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The Miami

Vol. 91, Issue 15 | Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

MONICA HERNDON // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR FEELING THE BEAT: Zeel Patel, a NOVA Southeastern student, dances Dandiya Raas at Garba Night. “Raas” is a traditional Indian dance performed with sticks called “dandiya.”

Festival of nine nights features Indian dance GOOD GRIEF! CHARLIE BROWN MUSICAL TO BE PERFORMED AT HILLEL PAGE 5

UM DEALT FIRST ACC LOSS CANES FALL TO NORTH CAROLINA, MORRIS SPRAINS ANKLE PAGE 9

Hindu Students Council, Indian Students Association host Garba Night BY SAM ABBASSI CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

n a flashy display of ceremonial dancing, the Hindu Students Council and Indian Students Association cohosted their annual Garba Night-Navaratri event in the BankUnited Center FieldHouse on Friday night. Navaratri is the Hindu festival of nine nights dedicated to the Goddess Shakti and her various forms: the Goddess

I

Durga for the first three nights, Lakshimi for the following three and Saraswati for the final three nights. Jewel-toned robes, dresses and blazing candles defined UM’s Garba Night celebration during the Navaratri festival. Participants and observers alike were enthusiastic, jubilant and, most importantly, dancing. SEE GARBA NIGHT, PAGE 4


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CAMPUS LIFE

Statue revealed at Homecoming opening ceremonies New U part of initiative to boost campus spirit

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

Last Friday, a new campus tradition was born. The U statue – a project three years in the making – was unveiled at the Homecoming opening ceremonies Friday afternoon. The Cane-colored U encased by stainless steel stands at the center of campus on a patch of grass by the Rock. Students are encouraged to pass by and rub the U for good luck on the way to exams, athletic events, interviews or any other important occasion. “Homecoming theme this year is all about tradition and the U. We thought it would be great to incorporate this new tradition into Homecoming,” said the Student Government (SG) Executive-atLarge External Bhumi Patel. UM President Donna E. Shalala, Vice President for Student Affairs Patricia Whitely and Sebastian the Ibis all helped to pull off the blue tarp and reveal the U statue. “It looks very clean, classy and simple,” said sophomore Steven De Nicola, who attended the statue’s unveiling. Freshman Freddy Michaud, who was also present at the ceremony, said that the statue makes campus look more complete. “I have three tests next week, so I’ll spend a whole bunch of my time there by the statue,” he said. The U statue was first proposed by the 20102011 SG Executive Board, which ran for office with a platform to temper the campus. The board included President Christina Farmer, who came up with the idea for the statue, and Vice President Pietro Bortoletto. “University of Miami students are very spirited when they’re at the stadium, but we felt like our campus was a little lackluster when it came to spirit,” Bortoletto said. They modeled the idea on the Sebastian the

Check out a photo slideshow by Zach Beeker from Sunday’s game against Virginia Tech. Alex Schwartz has the story. MONICA HERNDON // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR IT’S ALL ABOUT THE U: The new U statue was revealed Friday afternoon on the Rock. President Donna E. Shalala, adminstrators, alumni, student organizations and donors were in attendance.

Ibis statue in front of the Newman Alumni Center, which was revealed during Farmer’s presidency. SG wanted something similar in a more central location on campus, Bortoletto said. Under Farmer’s administration, SG announced a student design contest for the statue. Kevin Jones, an architecture student who graduated from UM in spring 2011, was the winning designer, according to Farmer. Last year’s SG President, Brandon Mitchell, took the project forward under his own ticket’s platform to spirit the U. “We made getting this U statue, or at least pushing it as far as we could, our number one priority on that platform,” Mitchell said. The efforts during Mitchell’s year included getting price estimates, seeking funding and determining a location. Whitely, who said she is thrilled with the U statue, was a big supporter of the project through-

out three SG terms. “President Shalala and I thought it was a terrific idea and that the U would add to the spirit and community on campus,” Whitely said. “More importantly, it was a student initiative.” The cost of the statue has come out to about $85,000, according to SG Press Secretary AJ Ricketts. This is significantly less than the approximately $1.2 million that Mitchell expected. According to current SG President Nawara Alawa, the statue was funded through the budget for the Student Center Complex project – which includes the construction of the new Student Activity Center and updates to the existing University Center. Mitchell is eager to see what other traditions emerge. “The students that are there now will be the ones to really take charge and figure out what they want the legacy of the statue to be,” he said.

