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The Miami

Vol. 87, Issue 11 | Oct. 1 - Oct. 4, 2009

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

Somebody’s watching you

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

TELL ME WHO’S WATCHING: From this single touch-screen monitor in his office, Chief of Police David Rivero can access all the cameras on campus.

Over 200 cameras monitor campus BY STEPHANIE GENUARDI | STAFF NEWS WRITER

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emember last year’s slaying of the University of Miami’s beloved campus crocodile? A police camera mounted on the Flipse Building captured the license plate number of the getaway car, which eventually led to an arrest. Earlier this semester, another police camera near the Ring Theater spotted two men trying to hotwire a motorcycle. Though the suspects got away, their pictures were quickly sent to officers around campus. This helped clear a student who police had stopped at gunpoint because he was wearing clothing similar to the suspects. The University of Miami Police Department is currently monitoring more than 200 closed-circuit

cameras across campus. The cameras have helped solve 14 crimes in the past six months, said Chief of Police David Rivero. “It’s amazing how many cases they help us with,” Rivero said. With only 25 officers to patrol the 230-acre campus, the cameras serve as a “force multiplier.” They enable officers to patrol two or more areas at one time. Rivero explained how an officer can sit in the Mahoney-Pearson parking lot patrolling the region while simultaneously monitoring the parking lot outside Mark Light Field on his or her laptop where the feed from the camera streams on a server. Junior India Stanton was surprised to find that UM has so many cameras on campus.

ALL HYPE? NEW MUSIC AGGREGATOR THE HYPE MACHINE GAINS FANS, ACCLAIM PAGE 14

ETIQUETTE RULES SIMPLE TIPS FOR CLUB RIGHTER AND GOOD BEHAVIOR PAGE 10

The Candy Man MARCUS ROBINSON ACHIEVES NIRVANA FROM CHOCOLATE PAGE 18

SEE CAMERAS, PAGE 4 October 1 - October 3, 2009

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UM graduate student donates laptops to Senegalese children

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com Lauren Whiddon captured the University of Miami’s future stars at the talent show held in the University Center. Check out the video online! A substance-free floor in Stanford went to the Cheesecake Factory for faux martinis. Read the article by Laura Coso. Also check out the photo slideshow by Tanya Thompson of the event. The School of Education received an endowment chair. Look for the article online written by Lindsay Oliver.

COURTESY STEPHANIE SELVICK

POWER UP: Students from Ecole Notre Dame, an elementary school in Senegal, utilize laptops donated through the One Laptop Per Child program. Selvick and Burnett spent the summer teaching students and teachers how to use the machines.

Selvick and Burnett both hope their help will leave a mark BY ARIEL S. BROWN CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Looking through Facebook statuses, Stephanie Selvick, a University of Miami graduate student, saw an update that changed her summer. One of her friends from her master’s programs had put a link to One Laptop per Child, an organization that oversees the creation of affordable computers for developing countries, up on her profile. With nine days left to register, Selvick decided to pursue this opportunity. “I was like, this is really going to screw up everything that I planned for my summer, but this looks kind of interesting,” she said. OLPC responded by giving her a $10,000 grant. With the funds, she and teammate Justin Burnett, a senior at the University of Minnesota, brought 200 laptops to École Notre Dame, a elementary 2

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school in Mboro, Senegal. Over the course of six weeks, they taught the children and adults there to operate these machines. “From the first day we got there, the kids wanted to be our friends,” Burnett said. “Before we even started working, one group of girls had already invited us to go to the beach with them for the day.” The students were generally Catholic or Muslim. They came from various economic backgrounds, but shared a desire to learn. “All of the kids were enthusiastic and motivated from the start,” Burnett said. “They were able to pick up most basic skills quickly and impressively well. As I saw the kids begin to work the computers, I realized that this won’t just improve the way subjects are taught or learned, but it will get kids excited about doing it.” The laptops were a variety of neon colors such as green and pink and featured French and English programming games and educational software that the teachers could incorporate into their curriculum. Despite a language barrier, Selvick and her team were able to teach entire classes. “Really, you only need to teach one student how to do something,” Selvick said. October 1 - October 4, 2009

“So, if you can get one student that speaks a little bit of English you’re like this is how you do it and then they’ll teach everyone else, within a minute.” The students, who were in first through fifth grade, even learned how to make videos on the laptops and went around town to conduct interviews and film the townspeople. Selvick said the community and especially the mayor, whose wife taught at the school, were excited about the laptops. Still, Selvick says she does not know how the computers will affect Mboro over time because education is not a cultural focus in western Africa. “Education really isn’t their primary [concern],” Selvick said. “It was something that was kind of a culture shock for me.” For Burnett, the project shed light on the realities of international aid. “This project did give me a new look at how foreign aid works,” Burnett said. “We saw a lot of half-finished or abandoned projects and we don’t want that to be this one.” Ariel S. Brown may be contacted at abrown@ themiamihurricane.com.

Free beer at the Rat? Only for law students! Alicia Abalo covers the weekly ritual. Kelly Killian examines the traditions surrounding Ramadan in her article. Pay tribute to bomb squad legend Thomas Brodie with Nina Ruggiero in her article.

CORRECTIONS: Last issue we mistakenly said that fat spot reduction is possible in a headline, but it is impossible. Jews and Muslims (JAM) was indicated as a religious club. In reality, it is an unaffiliated, unofficial club.


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The University of Miami’s distribution of gender remains uneven across the different schools on campus. However, the gender breakdown amongst all undergraduates is almost equal. For the past five years, the College of Engineering’s undergraduates were 70 percent male, while the School of Communication and School of Nursing and Health Studies had over 60 percent and 90 percent females, respectively. Even within the School of Communication, men are the majority in the motion picture major, while women dominate broadcast journalism, advertising and public relations. According to School of Communication Dean Sam Grogg, this reflects a national trend. “The advertising and especially public relations professions traditionally attract more female students than male. The motion picture profession—on the production side—has traditionally been male dominated.” “On the executive side, there is an increasing number of females,” he continued to say. David T. Poole, director of admissions at the College of Engineering, expressed similar remarks. “People’s perceptions become realities,” he said about students self-stereotyping themselves into a field. Nationally, about 82 percent of students in an engineering program are male. UM was ranked 10th in the nation for the highest percentage of female students in engineering programs, according to Poole. “Only in the past 20 to 30 years have women entered the workforce en masse,” Poole said. That said, he does note that the number of women in the College of Engineering is growing, citing a rising awareness of new job opportunities in construction and thinking in academic and professional circles. “Look at how 9/11 altered ideas on building construction, or the green movement, and the importance for engineering systems to advance us to the next level. Engineers are needed to solve these problems.” Similar remarks came from Grogg about the equalizing trend in the School of Communication. “I think the change is primarily due to the increasing reality that the communication-related professions are expanding. These related areas are important to all aspects of human endeavor and students, male and female, want to engage with communication media to change the world for the better.” In the classrooms, however, students note little difference in experience based on gender distribution. “I don’t mind it. I’m used to it,” Shely Benaim, the only female in the 2010 electrical engineering class, said. Student Government Senator for the College of Engineering Omar de Leom, a senior, remarked that engineering majors “cherish” their handful of electives outside their major.

