoot museum houses the largest collection Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

of erotic art in the U.S. Showcasing a variety of time periods, cultures and mediums, the WEAM contains pieces that will turn you on, make you cringe and leave you asking, ““WTF?”” Just be sure to snap a photo of the 20-foot tall golden penis before you exit. 1205 Washington Ave., Miami Beach

3.

$10: Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

Escape the bustle of city life with a visit to the historical Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. Originally built in the 1910s as the home of wealthy industrialist James Deering, Vizcaya boasts 34 rooms decorated with original 15th to 19th century art and furniture. After touring the bay front mansion, wander through the expansive gardens located on the estate and transport yourself back to a time when the population of Miami was just 10,000. Finally, grab a bite to eat at the Vizcaya Cafe, which overlooks the estate’’s historic swimming pool. Remember to bring your Cane Card to receive the $10 student rate. 3251 South Miami Ave., Miami vizcayamuseum.org

4.

$8: Miami Book Fair International Street Fair

Whether you are a book

nerd or just seeking references for your final term paper, the Miami Book Fair International’’s Street Fair is the place to go this weekend. Returning to Miami for its 28th year, the fair runs from Friday to Sunday. More than 250 publishers and booksellers exhibit and sell books of all genres. As you hunt for your next literary delight, enjoy live musical performances held on the World Stage and snack on food from one of the numerous vendors in attendance. Go on Friday to avoid the crowds and score free admission. Miami Dade College’’s Wolfson Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave., Downtown Miami miamibookfair.com

5.

$7: Short Film Festival

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, the Miami Short Film Festival showcases more than 80 films from around the world that are 30 minutes or less in length. Each night of the festival, a series of films sharing a common theme are shown, including ““Moments of Insanity”” and ““Ecstasy of Life.”” Films are screened at a number of locations, including the Colony Theatre and Miami Beach Cinematheque. Visit miamishortfilmfestival.com for specific venue information for each showing. Discounted tickets are available at the door for students with ID.


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SPORTS

turnovers the women’s basketball team committed during Tuesday’s 92-76 loss to No.3 Tennessee

3180

the attendance for Tuesday night’s gane against Rutgers at The Bank United Center

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Grant, Scott lead charge in win over Rutgers Larranaga picks up second victory BY DAVID FURONES SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

ZACH BEEKER // The Miami Hurricane

THINK FAST: Senior Malcolm Grant makes a move toward the basket in the Canes’ game against Rutgers Tuesday night. Miami won 72-57 and will play North Florida at home on Saturday. 16

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

In its first test against a school from a major conference, the University of Miami men’’s basketball team prevailed against Rutgers Tuesday night by a final score of 72-57. The Canes were led by guards Durand Scott and Malcolm Grant, who dropped 19 points apiece. Scott was relentless against the Scarlet Knights down the stretch with his running teardrop over taller defenders, and Grant delivered from the three-point line. ““We are constantly trying to put them in positions to do well,”” said head coach Jim Larranaga, after his second win with Miami. Kenny Kadji, the redshirt sophomore transfer out of the University of Florida, chipped in with a loaded stat line of 13 points, five rebounds, three steals and two blocks. He provided the formidable post presence his team desperately needs with Reggie Johnson out. ““[Kadji] is very skilled,”” Larranaga said. ““He’’s long, he’’s athletic, he can jump. His defensive presence was one of the major keys tonight.”” While Kadji played solid interior defense, blocking and altering a number of Scarlet Knight shots, the Canes surrendered several secondchance opportunities, allowing Rutgers 22 offensive rebounds. ““Our initial defense was very good, our rebound defense could have been better,”” Larranaga said. ““That’’s an area where we’’re undersized. We know we have to work at it and improve.”” While Miami led by as many as 19, they experienced a scare midway through the second half

in the form of a 15-2 run that cut their lead to six. The difference in this game, as opposed to most of last year, was clear: When the opponent made a run to cut into a big Hurricane lead, the players kept their composure and ultimately came away with a win. ““We’’ve been through those tough times where we lost leads and didn’’t execute at the end,”” Grant said. ““Coach [Larranaga], he’’s key for us. He knows when a team is down, specific ways to beat them.”” Scott said the team has learned from past miscues and attributes their success down the stretch Tuesday to maturity. ““We just stayed calm, we stayed poised, stayed together,”” he said. Led by Malcolm Grant, who at one point drained three consecutive shots from beyond the arc, the Canes started 5 of 9 from the outside. ““I think the reason why Malcolm has been so successful is he’’s an incredible shooter,”” Larranaga said. ““Maybe the best I’’ve ever coached.”” Miami ended the first half shooting 53.8 percent on threes, but later came back down to Earth. Freshman Shane Larkin made his debut for Miami after receiving news at 1 p.m. Tuesday that an NCAA waiver cleared him to compete immediately after transferring from DePaul. He entered seven minutes into the game, and on his very first possession as a Cane, knocked down a three-point basket. The Hurricanes avenged their 61-45 loss early last season against these same Scarlet Knights up in New Jersey. Miami’’s next challenge will be another home game against the North Florida Ospreys on Saturday at 7 p.m.


