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The Miami

Vol. 87, Issue 16 | Oct. 22 - Oct. 25, 2009

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

Paradise lost

COURTESY RICK BRAVO

RESTORATION IN PROGRESS: Miami Marine Stadium located in Key Biscayne, Fla. is under plans for renovation with the help of UM architecture students.

THE OTHER GREEN REVOLUTION

Architecture students help renovate historic seaside stadium

THE DETAILS BEHIND IRAN’S ELECTIONS PAGE 10

BY COLLEEN DOURNEY | CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

NOT YOUR NANA’S MUSIC GRANNIE ANNIE NEW TO THE MUSIC SCENE PAGE 11

SHINE BRIGHT, SHINE FAR ‘GLITTER GIRLS’ BRING SPARKLE TO GAMES PAGE 13

nce the Miami Marine Stadium on Virginia Key was culturally relevant. Now it is covered in graffiti, condemned in 1992 because of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew. “It is unique because of the way the land kisses the water. To be able to have a performance at that union is something unique and beautiful,” said Hilario Candela, the original architect of the stadium. Well-known in its heyday, the stadium hosted a Jimmy Buffett performance in 1985 and

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was the filming site of an Elvis Presley movie Clambake in 1967. Over the past 17 years the seaside venue has fallen into grave disrepair. Two years ago, the City of Miami did not even have the stadium in its developmental plans. “When the Edward Durell Stone Plan for Virginia Beach first came, the plan was the stadium would no longer be there,” said Jorge Hernandez, a University of Miami professor in the School of Architecture. SEE MARINE, PAGE 4


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Rat employees: the face of your food The meaning behind your favorite menu

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com

BY ALICIA ABALO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Glancing over the menu at the Rathskeller is a routine part of nearly every student’s life at the University of Miami. But few question why there’s a “Donna’s Garden Burger,” a “Kenny’s Buffalo Chicken Sub” or the mysteriously titled chicken sandwich, “The Bergman.” There’s a noticeable mix of names from former employees to esteemed members of the staff to UM landmarks. “It started with the UM landmarks, then it moved to faculty members who we wanted to honor,” Everett Price, general manager of the Rathskeller, said. Yet it wasn’t until the invention of the Kitchen Posse Pita that the young employees of the Rat got a chance to namesake their creations. The dish, a pita filled with grilled chicken and the customer’s choice between a number of sauces, was created in-house at the Rat, by an employee who wished to remain anonymous. “At the time, everyone was using the word ‘posse,’ so it became the Kitchen Posse Pita instead,” Price said. After the opportunity was left open to employees to create their own foods, more and more names began to appear on the menu. One of these names was the Mini-McDermott Corn Dogs, named after eight-year employee Mark McDermott. McDermott, a student to UM from 1996-2003, was the kitchen manager at the Rat when he thought of putting the mini corn dogs on the menu. “We were getting these little corn-dogs from the Rathskeller Administrative Board (RAB) for football events,” McDermott said

Missed out on last Saturday's 27-7 victory over Central Florida in football? Watch Alex Broadwell's photo slideshow online. Dana Hatic has the details about the School of Business's freshman class. TANYA THOMPSON//THE MIAMI HURRICANE

YUM!: Mark McDermott eats a mini McDermott dog, the dish named after him. as he swung from an orange glider outside the Rat and munched on his own namesake doused in ketchup. “I thought they were pretty different, so I suggested they be on the menu.” Yet McDermott, standing at 5’5 ½”, insists they were not named after him because of their size. “They were mini already,” McDermott said. So how good are the mini corn dogs? Senior and avid Food Network watcher Kelley Rafferty puts the minis to the test. Closing her eyes, she bites into a McDermott fresh out of the kitchen. Rafferty puts the rumors to rest in one word: “heavenly.”

The employees who are fortunate enough to find their name on the menu are those who contributed to the success of the Rat as a whole. “We want to give our employees a sense of ownership to the Rat,” Price said. McDermott, now an employee at the T.G.I. Friday’s across from campus, agrees that the menu items give meaning to those that have come and gone in the past. “I’m still recognized when I come back here...and sometimes even over at Friday’s!” Alicia Abalo may be contacted at aabalo@ themiamihurricane.com

The healthy life

If I exercise at a lower intensity, will I burn more fat? BY JEREMY ALBELDA CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

Anyone who has been in a gym within the past 25 years has seen it. You know, that little easy-to-read chart on every piece of cardio equipment with the perfectly linear trend line showing the progression of heart rate to your exercise “stage.” Many of these visual aids like to display that when your heart rate reaches 120-150 beats/ minute that you are in the “maximum fat burning” zone. Although it is true you are burning 2

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predominantly more fat over other fuel sources like carbohydrates or protein at this time, it is not the peak of your fat burning potential. You will actually burn more fat calories at a higher intensity. However, in terms of ratios, more calories will be burnt from carbohydrates rather than fat at this higher level. As you increase your exercise intensity, the percentage of energy provided by fat goes down, but you burn more calories per minute. For example, when exercising at lower intensities (light walking), you may be getting 70 percent of your energy from fat but October 22 - October 25, 2009

you may only be burning 5 kcal (calories) per minute. When you increase to a jog, you may be only getting 50% of your energy from fat but you may be burning 10 kcal/ minute. If you only have 20 minutes to get your cardio in, and you want to shed off those arm sails, step it up a notch! The only way you’re going to burn more fat calories in a set time parameter is by increasing intensity and burning more total kcal overall. E-mail health questions to Jeremy Albelda at jalbelda@themiamihurricane.com.