NEWS BRIEFS NEW COURSES

DREAM CAREER

The course offerings for spring 2013 will be available to students beginning on Monday. Students can search for classes online using myUM. Registration appointments will be available on myUM Oct. 22. Registration will begin on Nov. 5.

Representatives from Dream Careers will be hosting information sessions as well as meeting with students for individual appointments on Monday. Dream Careers is an all-inclusive program that offers guaranteed internships in PR, advertising, film, television, marketing, radio, fashion and other fields in major cities around the world, including: New York, London, Los Angeles and Barcelona. The first informa-

Also, the last day to drop a class this semester is Oct. 25.

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

tion session is held at 11 a.m. in UC 241, and the second is at 1 p.m. in CIB 5063.

OPEN MIC The USpeak Open Verse and Short Story Performance Series is hosting a reading by MFA and undergraduate alumni of the Creative Writing Program at 8 p.m. on Thursday at the Oasis Deli in the UC.The event will be emceed by Zach Hickman, managing editor of the

Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

Mangrove Literary Journal. USpeak will also spotlight audience members who share a page of their writing during USpeak’s Open Mic segments. Sign up begins when doors open at 7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit miami. edu/uspeak.

Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@themiamihurricane.com.

Interested in more Garba Night coverage? See Monica Herndon’s photo slideshow. Did you miss Grovetoberfest? Danielle Ungerman has you covered. See her photo brief. Find out more about the new LGBTQ minor in Molly Canfield’s story. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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HOMECOMING

Week of spirit events unite, energize campus Highlights

Detailed planning began in January

This year’s Homecoming began with the unveiling of the U statue on Friday.

BY ALYSHA KHAN ENTERPRISE EDITOR

Homecoming 2012 kicked off Friday, but for the teams that are participating in the competitions, Homecoming began a month and a half ago. “It’s all about Homecoming in the weeks leading up,” said Lara Lackstein, chair of the Homecoming Executive Committee (HEC). After the Homecoming theme, “The Tried, The True, The U,” was revealed in the first week of September, all teams that wanted to participate were required to attend an informational meeting held by the HEC. At the meeting, the rulebooks were distributed, and teams were able to sign up for the events in which they wanted to partake. Then, the planning began in earnest, especially because this year, the teams face a new challenge. Homecoming Week is about two weeks earlier than usual, because the only option for the Homecoming game was against Florida State University. “It’s been very stressful, because we have a lot less time,” said Victoria Valdes, who is in charge of Homecoming for the Association of Commutter Students (ACS). “I’m trying to make it as organized as possible, because if I don’t have organization, I will explode.” ACS began writing its script for O-cheer the same night that the theme was announced. For alma matter, they held auditions to determine where to place members and to discover “if anyone had any special skills, like beatboxing.” “Once you get that done, you can work on all the fun stuff,” Valdes said. Throughout the process of creating teams, Valdes’ goal was to find something to do for everyone

SCHEDULE Check out the Homecoming schedule online at themiamihurricane.com.

HOLLY BENSUR // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER COMMUNITY SERVICE: Junior Shannon Van Gundy plants basil at the Miami River Commission by Little Havana Sunday morning as part of Hurricanes Help the Hometown (HHTH), an event for Homecoming week.

who wanted to participate. ACS, like most organizations, allows members to participate in as many events as they want. “Maybe you don’t sing, maybe you don’t dance, but you do something well,” Valdes said. “If that’s your strength, we want you to go with it.” In the Federación de Estudiantes Cubanos (FEC), all members are encouraged to take part in coming up with ideas for the different Homecoming events. “For alma matter, everyone contributes to the lyrics but the singers decide who’s alto, who’s soprano,” said Kelly Castro, the Homecoming chair for FEC. For the sorority Zeta Tau Alpha, the preparations for Homecoming coincided with the group’s annual philanthropy week. “Our girls were spread really thin,” said Tina Zeng, Greek relations chairs for Zeta. “We tried to delegate everyone in the right way.” According to Zeng, the hardest part of Homecoming is managing all the sorority sisters, since Zeta has more than 100 members.

