Issuu on Google+

MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

1

The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 13 | Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

DETERMINED: Vaughan Francis, a member of the Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club, does a squat jump exercise on Tuesday.

PHOTOS BY SAGETTE VAN EMBDEN

PUMPED: Therese Bjornaas, from Norway, takes a class on Tuesday at the Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club.

HIT ME: Jennifer Smith boxes with trainer Mickey Demos, Jr., a UM law alumnus.

Getting back in the ring Son of famous UM boxer keeps father’s legacy alive, works to create club sport BY ADAM BERGER | SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

There’’s a gym in downtown Miami that holds a missing piece of Hurricane sports history. Take a step inside on any given day and you’’ll find Mickey Demos Jr. leading a class of amateur boxers lined up behind a dozen or so boxing bags. His intensity during the hour-long sessions is unwavering and it drives participants forward during grueling finishes

BANKING BURDEN

BANK OF AMERICA TO CHARGE MONTHLY FEE TO DEBIT CARD USERS PAGES 2, 7

full of push-ups. Demos Jr. is an instructor at Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club on Biscayne Boulevard. He gets his enthusiasm from his love for the sport. His father, Mickey Demos Sr. is in the University of Miami Sports Hall of Fame for his years spent representing the orange and green in the ring. Yes, before Howard Schnellenberger made University of Miami football a marquee program, before

Ron Fraser brought championships to the baseball diamond, the winning tradition associated with the Miami Hurricanes was boxing. ““That was actually the first sport to put UM on the map nationally,”” said Demos Jr., referring to the success of the boxing team in the 1940s and ‘‘50s, before the NCAA dropped boxing as a sport in 1960.

MARKET MAGIC

HAPPY HOUR HOTSPOTS

WEDNESDAY FARMERS MARKET RETURNS TO CAMPUS WITH NEW VENDORS PAGE 3

SEE BOXING, PAGE 12

AN OVERVIEW OF CHEAP DRINK SPECIALS CLOSE TO CAMPUS PAGE 9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

2

NATIONAL ECONOMY

Bank hits debit card users with fee Charge makes up for bank’s profit losses

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY KYLIE BANKS SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Starting in 2012, Bank of America will levy a $5 monthly fee on customers who use their debit cards for purchases. Customers will be charged the same rate no matter how often they use the card. However, Bank of America will not charge customers who only use their debit cards to take money out of the bank’’s ATMs. After the recession hit in 2008, the American public expressed a desire for more government regulation in the banking industry. However, more stringent regulations have caused banks to charge customers to make up for profit losses. The bank has implemented the new fee as a result of the lower cap on how much it can charge businesses. According to an Associated Press article from Sept. 30, banks would collect around $19 billion in ““swipe fees.”” Swipe fees are the fees that banks charge businesses when customers use a debit card. Under new government regulations, banks can collect a little more than 20 cents per transaction from businesses, while they were able to charge around 44 cents per transaction. Though Bank of America is the first to charge customers for using their debit cards, Wells Fargo and Chase have been testing out a $3 charge for debit card use in select cities. For some Bank of America customers, the fees will not make a difference in how they spend money. ““I really don’’t care,”” sophomore Bharathi Subramanian said. ““I don’’t use my debit card to buy things.”” Other customers were not pleased with the

Check out the photo staff’s slideshow of Wednesday’s Farmers Market.

NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

MONEY IN THE BANK: Senior Natalia Leal withdraws money from an on-campus Bank of America ATM on Wednesday. Next year, the bank will begin charging a usage fee. news. ““I’’m disappointed,”” freshman Ross Ito said. ““When I first signed up for Bank of America, they said there were no fees associated with the card. It feels like I’’ve been tricked.”” Though the bank is pushing these fees to increase their profits, its decision may cause many customers to reconsider where they put their money. ““I’’m honestly thinking about changing the bank I use,”” senior Michael Acosta said. ““It’’s not a statute that banks charge their members to use their debit card.”” However, customers may end up grudg-

ingly accepting the new fee because of the complexities of transferring money between banks. ““Unraveling all that is a mess, and that’’s one thing that really works in the bank’’s favor for retaining the customer,”” said Brian Riley, research director of bank cards for TowerGroup, in an interview with the Associated Press. ““At the end of the day, it’’s just hard to change.””

Read more about the new fees in the staff editorial on page 7.

NEWS BRIEFS HOMECOMING ROYALTY

LAUNCH PAD WINS

If interested in the chance to be crowned king or queen, submit an application to the Department of Student Activities in UC209 before 5 p.m. on Friday. All registered students are eligible. For the preliminary round on Tuesday, each applicant will be expected to answer a question and give a two-minute dance, theater, vocal or instrumental performance.

The Metro Broward Economic Development Corporation awarded The Launch Pad a grand prize and a $2,500 grant at the Metro Broward Lighthouse Awards, an event designed to highlight awareness of business development in South Florida.