The School of Education received a $2.36 million donation. Lindsay Oliver writes about it. David Furones features the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, which is part of the Miller School of Medicine. UM's Miller School is one of three nominees for the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. Author Michael Chabon is coming to Books & Books for a book signing and talk at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Read Ben Cathey's preview of the event. Sarah B. Pilchick wishes she could relive her childhood in her review of Where the Wild Things Are. Sign up for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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Wellness Center renovation on hold H1N1 nasal vaccines available Appointments and supplies limited BY AUSTEN GREGERSON CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

COURTESY THE PATTI AND ALLAN HERBERT WELLNESS CENTER

A GLIMPSE INTO THE FUTURE: Aerial rendering of future plans for the expansion of the Wellness Center.

Plans to expand await funding BY DANIELLE KASLOW OF THE STAFF

A vision still awaiting fruition, the Patti and Allan Herbert Wellness Center has yet to begin its expansion. Due to the economy’s downturn and the university’s current financial situation, President Donna E. Shalala issued a building moratorium last year. Construction was halted indefinitely on projects university-wide, including the Wellness Center expansion and the new Student Activity Center among others. “Once senior administration gives us the green light, we will proceed ‘full speed ahead,’ ” said Alan Rose, the assistant director of facilities at the Wellness Center. It is unknown how long students must wait before the expansion will begin. Nevertheless, students anticipate the exciting features to come, from brand new Pilates reformer machines to a stateof-the-art studio cycling room. “Wellness is a very important aspect to living a healthy life,” sophomore

Meaghan Gaynor said. “UM is always looking into the future.” The $6 million renovation is slated to take a total of twelve months to complete, and will add a total of 20,000 square feet to the Wellness Center. The decision to expand was prompted by heavy use of the center. The project will include the creation of new spaces and renovations to existing spaces. The area currently occupied by the outdoor courtyard will become the new addition to the Wellness Center. The workout area on the first floor will also be extended in this addition. “We will increase the number of machines by about 30 percent and will have more space between each machine,” said Norm Parsons, director of the Wellness Center. “We hope to gain 7,000 square feet [in the workout room].” On the second floor, students will find a new Pilates studio, two multipurpose rooms and a cycling studio complete with South Beach-worthy sound and lights systems. “It’s cool that [the university] is putting more money into the Wellness Center,” sophomore Katie Ondrasik said. “More people will want to spend time there.”

When the construction begins, students will see changes in the setup of the Wellness Center, but will not be negatively affected by the construction. “We will relocate all the workout equipment to the gymnasium, “ Parsons said. “Students will walk outside around the perimeter of the building to get into this area and will still be able to use about 95 percent of the workout equipment.” The outdoor basketball courts will be used as a staging area during construction, though they will be available to students once the project is completed. All other areas of the center, like the pool and juice bar, will not be affected and will remain open. At this time, there are no further plans to renovate other parts of the building. Although construction on the Wellness Center will not begin for quite some time, the entire university community looks forward to the project’s commencement. “We are excited and anxious to get started, as is President Shalala,” Parsons said. “We are also very grateful to the Herberts for helping us with this cause.”

The University of Miami recently received a limited supply of vaccinations for the H1N1 virus. “Additional appointments will be offered as more supplies become available,” Patricia A. Whitely, vice president for Student Affairs, said in a statement to The Miami Hurricane. Initially, only healthy and eligible students ages 24 and younger will be allowed to be inoculated with the vaccine. Although not available for comment, Director of Student Health Services Dr. Howard Anapol announced in the IBIS News that students would be able to go online and make an appointment for the vaccination. However, before students go to their appointment they must have a signed consent form and review the Vaccine Information Statement. Both of these documents are online and must be brought to the appointment. These shots will be given in the Flamingo Ballroom (A & B) on the second floor of the University Center. The first batch of the vaccines will be administered through a nasal mist, instead of the more traditional intramuscular method. Students that cannot receive the nasal mist can get an inactivated vaccine. However, they still must go online to print the consent form and Inactivated Vaccine Information Statement to bring to their appointment. Furthermore, they must fax the consent form to 305-284-4905 or e-mail it to it to H1N1@miami.edu. Despite misgivings from peers, junior Sophia Alzerreca supports the vaccine: “I always want to take precautions because I know it’ll help me and protect me.” Austen Gregerson may be contacted at agregerson@ themiamihurricane.com.

