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The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 19 | Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY Y OF OF M MIAMI IAM IA MII IIN N CORAL G GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

Miami’s tricks and treats SEE EDGE, PAGES 13-16, FOR SPECIAL HALLOWEEN COVERAGE

HURRICANE HOMECOMING COMMITTEE MAKES CHANGES TO NEXT WEEK’S EVENTS PAGE 3

TROUBLE WITH TYRANNY

INTERNATIONAL POLICY TO CHANGE IN THE POST-GADDAFI ERA PAGE 11

RESPECTED RECRUITS

NORTHWESTERN CLASS OF 2008 MATURES ON THE GRIDIRON PAGE 19


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GLOBAL NEWS

Issues surface as population increases Pollution, poverty pose dangers

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY JACKIE SALO STAFF NEWS WRITER

The world population is set to hit 7 billion by the end of the month, according to a United Nations Population Fund Association (UNPFA) report released on Wednesday. As the global community continues to face issues such as depleting resources and poverty, a booming population poses increasing danger. This year’’s annual State of World Population report, titled ““People and Possibilities in a World of 7 Billion,”” reveals astonishing population trends. The milestone will be reached just 12 years after world population topped 6 billion. Based on predictions by the UNPFA, this figure will hit 10 billion before the end of the century. Most of this population growth is occurring in subSaharan Africa and the AsianPacific. The population increase is a result of several contributing factors. While some countries like China enforce birth codes, many others do not. In order for a population to continue growth at a steady pace, each household must have approximately two children. However, according to the UNPFA, the birthrate in Afghanistan and several countries in Africa is 5.0 and higher. ““There are many countries where they have as many children as nature grants,”” political science professor June Teufel Dreyer said. Also, average life expectancy has increased by 21 years since 1950, from 48 to 69, according to the UNPFA. One of the many factors that has inf luenced the increase of life expectancy has been the fact that food is easily transported around the globe. This has helped stabilize food scarcity. ““A lot of [population growth] is linked to globalization of knowledge, food sys2

NEWS

Delta Gamma sorority carved pumpkins for the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind. Check out Jessica Daly’s photo slideshow. Excited for the football game? Read Austen Gregerson’s preview before the Canes take on Virginia Thursday night.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAYLA NIMMO

FACE IN A CROWD: According to a report released Wednesday by the United Nations Population Fund Association, the world population is expected to hit 7 billion by the end of the month. tems, medical science,”” political science professor George Gonzalez said. ““It helps people simply live longer.”” Still, 925 million people are hungry worldwide and nearly 1.4 billion people live in poverty, according to the World Bank Group. The population growth is expected to put a greater strain on the resources necessary to keep that rate from accelerating, and may hinder the poor from improving their standard of living. ““For individuals to all have access to energy, food and other aspects of the average life, the population would need to be smaller to live comfortably,”” Gonzalez said. ““There is a greater stress on natural resources as individuals try and climb out of poverty.””

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

This consumption of resources, however, is often determined by the society an individual lives in. ““If we were to equate the amount of resources someone uses to land consumption, it is very much depending on where you live,”” Gonzalez said. ““You might have an ecological footprint of 100 while someone in Kenya has 1.”” The U.S. consumes more resources than any other country. Sustaining the lifestyle of the average Americans use 9.5 hectares of resources over their lifetimes, while the worldwide average usage is just 2.7, according to the UNPFA. ““What we have been doing is living on our environmental capital instead of our environmental interest,”” Dreyer said.

Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

““What we should do is decrease the population, but it is almost impossible.”” A larger population contributes to an increase in pollution, too. Today, carbon dioxide emissions of one American equal those of around four Chinese, 20 Indians, 30 Pakistanis, 40 Nigerians or 250 Ethiopians. When a large country the size of China or India does not follow the rules, it can negate the progress that the rest of the world is making, Dreyer said. Any successful action to save the global ecosystem will require a cohesive, global effort. She also hopes that new scientific discoveries can aid in minimizing the population’’s impact on the Earth. ““Science has saved us many times, so perhaps science will save us again,”” Dreyer said.

@MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

EDITOR’S NOTES Photo Editor Marlena Skrobe created the photo illustration on the cover. The Miami Hurricane will resume publication Nov. 3.


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HOMECOMING

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Homecoming to incorporate changes

Students celebrate Hindu holiday

New features for 2011 events BY ELIZABETH DE ARMAS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Canes, prepare to get your spirit on. Homecoming Week 2011 kicks off on Friday at 6 p.m. on the Rock, with an opening block party that will feature the traditional alma mater preliminaries. The block party, which is this year’’s rendition of opening ceremonies, will also feature food trucks in Stanford Circle and a booth selling license plates. ““It’’s absolutely phenomenal,”” said Julian Glover, vice chair of the Homecoming Executive Committee (HEC). ““In no other time is the Hurricane pride truly shown.”” Also, this year’’s Homecoming celebration will be a revamped version of previous festivities, with new competition rules that will allow more student participation. ““The opening ceremony is usually a smaller event, but this year the whole student body will have the opportunity to watch the teams compete,”” HEC Chair Aly Jaffer said. ““We have made a lot of changes as far as the way Homecoming has been run and I’’m hoping that the students will enjoy it more.”” Under the new system, students can now compete in Homecoming events without being a part of any affiliated organization. Previously, only members of the Committee on

Festival promotes Indian community BY AIMEE ALLEN CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

FILE PHOTO

SHOWING OFF YOUR SPIRIT: Senior Maury Abascal sings the alma mater before the boat burning ceremony during last year’s Hurricane Howl at the end of Homecoming week. Student Organizations (COSO) were allowed to create a team by submitting an official roster through the COSO database. Twenty-one teams will compete on Friday, a noticeable increase from last year’’s student participation in Homecoming. ““We’’re trying to make Homecoming more than what it has normally been,”” Jaffer said. ““We want students to be proud of being a Cane.”” During the rest of the week, the committee has several other events lined up to carry out the UM tradition, including Hur-

FILE PHOTO

COMING HOME: Students from Henry S. West Laboratory Elementary dress up in monopoly theme last year.

ricanes Help the Hometown, alma mater Singing Competition, the Hurricane Howl and the blood drive. The goal is to collect 700 pints of blood, said Glover, who oversees the blood drive. The week will wrap up with the Homecoming football game on Nov. 5, when UM faces Duke University. During the game, the Homecoming King and Queen will be crowned and the winning team of the alma mater competition will perform their song. HEC Vice Chair Thelma Santiago is excited to see the turn out of this year’’s Homecoming. ““Alma mater prelims have always been my favorite event because it’’s amazing to see and hear what teams come up with,”” Santiago said. ““Teams are much more varied this year. We’’re seeing groups of students, who have never really competed in Homecoming, take a chance and enter in more events than usual.”” Glover strongly encourages all students to participate in the week’’s events. ““Homecoming is about go-

EVENTS  For a schedule of events, visit miami.edu/sa/ index.php/student_ life/student_ organizations/ student_activities_ and_student_ organizations/hec ing all out for your organization or team for the week. It’’s about winning the title for Homecoming champs for the year. It’’s about tradition, and it’’s about showing what it takes to be a true Miami Hurricane,”” Glover said. Senior Elizabeth Nickerson enjoyed last year’’s Homecoming week and hopes this year’’s is just as unforgettable. ““I can’’t wait to see Ludacris because I think he was an excellent choice for our Homecoming concert and he will pump us up for the game,”” Nickerson said. ““It is my last Homecoming and I can’’t wait to be surrounded by my Hurricane family.”” Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