For more information, contact the king and queen chairs: Daniel Beldy at dbeldy5@gmail.com, Sophianna Bishop at s.bishop3@umiami.edu or Niurka Monteserin at n.monteserin@umiami.edu.

2

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

The Launch Pad was recognized for being the first entrepreneur development center on a college campus, and for its commitment to recognizing innovative ideas.

CHANGE OF PLANS The Homecoming concert, which was originally scheduled to take place at the University Green,

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

will now be held at the BankUnited Center. Details to follow soon.

U.S. MARINE BAND Students are invited to a free performance by the “President’s Own” United States Marine Band. The event will be held in the BankUnited Center on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the UC Information Desk. A valid Cane Card must be presented.

Jonathan Borge may be contacted at jborge@ themiamihurricane.com.

Interested in boxing club? Check out Sagette Van Embden’s photo slideshow. Read David Furones’ matchup analysis for the Canes’ game at Virginia Tech on Saturday. Are you a cinema buff? Check out Carlos Mella’s new film blog. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

3

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Farmers market makes its return to campus New businesses join old vendors BY LYSSA GOLDBERG CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Heavenly aromas wafted from white tents lining the walkway between the UC and the Richter Library on Wednesday, marking the return of the weekly Well ‘‘Canes Farmers Market. The regional goods, ranging from locally-grown produce to spices, breads, soaps and herbal products, were brought back to campus for students, faculty and staff members to enjoy and for businesses to earn profits. ““Looking at the response we had last year, it was a hugely popular and successful event that students really wanted,”” said Michael Piacentino, the Student Government (SG) press secretary. ““Even over the summer, we started planning on bringing the vendors back and starting it up again.”” Wim Forstmann, who was working at the local honey stand, has returned to UM for a second year of weekly business. ““The sales are good enough and the environment is nice, so why not?”” Forstmann said. While other popular stands, like Harmony Kettle Corn, are back for more business, new vendors have joined as well. George Sortino brought fresh, handmade mozzarella and locally grown herbs to UM for the first time. ““There’’s a lot of people here,”” Sortino said. ““The key with Farmers markets is that, if there

ZOE LU // The Miami Hurricane

SWEET: Baked goods are popular items at the market.

NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

FRESH PRODUCE: Senior Emily Harkness shops for fruit during Wednesday’s Farmers Market outside the Richter Library. The market, which was started by Student Government last year, is a weekly event. This year, it will add new vendors to its standard assembly. are vendors, people come out. If people come out, you get more vendors.”” Sophomore Allison Beece noticed more vegetables and greens this time around. ““Having this is definitely a plus because it allows students to go grocery shopping without leaving campus,”” said Beece, who also noted the benefits for vegan

and kosher students. Freshman Nicolas Casaubon was on his way to the library when he stumbled upon the market. ““I’’d never really encountered a honey salesman before,”” Casaubon said. ““Students get exposed to things that are sold here.”” The situation is a win-win, said Claire Tomlin, founder of the Market Company, which gathers

NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

ZESTY: A variety of spices and herbs are sold during the weekly Farmers Market, which is located in front of the Richter Library.

all of the vendors and organizes the market’’s events. ““The setting is so beautiful and it’’s a good spot because we get a lot of foot traffic, which is really important,”” Tomlin said. ““Having that kind of support from the campus makes our job easier.”” After inviting back all of the vendors who participated under the Market Company during the

2010-2011 year, SG will be looking at anything that needs improvement. It will change and conform to shoppers’’ needs and wants, according to an SG news release. As of the end of the spring 2011 semester, the vendors are accepting credit cards. The Farmers Market will be on campus every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

CREAMY: Elihaj Dia shares his shea butter, which is extracted from a nut in African shea trees, with a UM student at the market. Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

3


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

4

Picking the rarest of roses

ZOE LU // The Miami Hurricane

MATCHMAKER: More than 200 Chinese students attended Sunday night’s dating event, “If You Are the One.” The function was hosted by the Chinese Student and Scholars Association (CSSA) and was held in the Storer Auditorium. There were six male participants and 12 female participants. The girls stayed up on stage wearing masks, while each boy walked across the stage. After he chose the girl he wanted to get to know, who was unknown to the audience until the end, female participants were unmasked. They then asked the males questions. When choices from both sides matched up, the participants won a dinner at a Chinese restaurant. 4

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

5

GRADUATE STUDIES

COURTESY MELVYS VALLEDOR

RESEARCH: Melvys Valledor (left) met with many Nobel Laureates to discuss her thesis. She spoke with Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn over breakfast in Germany.