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BY MASON POWELL STAFF NEWS WRITER

Gender Distribution among schools

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Seventy percent of the undergraduates in the College of Engineering are male

GRAPH BY FELIPE LOBON

Students strut their stuff in the UC EXHIBITIONISM: Junior Eric Hurley browses the artwork displayed at the UM Talent Network Showcase Wednesday night in the UC. The event was organized by Hurricane Productions and featured an art gallery and a concert. Headed by Kemy Joseph, the showcase sought submissions from artistically inclined students who wanted to show off their abilities.

Mason Powell may be contacted at mpowell@themiamihurricane. com.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

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CAMERAS FROM PAGE 1 “I don’t even see them,” Stanton said. “I’m fine with them as long as they’re not in my room. If there was a situation where a crime happened, I’d rather them have surveillance.” The current camera system has not always been so extensive or effective. “When I started three years ago, I realized we were having crimes with cameras all around, but we weren’t capturing anything,” Rivero said . “The system was dysfunctional.” A year and a half ago, Rivero began the process of revamping the camera system by analyzing a crime map and installing new cameras in high-risk areas, as well as replacing old cameras with high-definition cameras. An additional objective of the overhaul was to integrate all cameras on campus, as most academic buildings at the time operated their own private camera systems. Now all new buildings must have their cameras approved by UMPD. “It was a costly project,” said Rivero of the two-million-dollar overall price. However, he believes the system was worth every penny. “Ours is better than the Heat’s,” said Rivero of the American Airlines Arena’s camera system in downtown Miami. Rivero believes that the “On SSI” software is the element that sets UM apart. “We bought the best. We’re the leading edge,” he said. The software enables an officer to set parameters for the camera lens. If any movement is detected within those parameters, the police are notified. “Chief Rivero has selected the newest and greatest in video systems for the Gables campus. Absolutely amazing stuff and very functional,” said Tony Artip, the executive director of public safety at UM’s Miller School of Medicine. Rivero modeled his camera revamp after the med school’s advanced 500-camera system. Actively monitoring more than 200 cameras proves impractical for most officers who must patrol campus, respond to dispatch calls, track equipment and file reports. The cameras are primarily used as a means of catching criminals after they commit the crime. Rivero, however, wants to change that. He’s planning a $200,000 UMPD station expansion that he hopes will be underway within the year. With the additional space, he intends on installing a control room of camera monitors. “[It would be] like in the casinos,” he said. Rivero would pay students $10 an hour to watch the cameras in an effort to spot suspicious activity and alert officers before crimes happen. “I want to catch them in the act,” Rive4

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BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

I ALWAYS FEEL LIKE...: Chief of Police David Rivero explains how the surveillance system works at the University of Miami Police Department (UMPD) police station office last Thursday. With over 200 cameras all around the Coral Gables campus, Rivero can zoom in on a location and even track moving targets with those cameras. ro said. “I’d rather not have any crimes than catch a bad guy. We’re all about preventing them [criminals] from coming here.” The cameras have already caught numerous perpetrators. For instance, Rivero explained that when a laptop was reported stolen in the law school courtyard, the cameras revealed a worker placing trash from the tables, as well as a lap top, into the trash can she was pushing. “A lot of them are very well hidden, such as the one in the Wellness Center,” Rivero said. Approximately 50 percent of the cameras are visible, and 50 percent are hidden. The thought of being taped without one’s knowledge is often disconcerting to those who value their privacy. “That’s the negative; everyone thinks Big Brother’s watching,” he said, “We watch areas that are public, not bathrooms, not dorms, areas where you yourself could take out a camera.” “We want to record hot spots, where there are a lot of people. It wouldn’t pay [off for] me to put cameras where things aren’t

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happening,” he continued to say. In this “world of technology,” Rivero estimates the average person is photographed or taped at least six times a day, be it walking into Publix or driving through a toll booth. “I think our generation needs to be very wary about losing too much in terms of privacy in the name of advancements in modern technology,” Chris Noel, a senior, said . Artrip, the director of security at the med school campus, said cameras offer

many benefits. “To the criminals, I say big brother is watching,” Artrip said . “To the good students, staff and visitors, I say UM police are watching video in an attempt to detect and deter crime before it happens. “My daughter attends the school, and I’m thrilled that the university uses video surveillance to help protect her,” Artrip said. Stephanie Genuardi may be contacted at sgenuardi@themiamihurrcane.com.

CAMERAS are not the only tools UMPD utilizes to fight crime. They’ve installed a tag reader at the Stanford Drive entrance of campus that scans the license plates of every car entering campus. The device alerts police if the car is stolen or has been involved in a crime. UMPD can also add the tags of cars they do not want driving onto campus into the software. They hope to install additional tag readers at every entrance on campus in the future.


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Web site grades campus sustainability University’s score mediocre, students above average BY ALEXANDRA ROLAND CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The University of Miami made strides to “go green” within the past few years: launching Green U in 2005, introducing green initiatives such as UPrint and the Zipcar car sharing program and creating a new “sustainability coordinator” position last fall. However, according a report that compares the efforts of universities across the nation, these endeavors are a notch above mediocre. Greenreportcard.org, a Web site profiling the sustainability of North American

universities, issued a “College Sustainability Report Card” at the beginning of this year. The University of Miami scored a C+. A study of the breakdown shows better news. In the student participation subcategory, UM scored a B, almost a full-lettergrade higher than the average college institution. According to the Web site, the levels of sustainability promotion in areas such as student organizations, campus competitions, and orientation programs all contribute to the student involvement score. A large majority of the universities surveyed have at least one student organization on campus dedicated to promoting sustainability and environmental awareness. Sustainable U, Greenpeace UM and Earth Alert cover sustainability on UM’s campus. According to Earth Alert’s CoVice President Rajiv McCoy, a senior, the student club boasts hundreds of prospects on its list serve but only about 30 commit-

ted and involved members. “The number has definitely been growing in recent years as issues like climate change have put environmentalism back in the news,” he said. With the potential for increased student interest, the focus is now channeled into actual participation. The report further indicates that approximately two in five schools have established a sustainable residence. The University of Miami had a sustainable residence called “Living the Green Life.” It was a special interest floor in Mahoney Residential College, but it only lasted one year. This floor had about nine members during the 2008-2009 school year, according to Artie Jamison, the residence coordinator of Mahoney. This group was committed to living sustainably and reducing their carbon footprint. Jamison noted that the group was well-received and successful but on a small scale.