Danielle Kaslow may be contacted at dkaslow@themiamihurricane.com. October 22 - October 25, 2009

Vaccine information APPOINTMENT www.mystudenthealth.miami.edu INFORMATION www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/nasalspray_qa.htm>

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MARINE FROM PAGE 1 Hernandez quickly enlisted the help of Candela. Together, the pair teamed up with 12 University of Miami architecture students in a studio last spring geared toward the restoration of the stadium. “We really used the brainpower of the university to champion this cause,” Hernandez said. Throughout the semester, the students generated plans to restore the stadium to Candela’s original creation with some modern changes. Robert Douglass, a graduate student, participated in the studio and said the biggest contribution the class made was actually the preservation of a manmade basin that borders the stadium. “The overcrowding of boat slips would take away from the natural beauty that the stadium has, so we moved those out of there to allow the basin to continue to be unencumbered space,” Douglass said. This suggestion was incorporated into the city’s new plans for restoration after the City of Miami’s Preservation Board declared

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NEWS

COURTESY HILARIO CANDELA

A NEW LOOK: This rendering of the Miami Marine Stadium in Key Biscayne was created to imagine the result of its facelift.

it a historic site. The support for the stadium has grown. It was just added to the World Monument 100 List and those working on the project couldn’t be happier. “It makes me feel like we can really make a contribution even though we’re just a group of students,” Douglass said. Hernandez feels accomplished after

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all of the support and is moving on to the next phase of restoration: funding the project. “We’ve gotten everything we needed preservation wise; now all we need are the funds to start the restoration process.” Money is tight right now, but with the help of the members of Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, which Hernan-

dez and Candela co-founded, they hope to find funding from any place possible. “It’s not going to be a quick fix, but with a little work, our hope is that we’ll all soon be able to watch Jimmy Buffett play at the stadium again,” Hernandez said. Colleen Dourney may be contacted at cdourney@themiamihurricane.com.


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October 22 - October 25, 2009

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Mangrove receives recognition Literary magazine granted funding and club status from COSO BY PRISCILLA GOMEZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The Mangrove Literary Magazine, a publication for University of Miami undergraduates, is breaking new ground. For the first time, it will receive funds from the Committee on Student Organizations. “By receiving additional funding, as well as taking advantage of the other benefits of being a student organization, we hope to really raise our profile,” said KC Culver, managing editor of Mangrove and the assistant director of the English Composition Center. The publication is the only school magazine funded by COSO. Mangrove originally received funding from the English department but recession-motivated cutbacks motivated them to look elsewhere.

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This publication began over a decade ago as the national literary journal for UM’s Creative Writing Master of Fine Arts students. However, since the MFA program was small, the editors were over-burdened and there was little consistency in the magazine, according to Culver. Now this magazine is only for undergraduate students’ work. “Two years ago, we explored options for making the journal a brighter, more solid product of UM,” Culver wrote in an e-mail. “At the same time, the creative writing program recognized the untapped talent of its undergraduate creative writing students.” Graduate students may still work on the magazine’s staff. Senior Collette Morris, the editor-inchief of this magazine, was very excited when she first learned about Mangrove and its relation to her creative writing major. “I was looking for an organization that catered to my major and where I could surround myself with…students who had the same passion for writing as I did.” Mangrove is currently accepting creative works, including poetry, memoirs, jour-

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October 22 - October 25, 2009

nalism, drawings, photography, interviews, paintings and video for their Web site. “If it’s creative, we’ll consider it!” Culver said. As part of their search for submissions, the magazine is hosting their annual contests for fiction, poetry, and artwork. A $100 prize will be given to the winners. The deadline is Dec. 15. Due to the lack of nonfiction content in last year’s issues, Mangrove has now added a nonfiction component to the contest. The magazine publishes online every fall and spring. It also has an annual print copy which is made up of selections from the two online editions along with submissions for the competition. The deadline for fall submissions is Nov. 4 and the fall online issue will be published Dec. 4. For more information about joining or submitting work to Mangrove, visit their website http://www.as.miami.edu/ mangrove/ or e-mail them at mangrovejournal@gmail.com. Priscilla Gomez may be contacted at pgomez@ themiamihurricane.com.

COURTESY MANGROVE

A NEW START: Cover image of Issue 1 of Mangrove published in March 2009.


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Adapting to a changing job market Preparing graduates for uncertainty BY ROBBIE SHIVER CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

With 15 percent of journalists losing their jobs in 2008, colleges and universities across the nation have been left scrambling to figure out the best way to prepare their students for the new demands in the workforce. “We don’t need to talk about print and broadcast journalists anymore, we just need to talk about journalists,” said Tsitsi Wakhisi, an associate professor in the University of Miami School of

Communication. In light of the fact that many people are getting their news from sources other than newspapers, Wakhisi believes that teaching new media, broadcast, print and multimedia should all be included in one program since the job market now requires all of those skills. Currently, UM’s undergraduate program offers both a print and broadcast journalism major. However, each major gives a student an opportunity to select nine electives in the field so they can build their own track and get a well-rounded curriculum. While many schools have decided to combine the broadcast and print journalism majors into one, UM has not yet followed suit.

“We’re introducing photo, audio, video and web content management skills earlier in our curriculum and developing seniorlevel courses, such as In-depth Reporting & Convergence, in an attempt to bring all the core functions of journalism together to develop content for an array of media platforms,” Sigman Splichal, the director of the Journalism Program, said. Austen Gregorson, a sophomore print journalism major, remains confident in his track. “Print journalism skills still apply, there will just be a focus of online and multimedia news,” he said. The graduate journalism program at UM is facing many of the same issues as the undergraduate program in regards to preparing students for the real world.

Mike North, a 23-year-old print journalism graduate school alumnus is experiencing many of the well-documented hardships first hand. “I am unemployed but have found internships, but most have been unpaid,” explained North. His most recent internship was with the Miami New Times. Despite North’s common struggles, he still believes that UM has prepared him well. “I believe the program has made me more marketable for jobs in print and broadcast since we have learned a basic skill set for each,” he said. Robbie Shiver may be contacted at rshiver@ themiamihurricane.com.