The Indian Students Association (ISA) will celebrate Diwali, the festival of lights, at 7 p.m. on Saturday with a performance at the Manuel Airtime Theater in Miami. Diwali is a five-day Hindu holiday that celebrates the victory of good over evil and light over darkness. It also marks the start of the Hindu New Year. The festivities on campus began last Friday with the Navratri celebration and continued Monday at the Rock with the religious prayer for the first day of Diwali, which was hosted by the Hindu Student Council. ““We want to promote the Indian community among our members and all students at UM,”” said Richa Taneja, president of ISA. The ISA Diwali performance will start off with a prayer. Also, members will explain the significance of the holiday throughout the night. ““We want to let everyone know what the Indian festival is and how we celebrate,”” said Aruna Arian, ISA adviser for the past 17 years. Groups performing will include UMiami SwaggeRaas, Hurricane Bhangra, UFusion and UMiami Tufaan. ““I am excited for everyone to come out whether they are Indian or not; it is important for everyone to be exposed to different cultures,”” said Ronak Patel, vice president of ISA. Admission is free for ISA members, $5 for students with a valid Cane Card, $10 for children and $15 for adults.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Diwali Show WHERE: Manuel Airtime Theater WHEN: 7 p.m. on Saturday TICKETS: $5 for students with a valid Cane Card, $10 for children and $15 for adults THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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GREEK LIFE

WEATHER

AN EYE ON HURRICANE SAFETY

Rina predicted to take detour BY ALYSHA KHAN| NEWS EDITOR ALEXA LOPEZ| EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Hurricane Rina is expected to downgrade to a Category 1 storm as it approaches the Yucatan peninsula on Thursday. The National Hurricane Center also predicts that Rina will bring stormy weather to South Florida over the weekend. Still, a direct hit to the state is not projected, according to an article in The Miami Herald. Residents, however, should still prepare. In 2005, Hurricane Wilma followed a similar path and Get your snack on hit South Florida as a CateAlthough on-campus gory 1 storm. It caused 25 food service will be open deaths, along with power as long as possible during an outages in more than 3 emergency, make sure to have million homes. non-perishable food items stocked, Here are a few as well as snack foods. tips to help UM students prepare in case a hurricane strikes. Don’t be afraid of the dark

HOW TO PREPARE FOR A HURRICANE

Fill ‘er up

Clean the tub and fill it halfway. In case there is a water shortage, the bathtub water could be used for washing or flushing toilets.

Don’t save any for the fish

Keep several containers filled with water for drinking in case water supply is cut off after a major storm.

In case of a power outage, do not use candles or other flammable lighting. Instead, buy a couple of flashlights and stock up on fresh batteries.

Fuel the fire

Fill a plastic gas tank with fuel before a hurricane. If a power failure occurs, gas pumps will not work to fill up your car.



Be sure to keep an eye on the storm and log onto miami.edu/index.php/about_ us/emergency_preparedness to learn how to stay safe during an emergency. RESEARCH FROM NCDC.NOAA.GOV AND MIAMI.EDU PHOTO COURTESY WEATHERTAP, GRAPHICS BY CARLOS MELLA, DESIGN BY ALLISON GOODMAN

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

Fraternity raises funds to repair chapter’s house Barbecue celebrates donations from alumni BY JONATHAN BORGE ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Lambda Chi Alpha brothers met at their fraternity house on San Amaro Drive last Friday to celebrate the culmination of summer-long efforts made to preserve the history and future of the chapter’’s house, a push that led to an approximate $93,000 alumni-driven donation. The weekend barbecue was planned to thank the alumni for their financial and spiritual support in response to a City of Coral Gables ordinance that would have otherwise left about 20 students homeless. As previously reported by The Miami Hurricane, the City of Coral Gables’’ fire marshal conducted brief, almost unexpected inspections of on-campus fraternity houses over the summer. Each chapter’’s adviser had little time to gather adequate resources for preparation. Lambda Chi Alpha, in particular, suffered from a series of expensive mandates to repair and update facets of the house that no longer met fire-code standards. Outdated alarm systems, loft removal and wall damage could have shut down the house come fall semester. ““I had 30 days to come up with funds out of no where to address this issue,”” said Freddy Stebbins, UM alumnus, adviser and brother of Lambda Chi Alpha. After learning of the necessary changes, Stebbins, along with other alumni, began to use social networking sites to garner the attention of the local and national fraternity. The changes imposed by the fire marshal reached nearly $30,000, but Stebbins’’ mobilization efforts and an unprecedented donation campaign have enabled the chapter to repair and upgrade other older, otherwise irreparable, problems. ““People were so scared that we were going to lose the fraternity house that many more dollars were raised,”” Stebbins said. ““People just sent money and, with that money, we were able to repair other things that were not fire-related.”” Jay Janger, an alumnus who now lives in Houston, Texas, was also part of the grassroots effort. ““As soon as we knew that there was some pretty serious turnout happening in terms of financial support, we knew that we would want to wrap it up with an event to help celebrate the alumni,”” Janger said. A plaque, in addition to other presentations and awards, was made to honor every brother who donated to the overall drive. ““It was really powerful because alumni of the fraternity and new pledges represented different stages of the fraternity, and it was incredible to see it all in one room,”” said Tony Gustitus, current president of UM’’s chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha. ““They lived in the same rooms that we do, they built parts of the house, and it was cool to see and hear things that you never knew about the place.””


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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Parking, dining projects aim to improve on-campus life Changes rely on student feedback BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Student Government (SG) has a list of upcoming projects –– including take-out dining, e-Book rentals and new parking garage mirrors –– all of which will hopefully improve students’’ lives at the University of Miami. Students can take surveys about their interest in the take-out dining and e-Book rental programs on SG’’s Facebook page. If implemented, the take-out dining system would give students with a meal plan the opportunity to take food from the Hecht-Stanford and Mahoney-Pearson dining halls in a ““grab-and-go”” fashion. ““Sometimes eating in my room is more convenient,”” freshman Maxwell Collie said. ““But because you can’’t take food from the dining hall, I’’m forced to get less healthy food from the food court.”” While SG Press Secretary Michael Piacentino admitted that making this transformation mid-year is ““logistically problematic;”” options are being explored for next semester as well as next year. The e-Book rental program would allow students to rent e-Books, much like those available on Amazon.com, from Richter Library. These would be accessible via digital download through a compatible e-Reader for a specified period of time. Results from the two surveys will be used to determine the next steps that SG will take. The third project is the installation of mirrors in the Mahoney-Pearson parking garage in conjunction with the Department of Parking and Transportation. These mirrors are intended to allow drivers to see around corners and other blind spots. ““People tend to speed around them without knowing who might be coming, which could be very dangerous,”” sophomore Samantha Belabin said. However, many people feel that based on their experiences with the mirrors in Pavia and Ponce parking garages, the new mirrors could be ineffective. ““It’’s not like I look up at the mirrors before I turn,”” said sophomore Isel Perez, a commuter student who parks in Ponce. ““I don’’t think they’’re very wellpositioned.”” SG is also working to remedy the identified issues with the new parking sys-

tem initiated at the beginning of the fall semester, Piacentino said. The Department of Parking and Transportation is currently reevaluating the system based on student feedback. Another project SG and the Department of Parking and Transportation are working on is providing shuttles to Dadeland Station and Dadeland Mall. This will benefit students that previously needed to take the Metrorail to get to Target, BestBuy and the mall itself. The second SG Comes to U event will be held on Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. in the Hecht Faculty Master’’s Apartment. The topic will be information technology (IT) and students will get the chance to dicuss their concerns with UM’’s chief information officer, Steve Cawley, project manager Lindsey George and other IT staffers. ““We have definitely noticed that there has been some issues on campus in terms of it, so that’’s an issue we hope you address,”” Piacentino said. ““We hope to hear student suggestions and feedback and also have administrators from it hear directly from students to use their services.”” Renovations to the University Center are also underway, with a goal of creating spirited student lounges in mind. ““The building in the middle of campus is an obvious place to start,”” Piacentino said. New furniture, tiles, carpeting and decorative waves with the orange and green theme have been installed in order to ““Spirit the U,”” but functionality has also been addressed. Additions like the new information desk and TV sets are being funded by the Student Activity Center fee, which is also going toward the construction of the future Student Center. ““It’’s a lot more exciting,”” junior Allison Basham said. ““I love the color and the couches. I sometimes come here instead of the library. It’’s much more comfortable.””