“They did not have enough students interested in maintaining it,” she said. When the group applied for renewal for the 2009-2010 school year, its application was denied. According to Emily Vaughan, a program coordinator in the Office of Academic Enhancement, “Living the Green Life” failed to secure the initial required quota of 16 interested members. John Van Leer, associate professor of meteorology and physical oceanography at UM, and former faculty adviser to the “Living the Green Life” special interest housing group, hopes that the passion for sustainability originally fostered by the students will soon be rekindled. “Unfortunately, as passive consumers of information, most students do not tend to mobilize into action,” he said. Alexandra Roland may be contacted at aroland@themiamihurricane.com.

VISIT WWW.THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM TO READ EXCLUSIVE ONLINE FEATURES!

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Sushi Maki brings Toppel offers career fishy flair to food court interest assessment Test helps students discover majors BY RACHAEL KAMINSKI CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

GRAB YOUR CHOPSTICKS: Senior Erica McGill buys lunch at the new Sushi Maki located in the University Center Food Court. Sushi Maki replaced Olo Sushi.

New stand replaces Olo Sushi BY NICOLE ADLMAN CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

In the northeast corner of the Hurricane Food Court sits Sushi Maki, the newest innovation of the university’s restaurant services. Introduced this fall as a replacement for Olo Sushi, the previous establishment for the past four years, Maki has students grabbing for chopsticks in bundles with its variety of Japanese dishes and high quality food. “Honestly, I had fish from [Olo] last year and it almost turned me off sushi,” Sophomore Jillie Staffiera said. “The taste and quality that Maki offers is noticeably better. I’m in love again.” Sushi Maki is at the forefront of sushi restaurants and seafood providers in South Florida; other locations include Miami International Airport and the prepared foods section of Whole Foods Market. Dining services at UM came across Sushi Maki through student and faculty feedback on preferred restaurants and food. The survey feedback also included praise and complaints of the current selection of on-campus eateries. Upon entering the food court, Maki may not seem very different from the previous enterprise, as it is in the same exact spot and offers some of the same food. But a closer look shows bright colors that adorn hanging signs calling out to UM’s sushi fa6

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natics. The décor is sprinkled with images of sushi, tea, and other Japanese embellishments. There are various sushi selections to pick from in the open fridge area, and more rolls can be made fresh upon request. Lowell Resurreccion, a sous chef who has worked at Sushi Maki for four months, said that the variety of options is what makes people crave sushi. “We have tuna, crab, eel, salmon, and shrimp all delivered fresh daily,” he said. There are vegetable rolls as well as the traditional fish variety, and many side choices: edamame, steamed pork dumplings, miso tofu soup and tapioca Bubble Tea. The Dragon Roll and Rainbow Roll are two of the most popular choices at Maki; they are priced at $9.50, but most options on the menu are well under that price. Maki’s dedication to providing healthy options, affordable prices, and above all, tasty food has made it an immediate hit with students. “I like their sushi and the Bubble Tea is so refreshing. I’m really into the green tea,” Samantha Lin, a freshman, said. The positive feedback is a relief to Mel Tenen, assistant vice president for Auxiliary Services. “Profits have increased 40 percent since last year,” he said. For more on Sushi Maki and other South Florida locations, visit: http://www. sushimakirestaurants.com. Nicole Adlman may be contacted at nadlman@ themiamihurricane.com.

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In their first or second year at University of Miami, most students face the difficult decision of deciding on a major. However, the Toppel Career Center’s Strong Interest Inventory Assessment can help, ranking students’ interests based on their answers to a series of questions. The assessment, which takes anywhere from 25 to 45 minutes to complete and costs $10, aims to demonstrate students’ interest areas, not their abilities or skills. Based on the student’s responses to whether they like or dislike numerous different occupations, subject areas, activities and types of people, the results recommend five different professions and interest areas. “The interests [in the assessment’s results] don’t always match what [students] think their interests are,” said Frits Bigham, assistant director for career development. “The ‘Strong’ can be an awakening for students [who never considered a major in a certain field].” Roughly 100 people took the assessment last year, but with 500 un-

declared freshmen at UM, many more could benefit from it. “A big part of the test was honesty with myself. If I wasn’t being honest then I wouldn’t get the most accurate result,” said Emily Wingrove, a junior who took the assessment her sophomore year. “The test proved to be actually very accurate and I chose my majors [English and broadcast journalism] within a few months.” The assessment isn’t only open to undeclared students. Since it can suggest vocations for those who have a major or a degree, it can also be valuable for upperclassmen, alumni and graduate students. Senior Rio Dienn took the assessment last year because she had no idea what she wanted to do after she graduated. After taking the assessment at Toppel, students are required to schedule an appointment to meet with an advisor and discuss the results. At this meeting, a student’s results will be analyzed and then the student will be able to take the results and ref lect on them. “Don’t fret, you can still come in and meet with a career advisor or take an assessment,” Bigham said. “There’s a big population of undeclared students and that’s okay.” Rachael Kaminski may be contacted at rkaminski@themiamihurricane.com.

RACHAEL KAMINSKI // The Miami Hurricane

MATCHMAKER: Alicia Rodriguez, Associate Director of Career Development, meets with sophomore Priyanka Surio to discuss the results of her Strong Interest Inventory Assessment at Toppel’s Career Technology Lab.


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Admissions remain strong for this year Despite tough economic climate, students still attend BY IKU KAWACHI CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The impact of the economic recession can be felt everywhere, from the aggressive incentives offered by car dealerships to the once-employed workers that scour newspapers for job offers. It might be comforting to know, then, that its impact on enrollment at the University of Miami for 2009-2010 has been substantially milder. Early indicators suggest that the incoming freshman class for this academic year is much like that of previous years in both size and composition, with slight rises in the number of international students as well as total enrolling freshmen. “The good news is, we had more applications this year than we had last year,” said Paul Orehovec, vice president of enrollment management and continuing education. “A couple handfuls more.”