“We’re quite a big sorority,” she said. “With such a big org, it’s easy for people to get confused about events. You have to keep answering their questions and not get too frustrated with anyone if they don’t know what’s going on.” Scheduling rehearsals can also become a challenge for all teams. In FEC, most of the members active in Homecoming participate in multiple events that often require a lot of practice, such as alma matter and O-cheer. “We start having meetings almost every day as it gets closer,” Castro said. “Accommodating everybody’s schedule can get really difficult.” ACS also holds practices every night but makes it a rule to stop at 9:30 p.m. “School is also important,” Valdes said. Prepping for Homecoming requires not only time – it also requires cash. “We are aware that some teams have money and other teams don’t,” Lackstein said. “It’s not necessary to spend money on Homecoming. It is up to the team’s

discretion.” For O-cheer, all teams are only allowed to spend up to $300. For the parade float, teams are given $100 gift cards to Home Depot. “It’s not necessary to spend money on O-cheer,” Lackstein said. “Costume could be samecolored shirts. The backdrop could be the banner.” According to Castro, FEC tries to get creative with its costumes and reuses its backdrops each year. For the first time, Greek organizations are teaming up to compete together. The sorority Delta Phi Epsilon and the fraternity Beta Theta Pi paired up to compete as one dynamic duo. They won first place in the banner competition last week. “It was a no-brainer to team up for Homecoming,” said Cody Colleran, vice president for academic affairs for Delta Phi Epsilon. “Although we are members of different organizations, we are all UM students who genuinely love our school. I have already gotten to know so many amazing brothers I had not met before.” Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

HURRICANE HOWL WILL INCLUDE INFLATABLE ATTRACTIONS AND FOOD TRUCKS. GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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Goddess Shakti takes on various forms over nine-day span

TRANSPORTATION

A crash course in safety Here is a look at the statistics regarding car accidents and injuries caused by distracted drivers. Texting is among the most dangerous activities one can engage in while driving.

GARBA NIGHT FROM PAGE 1

“It provides me a fun environment with my culture,” said Ravin Sajnani, captain of the Hurricane Bhangara dance team. Most of the participants said that they came because of the dancing, as the two integral highlights of Navratri are the dances, Garba and Raas. Garba is an Indian dance native to the Gujarat region. People dance in rhythm around a central lit candle and a picture or statue of different avatars of the Shakti goddess. “You spin in circles, symbolizing that whatever you do in life, the idol is in the center,” said Raj Kumar, the freshman representative for the Hindu Students Council. Dandiya Raas, or just Raas, is the second dance, which follows a brief ritual of worship called Aarti – when a lit flame is offered to one of the Hindu gods and passed around as a blessing. During the Raas dance, people stand in two lines, while dancing to strong drum beats symbolizing the strength of the heartbeat and the dynamism of life. They also wave sticks called “dandiyas.” “It’s a really good opportunity for diversity on campus,” said Junior and ISA member Shreya Baid. “It introduces people to Indian culture and gets them involved.” The event was not limited to Indian students. Sophmore Dalton Fouts and junior Annie Ouyang were among the many non-Indian participants at the event. Fouts said he hesitated at first because of unfamiliarity with the festival, but once there, he was fully engaged. Ouyang said the Garba Night-Navaratri event was a “very welcoming and fun outlet.”