This is thriller, thriller night BRAINS: UM Law School students finish up their last practice in preparation for Thrill The World in the Law School lounge. The event is a worldwide attempt to break the record for most thriller dancers and will raise awareness for charity. Thrill The World is comprised of multiple events worldwide organized by volunteer event organizers. There is no limit to the number of events which can occur in a single city, and there are no requirements for registering to organize an event. Further, each organizer has the opportunity to use the worldwide dancing to raise money for a local charity of their choice. Some dancers are set to perform at the Law School this Saturday along with different locations, including Miami Beach. For information on how to join existing events or how to become a volunteer event organizer, visit the www.thrilltheworld.com.

MARIANA ZAPOTILOVA // THE MIAMI HURRICANE

October 22 - October 25, 2009

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OPINION speak

UP!

What is your favorite drink?

SAM MIZRAJI Freshman “AriZona Iced Tea.”

EVELYN FORNELL Senior

The Miami

Some people at ‘Club Richter’ look cracked out of their minds...

HURRICANE

- EVAN SEAMAN, contributing columnist

Health Center finally gets it right One student with an exposed flesh wound was told to sit down and wait in line, instead of receiving immediate treatment. Another stepped on glass, and health center employees refused to remove it While these horror stories may very well be anomalies, the fact remains that they occurred. However in changing their vaccine distribution method, the health center is learning from their mistakes and making a change for the better. Despite their previous misdeeds, the Student Health Center should be applauded for their efforts. Hopefully this new appointment system will remain in place for future vaccination distributions, and also for other health-related needs. The health center would run more efficiently, vaccines would be distributed in an orderly manner, and students seeking emergency attention could be seen more quickly. For more information about the H1N1 vaccination or making an appointment, visit www.miami.edu/flu or www.mystudenthealth.miami.edu respectively. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial staff.

xams are no fun for anyone unless you have sadistic tendencies. Sometimes I find it necessary to study dense portions at a time the night before an exam as slacking is a recreational pastime. But the cramming culture is out of control these days. EVAN SEAMAN CONTRIBUTING I have never understood, COLUMNIST or in fact pulled, an “all-nighter.” I’ve been up considerably later than I’ve wanted to be to learn material. Solid sleep is necessary to consolidate and reinforce the ideas from textbooks, even if you only care to regurgitate them on the paper the next morning for the sake of doing well. Caffeine helps facilitate otherwise resistant attitudes towards studying. Some people at “Club Richter” look cracked out of their minds, shaking their heads while rifling through pages in their pajamas after numerous Red Bull and cigarette breaks. However, if you find this to be most efficient, do whatever works.

E

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. compiled by

Kyli Singh

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BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick

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©2009 University of Miami

Up all night in academic zombieland

“Iced coffee.”

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash

“Red Bull – massive amounts of it.”

ALEX GOLDKLANG Sophomore

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For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

STAFF EDITORIAL

With the recent release of the H1N1 vaccine on campus, the Student Health Service has begun a new procedure of administering the flu mist nasal spray. Students eligible for the vaccine are directed to sign up for an appointment and to report to specified Flu Clinic areas in the second floor of the University Center. This new method of distribution is much more effective. It lends itself perfectly to the limited number of vaccine doses available to students. Therefore students will know ahead of time if they will be able to receive the vaccine, instead of suffering through a long wait. As many students know, time is a valuable commodity. With the new appointment system there is virtually no wait, getting students in and out of the clinic much faster. The initiative is beneficial for busy students and also for health center staff, who will not be overwhelmed with a sudden onslaught of students hoping to get vaccinated. It completely streamlines the process. The health center is taking a step in the right direction, with their common-sense approach. However, things have not been handled so well by the Student Health Center in the past.

Founded 1929

As if Club Richter wasn’t crazy enough, the moments leading up to and after an exam are the most perturbing. Roll into class a minute before the exam, otherwise you’ll be around a bunch of neurotic, academic zombies having Q&As in scrambled, miscalculated thoughts. Take a deep breath, do what you need to do and leave. I don’t think anything that hasn’t been learned the night before can be crammed in the last few minutes leading up to the test; it can only hurt. Also, when an exam is complete, I get annoyed if I was on the fence about certain questions. But I never understood the sense of urgency for people to open their textbooks immediately after the fact to see if what they did is even remotely right. Remember: What’s done is done; try to look forward. Of course, this is all easier said than done, but there’s no reason to extend the time padding around the test to make being in the “hot seat” any more of an excruciating process. Evan Seaman is a junior majoring in economics. He may be contacted at eseaman@themiamihurricane.com. October 22 - October 25, 2009

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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The green revolution against oppression