Orehovec, whose division oversees UM’s admission and recruitment-related offices, said the university had met and even slightly exceeded its goal of recruiting 2,000 freshmen for the fall semester, on par with the 2,010 that enrolled last year. While members of the class of 2013 were concerned by the downturn in our economy, they seemed content with their decision to attend UM. “I eliminated what schools I applied to based on whether or not they offered scholarships,” freshman Kira Richards said. “But the well-rounded academics and the social aspect of the school appealed to me.” Though Orehovec characterized the admissions process over the last 12 months as “challenging” and even “crazy,” citing serious concerns as to how many admitted applicants would actually choose to enroll given their financial well-being, he felt that the impact of the recession on the most recognizable private institutions was subdued. “I suspect the ‘middle-tier’ and ‘lower-tier’ private schools had a difficult time,” he said. “There’s no question …

more students were opting to go to lower-cost public universities. [But] the best private universities—and I put the University of Miami in that group—I think they did fine.” Some students admitted their perceptions of college tuition shifted over the past year. On the other hand, they did not feel the cost of attending UM was exorbitant, particularly given the availability of financial aid and merit-based scholarships. “It’s pretty reasonable,” freshman Salvatore Lee Puma said. “Yeah, I was surprised. My dad was all, ‘I have the money … you’re going there no matter what.’” That is not to say the entire university remained unaffected by the economic crisis. Orehovec cited UM’s endowment funds as one area of noticeable decline. “There’s a whole series of things that could be impacted by a down economy… This year will be a very telling year.” Iku Kawachi may be contacted at ikawachi@ themiamihurricane.com.

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2009-2010 •Isaac Bashevis Singer Scholarship: Full Tuition $34,000 annually •University Scholarship: $24,000 annually •Dean’s Scholarship: $16,000 annually •Trustee Scholarship: $11,000 annually •Collegiate Scholarship: $8,000 annually Visit www.miami.edu/scholarships for more information about scholarships offered to incoming and current students.

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Eight ball in the corner pocket BANK IT: Senior Eddie Garza concentrates during a game at the pool tournament, which took place at the on-campus Rathskeller restaurant last Saturday. The event was sponsored by Hurricane Productions and Rathskeller Advisory Board (RAB).

CAYLA NIMMO // The Miami Hurricane

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OPINION STAFF EDITORIAL

Club Richter courtesy With midterm exams rapidly approaching, one of the most glaring issues on campus is that of library etiquette. One of the reasons we have a library on campus is to have a quiet, reliable place to study. The Otto G. Richter Library is located in the center of campus, and being open until 2 a.m. most days, it’s probably the most convenient study locale. The first floor of the library is generally accepted as a place where talking is permitted, but that doesn’t excuse the packs of friends who arrange their chairs in the reading area and audibly catch up on the latest gossip. Talkers, there are an abundance of tables just outside the library and at Starbucks. For the sake of the university community’s sanity, go outside. Even more offensive are the talkers on the second floor. The second floor is generally acknowledged as a place where breathing too loudly will put you on the receiving end of shushes and glares; still, many students find it acceptable to have study sessions or take phone calls at desks. Talking isn’t just the only way to show lack of respect towards the library. Students who take out their frustrations on library workers are equally disrespectful. Library workers, particularly those who work in the stacks, are aware that midterms are stressful times for students and they try hard to work as silently as possible. However, they can’t control every source of noise. Trucks rumble, books fall and shelves echo. Get used to it. And for God’s sake, don’t harass workers. They don’t get paid enough to hear your complaints. Furthermore, you can’t have your cake and eat it too. If you complain that workers are making too much noise, they can’t do their job properly, which means that when you go look for that final source for your term paper, it might not be there. Be kind and be courteous. All will appreciate the effort.

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ravel agencies around the world make India out to be nothing more than a jungle, a vicious amalgamation of filth, mystery, over population and poverty. Government agencies call India a third world country, now a second world country. It is dangerous, volatile, violent and uncivil: a place of unrest and turmoil, where SUSHANTH SHYAMSUNDER people look to pick a fight for no reason. AcCONTRIBUTING cording to some, sages, saints, mystics, elCOLUMNIST ephants and tribal warriors roam the streets. India is also marketed as a spiritual destination, somewhere to go to if you want to attain the highest level of spirituality. In the western world, there exists this biased, prejudiced view of a land far, far, away, tucked in the eastern corners of the globe. Most people forget that India is one of the world’s fastest growing economic superpowers. Since gaining independence

[Poll Results] Does technology simplify your life? 23% 23%

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I am a democrat, yet after witnessing the feeble effort made by Obama and congressional democrats to pass a diluted climate bill, I have absolutely no confidence in our current government to solve our most serious problems. Meanwhile, Americans continue to buy more oil than ever; propping up Putin, Chavez and Ahmadinejad, financing the opposition in our “war on terror,” financially backing political systems that abuse women and setting the stage for an earthshattering conflict with China. Americans need a serious national discussion about climate change, which should transcend even the wisdom and rationality of the national debate on “Obamacare.” Boisterous patriots made it clear that “death panels” and government interference with private institutions like Medicare would not be tolerated. We cannot wait for the “real” Americans to accept that man-made global warming is a force to be reckoned with, and is not just “God huggin’ us closer.” There is no issue more paramount than that of our environment. Nevertheless, a recent CNN poll shows that Americans care more about illegal immigration, social security and Medicare, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their taxes far more than they care about a problem that affects billions of lives and will cost trillions of dollars. Those other issues are still worthy of concern, but our tendency to get so easily sidetracked by the governor’s call girl and the president’s nationality will make The Day After Tomorrow one day closer. Josh Kornfield is a sophomore majoring in international studies and political science. He may be contacted at jkorn@gmail.com.

Contrary to popular belief, India is not a hellhole

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What do you think? Take our poll on the themiamihurricane.com homepage!