It’s a really good opportunity for diversity on campus. It introduces people to Indian culture and gets them involved.” Shreya Baid, Junior and Indian Students Association member, on the Garba Night celebration

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

In 2010,

3,092 deaths involved drivers who were distracted

416,000

other victims were injured by distracted drivers

text messages sent in June (billions)

Drivers are

23

times more likely to crash if they are text messaging

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times more likely to crash if they use a handheld device

4.6 average number of seconds you spend looking at your phone when receiving or sending a text while driving

37% reduction in brain activity that could occur while a driver is texting

SOURCE: DISTRACTION.GOV

GRAPHIC BY ALI FISHMAN

‘Put it Down’ event to address texting epidemic UM, FDOT team up to educate student drivers BY RIANNA HIDALGO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Last year, senior Julian Malagon was the victim of a hit and run on U.S. 1 that left him with a broken nose, stitches above his left eye and two sprained ankles. Two months ago his car was totaled when a student ran a flashing red light at the intersection of Miller Drive and Red Road. In the instances, both drivers were looking at their cellphones. In order to raise awareness on texting and driving, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and the University of Miami, with the aid of other partners, will be holding an outreach event from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 24 on the Rock. The event will be held as part of the “Put it Down” campaign to educate students about the dangers of distracted driving. “Nobody ever thinks that sending a text could end with a catastrophic result,” said Tara Kirschner, the executive director of the Dori Slosberg Foundation, one of FDOT’s partners. “Again and again, we are finding that it does.” Distracted driving does not solely reOct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

fer to cellphone use. According to Carlos Sarmiento, the community traffic safety program coordinator for FDOT District 6, it includes anything that takes your hands or mind off the road – putting on makeup, eating, changing the radio station or even engaging in conversation with passengers. “You can get so caught up in those actions, but it takes a fraction of a second to put someone in danger,” Sarmiento said. The campaign, which began on Labor Day and runs through the end of October, targets those between the ages of 16 and 24. It is part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Transportation to end distracted driving, which Distraction.gov, the official government website, refers to as an “epidemic.” “All my friends text,” senior Erik Akre said. “It’s not like any of them would say, ‘Hey, I’m driving, I can’t text you back.’” Some UM students admitted they use their cell phones while driving despite thinking it’s dangerous. “It’s bad,” said freshman communications major Kenia Vasallo. “Everyone does it. It’s a big deal because you never know what’s going to happen.” Although Florida is one of few states with no cellphone driving laws, those involved in the campaign hope statistics from the USDOT will offer other reasons to “put

it down.” According to Sarmiento, the mutilated car on one of the campaign posters is from a fatal wreck in which a young man swerved into the lane of oncoming traffic while texting and collided with a semitruck. “For the most part, I don’t think people will get it until it happens to them, or someone they’re close to. It’s unfortunate,” Malagon said. The UM event will feature the UM Police Department, the Department of Parking and Transportation, the Association of Commuter Students and many more. Students will have the opportunity to visit promotional booths, speak with law enforcement officers and try driving simulators provided by the American Automobile Association. They will also walk away with some free items and potentially life-saving knowledge. “I want as many students as possible to come out and take advantage of these resources,” Kirschner said. Students will also be able to take a pledge saying they will not text and drive. Until then, Sarmiento has a message for students: “If you start with yourself, it can trickle down to others and everyone can do the right thing.”


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PHOTO BRIEF

Obama rallies capacity crowd of supporters COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF: President Barack Obama spoke to a packed crowd of 9,200 people at a grassroots rally Thursday afternoon in the BankUnited Center. It was Obama’s third visit to UM in the past eight months. The speech highlighted his accomplishments during his first four years in the White House. Obama also emphasized his campaign slogan, “Forward.” “If there’s one thing I know, Florida, it’s this: We have come too far to turn back now,” he said. “We can’t afford another four years of the policies that got us into this mess.”  Visit themiamihurricane.com for a full report on Obama’s rally by Lyssa Goldberg.