NFL needs to man up

hmadinejad is losing control of his people. Over the past four months, Iranian civilians staged protests against his regime, cried “Allahu Akbar” from rooftops in defiance, and stood behind his opponent, Mir-Hossein Mousavi, in a sea of green—the KATHLEEN ELISE MURPHY official color of Mousavi’s presiCONTRIBUTING dential campaign. They have COLUMNIST challenged powerful ayatollahs, disregarded threats of imprisonment and death and refused to be intimidated by Basij forces. And on the last Friday of Ramadan, they did it again. International al-Quds Day is meant to consist of demonstrations opposing Israel’s control of Jerusalem. Despite threats from Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei, Iranians used the Quds Day protests as a platform to express their disdain for Ahmadinejad. Shouts of “Dictator, this is your last warning! The nation is ready to rise up against you!” and “Liar! Liar! Where is your 63 percent?” undermined Ahmadinejad’s anti-Semitic speeches. For those who are unaware, Iran has been in upheaval since the disputed June 12 election. President Ahmadinejad claimed victory over Mousavi and two other opposition candidates, but it soon became evident that the election was rigged. For weeks, Iranians staged massive protests throughout the country

to show their support for Mousavi. They displayed their solidarity as a people who would not sit by as an illegitimate regime tried to take their voice. Peaceful protests soon digressed into violence as plainclothed Basij began to beat and arrest civilians. There have been allegations of rape and torture, and reported death tolls range from 37 to 300 people. Because of government censorship, protests have largely been organized via social networks like Twitter and Facebook. Opposition Web sites have been blocked, foreign journalists have been forced to leave the country and state-run television channels ignore the unrest. I am greatly encouraged by the display on Quds Day. It shows the Iranian people cannot be pacified by a regime that tries to silence them, that they will continue to speak out until they are heard. No, I am not Iranian, nor am I Muslim. I do not claim to understand what it is like to live in an Islamic state or to know what these protestors and other civilians are experiencing as their country is turned inside out once more. I do know that I admire these individuals and their resilience. To stand up against an oppressive regime with a military that has beaten, raped and killed your friends—this is courage. As a citizen of the world, I stand in support of the Iranian people.

he National Football League is known as a gladiator league where only the biggest and strongest can survive. But after watching various games over the first five weeks of the season, it is becoming painfully clear that the “wussification” of the NFL has begun. Referees are favoring offenses more than ever and at times going out of their way MICHAEL PERCHICK to protect quarterbacks from injuries. LateCONTRIBUTING hit and roughing the passer calls have beCOLUMNIST come far too commonplace in a league that prides itself on physicality. Yes, the NFL is smart in trying to deter late hits, as injuries to any of the NFL’s stars can be severely detrimental to the league. Rules already in place limit any contact to the helmet of an offensive player. All of a sudden, the space where a defensive player can hit an offensive player has become much smaller, making it tougher to make the play. Current players have been grumbling about the restrictions. As a fan of a notoriously physical team (the Giants), the recent calls made by the refs are of a concern to me. Though I love watching high-scoring affairs every now and then, defensive showdowns are more exciting than two teams who don’t play defense. If I wanted to watch a league where defense isn’t important, I’d just watch the NBA. So sit back—the “wussification” of the NFL has begun.

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Kathleen Elise Murphy is a freshman with an undeclared major. She may be contacted at kmurphy@ themiamihurricane.com.

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Michael Perchick is a freshman majoring in broadcast journalism. He may be contacted at mperchick@themiamihurricane.com.


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Local power-swing sextet Ever So Klever at Transit Friday at 11:30 p.m.

edge

Grannie Annie and Fight Like Animals: Fighting for Musical Integrity

BY ANDREA CONCEPCION CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Sticky notes hang on a wall. CDs are piled up on the floor. Press releases and legal work lay on a desk. The rest of the space consists of a bedroom, living room and kitchen. This small apartment in Coconut Grove accommodates an independent record label. This is Grannie Annie Records. William Alton, 25 years old and a manager at a Borders bookstore, always wanted to start a record label, but never thought it could happen. He tried researching, but found the effort ridiculous. Not until meeting local duo Fight Like Animals did he consider pushing forward. Now, his burgeoning label is centered on the symbiotic relationship with its sole band. “I don’t want to say it [was] fate

or coincidence,” Alton said. “But it [did] have written ‘right place at right time’ all over it.” Fight Like Animals is a twomember instrumental rock band based in Miami. Rostislav Vaynshtok, 19, and Volodymyr Rychko, 17, or Steve and Vlad, as they prefer to be called, are both from the Ukraine. They have lived in the United States since childhood. Three or four months ago, Alton met Vaynshtok at Borders. Alton was skeptical as they started talking about Vaynshtok’s band. Alton joked, saying “your music probably sucks.” He realized the band’s potential when Vaynshtok sent him a video of Fight Like Animals performing live. The duo has a unique, synthesized rock sound that captivated Alton.

“If Fight Like Animals was a dinosaur, we were an electric pterodactyl,” Vaynshtok said. “We were a major screeching pile of electronica, a pure independent instrumental symphony.” The video of the band and their music were Alton’s big indications to establish the label. Alton thought about a few names before finally deciding on Grannie Annie, after his grandmother, the matriarch of his family. After going corporate, he wrote up a contract for Fight Like Animals. Aware of how high the stakes were when delving into this business, Alton still decided to put all his savings into the band. “If I don’t do well for the band, then the label [would be] done,” he said. “I’m not going to put more effort in anyone than them.”

The band members have two different views on what they want to do on the label. Vaynshtok is focused on marketing the band and making connections while Rychko said he just likes to make the songs. “Playing just [gives] me a lot of satisfaction,” Rychko said. Just as many larger record labels target specific genres, Grannie Annie Records and Fight Like Animals aim to bring musical variety to a transforming industry. They hope to bring integrity and passion to music since both need each other to thrive. Vaynshtok summed up their relationship, “We got the wheels, but Will has got the car." Andrea Concepcion may be contacted at aconcepcion@themiamihurricane.com.