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his summer American voters got another glimpse of republicans’ continuous orgy occurring behind the seductive red canvas of their party’s circus tent. Republicans seem to possess a penchant for the raunchy romp. They might do an impassioned tango in Buenos Aires like the honorable governor of South Carolina. Maybe JOSH KORNFIELD CONTRIBUTING they’ll have an intense conference with COLUMNIST the campaign manager’s wife and send a tasteful bouquet of hush money to her husband like the senator from Nevada. Three summers ago, we learned of amorous e-mails sent to pubescent boys, and two summers ago we heard tell of a senator hoping to tap something other than the floor in an airport bathroom. Of course, democrats have their share of scandals as well. Spitzer, Edwards and Clinton each performed carnal gymnastic routines of their own. Despite my appreciation for the farcical value of the political sex scandal, our national addiction to the trashy soap opera of our public servants puts a scarlet V on all of our chests… we’re a nation of voyeurs. Our voyeurism could not come at a worse time. The world is rapidly heating up with conflicts over food, water, oil and religion. It seems as if the irreparable destruction we have wreaked on the environment will be the fall that will kill us all.

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Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Partisan Americans need to get priorities straight

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from the British Empire on Aug. 15, 1947, India has grown to a position of power in about 60 years. India is moving beyond the old days of poverty, which was inflicted upon it not by choice, but by the subjugation of the British. Elephants no longer roam the streets; they’ve been replaced by cars and motorbikes. The big cities around the country boast of some of the world’s architectural masterpieces, both ancient and modern. Unlike most countries that are bilingual or trilingual at most, India is a country that boasts of more than 120 languages. Every state in the country is a land of value in itself, every religion respected, every person appreciated. If I had a penny for every time someone asked me if elephants walk the streets of India, or if I’ve met Mahatma Gandhi, who passed away 41 years before I was born, I would be a rich man. Sushanth Shyamsunder is a sophomore majoring in media management and creative writing. He may be contacted at icarus.swims@gmail.com.

DO YOU FIND CLUB RICHTER FAUX PAS ANNOYING? GO VOTE ON THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM


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The Miami

I am a democrat, yet... I have absolutely no confidence in our current government to solve our most serious problems. - JOSH KORNFIELD CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

HURRICANE Founded 1929

speak

UP!

If you could go on a date with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be?

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash

BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick

MANAGING EDITOR Christina De Nicola

WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky COPY CHIEF Sarah B. Pilchick

ART DIRECTOR Felipe Lobon

COPY EDITORS Lila Albizu Laura Edwins Zach Miller

NEWS EDITOR Ed S. Fishman PHOTO EDITOR Brittney Bomnin

ADVERTISING EDITOR Emma Cason-Pratt

SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

PUBLIC RELATIONS Jacob Crows

EDGE EDITOR Hilary Saunders

JOSH FU Senior “The actress from Entourage who plays Sloane.”

ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

OPINION EDITOR Danielle Kaslow ASST. NEWS EDITORS Lila Albizu Megan Terilli ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Ramon Galiana ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Tanya Thompson

GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow

MULTIMEDIA EDITORS Matt Wallach Lauren Whiddon

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

SONYA NANDA Junior

ACCOUNT REPS Shoshana Gottesman Misha Mayeur Katie Norwood Brian Schuman Jack Whaley

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

DESIGNERS Demi Rafuls Kiersten Schmidt Allison Goodman

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

“Frank Sinatra!”

LETTER TO THE EDITOR As a personal trainer at the Wellness Center and a senior majoring in exercise physiology, I would just like to express my concern for the overall health of the university community. With reports of H1N1 spreading throughout the South Florida region, I think it is important to provide some basic knowledge that could help prevent more cases, as well as improve the wellbeing of our community here at UM. As a student myself, I know how much the social aspect of college seems to overshadow some other parts of our lives... ahem school. Of course students are going to go to the Grove on Thursdays and drink and sing Journey songs until their faces hurt. This is not the problem. The real issue is moderation. Instead of drinking as many pitchers at Tavern as possible, we can limit our alcohol intake to still “have a good time” and not suffer the dire effects to our health and immune system. Consuming large amounts of alcohol dramatically decreases immune function and also puts us at risk for picking up even the most common of bugs. Pair this depressed

immunity and having class the next day (if you make it of course) in a room with 150 other students, and you have a veritable “hot zone” for the spread of airborne illnesses. It is paramount that we try and get seven to eight hours of sleep a night, exercise in some form most days of the week and eat healthier. Not only will we look, feel and work that much better, but we can try and thwart the spread of this very determined virus and better ourselves all in one push. So talk to your friends, roommates, and classmates and plan out a healthier lifestyle together, even if you’re just making small changes. Start shopping on the perimeter of the supermarket where the fresh and unprocessed vegetables and meats are. Go to the wellness center and join a free fitness class. Maybe don’t go out drinking one night of the week you usually would and participate in one of the free on-campus activities like salsa dancing or a movie at the Cosford. Just remember if you don’t have your health, you don’t have anything. - Jeremy Albelda, senior J.albelda@umiami.edu

©2009 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221.

CHRIS RAWLINS Senior “Eva Mendez for sure.”

LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations.

LINDSAY ROSEN Freshman “Leonardo DiCaprio!”

DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year.

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. compiled by

ANNA IRANI

October 1 - October 4, 2009

AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Opening art exhibit “Girl from Cali” by Cecilia Moreno-Yaghoubi @ 280 Aragon Avenue Friday 7-9 p.m.

B

A

Fashion 4Word BY DANIELLE KASLOW OF THE STAFF

Looks from the 1960s and 1990s are back this fall, and students have taken notice. Sporting these trends in and out of the classroom, stylish undergrads choose key pieces from the past to create effortless, cool, modern outfits.

1960s Silhouettes

C

A

Take a hint from the television show Mad Men and show off your alluring silhouette. The 1960s look is flattering on any shape, with tailored pieces and clean lines. Gents can look sharp in suit coats and skinny ties, pairing the look with jeans to dress it down. Ladies can highlight their hourglass figure with cigarette pants, high-waisted pencil skirts, flirty blouses and structured dresses, complete with a fitted bodice and full skirt.

Tiny Floral Print

B

Another throwback to the 1990s, tiny floral print is a key component of fall fashion. Feminine and delicate, the prints can be found on skirts, dresses, knit tops, and blouses. Avoid looking like a kindergarten teacher by keeping the look trendy. Make sure skirts fall above the knee, and add a waist belt and wedges for extra flair.

C

Plaid, Round Two

This season plaid is back with an edgier, grunge vibe. The preppy styles of seasons past are still available in stores, but students on the cutting edge know that the look needs to be reworked to stay trendy. Girls style their fitted plaid shirts with cuffed shorts or skinny jeans. Guys can pair their plaid with khakis or destroyed denim pants. Roll up the shirt’s sleeves and throw on a pair of Converse sneakers to complete this modern take on 1990s grunge.