MONICA HERNDON // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

GET READY FOR YOUR

YEARBOOK PORTRAIT

Monday thru Friday Oct. 8–23 10AM–6PM

Graduating? Make your appointment at

IBISYEARBOOK.COM

UC Lower Lounge Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

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NEWS

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OPINION UP!

What is your favorite quote from a movie?

DANIELA LORENZO FRESHMAN “I can’t concentrate on my porn with all this real sex going on.” (Friends with Benefits)

KAYLA DIMPSEY JUNIOR “If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t go looking any further than my own backyard. Because if it isn’t there, I never really lost it to begin with.” (The Wizard of Oz)

MICHELLE CHAN FRESHMAN “She doesn’t even go here.” (Mean Girls)

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com.

Jennifer Levine

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OPINION

Students: Texting and driving should never be an option. A text can wait. Our lives cannot.

The Miami Hurricane

brother, a mother, a friend. We wait until it is too late. In a poll conducted by The Miami Hurricane, 57 students admitted to texting while driving, while 11 students said they haven’t. Clearly, the overwhelming majority of college students text and drive even though most are aware of how unsafe it is. The University of Miami has teamed up with the Florida Department of Transportation for a “Put it Down” campaign, which educates students about the risks of distracted driving. Although this campaign isn’t going to break bad habits overnight, it will help spread awareness about an important topic that can drastically change someone’s life instantaneously. College students will continue texting and driving until something drastic changes their minds. This includes what we like to call the “safety zone” – texting when stopped at a red light. This may be the preferable option when comparing it to texting and driving simultaneously, but things can still go wrong such as not driving when the light turns green, or driving when the light is still red. Students: Texting and driving should never be an option. A text can wait. Our lives cannot. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Candidates should focus on climate change

I

t’s October. The polar ice caps are at the lowest levels that have ever been recorded and the sea ice has not only ROBERT PURSELL lost about half CONTRIBUTING of its volume COLUMNIST since 2000, but also about 72 percent of its density. According to Peter Wadhams of the Polar Ocean Physics Group, this constitutes “an imminent and unavoidable global disaster.” Global warming is real, folks. It isn’t a bunch of hype or some crazy conspiracy theory dreamed up by scientists. It’s as real as the rising oceans, the melting ice caps and the rapidly

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

evaporating ozone layer. There’s a reason why Sir David King, the chief scientific advisor to the British government, called global warming the “biggest problem society has ever confronted.” And the scariest part for us concerned citizens is that when it comes to this year’s election, neither candidate could care less. It seems environmentally conscious voters currently find themselves stuck between a rock and a hard place, faced with the daunting prospect of having to vote for one candidate who lies through his teeth and promises reform while actively ignoring it, and another who laughs in the face of even attempting to reform the environment. President Barack Obama has promised to wean our nation’s dependence on oil, but has done the exact opposite. He has called for more

Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Eyes on the road – your text can wait Texting while driving has become a habit for most college students. We get in the car, blast our favorite music and do anything but keep our eyes on the road. If we’re not using both hands to text, we’re using one hand to text and the other to eat. All the while, our knee is controlling the wheel as we juggle everything else. This isn’t the type of driving we had to master before getting our license, but it’s the type of driving we have all come to learn, master and accept. But texting and driving isn’t a skill; it’s a danger to yourself and others around you. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 1,000 deaths and 24,000 injuries in car accidents resulted from distracted drivers using their cell phones. All of these accidents could have been prevented if drivers would’ve put down their phones and paid attention to the road. Many college students don’t realize how quickly one text message can turn into one giant nightmare. We think we’re invincible because nothing has ever happened to us, and we dismiss the idea that anything ever will. We’re mistaken. It shouldn’t take a near-death experience or the death of a loved one to change our ways, but that’s what we wait for. We wait for that terrible crash. We wait for that dreaded phone call from a cousin, a