Grad student attends 2011 Nobel Laureate Meetings Researchers meet Nobel Prize winners BY PAUL LEVY CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Nobel Laureates are the rockstars of the academic world, and one UM graduate student recently had the chance to to meet and share her ideas with the prominent group. Melvys Valledor, a microbiology and biochemistry student at the Miller School of Medicine, attended the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in Lindau, Germany over the summer. The meeting offered the distinguished young researchers in the sciences the opportunity to to hear the ideas of fellow peers and Nobel Prize winners. Each conference held is for a specific science; Valledor attended the physiology/ medicine meetings held from June 26 to July 1. The program for the meetings included presentations by the Laureates, panel discussions and smaller meetings with the Nobel winners and the students. The intellectual intimacy the meetings provide is very rare. Valledor attended a breakfast with 2009 Nobel Prize winner Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn. ““I had the opportunity to ask her all my questions and discuss all my ideas with her,”” Valledor said. ““Our conversation was stimulating and intense.”” Being selected to attend the conference is, in itself, a significant honor. Only 70-90 American students, the majority of whom are Ph.D. candidates, are invited after a process that requires nomination by various academic institutions and a review by the Lindau committee. At this year’’s meetings, 566 total students from 77 different nations attended, along with 23 Nobel Laureates. The mix

of great minds and different backgrounds provided for an enriching experience, both scientifically and culturally. ““My mind became opened to new problems and potential solutions,”” Valledor said. Raised in Cuba, Valledor studied biochemistry at the University of Havana and won an award to travel to Germany to continue her studies. She then immigrated to the U.S. and soon found herself at the University of Miami, where she became a graduate student in 2007 after working as a lab technician. Valledor’’s advisor, Dr. Richard Myers, is proud of her talents as a scientist and person. ““I have never mentored a more driven, competent and creative individual than Melvys, ”” Myers said. ““I expect her to make substantial contributions to science throughout her career.”” Valledor encourages students to become involved in research opportunities on campus. ““There is no more effective way to integrate your studies and ‘‘own’’ your education than to conduct independent inquiry to solve authentic problems,”” she said. Valledor’’s current research involves manipulating genes in human stem cells. Research in this area of molecular cell biology and biochemistry is helping put scientists closer to being able to modify genomes in order to cure genetic diseases. Her ultimate career goal is to help study and cure diseases through independent research. In addition to her research, Valledor mentors young minority science students. ““I am grateful for the opportunities I had, for the insightful conversations we had together, and for their suggestions about my research, my professional development and my life,”” Valledor said.

*Please drink and drive responsibly

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

5


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

6

CRIME REPORT

Student on house arrest after car crash Faces charge of vehicular homicide BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

University of Miami student Ivanna Villanueva, 19, was involved in a fatal car crash early Sunday morning at the intersection of LeJeune Road and Majorca Avenue. At around 4:30 a.m., Villanueva was driving south on LeJeune Road between 80 and 85 mph when she slammed into 68-year-old Eyder Ayala’’s vehicle, according to police reports. Ayala’’s trunk was pushed toward the car’’s front seats. She sustained fatal injuries, including extensive trauma to her forehead, and was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident. Villanueva was not injured. Villanueva went before a judge on Monday morning, and was charged

with vehicular homicide and driving in a reckless manner. However, she could face additional charges because, according to police reports, she said she consumed alcohol while at a club earlier that night. Her blood alcohol level was tested at the scene of the accident and the results are pending. She was released from jail on $50,000 bond and is now on house arrest. However, Villanueva is allowed to attend classes. Dean of Students Ricardo Hall would not comment on Villanueva’’s case. Her family released the following statement to the media: ““The Villanueva family is exceedingly saddened by the events of this past Sunday and Ivanna Villanueva is grief stricken over the tragic accident. Everyone in the family wishes to convey their deepest sympathies to the Ayala family at this very, very sad time.””

CRIME REPORT

Law professor attempts to purchase sexual services Previous offenses remain in question BY KYLIE BANKS SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Donald M. Jones, a UM law professor, was arrested and charged with a misdemeanor for purchasing services from a prostitute on Sept. 26. According to a Miami Herald article published on Sept. 30, Jones attempted to pay an undercover cop $20 to perform a sexual act. Jones teaches constitutional law, criminal procedure and employment discrimination at the law school. His university biography states that he has appeared in numerous TV programs on PBS, CNN and Fox, and has written for the Miami Herald and the Miami New Times. In 2005, Jones wrote a book titled ““Race, Sex, and Suspicion: The Myth of the Black Male.”” 6

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

According to an article by NBC Miami posted on Sept. 30, UM released an official statement through spokeswoman Karla Hernandez: ““The University of JONES Miami is aware of the situation concerning UM School of Law Professor Donald M. Jones. It should be noted that Professor Jones has never been convicted of any previous crime.”” According to the same article, Jones was previously charged with a misdemeanor for soliciting an undercover cop for sex in 2007. However, the charges were dismissed. During this time, he also sued the legal blog, ““Above the Law,”” for defamation after the site posted about his arrest and called him ““The Nutty Professor.””


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

7

speak

UP!

Where is the farthest place you have traveled?

NIBRAS CHOWDHURY Senior “Bangladesh.”

NEEL SHETH Sophomore “India.”