D

Biker Jackets

D

Ladies can tap into their inner bad girls by wearing this season’s hottest trend: the biker jacket. Made from a variety of material ranging from terrycloth to leather, there is an option for everyone. Be sure they include edgy zippers, grommets and lots of attitude. A revival from the 1990s, this jacket will be a wardrobe staple when the temperature finally dips later in the semester. FLICKR.COM

Danielle Kaslow may be contacted at dkaslow@themiamihurricane.com. October 1 - October 4, 2009

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Site keeps music fans ‘in the know’

Festival Miami comes to Frost School of Music

BY BEN WEXLER CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Have trouble finding new music? Ever wonder when your favorite band is coming to town? If the answer is yes to either question, you should check out The Hype Machine. When sophomore Danny DeOliveira recently heard about The Hype Machine, he was in awe. “Lately I’ve been hunting the Internet for music, and this will make my life that much more easier,” DeOliveira said. “I might become addicted.” Started in 2005 by New Yorker Anthony Volodkin during his sophomore year of college, The Hype Machine is a Web site (www.hypem.com) that aggregates select music blogs and posts songs from the blogs onto its own Web site. Each song posted has a link to the original blog, where you can often download the song for free.

Lately I’ve been hunting the Internet for music, and this will make my life that much more easier. - DANNY DEOLIVEIRA sophomore

The site’s homepage lists the latest songs that have been uploaded. Another section has the most popular songs on the site from the last three days, which gives everyone the opportunity to be exposed to new artists. There is also a search feature which enables you to look for songs from your favorite artist. The diversity of music on the Web site is remarkable. You can search for musicians ranging from Bob Dylan and Daft Punk to JayZ. Local concert schedules are also listed for each artist. Critics contend that the site is just used to download music without having to pay for it. However, users do have the option to purchase music from Amazon or iTunes through www.hypem.com, which supports both The Hype Machine and the artist. While electronica artist Boys Noize, who also operates his own label, doesn’t think it’s The Hype Machine’s fault for pointing music fans to blogs where they can download songs for free, he has had to request to have his songs taken down on numerous occasions. “[I think] blogs and mp3s are cool,” Boys Noize wrote in an e-mail interview with The Miami Hurricane. “It‘s not cool to post a track in super quality months or weeks before the official release… If it continues like this I’m not sure how long my label, BNR, can survive.” Mashup artist E-603 sees it differently though. “[Artists] can possibly get helped substantially by The Hype Machine whether they agree or not,” E-603 wrote in an e-mail. “The Web site helps smaller independent artists like myself make a splash in the popular music world.” Ben Wexler may be contacted at bwexler@ themiamihurricane.com.

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

COURTESY ELIZABETH AMORE

JAMMIN’: Dean Shelly Berg performs at last year’s Festival Miami event “Bruce Hornsby and Friends.” This year, the festival will feature four different musical themes and Latin Grammy winner Arturo Sandoval. BY LOUBNA TURJUMAN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Festival Miami is one of the most important events hosted by The Frost School of Music, a celebration of culture and diversity through music that brings artists from all over the world to the University of Miami campus. The festival was started 26 years ago and has grown immensely over the years. Since it began, the festival has attracted award-winning artists from around the globe, providing the South Floridian audience with a month full of excellent entertainment. This year’s festival will begin on Oct. 2 and will finish on Oct. 30. It has been divided into four different themes, Great Performances, Music of the Americas, Jazz and Beyond and Creative American Music. Each week will be dedicated to one of these themes. Planning begins with a meeting in which the artists are chosen based on ideas from faculty members and the artist’s availability. “The process of getting artists to sign a contract is probably the one that takes the longest,” Marianne Mijares, the events planner said. Marketing, public relations, and scheduling follow.

October 1 - October 4, 2009

After all the hard work, the festival commences, offering various opportunities to students. “It’s a good place to exhibit your work, it’s also a lot of fun to see what others are doing, to see different styles of music and what is current,” junior Amanda Zelman said. The artists not only perform concerts on campus but also participate in lectures, workshops, master classes and forums. Music students are able to present their composed works and have them critiqued by these professional musicians. This year’s lineup includes artists such as Latin Grammy winner Arturo Sandoval. “I am looking forward to showcase my work, I did it last year. I had a piece on the piano,” Zelman said. “All concerts are made affordable for the community,” Mijares said. “How often do you have all these great musicians play on campus?” Most concerts take place in the Maurice Gusman Concert Hall and the Victor E. Clarke Recital Hall, both located on the Coral Gables campus. Loubna Turjuman may be contacted at lturjuman@ themiamihurricane.com.


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‘Fame’ remake dull, fails to excite BY SARAH B. PILCHICK OF THE STAFF

The most glaring problem with Fame is not that it is an unnecessary remake of a farsuperior movie. It is not that it removed the heart and soul of the original 1980 film–the music that made it so eternal–and replaced it with an ill-conceived, updated hip-hop sound. The issue at hand, to be honest, is that it is dull. Fame, the 1980 musical film which inspired a generation of artistic adolescents and spawned a hit TV spin-off, is the story of a group of students at the New York High School of Performing Arts, based on the famous LaGuardia High School. The students are actors, singers, musicians, and dancers; in the original, they face realistic, somewhat-taboo problems like teen pregnancy, racism, and abortion. In the remake, the most these obnoxious brats deal with is an ill-conceived first time drinking. One of the major issues is that there are too many characters, none of whom are particularly compelling. Kay Panabaker is terrible as repressed actress Jenny–she’s supposed to be the best of the best?–and Marco, her character’s boyfriend, is portrayed by

Asher Book, a poor man’s Zac Efron. The only actors who escape relatively unscathed are the adults who portray the instructors, Broadway luminaries such as Bebe Neuwirth and Megan Mullally. Fame runs far too long and devotes far too little time to its characters. There are better things to watch than this unnecessary Fame, including High School Musical. At least the insufferable Disney series of movies isn’t trying to be something it’s not. The earnest characters of Fame may want viewers to remember their names, but this is one film that’s better left forgotten. Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@themiamihurricane.com.

Fame Starring: Kay Panabaker, Asher Book, Naturi Naughton Directed by: Kevin Tancharoen MPAA Rating: PG PHOTOBUCKET.COM

October 1 - October 4, 2009

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Grand Archives offer mediocre indie pop BY THOMAS PRIETO CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

FLICKR.COM

ROCKING OUT: Drummer Thomas Wright of the Grand Archives opens up for The Helio Sequence at The Rhythm Room in Phoenix. Their second album was released Sept. 15.