HURRICANE NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

compiled by

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offshore drilling, refused to enact tougher federal standards for fracking and has denied enforcing tighter standards on ozone pollution. Domestic drilling has quadrupled under Obama and, despite promising to end dangerous deep water drilling in the wake of the BP spill, Obama has continued to issue permits to companies like BP and Shell to drill in even deeper and more dangerous waters in the Arctic Ocean. In fact, Obama is the first president since Lyndon B. Johnson to see an increase in domestic oil production for four straight years. Obama was absent from a recent July meeting between world leaders in Rio aimed at reprising environmental reforms enacted through the monumental 1992 Copenhagen accord. FINISH READING AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Allison Goodman MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REP Kristyna Fong ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto

OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn

EDGE EDITOR Nicky Diaz

ENTERPRISE EDITOR Alysha Khan

SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot

ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

COPY CHIEF Spencer Dandes

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

COPY EDITOR Rebecca Cohen Jordan Coyne Erika Glass To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2012 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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CHARLIE BROWN BY ERIKA GLASS COPY EDITOR

This fall, the popular downhearted “Peanuts” star Charlie Brown is coming to campus. All blockheads, makeshift psychologists and irritating baby siblings are invited. The musical “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown” will be the first of QuantUM Entertainment’s performing series, debuting Nov. 8. An advisory board under the Hurricane Productions umbrella, QuantUM is in charge of student-run performing arts events at the university. In addition to “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” the board also plans to team up with the Cinematic Arts Commission later this month for the annual production of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” The club offers students of all majors the opportunity to participate in authentic productions, equipped with live accompaniment, custom sets and costumes. Senior Jason Mulligan, a music

:

QuantUM brings classic play to life with music students at the helm

composition major, is looking forward to his first directing gig. “I have been involved in theater for 12 years now, but this will be my first time directing,” Mulligan said. “I knew that they needed someone to direct for the fall and ‘Charlie Brown’ was a perfect choice for me to get my feet wet. It’s a simple show tech-wise, but it has a great message.” Justin Moniz, a second-year vocal performance graduate student, is also excited for his role as musical director. “I spoke to Jason about being musical director since I wanted a chance to do it at school,” Moniz said. “I had directed before professionally, but this is a whole different experience and I’m definitely having a blast throughout this whole process.” However, this year the club is looking to broaden its scope by not only offering theater opportunities, but also other performance options. “We are trying to make it bigger and better than it’s ever been,”

QuantUM president Jeremy Weidmaier said. “Last year we had a belly dance workshop, and we’re hoping to bring that back along with other dance and recital-type things. We were even thinking of incorporating a ‘playwrite-off,’ but everything is still in planning.” QuantUM has previously required show proposals to be submitted as a directing project. They are currently reworking this system so they are no longer limited to directorial proposals. Any idea is welcome, Weidmaier said. To make a proposal or for more information, email him at j.weidmaier@umiami.edu “We encourage people of all majors and backgrounds to participate because if I thought I needed theater experience to work with QuantUM, then I wouldn’t be where I am now,” Weidmaier said. “I am a music engineering major, and I’d always been interested in theater. But when I first got involved, I thought I’d maybe do sound for a show or stage manage; I never imagined I’d end up president.”

IF YOU GO WHAT: “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown“ WHEN: Nov. 8 at 8 p.m.; Nov. 11 (time TBA); Nov. 11 at 2 and 8 p.m. WHERE: Hillel  Ticket free with Cane Card

DESIGN BY AMILYNN SOTO

Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

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THEATER REVIEW

COURTESY ALBERTO ROMEU PHOTOGRAPHY MODERN TWIST: Members of Actors’ Playhouse perform the popular Broadway and offBroadway production “Godspell” at the Miracle Theatre. The show debuted Friday.

Post-apocolyptic America meets ‘Godspell’ musical BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

Prepare ye the way for Actors’ Playhouse’s enchanting season opener “Godspell,” which opened Friday. Adapted from the Broadway and off-Broadway hit, “Godspell” is a musical based on the parables of the Gospel of Matthew and features an ensemble cast that finds Jesus Christ and learns to become a community. David Arisco, artistic director of “Godspell,” wanted his version to be different from previous renditions, setting the story in a future, post-apocalyptic American city. He also insisted that “Godspell” is not about religion but about a group of people that learn to lead better lives. “The New Testament sets the story in motion,” he said. “Ten separate people come together to learn, share and grow.” This post-apocalyptic environment is imagined on stage with an elaborate set de-

IF YOU GO WHERE: Actors’ Playhouse at the Miracle Theatre, 280 Miracle Mile WHEN: Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. TICKETS: $15-$50, $15 student rush tickets available 15 minutes prior to curtain.