PHOTO BY OLGA MILJKO COURTESY WILLIAM ALTON

October 22 - October 25, 2009

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Shop for a cure

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

SHOP ‘TIL YOU DROP: VIGI Boutique caters to a variety of women, allowing patrons to shop for a cause, contributing to the Susan G. Komen foundation. BY SAMANTHA HICKEY CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

For all those ladies looking for a hot new Grove outfit or South Beach-ready shoes, stroll on over to Red Road’s VIGI Boutique. This Thursday the trendy onestop fashion store is inviting people to shop for a cause. From 4-8 p.m., VIGI will be hosting a shopping/cocktail party during which 10% of proceeds go to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation to help fight breast cancer. Additionally, VIGI will be giving away free pink cupcakes and cocktails provided by 2 Girls and A Cupcake. Pink tote bags will be available with every $50 purchase. DJ Ali B will also be spinning the tunes. Aside from its social awareness, VIGI is an established boutique with a fashionforward style and a classic and polished vibe. “We are trendy without being trampy,” said owner and president Virginia Lovaton. At VIGI, shoppers will find everything from cute and comfy t-shirts and jeans to sky-high heels and chic dresses. Lovaton stocks her boutique with unique brands not found in department stores such as J.J. Winters and Hanky Panky, giving VIGI an original edge. Unlike other stores, VIGI carries clothes for the season so shoppers can 12

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walk in to find something to wear that very night. “I sell clothes for the Miami lifestyle and the Miami weather,” Lovaton said. “We carry the winter look without the winter weight of the fabric.” VIGI caters to women of all ages and sizes, carrying sizes 2-12. “I went to VIGI when my mom was visiting and not only did I find a great purse, but she even found a pretty dress!” junior Caitlin De Cristo said. Prices range from $80 to $300, so for those on college budgets, it might be a little pricey. VIGI The Backroom is located just around the corner from the main shop and is stocked with items on sale from 3070% off the original price. Samantha Hickey may be contacted at shickey@themiamihurricane.com.

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IF YOU GO: WHAT: VIGI Boutique’s shopping/cocktail party to support Susan G. Koman for the Cure WHEN: Thursday, 4-8 p.m. WHERE: 7230 Red Road

October 22 - October 25, 2009

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4

the number of hours it takes the Glitter Girls to prepare for a Canes football game

84%

the percent of innings pitched the UM baseball team returns from last year

Sparkle and shine: UM’s Glitter Girls Front row duo captures attention BY EMILY WINGROVE WRITER’S RANKING POSITION

On Saturday at 3:30 p.m. there will be a spotlight on two sophomores and their names are not Jacory Harris and Sean Spence. A TV camera pans to the cheering crowd in the stands and then stops suddenly on two students aglow in orange and green. Who are these Glitter Girls, and how can they possibly wear all that art? Sophomores Lauren Lococo and Alex Goldklang, suitemates who live in Pearson Residential College, spend approximately four hours glittering up their entire bodies for each home football game. And that means giving up tailgating beforehand because these super fans have to shoulder their way in line to get front-row seats in the end zone in the student section. “We just want to make people excited and we want to support the team,” Goldklang said. The girls face many obstacles along the way. Lococo and Goldklang have to buy their materials, apply them, drive to the stadium and wait in line for first-come, first-serve seating. Fortunately, Lococo and Goldklang have gained enough popularity that fellow students help by saving seats so they can be near the “Glitter Girls.” The pair also gets repeated requests for pictures, not only with students, but also with Miami natives and alumni too. Matthew La Pan is a senior who has sat near the Glitter Girls. “Even though I get covered in glitter when I sit near them, at the end of the day these girls are the perfect women: they love football,” he said. Lococo finds it easy to have so much school spirit because she

was born and raised in Miami as a Hurricane fan. “Lauren educated me on the UM history and it was really easy to get into it,” said Goldklang, who is from New Jersey. She also knows something about football: her dad played football at Duke. Both girls came up with the idea to begin the glittering and it has turned out to be a bonding experience. This is the second year the girls have been glittering, but they have received much more attention this season, perhaps because the Hurricanes have given fans a lot more to cheer about. With new fads and fashions, there is always a risk of getting copied, but Lococo and Goldklang are not worried about that. “I don’t think people will copy us because I don’t think they’d have what it takes to commit to this,” Goldklang said. “I even doubt myself sometimes.” When all the fun and excitement is over, the girls still have to think about how to remove the multitude of glitter from their bodies. It takes more than an hour to remove most of the glitter, but unfortunately for the girls, some of it never seems to disappear. “Even after I wash myself, it’s still there,” Lococo said, “It’s in my car, my bed, everywhere!” The Glitter Girls leave such a thick trail of glitter that they have been banned from the buses that take students to the game. The girls say they spend an average of $30 per game, which includes gas, parking, food and of course their secret recipe for putting on the glitter masterpiece. Emily Wingrove may be contacted at ewingrove@themiamihurricane.com.

Be sure to tune into UMTV's SportsDesk on channel 96 this Friday night @ 7 p.m. The Glitter Girls will be featured.

COURTESY EMILY WINGROVE

TWINKLE: Sophomores Lauren Lococo and Alex Goldklang attend every home game, sitting front row in the student section covered in glitter. The duo commits to hours of preparation to stand out.