IF YOU GO WHAT: SG Comes to U WHERE: Hecht Faculty Master’s Apartment WHEN: 7 p.m. on Nov. 7 TOPIC: Information Technology Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

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Dog wash raises money for Humane Society SPLISH SPLASH: (From left to right) Senior Brttany Kalisha, junior Abby Wisnet and sophomore Kristen Bullwinkle wash Carter, a 10-monthold yellow labrador. The girls are members of the PreVeterinary Society, which held the annual Halloween dog wash on the Rock on Wednesday. “The girls are so friendly and so nice,” said Anna Martin, Carter’s owner and the area director of Mahoney. The event raised money to purchase supplies for the MiamiDade Humane Society. “I volunteer at the Humane Society, so it’s really good to see where the money goes and how it helps,” Kalisha said.

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011


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Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

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EDUCATION

Online course options limited for students Internet classes gain popularity nationwide BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Universities are starting to use the Internet as another source of education. Formally called ““distance learning,”” online courses have changed the way students earn or finish their degrees. Though limited in comparison to other colleges, UM offers certain online programs that can aid in building resumes or pursuing an interest. The Division of Continuing and International Education administers all online courses. This includes mainly non-credit options and credit certificate programs. Many of these programs involve certificates for law specialities, such as paralegals, studies, or language classes like Mandarin and teaching English as a foreign language. All students can take these courses as a supplement to their degrees. For example, nursing students can take an online patient advocacy course. Though the majority is not for credit, the Division of Continuing and International

Education also offers courses for credit. These are only open to non-degree seeking or Bachelor of General Studies students. The list is not extensive, offering the minimum introductory or general requirements to graduate. Students must then supplement online work with classes on campus. Gina Astorini, the director of Undergraduate Academic Services in the School of Education, calls virtual classes ““a doubleedged sword.”” ““Even though there is an attraction to online classes, I feel that students would eventually realize that they missed out on the true meaning of a higher education,”” Astorini said. For students, time is the main attraction. As an adviser, Astorini has noticed a trend in the past two years, with students trying to graduate in three years instead of the traditional four. With the rise in the cost of attending college and the lure of graduate school, she said she can see the reason for pursuing an online education. Astorini is not a stranger to online classes herself, as she is currently in the process of virtually completing a doctorate in higher education. ““I like the classroom environment. With online, one loses personal interaction, and it is

If they were more available, I would probably take a general requirement but not a class for my major Priya Patel, Junior difficult to analyze diversified opinions,”” she said. Across the nation, schools have joined the online bandwagon. In Florida alone, the University of Florida offers six online Bachelor of Science degrees that range from business administration to microbiology. UF states that the programs are meant to be a continuation of an Associate of Arts degree earned from a Florida community college. Florida State University has programs in computer science, criminology and police science, in addition to similar certificate pro-

grams. Several Ivy League universities also have online degrees and certificates. Columbia University’’s Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science provides opportunities to earn a Master of Science or Professional Degree through online courses. Other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell and Harvard, have followed suit with a variety of certificate-level programs for undergraduate and graduate students. Students have mixed feelings about online learning. ““I don’’t like online classes,”” senior Regine Darius said. ““I like interacting with people.”” Sophomore Dennis Cannon feels similarly, and argued of a physical classroom. ““I have better grasp of the material by going to class,”” he said. ““I have a better sense of staying on track and can take more of an initiative.”” Junior Priya Patel sees the benefits of taking a virtual class or two but not as a substitute for going to class entirely. ““If they were more available, I would probably take a general requirement but not a class for my major,”” she said. ““I am used to learning from teachers, so I wouldn’’t learn much from online classes anyway.””

‘Canes Care Scare Fair

DANIELLE PELOQUIN // The Miami Hurricane

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

HAPPY HALLOWEEN: Freshman Elizabeth Ionescu (center) and Marissa Bell (left) hand out candy to Dylan Diliberto at the first annual ‘Canes Care Scare Fair on the Hecht-Stanford Bridge Tuesday. “I was trying to think of a way to go trick-or-treating but this is even better because it’s candy and resources,” said Bell. The fair was held for freshmen students to help raise awareness of the many resources UM has to offer, such as the Toppel Career Center, Wellness Center, Student Government, Undergraduate Honor Council and Pier 21.


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CRIME REPORT

Student faces several charges after fatal crash Hearing scheduled for early 2012 BY KYLIE BANKS SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Ivanna Villanueva, a 19-year-old UM sophomore, was charged with vehicular homicide, DUI manslaughter and possession of false driver’’s licenses on Monday, according to police reports. At 4:30 a.m. on Oct. 4, Villanueva crashed her father’’s Audi Q5 into Eyder Ayala’’s Ford Focus. The impact pushed the back of Ayala’’s car into the front seat, according to a report released by WSVN Miami, the local Fox affiliate. Villanueva was driving back from South Beach after drinking underage at Liv, a club located inside the Fountainebleau Hotel. Her blood alcohol level after the crash was .231, according to an article in The Miami Herald.

Ayala, a manager at a local McDonald’’s, was returning home from a night shift. The 68-year-old was a mother of five and a grandmother of seven. The court set Villanueva’’s bond at $50,000, and she was released on bond out of jail the same day. She was given an electronic bracelet and put under house arrest. However, she is allowed to attend classes. Ayala’’s family is suing Villanueva and her father for negligence. Attorneys for the family also mentioned that they might pursue a lawsuit against Liv for serving alcohol to Villanueva, according to a report released from CBS 4. David O. Markus, Villanueva’’s attorney, released a statement to The Miami Herald: ““This is a tragic case all around, and the Villanueva family would like to extend their deepest sympathies to the Ayala family.”” A hearing is scheduled for Jan. 13, 2012.

NEWS BRIEFS A POLITICAL VISIT Condoleezza Rice, former National Security Adviser and Secretary of State under the George W. Bush administration, is scheduled to speak to students on Nov. 3 at 1 p.m. in the BankUnited Center Fieldhouse. Rice will discuss her career in Washington and her new book, “No Higher Honor – A Memoir of My Years in Washington.” Students may pick up tickets with a valid Cane Card from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the UC Information Desk on Thursday. The first 200 students will receive a free book.

5 p.m. until Dec. 1. Tickets will be sold one for $5 or 3 for $10. The drawing will be held on Dec. 2 at noon. Winners will be contacted via email.