HURRICANE

Alexa Pappas, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Bank fees just don’t please As if money wasn’’t tight enough already, banks will start charging debit card users $5 per month for purchases made with their card in 2012. Bank of America is the most recent bank to make this decision and, as UM’’s on-campus bank, it affects most of us very directly. If we step back and take a look at recent trends, this new fee is not surprising. Free checking accounts are a thing of the past; according to a report relased by The Miami Herald, only 45 percent are free, which is down from 75 percent in 2009. ATM fees have also been on the rise. However, being charged for spending our money seems ridiculous. New federal regulations limit the amount banks can charge merchants when a customer uses his or her debit card. This will most likely lower Bank of America’’s revenue and the new fee is being enacted to offset this. In other words, customers are now responsible for paying for what merchants used to. Should we be saddled with this responsibility? It feels more like a punishment than anything else.

.

com

OPINION

The Miami

We do anything and everything except what we’re supposed to be doing.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Gonzalez

MANAGING EDITOR Kyli Singh

The use of debit cards will probably decrease once this fee goes into effect, with people either turning to cash, checks or credit cards to make their purchases. Credit cards present the same ease and convenience as debit cards, but may have some unfortunate consequences. If we become reliant on credit, it sure won’’t be doing our economy any favors. One would think (and hope) that Bank of America would keep us broke college students in mind when figuring out exemptions from the fee, but think again. Only certain premium accounts will be exempt; that is, accounts with more than a specific amount of money in them. These figures haven’’t been released yet, but it’’s probably safe to assume that an account filled with minimum wage paychecks from an on-campus job won’’t cut it. If you still want to use a debit card, the University Credit Union is an option with fewer fees. Changing banks may be a hassle, but $5 per month adds up. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo

ACCOUNT REP Valerie Andrade Cristian Benavides Melissa Castillo Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger

NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan OPINION EDITOR Darci Miller EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers

SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

ONLINE EDITOR Amilynn Soto ASST. NEWS EDITORS Jonathan Borge Chelsea Kimmey DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Demi Rafuls

COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz Tasha Giuda WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2011 University of Miami

Stop procrastinating, start working TINA LIGHTER Sophomore “Antarctica.”

ALEXANDER VAZQUEZ Senior “Hawaii.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

E

ve r yo ne d o e s it constantly. As much as we enjoy it, we tend to feel pretty bad about ourALEXA PAPPAS CONTRIBUTING selves after COLUMNIST the fact. Yes, I’’m talking about Facebook and Sporcle and StumbleUpon and eating and tweeting and anything else that ultimately boils down to procrastination. We do anything and everything except what we’’re supposed to be doing. Ninety-five percent of people are prone to procras-

tination, 20 percent of which are chronic procrastinators, according to Psychology Today. The etymology of ““procrastination”” directly translates to ““belonging to tomorrow,”” so your essay can totally wait until later, right? Nope! There’’s no way to cure procrastination —— it’’s a decision that you yourself have to make and stick with. Creating a to-do list and tackling the hardest task first will allow you to prioritize and stick to one assignment at a time. Taking mini-breaks (but only mini!) between each task will provide incentive to complete your tasks. Finally, don’’t overthink as-

signments. If you have reasons A, B and C for why you absolutely cannot get your essay done, you’’re not going to get anywhere. Just do it. We were all accepted to the University of Miami for a reason and finishing that seemingly endless essay during junior year probably helped us in some way. I know your Marine Science 101 essay may seem like it will never get you a job as a reporter for ESPN, but somehow, it will. So get it done, do it well and you’’ll go far. Alexa Pappas is a freshman majoring in broadcast journalism and sport administration. Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

OPINION

7


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

8

Balance is key during digital age On my f light down to Miami at the beginning of the school year, the lighthearted f light attendant instructed us to shut off all electronic devices for take off: ““Turn off your iPods, your iPads, your iPhones, your Blackberries, your i-yiPAUL LEVY CONTRIBUTING yis……”” COLUMNIST We all chuckled at his remark, but perhaps his message was meant for more than just laughs. In our modern world, we move from one screen to the next: cell phone, to iPod, to laptop, to TV. These devices promise to connect us and help us organize our lives. Ten years ago, who would’’ve imagined a future where people could connect thousands of miles away with Skype or Google+ hangouts, and stay in touch with high school friends through Facebook. But can this connectedness reach a point where it becomes detrimental? I believe that people often become too attached to the digital world, forgetting to enjoy the world around them. We all know that person who is constantly texting, checking emails, or updating Facebook on his or her iPhone. These people often feel

8

OPINION

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

distant to those around them because they are. Their minds are elsewhere, not focused on what is going on around them. Humans are social creatures and being with other people makes us happy, yet sometimes technology takes away from the time spent with others and ourselves. With so many ways for people to occupy their time, it can certainly be said that we live in a complex and wired time. Perhaps it’’s wise to step back from this brave, new world of connectivity, and examine what is useful and what is hurtful. It can be a relief to step away from all your screens for just a few minutes or maybe a few hours, and take the time to enjoy what is around you. You can go for a walk outside and do some thinking, talk with friends, read or play sports. These simple activities can teach you a lot about yourself and others, and are surprisingly enjoyable. Leading a simpler life can lead to less stress, a better understanding of yourself, and more time spent with the people and activities you enjoy most. The digital age certainly does provide us with great connections and capabilities, but, as with all things in life, balance is key. Paul Levy is a freshman majoring in physics.