MATCHUPS: MIAMI VS. CLEMSON ADVANTAGE

POSITION

POSITION

Quarterbacks

Defensive Line

Running Backs

Secondary

Wide Receivers/ Tight Ends

Special Teams

Offensive Line

Coaching

ADVANTAGE

Matt Reed may be contacted at mreed@themiamihurricane.com. LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR MATT REED’S ANALYSIS OF EACH UNIT.

October 22 - October 25, 2009

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Canes hope to tame Tigers

POLL RESULTS: Agree with the Canes? Who do you think has the best hair style on the football team? Travis Benjamin

Graig Cooper

Olivier Vernon

26%

26%

24%

Other

Levi Paalua

Unsure

12% Total voters: 121

BILLY GILBERT // The Miami Hurricane

SEARCHING THE OPEN FIELD: Sophomore starting quarterback Jacory Harris looks for a receiver during Saturday’s 27-7 victory over the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Miami hosts Clemson Saturday at Land Shark BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

After picking up their fifth straight nonconference win dating back to last season, the No. 8 Miami Hurricanes will return to Atlantic Coast Conference play and host Clemson at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Land Shark Stadium. This will be the first meeting between the two schools since 2005. Following the first week of the BCS Standings with the Hurricanes (5-1) ranked No. 10, the Canes control their own path to winning the Coastal Division. Head coach Randy Shannon has always understood the importance and urgency against an ACC opponent as his squad is 2-1. “Clemson [is] another conference game. It’s a very good football team,” Shannon said. Miami leads the series 5-2. “Conference games are more valuable than anything. We have to keep worrying about our conference games. Clemson has the same type of athletes we have at Miami, guys we recruited.” Four years ago, it took three overtimes and a Kenny Phillips interception to pick up a road win against the Tigers, 36-30. But the Canes had hoped to avenge the loss from the year before. In 2004, the Hurricanes played the Tigers in Miami where they had a 17-3 advantage at halftime. Miami squandered the lead away in the second half and eventually lost in overtime, 24-17. That loss knocked Miami out of contention for a BCS bowl game and out of first place in the ACC. “The last two times we played them we went to overtime,” said Shannon, who has never faced Clemson as a head coach or a player. 14

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“No matter if it’s a couple of years ago or now, it’s still Clemson.” Clemson (3-3, 2-2 ACC) is coming off its most dominating performance of the season; it destroyed Wake Forest, 38-3. Versatile senior running back C.J. Spiller, a native of Lake Butler, Fla. and a player Miami once recruited, has averaged 191 all purpose yards this season. The Canes have to carry over the defense they had in their 27-7 win over UCF last Saturday. Miami’s secondary played solid as a unit as it made several tackles for a loss and blitzed. “Offensively they have two of the fastest guys in the ACC, Jacoby Ford and C.J. Spiller,” Shannon said. “They’re very dynamic players; [they] do a good job.” The Tigers are led by sophomore quarterback Kyle Parker. Parker is a two-sport athlete who shined on the baseball field last year and was a named first-team freshman All-American by Baseball America. He torched UM last year with his bat and will look to do the same with his arm. He finished a three game series against UM 4-for-10 with seven RBI. On defense, Clemson is going to challenge Miami with man-to-man coverage and allow its front seven to strictly play the run. Sophomore quarterback Jacory Harris has to take advantage of the one-on-one match ups and continue to move the chains against the Tigers to be successful. “It feels like a rivalry game,” said sophomore Jacory Harris, who ranks eighth nationally in passing efficiency, has 1,518 passing yards and 12 total touchdowns. “Clemson has always been one of the top dogs in the ACC.” The game can be heard on the student radio station at the University of Miami 90.5 FM WVUM or watched on TV on ABC. Lelan LeDoux may be contacted lledoux@ themiamihurricane.com. October 22 - October 25, 2009

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October 22 - October 25, 2009

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BASEBALL

Fall ball begins

STEVEN STUTS // The Miami Hurricane

PLAY BALL!: Junior Iden Nazario pitches in a Sunday afternoon game last year. Nazario is under consideration to be the closer this season.

Canes prepare for their new season BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

Last week the UM baseball team opened its fall practice at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field. The Canes have been tabbed with the No. 9 recruiting class according to The Collegiate Baseball Newspaper. Recruiting coordinator JD Arteaga brought in 13 newcomers, six of whom were drafted by a major league baseball team last June. “This is a real athletic class,” Arteaga said. “It gives us a lot of options offensively to run and put pressure on other teams.” Last year the Canes faltered in the first round of the NCAA Tournament after losing twice to the arch-rival Florida Gators in the Gainesville Regional. After the series, head coach Jim Morris said team chemistry issues led to a disappointing ending. “Right now our team has a good attitude, but it’s easy to have a good attitude when everyone is playing and everyone is doing the same thing,” said the 17th-year coach, who just signed a contract extension through 2015. “We just finished going through a boot camp. If we run our program like the marines, I would love to be able to do that,” Morris said. “When those guys come out of boot camp they care for each other and would take a bullet for each other. We just went through the toughest boot camp since I have been at Miami.” The Canes return 84 percent of their 16