FREE PIZZA The Society of Professional Journalists will be hosting a lunch in the School of Communication Courtyard on Thursday from 1 to 3 p.m. Students who give up their First Amendment right of freedom of speech will receive free pizza. For more information, email umspjinfo@gmail.com

MOCK INTERVIEWS SCHOLARSHIP The Toppel Career Center will be holding walk-in mini mock interviews with a peer adviser. Mock interviews are available Monday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

APPLE RAFFLE The Office of Student Account Services is raffling an iPod Touch, iPad 2 and MacBook Pro in support of United Way. Tickets are being sold in the office (Ashe #158) Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to

Sophomores and juniors pursuing a career in mathematics, engineering or the natural sciences may be eligible for the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship which covers up to $7,500 of expenses per year. Students with a strong academic record (3.7+ GPA) are encouraged to apply. For more information, email the Office of Prestigious Awards and Fellowships at prestigiousawards@miami.edu or visit miami. edu/awards. Jonathan Borge may be contacted at jborge@themiamihurricane.com.

Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

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speak

UP!

What are you going to be for Halloween?

JOSEPH BURLESON Freshman “A partner and I are going to be a blind man and a seeing eye dog.”

ISABEL SARMIENTO Junior

Seth Furman, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

ness away. Also, if you’’re going to put in the effort to trick-or-treat, putting the same amount of effort into a costume would not go unnoticed. People are always more inclined to give candy to someone in an elaborate, unique outfit. Otherwise, Miami is filled with opportunities to celebrate Halloween like an adult. Check out parties in South Beach clubs, or a local haunted house or ghost tour. Another option is hosting your own Halloween and drunkenly dance to the ““Monster Mash.”” You can even host a costume contest for your friends, or plan a night filled with carving pumpkins and watching scary movies. But if Halloween is your favorite time to get in touch with your inner child, by all means, go all out. Halloween can be fun for everyone –– just remember to respect the families out on the streets. If you partake in childish activities, try to keep it classy. And above all, have a safe Halloween! Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

 Turn to page 13 for things to do on Halloween night.

“A fruit.”

H

KYLE RADIN Junior “Rocky.”

BRYAN TACHIBANA Sophomore “Al Golden.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

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OPINION

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NBA players must fight for their season

Jennifer Levine

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How to avoid a Halloween horror When we’’re young, we all look forward to Halloween so we can dress like our favorite super hero or princess, and then go trick-or-treating for pounds of candy to later devour happily. But now, we’’re in college. And although some of us love to express and embrace our inner kid, that doesn’’t mean it’’s always OK to continue to go trick-or-treating on Halloween night. Although trick-or-treating doesn’’t have a set age limit, once you’’re taller than the kids putting candy in your bag, you may want to reevaluate your Halloween plans. Halloween is primarily a children’’s holiday. That’’s not to say that teens and adults shouldn’’t celebrate, but there are some components of the festive night that need to be regulated. Take alcohol, for example: If you’’re going to binge on the ““boos,”” make sure to steer clear of trick-or-treating for the night. I’’m sure families won’’t enjoy opening the door to a drunken sexy nurse or ““Beercules”” when they’’re expecting a cute Power Ranger or Disney character. However, if you’’re an adult and you feel the need to trick-or-treat, there are ways to make it socially acceptable. Chaperoning a couple of your nieces or younger cousins takes a bit of the weird-

The Miami

com

OPINION

Take off the gym shorts and put on the business suit. Drop the basketball and pick up the briefcase.

as anyone seen LeBron James lately? No, this isn’’t another fourth quarter joke. The 2011 NBA Finals SETH FURMAN CONTRIBUTING are a thing of COLUMNIST the past, and James and the Heat can focus on the 2012 season. Sadly, fans and players alike may be waiting a long time for said season to begin. The fans may be demanding a new collective bargaining agreement, but what about the NBA players? Let’’s examine their stance on the issue. Oh, that’’s right. They’’ve been busy hosting charity basketball games, flirting with international basketball teams and getting more shoe

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endorsement deals. The offseason of 2011 may just turn into the 2012 NBA lockout-season if they keep this up. Unlike the NFL during its own lockout, the NBA lacks a sense of urgency on the part of the players. Two weeks ago, NBA Commissioner David Stern speculated that if a deal wasn’’t settled by Oct. 18, no games would be played before Christmas. ““Blame it on the owners! They aren’’t giving us a fair share of the revenue!”” This argument has been repeated again and again by NBA players, but who is really to blame here? For one, just like James during the 2011 Finals, the players have mysteriously disappeared. During the NFL’’s lockout this past summer, superstars like Drew Brees, Peyton Manning and Tom Brady rose to the challenge of negotiating some of the most daunting

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terms ever seen in the sports world. Who’’s the NBA’’s biggest and most visible advocate right now for the players? Derek Fisher, the five-time NBA Champion and president of the National Basketball Players Association. Where is the rest of his team? To James and every other NBA player out there: WAKE UP! The fans support you when you need us to, so return that favor. Take off the gym shorts and put on the business suit. Drop the basketball and pick up the briefcase. You can point your fingers at the owners as much as you’’d like, but you are just as important to this process as anybody else. This season’’s shot clock has three seconds left on it. Can it be saved? That’’s for the players to decide. Game on. Seth Furman is a freshman majoring in business management.

©2011 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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Learning how to keep up with current events

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t seems that in every class lately the professor is preaching about the importance of keeping RACHEL KRANTZ CONTRIBUTING up with curCOLUMNIST rent events. They say it’’s imperative to read news about the industry, government and world affairs in order to avoid looking like an idiot at future job interviews. While this may be true, it is upsetting that some professors fail to understand students’’ reasons for skipping a thorough review of the day’’s news. Professors appear to forget that they themselves have assigned textbook and supplemental reading, which when added up between all five of an average student’’s classes can amount to a few hundred pages a week (and no, that is not an exaggeration). Professors have already read the assigned reading over their many years of teaching, or in some cases, wrote the book themselves. Not to diminish the time commitment that professors spend on grading pa-

pers and conducting their own research, but their required reading loads probably pale in comparison to that of undergraduate students. But perhaps this lack of motivation to read current events is not solely the fault of our well-intentioned professors. After all, they do want us to have successful careers and they surely aren’’t making up the importance of current events. Access to articles on The Wall Street Journal’’s website are highly restricted unless you pay for a subscription. Their cheapest current subscription offers two weeks free, and $1.99 per week for an online subscription (about $100 per year). The New York Times does have more content available for free, or you can buy an online and smartphone subscription for about $165 per year. If this is our only way of accessing the news that our professors and future employers deem so important on a regular basis, how likely is it really that college students on tight budgets are going to subscribe? Even in today’’s world of constant communication and Internet access on smartphones, sometimes finding the

news that ““matters”” is not as easy as it could be. Of course, you can pick up a copy of The Miami Hurricane, USA Today or The Miami Herald around campus, but where are copies of The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times? It turns out that Richter has both of these newspapers and others available to students as e-resources. Although viewing the headlines as a list in a database isn’’t as interesting as the newspapers’’ print layouts, it does get the job done. To be honest, I began researching these things because I was fed up with the disappointed look on my professors’’ faces when no one in the class managed to catch important news. I thought they had unreasonable expectations given students’’ time constraints and visible resources on campus. Now I realize that the true problem was merely my own lack of effort to hunt down the news. Is that an excuse for missing current events? Absolutely not, especially given the resources on campus. Rachel Krantz is a sophomore majoring in public relations and economics.

TOTAL VOTERS: 50

They’ll stay competitive, but drop off at the end

Where do you think the football team will finish in the ACC standings?