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COMMENTARY

SOCCER

Golden’s process a work in progress

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KENNETH RUBI // The Miami Hurricane

HEADS UP: Junior forward Kate Howarth battles a defender on the Alabama Crimson Tide while jumping up for a header in the Hurricanes’ first-round victory in the NCAA Tournament.

Howarth carries team after injury Player grows into mature leader despite obstacles BY KRISTEN SPILLANE STAFF WRITER

She’’s hard at work by 7 a.m. each morning, day in and day out. Two solid hours of hard work, conditioning and shots drills. For junior forward Kate Howarth, this is what being a Hurricane is all about. Howarth, who hails from Grand Blanc, Mich., leads the team in offensive statistics with 11 goals, six assists, 26 points, 39 shots, 17 shots on goal and three game-winning goals, while leading the team to the first postseason win in school history. Although she has helped lead her team to the second round of the NCAA tournament this year, things were not always so simple. Howarth suffered a season-ending injury just 10 games into her sophomore year. Such a devastating injury could have sidelined a player for good, discouraged and disappointed. But Kate Howarth is not just another player. ““My outlook on practicing and playing has always been, ‘‘play as if this is your last game,’’ but getting injured and being out for almost an entire year just brings those beliefs to life,”” Howarth said. ““In one split second I went from playing the game I love to having three surgeries and crutching around for nine weeks. If I would have run a little slower or a little faster I wouldn’’t have been there that second, I wouldn’’t have been

tackled. It was literally one moment.”” Howarth’’s attitude speaks a lot to her character and determination as a player. ““I wouldn’’t redo it if I could, it really gave me an entire new appreciation for the game and how it is a privilege to be able to play and never take it for granted,”” she said. ““Every single time I step onto the field I try my hardest to leave it all out there, because you don’’t know what could happen. One split second can change everything.”” Howarth’’s admirable mentality does not go unnoticed by her teammates and coaches. ““It was a really rough time when Kate got hurt, not only for her but for the team because we lost one of our goal scorers,”” said Fatima Nasser, a junior midfielder. ““But she recovered well and was one of the few that stayed over the summer to work out and get ready for the season with the strength coach and trainers.”” Part of Howarth’’s success can be attributed to her continuous development as a player and leader. ““I think over the last three years I have developed as a player through experience,”” she said. ““Every single game you play in, you can go back and watch the film and pick out specific things you can work toward doing better in practice to make sure you don’’t make those same mistakes again. That is a part of maturing as a player; there is always room for improvement, no matter what. That is the beauty of the game.””

FINISH READING AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM

iami has run out of options, run out of last-ditch hopes. All that remain AUSTEN GREGERSON are a few SENIOR SPORTS guarantees. WRITER T h e o n l y guarantees the Hurricanes have for the season’’s last two games, including this Saturday’’s matchup against South Florida, aren’’t very positive. Miami won’’t finish the season with a win against Florida State, won’’t earn a trip to the ACC championship game, and depending on the results of these next few games, may not have life much past Thanksgiving. Head coach Al Golden knows these truths to be apparent for his players, certainly for the seniors and NFL-ready prospects soon to be gone from Coral Gables forever. But Golden does not preach destinations, not even product. The process he preaches and demands his players adhere to doesn’’t allow for much ref lection, until the process has run its course. ““You’’re not going to get these days back, and you’’re not going to get these games back,”” he said. ““Just enjoy the journey.”” The journey this year has been far from easy and, depending on what the NCAA decides, may be far from over. But if ACC contention is out of the question and simple bowl eligibility may not be enough for a Canes postseason, only the games left on the schedule are promised. Now that the guessing is over, what else is there to do but enjoy the f leeting moments while they last? ““Enjoy being here in Coral Gables and at the Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