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

What do you think about Ludacris as our Homecoming concert act? VOTE ON OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

9

Feeling cultural?

Check out the Italian Film Festival at Regal South Beach Cinema 18. The series runs through Monday. For more information, visit cinemaitaly.com.

T

here aren’’t many late night options open as late as Flanigan’’s. There are more than 20 locations in the South Florida area, but you can do no wrong with the restaurant in Coconut Grove. Flanigan’’s offers a great happy hour t h a t includes half-off drinks and the option to pair up pitchers of beer with different appetizers for free. Here’’s a tip -- you can’’t go wrong with Wing Wednesdays.

FLANIGAN’S

edge

I

RA SUSHI f you’’re a sushi lover, this is the place Monday-Saturday: 3 to go. Ra’’s happy p.m.-7 p.m. hour menu offers a Sunday: variety of sushi 8 p.m.-close dishes and appetizers, as well as different drink options. Everything runs between $2 and $7. Among the more popular drinks is the 22-ounce Kirin with sake (sake bomb) for $7. Happy hour runs all week for those who need a midday break, but the best time to go is Sunday night. With a live DJ, ample seating both inside and out, and proximity to campus, it’’s worth checking out.

Monday-Friday: 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Weekends: 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

2721 Bird Ave., Coconut Grove

5829 SW 73rd St., Miami

*

TOP

HAPPY HOURS

BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

CHILI’S

C

hili’’s happy hour is one of the best-kept secrets near campus. Two-forone deals on everything except specialty drinks, every day from open to close means you won’’t have to spend a lot of money to have a good time. With two locations close to campus and relatively inexpensive prices, Chili’’s is a good spot to either start or end the night.

Sunday-Wednesday: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Thursday: 11 a.m.-11 p.m Friday and Saturday: 11 a.m.-midnight

After a long week of class, work, projects and anything else college life might throw at you, sometimes it’s important to just hang out with some close friends and knock a few drinks back. But with so many options available near campus, it might not always be easy choosing a place to indulge without breaking the bank. Here, we have compiled a few of the best options close to campus. PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO, DESIGN BY ALLISON GOODMAN AND MARIAH PRICE

3015 Grand Ave., Coconut Grove

T

hough Mr. Moe’’s is alMR. MOE’S ready a popular spot Monday-Friday: for Thursday night 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Grove outings, what many people don’’t realize is that it also has one of the longest running happy hours around. From Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Moe’’s has plenty of beer specials and specialty shots for decent prices. Before it gets packed for College Night, it’’s a nice spot to sit back and relax after a long day. 3131 Commodore Plaza, Coconut Grove

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

10

LOWE ART MUSEUM

Collectors donate religious pieces for new display BY ERIKA GLASS CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

The Lowe Art Museum will unveil a year-long display called ““Saintly Blessings: A Gift of Mexican Retablos”” starting Saturday, after receiving a gift from prominent

COURTESY LOWE ART MUSEUM

ART: “El Divino Rostro,” was among 28 of the total artworks donated.

10

EDGE

art collectors Joseph and Janet Shein. The couple graciously donated 28 retablos, inspiring the new exhibit. Retablos are small religious scenes depicted on metal. Often used in the Mexican culture as a symbol of worship and prayer, the retablos will be featured in the Lowe’’s Matus Focus Gallery. ““We wanted to say thank you [to our donors] and show the community our new holdings,”” said Denise Gerson, associate director of the museum. For believers, retablos are more than just images; they represent a saint’’s spirit, which can be invoked through devotion and prayer. Although sometimes placed in churches or other places of worship, retablos typically make their way into living rooms across Mexico. They often represent a family’’s favorite saint or image and are venerated on a daily basis. Retablos have been recognized as a true art form and are in demand worldwide. The 28 retablos are displayed in a small hallway reminiscent of a traditional Mexican home. Some of the pieces carry a frame also painted by the artist, while others just stand alone, letting the colors, and

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

the saints they represent speak for themselves. Just in time for Hispanic Heritage Month, the opening of the retablos exhibit offers the opportunity to learn about a Hispanic culture. ““One thing that’’s really exciting about retablos is that [the artists] use everyday objects to make a wonderful work of art; anyone could make a Retablo,”” said Michelle Maldonado, professor of religious studies at UM. ““They are not ‘‘high art’’ in the way we think of it. They tell a story of faith and culture very explicitly. Each retablo has a story behind it that is visual narrative and not a written one.””

IF YOU GO WHAT:“Saintly Blessings: A Gift of Mexican Retablos” WHERE: Matus Focus Gallery at the Lowe Art Museum WHEN: Opens Saturday and will run for one year

COURTESY LOWE ART MUSEUM

RELIGION: “El Divino Rostro,” titled the same as the painting on the left, is also from the 19th century.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

11

SPORTS

2

the number of former Hurricanes currently in the MLB playoffs (John Jay of the St. Louis Cardinals and Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers)

He’s a wild horse and we’ve got to get him saddled.