They’ll win the Coastal Division

What is your favorite Homecoming event? Vote online.

They’ll win the conference

Technology detracts from viewer’s reality, humanity

W

ith the death o f Libya’’s Moammar Gaddafi on Oct. 20, international politics changed PAUL LEVY greatly. In CONTRIBUTING charge since COLUMNIST 1969, Gaddafi’’s presence was felt worldwide with his outlandish leadership style and disregard for the scorn of the international community. Those in Libya are grateful for the coming change in leadership, as are many around the world. While I do not believe it is right to be happy for the death of any person, certainly Gaddafi was a source of evil. What shocked me most about the coverage of Gaddafi’’s death was the prevalence of first-hand accounts of his last moments. In our digital age, anybody with a cell phone or other technology can quickly document events. This will completely change the sources where history stems from in the future. History will be much more first-hand and opinionated. Numerous YouTube videos emerged of Gaddafi’’s nearly lifeless body being jarred by Libyan civilians. One video even showed civilians cheering around his dead body.

The videos, which are quite graphic, say something about our modern society. Perhaps we have become too accustomed to violence. This may be because we are merely interacting with a screen when we see such a video, but this detracts from the true situation. Reality is not digital. Reality is stuffed with humanity, which we fail to recognize by becoming desensitized to interactions with nonhuman objects. As a society, we must evaluate what crosses the boundaries. With the prevalence of technology, privacy is becoming a comfort of the past. To what extent can we permit this? I believe that degradation of privacy is taking away from the value of each person. Gaddafi certainly committed heinous crimes against his own people and others, but do his final moments deserve to be broadcast to the world amidst cheers? These are questions that our society must answer as technology increasingly becomes a part of our lives. I would argue that while the ability of technology to provide openness is absolutely important, we as a society cannot forget the humanity behind these and all situations. Paul Levy is a freshman majoring in physics.

Stacks prevents procrastination

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sneeze and can nearly feel the death glare from my neighbor through my cubicle wall as I try to turn the page of my ALEXA PAPPAS CONTRIBUTING textbook as COLUMNIST silently as possible. In the Richter Library Stacks Tower, in this instance on the 7th floor, any form of noise seems unacceptable. Alas, there goes my master plan to longboard between the rows of books. This was my first time ever studying in the stacks and easily the most productive six hours that I’’ve had yet this semester. It may be the mindset of working in the library that helped me avoid procrastinating, the near-requirement to be silent Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

or the fear of judging from fellow students that keeps my work ethic so strong here. There are so many aspects about the stacks that I question. Is there a certain reason people choose to study on a specific level? If I got murdered in the stacks, how long would it take for someone to find me? Am I really the only person up here who’’s incredibly creeped out? The stacks aren’’t for everyone, but I can almost guarantee that if you’’re willing to work there, you will get into your ““crunch”” mode sooner than you think. Losing track of time could be a problem, as hours slip by faster that you’’d think, but the amount of work completed at the end of your study session will be worth it. Alexa Pappas is a freshman majoring in broadcast journalism and sport administration.

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Want to watch something spooky and scary?

Check out “The Addams Family” musical at The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts through Sunday. For more information, visit arshtcenter.org.

Are you afraid of the dark?

edge

BY MARGAUX HERRERA EDGE EDITOR

We’’ve outgrown trick-or-treating (well, for the most part) and partying in the Grove doesn’’t seem special enough to celebrate the holiday we used to enjoy almost as much as our birthdays. If we’’re celebrating Halloween, we want to go all out, right? South Florida, as it turns out, has a handful of full-fledged ghost tours and haunts. If you feel like driving to Ft. Lauderdale, you can hit up Fort Lauderdale Ghost Tours, where you’’ll get the best bang for your buck all weekend and on Halloween night. On the tour, you’’ll visit at least 10 different locations over the course of two hours and 10 blocks of walking. ““I had three teenagers run up the block and their mother had to take off her heels and chase after them,”” said John Carr, who runs the company, about an incident at one of the houses. ““They were sitting on the porch and they swear they saw these red eyes staring at them.”” On the tours, speakers will be used to amplify EVP [Electronic Voice Phenomena], believed by some to be talking spirits. Carr, who has been a paranormal researcher since 1998, leads all of the tours. ““I had a friend that died and he haunted me for a year and a half,”” Carr said of how he became interested in the study. There will also be tours through a haunted fire station on Friday and Saturday. Those tours last 45 minutes and cost $15. All proceeds will go to charity. There will also be a ghost hunt at 10 p.m. on both nights. Carr will conduct a seance at midnight and participants will be able to use their equipment. For a closer ghost tour, check out Deering Estate. They have multiple tours, ranging in length and price, but they will all freak you out. During the Deering Estate Spookover on Friday, you’’ll spend five hours, starting at 11 p.m., hunting for spirits in the area. The League of Paranormal Investigators will take participants to investigate the house and grounds. The tour costs $65. If the Spookover is too much for you to handle, there is always the ““Voices of the Past”” tour on Nov. 17. You’’ll get to hear recordings captured by the team and learn how they go about debunking evidence. Private tours are available from both companies throughout the year. For more information, visit deeringestate.org and fortlauderdaleghosttour.com. ILLUSTRATION BY MARIAH PRICE

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MUSIC REVIEW

KISS THE CHEF

Honor Society’s album impresses BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

After parting ways with Hollywood Records earlier this year, Honor Society proved they don’’t need a label to release an incredible album. The pop-rock band’’s new record, ““A Tale of Risky Business Part 2,”” has a more mature sound, and their talent and musicality exudes from the interludes and lyrics. It follows their debut album, ““Fashionably Late,”” which was dominated by a funky pop-rock sound. ““Risky Business Part 2,”” however, is a mesh of funkier pop-rock, R&B and hip hop. It kicks off with an eerie yet romantic setup. The prologue, ““M.I.A.,”” really sets the mood for the album by providing warmth with the laughter and voices in the background of the beautiful piano melody. As the voices and music die down, the first chords of ““Living a Lie”” strike. The guitar riffs and lead singer Michael Bruno’’s raw vocals on this track are reminiscent of ““Fashionably Late.”” The radio-friendly track is a slap in the face to whoever screwed them over with lyrics like ““You think you’’re so slick/Did you think I wouldn’’t find out?”” The subsequent interlude, ““Such a Lovely Life,”” slows things down. Unlike the last track, it sets an optimistic mood with a simple melody, telling listeners ““it’’s such a lovely life.”” Drummer Alexander Noyes and keyboardist Jason Rosen dominate the next track, ““Gentleman After Dark.”” The duo complements the song’’s laid-back beat and sensual lyrics. ““You text me all your pictures girl/But tonight I want to feel it,”” Bruno says. The harmonies at the end of the song make this track one of the highlights of the album. The subsequent interlude, ““Central Park,”” shines with the lyrics, ““You were always the girl,”” from Honor Society’’s past hit ““See U In The Dark.”” Adding old lyrics to their new sound makes their growth as musicians and a band evident. The track ends with the waves crashing against the shore, leading into ““One of a Kind,”” a song reminiscent of Jason Mraz’’s style. ““Speak Easy,”” marked as the album’’s intermission, perfectly splits the album in half. The track’’s tranquility is led by a piano melody that demonstrates Honor Society’’s talent and musicality. It’’s a great divide between ““One of a Kind”” and the ““What’’s It Gonna Be,”” which has the catchiest guitar riffs in existence. Here’’s where the funkier pop-rock sound comes in. Coins fall at the start of ““Redundancies,”” the interlude that follows. The guitar riffs that flawlessly lead into the next song make it one of the best transitions on the album. The next song, ““Run For Your Money,”” was incredible live during Honor Society’’s Wherever You Are Tour this past summer; the track is just as good on the album. The next two songs make the album flawless. ““This Bed Is An Ocean”” will give fans chills. It’’s a great rendition of an unrecorded track and, like ““Central Park,”” it shows how their sound has grown from past albums. The interlude leads into ““Wherever You Are,”” which defines where the band is right now. It leans toward a hip-hop sound, which is relatively new to their music; it should definitely be considered as a single. The album’’s epilogue, ““Find You In The Dark,”” and the bonus track, ““Hurricane,”” end the record with new, yet familiar sounds. The epilogue’’s lyrics are some of the most moving on the album: ““What we are is a bag of bones/Following that spark/Don’’t let go/I’’ll find you in the dark.”” Musically, it picks up where the prologue left off. It’’s followed by ““Hurricane,”” in which the sound is similar to that of ““Fashionably Late.”” The only thing that could possibly make ““A Tale of Risky Business Part 2”” a better album would be releasing it on vinyl. 14