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EDGE

sign featuring various open windows from which the cast emerges between scenes, a water pump used during the opening baptismal scene and a chain-link fence that holds Christ for the crucifixion scene. While the setting sometimes feels out of place with the play’s theme, the characters and script integrate the two well for a modern audience. Arisco’s script includes pop culture references such as Facebook, Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump. Interspersing these references throughout Act 1 results in non-stop hilarity. “We want you to have fun, relaying how we should live our lives, take care of each other and the planet,” Arisco said. But what sets “Godspell” apart is its musical hits composed by Stephen Schwartz, better known for his role in “Wicked.” Schwartz offers an upbeat array of gospel-inspired sounds that are catchy and light. The most memorable songs are “Day by Day” and “Light of the World,” which got some members of the audience clapping and tapping their feet. After the show, people were still humming to the uplifting beats. To bring the music to life, Arisco has compiled a mixed cast of veterans and newcomers that worked well together and remained true to their characters. They were each given a solo and had their own quirks on stage.

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place finish for the Hurricanes golf team in the MercedesBenz Collegiate Championship this past weekend

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national ranking for the Miami volleyball team

FOOTBALL

ZACH BEEKER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER MAN DOWN: Quarterback Stephen Morris receives treatment during Saturday’s loss after he injured his ankle midway through the fourth quarter.

Miami loses first ACC game as Homecoming showdown looms Morris questionable after ankle sprain BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

Heading into Saturday afternoon, the Hurricanes were a perfect 7-0 under coach Al Golden in games that followed a loss. That streak came to an end at Sun Life Stadium, and it came at a price. Junior quarterback Stephen Morris was carried off the field in the fourth quarter with an ankle injury, and Ryan Williams’ comeback attempt fell short. Miami

fell to the North Carolina Tar Heels,18-14. The loss is the first conference defeat for Miami (4-3, 3-1), which is now in a four-way tie for first place in the ACC Coastal Division. “There’s a lot to learn from this game. There’s no question. We made too many critical errors to win the game,” Golden said. “We have to continue to learn and grow. We’re playing a lot of guys that are learning. They have to continue to grow.” Morris scrambled near the Hurricanes’ sideline, fell awkwardly on his left ankle and needed assistance to get up. He was attended to on the sidelines, where he was

given a walking boot, and made his way to the locker room. After filling in on the previous drive following the injury, Williams came in for his first full drive with 1:47 remaining in the game and the Canes down four points. He was able to drive the team 59 yards down the field, but on fourth down and 16 yards to go, an 11yard reception to Clive Walford ending Miami’s day. “It’s tough just to lose at home. Just going out there, I wasn’t nervous,” Williams said. “I knew we needed a touchdown. We just didn’t execute. I tried not to force anything and do anything I knew I was not capable of.”

X-rays on Morris’ ankle came back negative, and Golden revealed in his weekly post-game teleconference that he has a sprain, but not a high ankle sprain. It is still unclear how much time Morris is projected to miss, but there is a slim chance he starts this weekend. Miami will prepare during the week as if Williams will be the starter, but Morris may have a shot to start depending on how he feels during the week. The Seminoles, now ranked No. 12 in the AP poll, will be the third opponent currently ranked in the top 10 the Canes will have faced. Senior running back Mike Oct. 15 - Oct. 17, 2012

James believes the looming challenge makes it easier to move past the loss. “You have to come around fast, no matter who it is, but knowing that it’s Florida State, with the added animosity, it just makes it that much easier to move on,” he said. For Williams, who may well be starting against a top-10 team for the first time in his career, it will be a game to look forward to. “It’s what I grew up watching, and what I’ve always wanted to play in, really the biggest game on our schedule based on rivalry,” he said. “I just go into the game like every week – just ready to play.”