- AL GOLDEN, on the return of safety Ray-Ray Armstrong

FOOTBALL

Trip to Blacksburg starts tough ACC road Playmaker Ray-Ray Armstrong to make return at safety BY AUSTEN GREGERSON SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

As Miami travels to Blacksburg this Saturday to take on No. 21 Virginia Tech, the Canes will be playing the team responsible for ending their conference title dreams in 2010. Miami gave up 31 points last season in a home loss to the Hokies, killing their shot at the ACC Coastal Division title. This game begins what head coach Al Golden is calling the ““ACC tournament.”” If their early season performances are any indicators, a role reversal for these two teams is hard to imagine. But luckily for the Canes, one key mid-season addition will make a turnaround possible. With his four-game suspension now complete, safety Ray-Ray Armstrong has been reinstated and should be

ready. ““Ray-Ray’’s kind of a bucking bronco,”” Golden said. ““He’’s a wild horse and we’’ve got to get him saddled. But what I don’’t want to do is saddle his passion, his energy for the game, his willingness to be tough and play reckless, but we’’ve got to marry that with the technique. You want to harness that, but you never want to suppress it.”” Golden plans on utilizing both Armstrong and Vaughn Telemaque at the free safety position, letting Armstrong play for roughly 20 snaps in his season debut. ““It’’s tough for him and it’’s tough for us,”” Golden said. ““All the coaching points that you’’ve made for five weeks, he’’s seeing it for the first time. It doesn’’t matter how good you are or how talented you are, it’’s a matter of practicing it and seeing it for yourself.”” O f fe n sively, Virginia Tech offers a nearly perfect balance of production on the ground and through the air. The Hokies have rushed for 990 yards and passed for 999 on the season with a combination of both pro-set and spread-option formations, the latter of which consistently gashed the Miami defense in the previous two matchups. Junior David Wilson is the team’’s leader in all-purpose yards, and his speed at both running back and kick returner allows head coach Frank Beamer to utilize him in many ways, much like Golden does with Lamar Miller. ““We’’ve just got to stay in our gaps and execute; I think that’’s been our problem the last couple of weeks,”” said Adewale Ojomo, who was moved to defensive tackle this week and is listed as a co-starter with Marcus Forston. ““Just not executing and staying in our gaps, those are fundamentals of the game. It’’s lack of discipline more than anything.”” Ojomo’’s move to the interior of the defensive line lets freshman Anthony Chickillo and senior Marcus Robinson cement their positions at the ends,

but Ojomo’’s lack of size –– or ““girth,”” in Golden’’s words –– is concerning. Listed at 265 pounds, his unique combination of strength and agility at the position will have to compensate for the weight differential. ““My thing is more of a mentality more than anything, I think I’’ve got the edge on quickness and speed,”” Ojomo said. ““The fastest way to the quarterback is a straight line and I’’m right there going against slower guards, so it’’s much easier for me to beat them.”” After playing brief ly in last week’’s game against Bethune-Cookman, Seantrel Henderson will make his debut likely starting at right offensive tackle. Until last week, Henderson missed all live action dating back to summer training camp, spending most of his time maintaining his weight on a stationary bike while recovering from off-season back surgery. During a workout back in April, Henderson said he felt his leg ““go dead,”” on his last rep of squats. ““I didn’’t know exactly what it was; I thought I pulled a hip muscle or something like that,”” Henderson said. ““I didn’’t get an MRI until the day before we had our last spring game.”” The addition of both Henderson and Armstrong will surely help remedy some ills on their respective sides of the ball. However, while Henderson has the ability to help control Virginia Tech’’s pass rush and open running lanes for Miller, attempting to continue his 100-yard rushing streak against a defense which has yet to allow a player to reach that mark this season, the play of the offensive line has not been an issue thus far for the Canes. For Armstrong, his contribution may be less tangible while he splits time at safety with Telemaque. What he brings in talent and energy will be only in sporadic bursts, yet must somehow mask the f laws of a defensive unit still in f lux. All of this, it must be noted, will be done in front of 66,233 Hokie faithfuls. ““You have to control the variables you can control,”” Golden said. ““You can’’t control the noise, but you can control your shifts and motions and checks. We’’re going to find out how mentally tough we are. We’’re going to find out whether we’’re unified or not.””

CATCH THE GAME WHAT: Miami @ Virginia Tech WHEN: Saturday, 3:30 p.m. WATCH: On ESPN/ABC LISTEN: Radio coverage at 560 WQAM

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

11


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

12

Student interest in boxing club still needed to revive sport BOXING FROM PAGE 1

SAGETTE VAN EMBDEN // The Miami Hurricane

PERFECT FORM: Dario Arana, a Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club member, does pushups and planks during a Tuesday afternoon class.