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PHOTOGRAPHER’S NAME // The Miami Hurricane

JESSICA DALY // The Miami Hurricane

Jack-o’-Lantern treats BY KEVIN MASON CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

One thing I miss about my childhood in upstate New York is going to a local pumpkin patch and picking out the one I thought had all the characteristics of a great pumpkin. My carvings were always mediocre, but I learned how to scrape the inside of a Jack-o’-Lantern and harvest the seeds for a delicious snack. Never throw away these tear-shaped treats again. After basic carving rituals, separate the stringy elements from the seeds. Then, we’ll get started. You will need: 2 tsps olive oil 1 ½ cups of pumpkin seeds  salt cayenne pepper Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. In a small bowl, pour in olive oil, then toss in the pumpkin seeds. Add your desired amount of salt and a dash of cayenne pepper. Spread seeds on tin foil and place them on a baking sheet. Turn every 15 minutes until golden brown. Estimated time: 40 minutes.

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HALLOWEEN

GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

Nightlife madness on Halloween weekend BY JONATHAN BORGE ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Dressed as a 1960s Pan Am stewardess or a stylish adman from the scenes of ““Mad Men,”” your Halloween costume should be designed for the endless slew of late-night soirees headed for the Magic City this weekend. Just last week, party-goers flocked to Miami Beach for a DJ-fueled kickoff at LIV with Dirty Harry, Bobby Burns, Quintino and heavy-hitter Afrojack each tearing up the stage. And this week, Miami once again proves to be the unrivaled destination for nightlife madness with an Ultra-like weekend lineup.

THURSDAY Miami’’s own DJ Irie of 99 Jamz will welcome the crowd at SET nightclub while Thomas Gold stirs things up at LIV, both giving a glimpse of what’’s to come.

FRIDAY Once again, LIV will deliver with a solo performance by Axwell, the third Swede behind Swedish House Mafia, the DJ trio that brought the One Night Stand at the Masquerade Motel to Miami last Halloween. If flying solo doesn’’t appease his fans, rumors have circulated about his expected arrival at ““Back in Black”” on Saturday night.

pare to enter ““The Twilight Zone,”” but not the creepy one your grandparents know. From the outdoor terrace to the indoor main room, the Twilight Zone at Club Space will be a mix of perfectlysynced strobe lights dancing to the sounds of DJs Boris and Louis Puig. Over the causeway and onto South Beach, Club Play will welcome 10 of Maxim magazine’’s most attractive models as they prepare to award $1,000 to the bestdressed patron at the hip-hop hot spot. Then, Wall Lounge at the W South Beach will channel Natalie Portman’’s ““Black Swan.”” It’’s encouraged for all to come dressed as characters from the movie, from the atypical ballerina to her dark counterpart. The music continues at LIV from dusk until dawn where DJ Sander Van Doorn will be celebrating the newest tracks from his recent album, ““Eleve11.”” Miami’’s most anticipated event, ““Back in Black,”” is in the heart of Midtown, where Sebastian Ingrosso, Alesso, Erick Morillo, LA Riots, Patrick M, Bob Sinclair and others will join forces under a tent to present what Go Big Productions has dubbed ““the largest dance music costume event in the U.S.””

SUNDAY Finally, Avicii will wrap up the chaotic weekend at Mansion, known for its over-the-top Halloween bashes, alongside resident DJ Laurent Simeca and special guest Cassette.

SATURDAY Saturday is the most promising night of them all. Arrive in Downtown and preOct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

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HALLOWEEN

Spice up your Halloweekend at these hot spots BY ALEXANDRA LEON SENIOR EDGE WRITER

1.

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Experience sassy transvestites and UFOs both on screen and in live acts by students. There will be screenings on Friday, Saturday and Sunday night from midnight to 2 a.m. It’’s free for UM students, but bring your Cane Card. For more information, check out hurricaneproductions.org.

2.

Cin-e-maze

Miami Beach Cinematheque has prepared a slightly more cultured sensory experience for all you former AV club elitists. At Cin-e-maze, take a walk through the installation, which lights up with scenes from German expressionist horror films for a series of truly twisted turns. Then catch showings of ““Dr. Caligari”” all night starting at 8 p.m. on Monday. The event will be at 1130 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. Tickets cost $5. For more information, visit mbcinema.com.

3.

Oh Jack

Party at Dream in SoBe. The hotel will be transformed into London’’s East End Whitechapel District circa 1888, where Jack the Ripper lurked in the streets. Pose for portraits in the bedroom of Mary Kelly, our dear Jack’’s last victim. Lights go out at 9 p.m. on Saturday. Dream is located at 1111 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Tickets cost $25 during the presale and $35 at the door. For more information, visit supermarketcreative.com.

CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

REACH OUT: Senior Jenny Hamilton dances to the song “Touch Me” with junior Dilshan Seneuiratna for Rocky Horror Picture Show.

4.

Lincoln Road Zombie Walk

A casual stroll down the beach will turn into a dance with the undead as bloodcovered zombies take over Lincoln Road this Saturday. It’’s finally time to whip out those childhood ““Monster Mash”” moves and march toward the overpowering scent of brains. The walk runs from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. and starts at 420 Lincoln Rd. The event is free of charge.

Carving pumpkins for philanthropy DONATION: Junior Maria Victoria, a member of the University of Miami’s chapter of the Delta Gamma sorority, grimaces at the insides of a freshly cut pumpkin. Delta Gamma carved pumpkins on Wednesday for their philanthropy to benefit The Miami Lighthouse, which aids the blind and visually impaired. The donated pumpkins will decorate the lighthouse for Halloween and provide light from the Jack-o’Lanterns, which create shapes and images for the visually impaired. 16

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Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

JESSICA DALY // The Miami Hurricane


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SPORTS

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score that freshman Rika Park shot for the women’s golf team in the second round of the Las Vegas Collegiate Showdown, a season best

7

days before the men’s basketball team kicks off its season with an exhibition game against Florida Southern

FOOTBALL

GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

Top recruits aim to create lasting legacy Northwestern stars opt to stay close to home BY AUSTEN GREGERSON SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