University of Miami,”” Golden said. ““Every time you meet, every time you’’re in the locker room, every time you go get something to eat on campus, enjoy those moments because when it’’s gone, it’’s gone forever.”” Golden’’s tone during his weekly press conference, while appropriate for a season nearing its end, sharply contrasts with the tunnelvisioned ‘‘Process’’ he took to spouting about whenever a distraction or life-changing moment took place. Whether it be rushing for a thousand yards or having the walls fall down around you when your name is placed alongside a billion-dollar ponzi schemer, The Process was something infallible in nature. The Process has no need for distractions, no need for moments to stop and ref lect. Processes, by their very nature, move forward. Onward. Those moments fill the entire season, and appropriately for their record, stack evenly both positively and negatively. For the negative moments, plenty of time has passed for realities to set in and, hopefully, grow from and move on. The Process is a guarantee, no matter what else happens. ““We just have to prepare and play well and everything else will take care of itself,”” Golden said. ““Thinking about [the postseason] is not going to help us prepare or find ways to stop Daniels or take care of [defensive tackle] Corey Grissom inside on the defense. For us, we just have to get ready for the game and let that take care of itself.”” What changes if it doesn’’t? Not much. There aren’’t many different ways two games can go. But for the players, it’’s all they have left. Until next week, that is, when the process starts over again. It always has a way of working itself out.

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Dear V: I’m not ashamed to admit I need an alpha male... Dear Post-Coitus Praying Mantis, , When it comes to guys, I’’ve always been the type of girl who goes for what she wants. I’’ve never been the type to sit back and wait. Although this has been my MO for as long as I remember, I’’m starting to get tired of constantly chasing and wish that I could be the one pursued for a change! I have a friend who I could maybe see a future with and have always had chemistry with, but the problem is that he is the textbook definition of passive aggressive when it comes to these things, which completely turns me off. I’’m not saying that I need a juicehead gorilla, but I want someone who’’s somewhat aggressive and will make the first move for once! Is it so wrong of me to want a guy who’’s willing to go after what he wants? Ms. Never Passive

I don’’t think your desire is unreasonable; after all, it’’s no secret that most women desire a man who’’s at least somewhat masculine. Sure, the sensitive guy persona has been all the rage in the past decade, but when push comes to shove (literally), even girls with Bieber Fever want their man to show he’’s not going to get kicked around (just ask the security detail at the Macy’’s in New York City). The pursuit that you’’re talking about is part of most male’’s masculinity; it’’s rising as an alpha male and taking what you want. Passive-aggressiveness is not masculine at all. As a matter of fact, passive-aggressiveness is one of the most cowardly qualities anyone can have and what’’s truly sad is that some people are proud of their passiveaggressiveness. Passive-aggressiveness is used as a response when you’’re not brave enough to say what’’s actually on your mind. They can call it clever and claim they’’re getting the last laugh all they want, but the truth is they’’re too weak

dear ... to stand by what they believe so they invent a way to claim they’’re being cunning when they’’re just being a wimp. I’’m not necessarily indicting the guy you’’re talking about because there are other reasons he could be passiveaggressive. Sometimes being coy is an effective way to charm a woman to take interest in you, but you’’re clearly not the type for that. Try toning down your aggressiveness; maybe go from a Tom Berenger (10) to a Tom Selleck (5). If you act less aggressive, he might elevate from a Woody Allen (1) to the ““Jesse Stone”” level, so there will be a perfect harmony between you. If that doesn’’t work, you might need to spell it out for him because some people aren’’t the conquering type. But let’’s hope he finally hops in the driver’’s seat…… ……and let‘‘s pray he drives better than Vince Neil, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane.com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

South Beach Real Estate Co. Seeking Entry Level Book-keeper Duties: accounts payable/ receivable, posting bank deposits and clerical ofce duties. Must be Microsoft Ofce procient. Salary according to qualications. Email resume to: hrccof@gmail.com

INTERESTED IN SEEING YOUR WORK

IN PRINT?

Know the difference between Helvetica and Arial? Proficient in Adobe InDesign?

LSAT INSTRUCTORS WANTED Great PT job (up to $100/hr) w/fun company for candidates w/170+ LSAT. Send resume, cover letter, score report to info@blueprintprep.com.

ARE YOU A BLOGAHOLIC?

Apply to join the The Miami Hurricane design staff next spring!

TAKE YOUR TALENTS TO THE NEXT LEVEL AT THE MIAMI HURRICANE. For more information, contact managing@ themiamihurricane.com.

Contact design@themiamihurricane.com. Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

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miami.edu/calendar Thursday, Nov. 17 CAC’s Harry Potter Weekend - Meet the Quidditch Team 11:00 a.m. •• UC Breezeway Did you know that UM has its very own Quidditch team? Find out more at their table in the breezeway!