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

October 1 - October 4, 2009

Modern outfit Grand Archives is a mix between the sounds of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Eagles, and the Beach Boys. The Seattle-based band’s songs are the kind of harmonydriven tracks often found in the catalogues of these classic bands and more recently, college darlings the Fleet Foxes. Throw in a shared affinity for sunny West Coast country twang and Grand Archives creates a solid mix of old and new. Grand Archives formed in 2006 after guitarist Mat Brooke left indie rock group Band of Horses. Brooke picked up vocal duties in the band and was joined by bassist Jeff Montano, guitarist Curtis Hall, drummer Thomas Wright, and multi-instrumentalist Ron Lewis. Before the recording of their new album, Lewis left the band to join The Shins. Their second record, Keep in Mind Frankenstein, is the typical lazy summer day album. This is

epitomized on the melancholy, yet beautiful, “Siren Echo Valley (Part 1)” featuring a duet by lead singer Mat Brooke and Band of Horses member Sera Cahoone. The duo sings over a slow guitar arpeggio and what seems like a distorted handclap. Unfortunately, many of the songs on the album fail to leave an impression and act only as filler. These songs feel like generic indie folk/pop and weigh down the album. Keep in Mind Frankenstein’s five best tracks would make a great EP, but as a whole it’s only an above average album. Thomas Prieto may be contacted at tprieto@themiamihurricane.com.

Keep in Mind Frankenstein Producer: Ben Kersten Label: Sub Pop Release Date: Sept. 15


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SPORTS

4.67

The number of points per game Oklahoma is allowing

109

The total amount of points Oklahoma has scored in its last two games

FOOTBALL

Hurricanes prepare for prime-time showdown Miami hopes to avenge 2007 loss BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The true litmus test will come Saturday night at 8 p.m. Opportunity will be on the horizon for No. 17 Miami (2-1) when it hosts 2008 national champion runner-up and No. 8 Oklahoma (2-1) at Land Shark Stadium. “Big game this week,” said head coach Randy Shannon, whose team lost 51-13 in Norman in the second game of his coaching career. “Like I said before the season, after four games we’ll find out where we are as a football team.” In preparation for the Sooners while simultaneously washing away memories from the Virginia Tech loss, the team was forced to watch the Hokies game film together as a team, the first time as a whole in Shannon’s era. “I think the main reason behind it was for everyone to see [what went wrong],” senior captain Jason Fox said. “Normally when you watch it as positions you know who [messed] up in your unit. Now you can see who is not being accountable, who is not giving effort, who is busting it, who is making mistakes as a player.” Oklahoma, which averages nearly 41 points a game, is an offensive powerhouse averaging 256 passing yards and 196 yards rushing. The question is who will be leading the Sooner offense. Heisman Trophy winner and redshirt junior Sam Bradford, who missed the last two games due to a shoulder injury, is questionable. But there was a question about Bradford’s ability two seasons ago when he faced the Hurricanes in his second career start. Bradford led the Sooners with five passing touchdowns and put 51

points on the board. “We are preparing for a quarterback,” senior defensive back Chavez Grant said. “It doesn’t matter who it’s going to be. Both of them have to throw the football; the o-line still has to block and receivers still have to run routes.” Since going down against BYU, Bradford has been replaced by redshirt freshman Landry Jones. He threw six touchdown passes, which is an Oklahoma record, in his last start against Tulsa, and had plenty of support from elusive junior running back DeMarco Murray. “Offensively, the offense hasn’t stopped,” Shannon said. “They are making plays. It’s the same offense. Last year to this year, it hasn’t changed at all.” The Sooners have only allowed 14 points this entire season, all of which came in a loss against the BYU Cougars. Oklahoma leads the nation in scoring defense after allowing just 4.67 points a game and has shut out its last two opponents. “They have a talented front seven,” said sophomore quarterback Jacory Harris, who has 806 passing yards and five touchdowns in three games. “They have the Big 12 Player of the Year, some wonderful and talented depth. It’s going to be a challenge. It’s going to be one of the hardest defenses we’ll face this year and we have to step it up.” Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

IF YOU GO: Wear orange Parking lot opens at 4:00 p.m. Stadium gates open at 6:30 p.m.

ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

OPTIMISTIC: Junior defensive back Jared Campbell celebrates a touchdown during the UM/FSU game. Despite last week’s tough loss, players and fans have high hopes for Saturday’s game. October 1 - October 4, 2009

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Defensive lineman’s secret to success Chocolate on gameday keeps the offense away BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The Hurricanes’ fastest defensive lineman does not need Gatorade or water to sack the quarterback or blow through an offensive lineman. He does not even need oranges or energy bars to produce on the field. Instead, the speed and passion comes from eating chocolate, something Marcus Robinson loves. “I have to eat my chocolate before every game,” he said. Chocolate has allowed this sophomore defensive end to create enormous plays for the Canes. In the season opener against Florida State, Robinson had a sack and forced a fumble on the same play to give the Hurricanes offense momentum in the third quarter. Last year in a Thursday night showdown against Virginia Tech, Robinson recorded three sacks and earned ACC Defensive Lineman of the Week honors. But football and chocolate are only a few humbling things in Robinson’s life. Growing up, No. 56 had a terrible attitude and had a lot of aggression, something his father, Mitchell, noticed everyday. Mitchell wanted Robinson to channel his anger into a good way so he pushed Robinson into football. “I used to have a real bad attitude,” said Robinson, who grew up in Homestead, Fla. “My father was always telling me to use all that aggression and go take it out on people on the field.” And that’s what Robinson did. As a senior at Homestead High, Robinson collected 98 tackles and 24 sacks, which brought him an invitation to the U.S. High School Army All-American game. Idolizing Ray Lewis for his passion for the game and his bone-crunching hits, Robinson became a Miami Hurricane in 2008. Since then Robinson has been a joyful but hard-hitting player for Miami, laying the wood on whoever gets into his path, including quarterbacks. Last season Robinson was the fifthleading tackler on the team and had four sacks. He was named to the 2008 Collegefootballnews.com Freshman All-American list. “I love to run and hit people,” Robinson said. “That’s what I do.”

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BILLY GILBERT // The Miami Hurricane

WILLY WONKA: Sophomore defensive lineman Marcus Robinson runs shuttle drills on the Greentree Practice Fields during midday practice. Robinson said he eats chocolate in preparation for each and every game. Off the field, Robinson enjoys spending time with his family while watching movies and tearing through pepperoni pizza, something he loves as well. Robinson especially enjoys watching Tyler Perry movies, which are about the power of family. “He is a good kid,” head coach Randy Shannon said. “Marcus is kind of quiet and very fun loving.”