Seven football players came to the University of Miami from Miami Northwestern High School back in 2008. Among the top-ranked class of recruits hauled in by former head coach Randy Shannon are Jacory Harris, Sean Spence, Tommy Streeter, Brandon Washington, Marcus Robinson, Aldarius Johnson, Kendall Thompkins and Benjamin Jones. Thompkins was the only player listed as less than a four-star recruit. While Johnson is no longer listed on

the team’’s roster and Jones has played seven games in the past three years, the other five are now at the tail ends of collegiate careers that are difficult to put in perspective. Spence was the ACC Defensive Freshman of the Year at linebacker, Streeter has asserted himself as a touchdown machine of late and Harris has climbed to second all-time in passing touchdowns among UM’’s storied quarterbacks. But of course, the story is not that simple. The decision for these players to come to Miami as a package deal was far from a sure thing. Most notable was the case of Harris and Streeter, both recruited heavily by the University of Oregon; they each took an official visit to the Eugene campus. They were met with a newly-renovated program funded almost entirely by Nike money, as

the company’’s co-founder, Phil Knight, became the school’’s largest athletic booster and showered the program with the newest training equipment, facilities and jerseys. ““I thought Jacory and Streeter were gonna go to Oregon because of their offensive system,”” Washington said. ““Those guys took a visit there and when they came back that was all they talked about –– Oregon this and Oregon that. So I was like, ‘‘Was the colors gonna get y’’a ll? Was the uniform gonna get y’’a ll?’’”” Fortunately for Miami, they did not. Harris and Streeter returned from Oregon for good, instead deciding to sign with the Hurricanes and embark on a college football career with extraordinary expectations. ““First of all, Oregon is like 9,000 miles Oct. 27 - Nov 2, 2011

away and our family wouldn’’t be able to see us,”” Harris said. ““When we took the trip out there, it took three flights before we made it. I wouldn’’t want our parents to go through the same things, so we wanted to stay home and play in front of our family.”” Harris’’ latest go-to receiver also considered family an important factor in his decision. ““When times get hard, I have people I can depend on to cheer me up,”” said Streeter, who struggled early in his career with injuries and inconsistent production. ““Even just going home to get home-cooked meals, just hanging out and being at ease. That’’s something that would be lacking if I didn’’t come here.””

SEE 2008, PAGE 21 THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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FOOTBALL

ANALYSIS BY ERNESTO SUAREZ

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COMMENTARY

Closer stadium not feasible It has been a persistent complaint ever since the Orange Bowl shut her gates for the last time in 2007. Somehow, someway, Miami needs to get its own on-campus stadium. Just about every major football program has one on or relatively near its home site; very ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR rarely do teams and fans need to travel 40 minutes outside their comfort zone to be able to support their team. Over the past few days, an online petition has been passed around trying to garner support for such a stadium somewhere in the southern Miami-Dade area –– if not in Coral Gables, than at least somewhere much closer than Sun Life Stadium. In just over 24 hours, the petition was picked up and passed around on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook and garnered more than 1,700 virtual signatures. The idea is, on its own, a righteous one. Miami is a major program and a new stadium might reenergize a fan base that on most days feels lethargic about such a long commute. After losing out on the Orange Bowl, such a stadium could be a new place for new traditions and bring about an outpouring of support that could never be attained at Sun Life Stadium. It would be a great thing to see. But we’’ll never see it. In a city where construction plagues just about every street and highway in sight, I cannot envision any way that the city would willingly agree to put down the funding for such a project. With all the backlash that

came about from building the Marlins’’ new stadium, which was erected right where the Orange Bowl used to be, most taxpayers won’’t exactly be lining up to give up more of their own cash. But let’’s ignore that part. Let’’s assume that the city of Miami somehow decides that it is in their best interest to give the Canes a new home, and everyone is behind it. Assuming that hurdle is passed (it won’’t be), then there’’s the entire issue of location. There’’s no space in Coral Gables to build it, and even so, zoning laws here are incredibly strict and would be very complicated. A popular location that has been mentioned is Tropical Park over in Westchester. This seems to make sense compared to other ideas, but that isn’’t saying much. Though it would be easily accessible, it’’s in the middle of two major streets right off of some large residential areas. Plus, you’’d be asking a large number of youth baseball and soccer teams, among others, to relocate to other areas as well. It’’s not a viable spot. As much as we would all love to see the Canes with their own place to call home, it is something that’’s easier to talk about than to actually get done. There’’s too much to overcome before even the smallest move toward building it can be accomplished. As unfortunate as it is, Miami is only in the fourth year of a 25-year lease with Sun Life Stadium. The best thing fans can do right now is to continue to try and give the team the support that would be seen at an on-campus stadium. Continue to create as much of a home-field advantage as possible, even if it’’s the same stadium shared by that pitiful NFL team that chooses to give recognition to college football teams not from Coral Gables.

Kite flying at Key Biscayne

CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

UP AND AWAY: (Right) Kristoffer Sarmiento teaches freshman (left) Ricky Chen how to control a kite on land. Chen takes lessons through the kiteboarding club, which meets at Key Biscayne on Sundays. The club is in its first year, so the members do not compete yet, they are just learning the sport. However, club Vice President Thomas Fields kiteboards professionally.

Harris, Streeter remain close with community 2008 FROM PAGE 19 And what was the big draw about this city? Much maligned for being fair-weather, particularly when the weather is fair, the notoriously fickle Miami fan base wouldn’’t match the deafening roars in Eugene or Chapel Hill. For Harris, it wasn’’t about playing for South Beach or the Gables, but the chance to play for and in front of his city, his home and his community. ““The connection to our community is pretty strong,”” Harris said. ““I wouldn’’t say the city. [It’’s] the black community, to be honest. That’’s our connection, through them, where we grew up in the inner city. That’’s strong. They always support us no matter what.”” Harris stated that he always receives support. ““Through hard times or good times ... [the community] is our foundation. They look at us like we’’re Obama or something,”” Harris said. ““They don’’t treat us quite like that, but that’’s how they view us because most of them didn’’t have the opportunity to go to college or play collegiate sports like we do. They want to see us do good, they never want to see us do bad. Unlike others.”” The ““others”” Harris references include the booing home crowds and transplanted detractors who serve as his catalyst to block out the negativity that surrounds him. Too many interceptions, poor decisions and a failure to meet expectations have damned Harris into becoming arguably the most scrutinized player in UM football history. That the criticisms were always unwarranted would be unfair to say. Harris recognizes that he must grant everyone their own opinions. Such is the nature of any fan, particularly those who have no real connection to the people Harris views as ““his”” community. Raised in Carol City, Fla., and a product of Miami Northwestern, where the population is listed as 93 percent African American, Oct. 27 - Nov 2, 2011

the faces he sees booing him don’’t reflect those who helped raise him. Harris’’ community considers the fact that he even made it this far a resounding success. ““I’’ve [accomplished] beyond what expectations the people that matter to me have,”” Harris said. ““Like the rest of my teammates, just being in college is something that’’s monumental for our whole community.”” Regardless of what they consider home, remaining in South Florida was an undeniable factor in keeping the players together. Offers were plentiful for all of the Northwestern teammates, particularly for the seven that ended up in orange and green. However, those colors combined with the excitement of home-grown talent unlike any in recent memory to create expectations. These were expectations that, if measured with the standards they created in high school (Northwestern took home the 2007 National Champsionship), this group has failed to reach. The fans expected not only a BCS Championship, but for this recruiting class to return Miami to a certain glory that has slowly slipped away. ““Just growing up in Miami–– period –– is a lot of pressure,”” Streeter said. ““When you have so much in you, people only expect greatness to come out.”” Spence believes that he and his teammates still have a chance to change their legacy at Miami even without bringing a national title to the school. Miami is currently in its first decade-long drought since first winning it all in 1983. This is tremendous pressure for a group of men, many of whom have known each other since their Pop Warner football days. Such pressure can destroy even the strongest relationships, certainly when considering how intensely and strong-handedly judgment is brought upon them. But for this group, at least, none of that matters. It’’s about them –– not us.