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Week 7 report card Sports editor Ernesto Suarez grades the football team’s overall performance during its loss against the UNC Tar Heels this past Saturday. The Canes fell to o 4-3, and 3-1 in the ACC.

GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

WEAR ORANGE & GREEN!

SPORTS BRIEFS VOLLEYBALL The Canes volleyball team extended its winning streak to six with a 3-2 win over Boston College in Massachusetts. Junior Alex Johnson set the tone with 16 kills and 17 digs, and senior setter Nrithya Sundararaman came up with 47 assists and 10 digs to lead the Canes to the victory. The win keeps the Canes, who are ranked No. 15 in the nation, tied atop the ACC with Florida State. The team will stay on the road next weekend as they take on Clemson next Friday night, and Georgia Tech on Sunday.

October 19, 2012 Canes Spirit Day Photo Contest Wear your most creative UM gear! Take a photo then upload it by 5:00 pm on October 22nd for a chance to win fabulous prizes. (Categories include Student, Student Group, Faculty, Staff, Faculty/Staff Group, & Alumni)

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SWIMMING & DIVING The Hurricanes swimming and diving team bounced back from a tough road loss with a win over the Houston Cougars at the UC pool on Saturday afternoon. The Canes got off to a quick start in the 200 Medley Relay and never trailed at any point during the meet.The team returns to the pool on Friday, to take on Florida State.

SOCCER Miami’s women’s soccer team fought its

way into a tie with the No.19-ranked Virginia Tech Hokies on Sunday afternoon. The game ended in a scoreless draw after both teams were unable to score through two overtime periods. Miami is now 7-6-2 overall on the season, including 2-4-1 in the ACC. The team honored former Hurricane goalie Austen Everett during the game, who passed away in August after a battle with nonHodgkins lymphoma. The team returns to the pitch on Thursday, as they face off against No. 8 University of Maryland.

GOLF The Hurricanes golf team placed 12th overall in the Mercedes-Benz Collegiate Championship to end the fall portion of its season on Sunday afternoon. The team will return to the golf course beginning in February, as they get ready for the Hurricane Invitational at the Deering Bay Yacht & Country Club to open the spring season. Information compiled from hurricanesports.com


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dear ...

Dear V: Sexless but satisfied... Dear Don’t Want the Dirty, , My friends always talk about which hot guys they’ve hooked up with recently, but it all seems so uninteresting. The idea of sex in general, I mean. Is there something wrong with me to think that when it seems so popular among other people? Sincerely, No Sex, Thanks

Sex is popular because it’s good, but that doesn’t mean something’s wrong with you. Sexuality is a f luid concept, and it sounds like you might just be more on the asexual end of the spectrum. Absolutely nothing wrong with that! And that’s coming from me, promoter of the horizontal mambo. But just because something doesn’t interest you doesn’t mean you’re broken or anything. Just put it in perspective. A lot of people like hamburgers. But if you don’t like hamburgers, whatever. It’s who you are and trying to change that to fit in with all your friends is only going to make you unhappy. You wouldn’t eat that hamburger if you hated it, right? Just like you shouldn’t try to seem interested in sex if you’re honestly not. Do you feel left out of conversation when your

friends talk about it, though? Because iin that case, maybe just mention something to them. As your friends, they shouldn’t judge, and then you guys can talk about things that you’re all interested in and enjoy, like the Jersey Shore. Everyone loves Snooki, right? I’m totally kidding, by the way. You just need to get comfortable enough to say “I’m just not that interested in sex. Is it cool if we talk about something else?” and no one can tell you that something’s wrong with you. Because they’re not you and they don’t know how you feel. You can even snap your fingers in a z-formation while you say it, if that’ll empower you more. So you do you, and don’t worry about “doing” anyone else. V

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