Patio Jams featuring Sam Friend 12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Sam Friend! For more information, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

RAB “Make Your Own License Plates” 3:00 p.m. •• Rathskeller If it’’s Thursday, something must be happening at the Rathskeller! One of RAB’’s most popular events is back - come out and make your own custom license plate on the Rat patio. The event is free for UM students.

boundaries of any single denition. In stark contrast to the typical ““magic show””, MAZE presents a unique blend of illusion, intuition, psychology, humor, mystery and danger. Free for all UM students, faculty and staff.

Women’s Basketball vs. Prairie View A&M 7 p.m. •• BankUnited Center Your nationally ranked Hurricanes return home to take on the Panthers of Prairie View A&M. Coverage available via Gametracker and WVUM 90.5.

Friday, Nov. 18 Interviewing Skills Workshop 11:00 a.m. •• Toppel Library This program is essential before attending an interview for an internship, graduate program, or full-time job! Topics that will be covered include how to prepare for the interview, questions the interviewer will ask, and the most effective ways to follow-up. An introduction to networking and negotiating your salary with also be provided.

CNL Presents Screen on CRU and Hurricane the Green – The Smurfs & Productions Present “MAZE” Harry Potter and the Deathly 6:30 p.m. •• UC Patio MAZE is an experience that escapes the Hallows: Part 1

Friday, Nov. 25th •• 3:30 p.m. Sun Life Stadium Cheer on the ‘‘Canes as we bid farewell to this year’’s senior class at the nal home game of the year. Buses will depart from the BankUnited Center beginning three hours prior to kickoff, with the last bus departing at 3:30pm. Out of town for Thanksgiving? Catch the game on ESPN, or online at www.wvum.org.

8:00 p.m. •• Foote Green Bring a chair, a blanket, and some friends for a great outdoor movie experience. First, watch as the Smurfs are chased from their village and into New York City by the evil wizard Gargamel. Then, as part of CAC’’s Harry Potter Weekend, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows: Part 1 will take you along Harry’’s adventure as he discovers the existence of the three most powerful objects of the wizarding world. In between lms, participate in the Harry Potter costume contest for great prizes, and sip on some homemade butterbeer!

Saturday, Nov. 19 Special Treatment Film Screening 12:00 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema French star Isabelle Huppert plays a highclass prostitute named Alice who serves up sexual fantasies for her clientele, from schoolgirl innocent to S&M dominatrix. Fed up with the seamy underbelly of French masculinity, Alice crosses paths with Xavier, a neurotic psychoanalyst facing a marriage crisis. The two quickly realize their professions share a thing or two in common as they navigate the overlapping worlds of psychotherapy and sexual therapy.

RAB Presents Football Watch

Party vs. USF 3:30 p.m. •• Rathskeller Bring your friends to the Rat as we cheer on the ‘‘Canes against the University of South Florida.

Men’s Basketball vs. North Florida 7:00 p.m. •• Bank United Center Coverage available via Gametracker and WVUM, 90.5FM.

CAC Presents: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 10:00 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema If you missed the kickoff of CAC’’s Harry Potter Weekend on Wednesday, here’’s your chance to watch the movie again! In the most recent Harry Potter lm, Harry, Ron and Hermione search for Voldemort’’s remaining Horcruxes in their effort to destroy the Dark Lord.

Sunday, Nov. 20 Special Treatment Film Screening 3:30 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

CAC Presents: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 8:00 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Hurricane Productions Presents “An Evening with Jerry Greenfield” Wednesday, Nov. 30th •• 7:00 p.m. Bank United Center Fieldhouse Join Jerry Greeneld, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’’s Ice Cream, as he tells the story of how he and his partner, Ben, built a store front venture into a $300 million empire. There will be free Ben & Jerry’’s Ice Cream for everyone in attendance! Cane Card required for entry. For more information, visit www.hurricaneproductions.org.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 20

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Nov. 17 - Nov. 20, 2011

Next week...

Football vs. Boston College

Sunday, Nov. 20th •• 11:00 a.m. Hecht Athletic Center Dance Marathon is a nationwide movement, involving college and high school students at over 150 schools across the country that raise money for the Children’’s Miracle Network hospital in their community. CANESdm - Dance Marathon at the University of Miami will be supporting Miami Children’’s Hospital, and ALL money fundraised goes directly to the hospital. Sign up as an individual, join a team, or bring your friends and create your own team! For more information, visit www.facebook.com/CANESdm.

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

Dance Marathon

The Miami Hurricane -- November 17, 2011  

The Miami Hurricane -- November 17, 2011

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