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Find Fi d 10 Ibi Ibises iin the h crowd d Bring your findings to the Hurricane Office (UC 221A) The first five people win!

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dear ...

Dear V: You ain’t gonna tie me down... , It’’s me, Barbie. Remember how I said I liked this kid? Well, I gave him a chance and he’’s been too clingy. He constantly asks me where I am, what I’’m doing and what I had for breakfast via text message! But in person, he doesn’’t even talk to me. If I don’’t let him know I’’m not into him soon, he may be ready to propose by New Year’’s. I already turned him down when he asked me on a date, and I specifically told him I just want to be friends. Any ideas on how to let him go? Sincerely, I Lost My Guy in 10 Days Dear Not Completely Satisfied in 30 Days or Less, Aren’’t you the one who liked the dude with the ““Jurassic Park”” pajamas? Yeah, I remember you, and I’’m glad you took my advice to heart. It’’s great that you gave him a

chance. That’’s really all anyone can ask for, and of course, sometimes that chance blows up in your face. Let me point out a few things quickly: 1. He texts you all of the time because he’’s probably never had a real girlfriend and he’’s excited. 2. He doesn’’t talk to you in person because he’’s inherently shy, which means he hasn’’t grown a pair of balls and you haven’’t accommodated that by making him comfortable with speaking to you. There are a few things you can do to let him go. You can order a hit on him, but that’’s highly illegal and immoral, and besides, he probably has some Dungeons and Dragons card that makes him temporarily invincible. You could find some other guy and parade around with him to make Dr. Alan Grant jealous, though that will certainly break his heart and make him spiteful, which could lead him to put a hex on you (again, the cards). I guess what I’’m saying is - steal the damn cards before you do anything. Seriously, if that Voodoo stuff works who’’s to say the Dungeons and Dragons stuff doesn’’t?

After you get the cards in your possession, try having a long, serious talk with him. You want to make it very clear that it isn’’t going to work because you’’re apples and oranges, but you want to do it in a way that softens the blow. It’’s important that you’’re also honest with him, so tell him that you actually don’’t want to be friends with him. I wasn’’t born yesterday; people don’’t just turn over a new leaf in a few weeks. You’’re still as shallow as you always were. Listen, like anyone else, you have a character flaw that isn’’t going to change, so just accept that you don’’t give a damn about any guy who doesn’’t have a six pack (or any guy who has a brain). After your talk, be civil with him but get yourself out of his life, because you aren’’t doing either of you any favors. Best, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane.com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

ARE YOU A BLOGAHOLIC? TAKE YOUR TALENTS TO THE NEXT LEVEL AT THE MIAMI HURRICANE. For more information, contact managing@ themiamihurricane.com. Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2011

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miami.edu/calendar Thursday, Oct. 27 Patio Jams featuring Daphne Willis 12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Daphne Willis. For more information, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Rathskeller Closed 4 p.m.

Business Interactions 7 p.m. •• SoC Patio (3rd Floor) Join Sigma Lambda Gamma as they help you gure out how to sell the best thing on your resume, YOU! Business Casual dress is preferred.

UM Football v. Virginia 8 p.m. •• Sun Life Stadium Cheer on the ‘‘Canes as they take on Virginia for this special night of football! Buses depart for the stadium three hours before kickoff and the last bus leaves the BankUnited Center at kickoff time. Admission to the stadium student section is rst-come, rst-served; the student gates are closed at the end of the rst quarter or whenever the available student seats

ll up, so claim your seat early and don’’t forget to come show your support by wearing orange! Coverage available via ESPN, GameTracker and WVUM 90.5 FM.

Friday, Oct. 28 Gourmet Food Truck Night 6 p.m. •• Stanford Circle The food trucks are back! Bring some friends a few bucks and grab a bite at one of the more than 20 food trucks that will be on campus!

Homecoming Block Party/ Opening Ceremonies 6 p.m. •• UC Rock Kickoff the 2011 Homecoming celebrations with a night full of special events!

Homecoming: Alma Mater Preliminaries Competition 6:30 p.m. •• UC Rock Support your fellow ‘‘Canes as they produce their very own versions of our Alma Mater in this time honored tradition of the Alma Mater Competition.

Women’s Volleyball vs. Virginia 7 p.m. •• Knight Sports Complex

Friday, Nov. 4 •• 10 p.m. (doors open at 9:30 p.m.) BankUnited Center This year’’s Homecoming Concert features Ludacris with special guest Rudy Currence! Tickets are free, but are required for entry. For more information, visit Hurricaneproductions.org/homecoming or contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Come out and cheer for your nationally ranked Lady ‘‘Canes as they take on Virginia!

Canes Night Live Presents: Screen on the Green 8:45 p.m. •• Foote Green Bring a chair, a blanket, and some friends and enjoy a movie or two on the Foote Green. This month’’s event features ““Hop”” immediately followed by ““Bad Teacher.””

QuantUM and CAC Present: The Rocky Horror Picture Show Midnight •• Cosford Cinema Coupled with a live shadow cast, this rock musical stage play is a classic parody for the traditional science-ction and horror movie. ‘‘Cane cards required for entry.

Saturday, Oct. 29 Hurricanes Help the Hometown 10 a.m. •• UC Give back to the community by lending a helping hand and your service for a few hours at one of the various community service locations.

CAC Presents: Cowboys and Aliens 10 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema A spaceship arrives in Arizona, 1873, to take over the Earth, starting with the Wild West region. A posse of cowboys and natives are all that stand in their way. Starring Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford and Olivia Wilde.

QuantUM and CAC Present: The Rocky Horror Picture Show Midnight •• Cosford Cinema

Sunday, Oct. 30 Women’s Volleyball vs. Virginia Tech 1 p.m. •• Knight Sports Complex Support your Lady ‘‘Canes as they take on the Hokies!

CAC Presents: Cowboys and Aliens 8 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

QuantUM and CAC Present: The Rocky Horror Picture Show Midnight •• Cosford Cinema

Senior Walk Saturday, Nov. 5 •• Sun Life Stadium Kickoff: 3 p.m., Sign In Begins at 1:30 p.m. Be a part of a great UM tradition! This year’’s ““Senior Walk”” will be held at the Homecoming Football Game vs. Duke. The rst 400 seniors through the student gate will have the opportunity to walk on the eld during pregame warm ups and each participant will receive a commemorative T-shirt. Don’’t miss out!

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 24

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HP Homecoming Concert ft. Ludacris

Friday, Oct. 28 Homecoming 2011 is finally here! First bring all your friends to grab a bite to eat; Food Trucks will be available from 6 p.m. to midnight; and then head over to the UC Rock to be a part of the Homecoming Opening Ceremonies at 6 p.m., with the Alma Mater Preliminaries Competition kicking off at 6:30 p.m. Then, CNL presents another Screen on the Green on the Foote Green at 8:45 p.m. This time, the hit comedies ““Hop”” and ““Bad Teacher”” will be featured. Finally, at midnight, head over to the Cosford Cinema as QuantUM and CAC Present: The Rocky Picture Horror Show! This rock musical stage play, coupled with a live shadow cast, is something you surely won’’t want to miss!

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

Homecoming Kickoff


The Miami Hurricane -- October 27, 2011