Demos Sr. was arguably the most successful boxer to ever fight for Miami. He competed twice in the NCAA championships and advanced to the title round during his senior year. Demos Jr., an alumnus of UM’’s law school, is no stranger to the ring, having had an incredible amateur boxing career that included a run of seven State of Florida titles. He talks about his father’’s days as a UM boxer with great pride. His ultimate goal, and hope, is to bring the sport of boxing back to UM in the form of a club. The idea to do that came via a random inquiry from a member of Demos Jr.’’s amateur boxing class. That member happened to be Aaron Ciarla, an assistant swim coach at UM. Students who know Ciarla got word of the fact that the first-year coach had started taking weekly boxing lessons and interest to start a club was sparked. ““I came to him and said, ‘‘I hear chatter around campus …… if there is student interest, do you guys have the time to [help form a club] and the interest to do it?’’”” Ciarla said. ““I didn’’t even know about the history with his dad.”” Demos Jr. agreed with the encouragement of UM alumnus Thomas Tew, who is a friend of his and a member of his boxing class who was instrumental in the founding of the Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club. Now the man who holds one of the last connections to a lost UM tradition seems genuinely excited about the prospect of bringing boxing back to the U. Still, a step is missing. ““The clubs at the university have to be student-driven,”” Demos Jr. said. ““If the students want it …… we can help them. If the

INTERESTED IN A POTENTIAL UM BOXING CLUB? WHAT: Biscayne Boxing and Fitness Club WHERE: 7200 Biscayne Blvd. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 305-754-5130 or visit biscayneboxing.com. students want it, we will help them do it.”” The club would be part of the National Collegiate Boxing Association, a non-profit organization that oversees college boxing now that the NCAA no longer sanctions it as a sport. Ciarla has pledged to be the faculty advisor for the club if it materializes. As of now the interest is there, but not entirely organized. Nevertheless, he seems optimistic that the boxing club will come together at some point. ““I had zero boxing experience,”” Ciarla said of his first days taking lessons at Biscayne Boxing. ““Mickey’’s teaching style is so good, the learning curve is quite fast with him …… he’’s not just some guy off the street that’’s teaching people how to throw punches. He’’s teaching technique.”” Until the club forms, Demos Jr. has promised to give student discounts to those who want to take lessons at Biscayne Boxing. He hopes to breed a new generation of Canes that are as capable as his father’’s teams were in the ring back in the day. ““When Miami came to town, people were scared,”” Demos Jr. said. ““They knew they were well-trained.””

SAGETTE VAN EMBDEN // The Miami Hurricane

FIERCE STARE: Therese Bjornaas, a 24-year-old student at Barry University, trains at the Biscayne club as she works toward her ultimate goal of making the 2012 Olympics. 12

SPORTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

13

MATCHUPS

Hurricanes travel to Blacksburg

Senior sports writer David Furones foresees that the 4-1 Hokies have an edge over the 2-2 Hurricanes. His prediction: Virginia Tech 31, Miami 20.

READ DAVID FURONES’ DETAILED MATCHUP ANALYSIS AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM. GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

13


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

14

Thursday, October 6th •• 7:00 p.m. the Rathskeller Think you have what it takes to be crowned Trivia champion? Come out and enjoy an evening full of fun with RAB’’s first Pub Trivia of the year! Winners will recieve Rat gift cards! For more information, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, Oct. 6 Patio Jams featuring John Payan and the Politix 12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch and enjoy the sounds of John Payan and the Politix. For more information, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305284-4606.

TOPPEL Presents: Effective Resume and Cover Letter Writing 3:00 p.m. •• Toppel Library A high-quality resume can effectively sell your skills to any organization! This program will teach you what essential components to include, how to format your resume and how to create outstanding accomplishment statements. In addition, learn about writing a cover letter that complements your resume.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Opening Ceremonies 5:00 p.m. •• UC Patio Come out and enjoy performances, games and food at this year’’s HHM’’s Opening Ceremonies. To RSVP or

for more information, contact MSA at 305-284-2855 or email us at multicultural.studentaffairs@miami.edu.

Miami Ballroom’s Rumba and Tango Lesson 6:00 p.m. •• UC Ballrooms Want your sexy back? Well, come join Miami Ballroom for our second lesson of the sexy Rumba and the sultry Tango! Miami Ballroom is the Latin and Ballroom Dance Club and we offer beginner and advanced dance lessons for students, faculty, alumni and members of the UM community. Come join us and enjoy a fun night of dancing! For more information and upcoming events, please visit miamiballroom. webs.com.

LoweDown Happy Hour: Moroccan Magic! 7:00 p.m. •• Lowe Art Museum It’’s time for another LoweDown Happy Hour! So come out and mix and mingle with savory Mediterranean munchies, and drinks and a tour of the student curated exhibition, Women, Windows, and the Word: Diverging Perspectives on Islamic Art by Dr. Karen R. Mathews. $10 Admission; free for Lowe Members. For general museum information, please call 305-284-3535

and our receptionist will be happy to assist you.