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October 22 - October 25, 2009

innings pitched from last year. The only notable pitcher gone is standout closer Kyle Bellamy, who was drafted in the fifth round by the Chicago White Sox. Fall practice will not only help work out chemistry issues and perfect the basic fundamentals, but Morris will also be evaluating potential candidates to fill the void All-American closer Bellamy left behind. “I don’t think you can win big time whether you are at this level or the major league level if you do not have a closer,” Morris said. “Personally I will trade two starting pitchers for one closer. It takes a special guy to fill that role. It’s our biggest concern.” The competition is wide open as the favorite to close, senior Taylor Wulf, is recovering from Tommy John surgery. Other candidates include senior righthander David Gutierrez and junior southpaw Iden Nazario. UM’s biggest asset will be its onetwo punch at the top of the rotation with junior ace Chris Hernandez and redshirt junior Eric Erickson. Erickson missed the entire 2008 season due to elbow surgery but is throwing bullpen sessions and is slated to be ready for the season opener. Erickson will be a huge addition as he is 19-5 with a 3.27 ERA in two collegiate seasons. “I’ve had a great support staff and been working so hard to try and get completely healthy,” Erickson said. “It was very tough to miss a year. I’m such a competitor. As much as I would have loved to be out there, it just wasn’t my time with the injury.” Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.


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BASKETBALL

‘Hoop there it is’: Seasons draw near Practices are underway for basketball squads BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

Basketball season is in full gear. Last night the men’s and women’s basketball teams began their 2009-2010 seasons as each practiced and scrimmaged in front of fans at the BankUnited Center for Hurricanes Hoopsfest. “This is great for us,” men’s basketball head coach Frank Haith said. “This was our first public appearance in front of people. I thought our guys handled themselves well. The young kids were really good.” This was the first opportunity for Haith to showcase another stellar recruiting class in front of the orange and green faithful. One of the stars of the scrimmage was redshirt sophomore Malcolm Grant, a point guard who sat out last year according to NCAA rules after transferring from Villanova. Last year the Canes were without a true point guard, but Grant will look to orchestrate the UM offense.

“I’m so excited to get on the court,” said Grant, a Brooklyn, N.Y., native. “Last year was really tough for me not being able to play but I took a positive out of it and saw the game in a whole new way. I was a vocal leader and now I’m ready to control the offense and get my teammates in good rhythm shots.” The Lady Canes head coach Katie Meier brought in five new recruits. Of note is McDonald’s All-American Morgan Stroman. Stroman will look to complement sophomore sensation Shenise Johnson. Johnson was the only player in Division I to lead her team in scoring, rebounding, assists and steals last year. Attendance to the free two-hour event was sparse. Senior Dylan Brooks enjoyed the action on the hard court, but was disappointed with the turnout. “It was really cool to see all the new faces on the teams, but the lack of support from the fans took away from the energy,” he said. BOBBY GILLER // The Miami Hurricane

Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@ themiamihurricane.com.

BACK INTO THE SWING OF THINGS: Sophomore Malcolm Grant and senior James Dews speak at the Meet and Greet that took place Oct. 12 on the Hecht Stanford bridge to welcome the start of the men’s basketball season.

October 22 - October 25, 2009

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Dear V: I hear more than bumps in the night...

, Dear V, My roommate is a screamer. She’s a great roommate and one of my best friends, but whenever her boyfriend comes to our apartment, I am traumatized by the noises of their passionate lovemaking. I’d hate to interfere with their relationship, and I don’t want to get into an argument with her either. How can I deal with this problem? I’m losing sleep! Sincerely Annoyed

Dear Annoyed, In any relationship, one must learn to pick and choose their battles. Whether it’s a lovers’ spat, or a beef among friends, engaging in pointless arguments can cause quite the strain. But it sounds to me like your roommate already has you worn pretty thin. This is a conflict that I think is worth settling. Your roommate and her boyfriend should be free to enjoy their sex life. But of course, you don’t need to know just how much they’re enjoying it. Sex should remain something that they share with each other—and not you. They have made their “lovemaking” part of your business, and you are certainly entitled to

dear ... your peace and quiet (and sleep!) inside your own home. Speak with her when you are both at home and her boyfriend isn’t around. Remember that she is a good friend to you, and approach her with the expectation that this matter can be settled civilly. Fortunately, while this is just a hunch, your roommate seems like she might not be too embarrassed about her sexual encounters. Therefore you should not feel too embarrassed in approaching her. Calmly (but confidently) tell her that her and her boyfriend are being too loud. And not only is it awkward for you, you can’t sleep! Reasonable enough, right? There are always two sides to each argument. Your roommate may or may not be completely willing to turn down

the volume, so be prepared to compromise if necessary. You can offer to let her know when you won’t be in the apartment, or if you’re feeling extra generous, give them a date night to do what they need to do. Plus, they could always go to his place. Do not allow her to sexile you under any circumstance. Not only is it rude, it is so freshman year! You’re both better than that. Best of luck, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@ themiamihurricane.com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE. Roommate Search: 2 female grad students searching for 3rd to share new house. - Private bath - Pool - Cable - Internet - Near Miracle Mile - $600.00 monthly Call: 305-525-8165 BARTENDERS WANTED!

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UP TO $250 A DAY NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Training Provided. Age 18+ OK

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. WILL TRAIN! CALL 305-929-8559 ext. 1003

800-965-6520 ext 166 October 22 - October 25, 2009

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DEAR V

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October 22 - October 25, 2009

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The Miami Hurricane -- October 22, 2009