Friday, Oct. 7 TOPPEL Presents: Accounting Career Fair 12:00 p.m. •• BUC Multipurpose Room Don’’t miss your opportunity to learn more about a specic company or industry. Frequently, company representatives at Expos are also the individuals conducting on-campus interviews. Students who have met their interviewers at a fair and perhaps, also at a company presentation, enter the screening interview armed with enhanced self-condence: They have a larger accumulation of company knowledge and greater ease with employers, with whom they have met on one or two prior occasions. The purpose of a career fair is for students and employers to meet and exchange information. Don’’t hesitate in your approach! Take the initiative and introduce yourself. However, recognize that, as in any new situation, rst impressions begin with the moment you approach an employer. Make that moment count!

Saturday, Oct. 8 RAB Tailgate Watch Party 3:30 p.m. •• The Rathskeller Support your Canes as they go on the road to face Virginia Tech! Free food and specials will be available! For more information please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

CAC Presents: The Hangover Part 2 10:00 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema In The Hangover Part II, Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms), Alan (Zach Galianakis) and Doug (Justin Bartha) travel to exotic Thailand for Stu’’s wedding. After the unforgettable bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu is taking no chances and has opted for a safe, subdued pre-wedding brunch. However, things don’’t always go as planned. What happens in Vegas may stay in Vegas, but what happens in Bangkok can’’t even be imagined! For more information please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Sunday, Oct. 9 CAC Presents: The Hangover Part 2 8:00 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

United States Marine Band

Monday, October 10th ••10:00 p.m. Cosford Cinema Come catch this special sneak preview of the musical documentary Pearl Jam 20! This movie chronicles the years leading up to the band’’s formation, the chaos that ensued soon-after their rise to megastardom, their step back from center stage, and the creation of a trusted circle that would surround them —— giving way to a work culture that would sustain them. The lm is carved from over 1,200 hours of rarely-seen and never-before seen footage spanning the band’’s career. For more information, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Friday, October 14th •• 7:30 p.m. BankUnited Center Established in 1978, ““The President’’s Own”” United States Marine Band performs a thrilling blend of traditional concert band and contemporary wind ensemble music at hundreds of events annually for the President of the United States and the commandant of the Marine Corps. They also tour in the fall, a tradition started in 1891 by the legendary 17th director John Philip Sousa. Free student tickets (two per Cane Card) are available at the UC Info Desk!

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

Next week...

CAC Presents : Pearl Jam 20

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 14

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

RAB Pub Trivia


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

15

dear ...

Dear V: I’ve become a mad woman... , I got out of a long (and turbulent) relationship about a year ago. Up to that point, I’’d always been faithful and very selective with my sexual partners. In this last year, as a single lady, my number of partners has nearly tripled - I’’m literally incapable of having a relationship. Either I cheat, or I grow tired of them right away, or I don’’t date them at all and have to deal with clingy one-night stands. Am I being too selective or are there just slim pickings in Miami lately? My close friends say I’’ve developed a Don Draper complex and gotten a taste for man-eating. Help! Stuck in the Middle Dear President Kennedy, I actually had to look up who Don Draper was, but from the sounds of it, you fit the bill pretty well

(and also from the sounds of it, your friends like pretentious TV shows). That being said, it’’s okay to go through the phase of not wanting to be tied down to a single lover. I think we all go through that phase at some point, and while I don’’t condone cheating, I can understand wanting something a little more adventurous. Before you ask me for help, you should probably try to help yourself. Why are you incapable of dating? One reason is that you consistently cheat on your partner. Who the hell would want somebody who finds it thrilling to sneak into others’’ beds? The person who enjoys that might also enjoy making charitable donations to the IRS or encouraging stray cats to breed. Your excuse is just like anyone else’’s –– ““they’’re boring, they don’’t excite me.”” Stop dating men who have the personality of a tortoise. There are over five and a half million people in Miami, if you can’’t find someone from that scene, the city isn’’t the problem. It’’s not the man’’s job to excite you,

it’’s a responsibility both of you have in a relationship, and if he isn’’t exciting you, maybe it’’s because you’’re not giving him any incentive to. As far as your clingy one-night stands, you’’re going to get some clingers because they don’’t realize that you were just in it for a cheap thrill. It sounds to me like you don’’t enjoy the purgatory you’’re in, which is that of somebody who isn’’t ready for a commitment, but doesn’’t want the crazy life of a wild bachelorette. I would try to find somebody you can have a little fun with, but also have a good conversation with. It’’s a good medium between commitment and nightly orgies. Now I think I’’ll go listen to some Hall & Oates, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane. com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

ARE YOU A BLOGAHOLIC? TAKE YOUR TALENTS TO THE NEXT LEVEL AT THE MIAMI HURRICANE. For more information, contact managing@ themiamihurricane.com. Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

15


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

16

16

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Oct. 6 - Oct. 9, 2011

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK


The Miami Hurricane -- October 6, 2011