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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With a chance to make an impact in the Homestead community, Robinson plans on graduating from UM and pursuing a football career at the next level. “I come from a real bad and hard background,” Robinson said. “The kids look up to me where I’m from. I use that to stay positive and do positive things. That’s why I want to give back as much as I can.”

The next time you witness Robinson either sack or create a turnover for the Canes, do not ask if he ate his Wheaties this morning. Know that chocolate is his key to success. Lelan LeDoux may be contacted lledoux@ themiamihurricane.com.


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MATCHUPS: MIAMI MIAMI Quarterbacks

VS.

OU

OU The biggest question surrounding this game is whether reigning Heisman Trophy winner Sam Bradford will play. It will be a game-time decision but if Bradford does not play, redshirt freshman Landry Jones will lead OU. Jones has put up monster numbers - 622 yards and nine touchdowns all against Idaho State and Tulsa. If Bradford plays the advantage goes to Oklahoma, but if he does not, Jacory and the Canes get the nod.

Running Backs

Running backs Graig Cooper and Javarris James need to be more efficient running the ball to take pressure off Harris and the passing game. Everyone knows about the passing game for Oklahoma, but the Sooners also have a two-headed monster in Chris Brown and Demarco Murray. The two have combined for 551 all -purpose yards in the three games this season.

Wide Receivers/ Tight Ends

Leonard Hankerson has really stepped up lately and currently leads all receivers with 186 yards. Aldarius Johnson’s possible return could be a jolt. Sooners receiver Ryan Broyles is the best receiver in the nation you have not heard of. In three games this true sophomore has 309 yards and seven touchdowns. Oklahoma is without AllAmerican Jermaine Gresham, who is out for the year with a knee injury.

Offensive Line

The offensive line will be the key to Miami’s success against Oklahoma. OU lost four of its starting five offensive linemen from last year to the NFL Draft. The offensive line is the biggest weakness of this team and can be exploited.

Defensive Line

UM’s run defense has not been much better as the Canes ranks 86th in the nation against the run. Oklahoma’s defense is only allowing opponents an average of 40 rushing yards a game. The defensive line is led by two Big 12 preseason first team selections, Gerald McCoy and Jeremy Beal.

Linebackers

Collin McCarthy has stepped in nicely for the struggling Sean Spence. The linebackers have always been the heart and soul of an Oklahoma defense. So far the Sooner defense has shut out Idaho State and Tulsa.

Secondary

Miami’s defense is currently ranked 89th against the pass and the inconsistency of the secondary has been the reason. OU’s secondary has four interceptions on the year and is led by Big 12 Preseason First Team defensive back Dominique Franks.

Special Teams

Graig Cooper is averaging 31 yards on kickoff returns, which is good enough for 17th-best in the nation. Ryan Broyles is a threat to return a long kick for the Sooners.

Coaching

Offensive coordinator Mark Whipple just hit a bump in the road against Va Tech. No matter what the coaches say, the rain played a huge factor in the inability of the UM offense getting in a rhythm. It is now time to see how the Hurricanes will respond after a loss. OU head coach Bob Stoops is a winner, but he has had problems with big games during his career. Matt Reed may be contacted at mreed@themiamihurricane.com.

October 1 - October 4, 2009

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Upgraded baseball stadium in final phases Scoreboard to be finished in 2010 BY EMILY WINGROVE CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

After two years, Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field is in its final phases of construction. With the completion of bleachers on both the first- and third-base lines in August, there is little left to do. The stadium now holds 5,000 fans. The original capacity of the Light was 3,000. According to head coach Jim Morris, who has been at the helm for 16 years, all that is left to finish is a new scoreboard that should be finished in 2010. “The project has been coming in phases,” Assistant Sports Media Relations Director Rob Dunning said. Some of the money used for the project comes from the $3.9 million donation made by New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez in 2002. The rest comes from money raised by the team through games, sponsors and do-

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nations. “Miami is growing with the ACC,” Morris said. “And we have developed a rivalry with other sports teams outside of baseball.” Among the improvements already made to the park include a new athletic training room, a new weight room separate from the Hecht Athletic Building, a computer lab, new concessions, a video room with a 25-person occupancy, a multipurpose conference room with a 52-person occupancy, new lighting, new stadium speakers, new locker rooms for coaches and athletes, a new press box and several VIP boxes, one of which belongs to Rodriguez. “The new facilities are for the fans, the umpires and the players,” Morris said. “It is an upgrade for everyone, not just the team.” According to Morris, the culture of the stadium and the happiness of the fans are his main priorities. He also just signed a contract extension that will keep him as head coach until 2015. The University of Miami baseball recruiting class was just ranked ninth. Morris and his staff recruited eight freshmen and expect 12 others to join. “The new stadium is fitting for the

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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STEVEN STUTS // The Miami Hurricane

TAKE A SEAT: With the addition of bleachers down the left and right field lines after last year’s regular season, stadium seating capacity is back up to 5,000. school,” junior Stephanie Parrish said. “The team is known for being one of the best, so they deserve a stadium that reflects their reputation.”

Official fall practice starts on Oct. 15. Emily Wingrove may be contacted at ewingrove@themiamihurricane.com.


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Ticket sales skyrocket Recent successes raise fan interest for OU game BY MICHAEL MATTHIESEN CONTIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

Despite the disappointing loss to Virginia Tech last Saturday, there is still plenty of buzz surrounding Saturday’s non-conference meeting between two top20 teams. As Oct. 3 approaches, the anticipation grows for Canes fans. The Hecht Athletic Center’s Hurricane Ticket Office’s phones cannot stop ringing. Those who bleed orange and green are rushing to witness action. Especially after the victories over FSU and GT, Oklahoma

tickets seem to be printing exponentially, selling out section after section at Land Shark Stadium. All the upper bowl seats sold quickly. $100 is now the general average ticket cost for this Saturday’s clash, but ticket prices may not be that way for long. According to the ticket office, this is the fastest-selling game it has seen in quite some time. “This game is by far the most sold-out game of the year,” said Matthias Martinez, senior accountant at the Hurricane Ticket Office. Martinez is not the only one to notice the immensity of this event; the anticipation weighing upon this game has even caught the eye of some sponsors of Hurricane Sports. These sponsors and other corporations have been buying huge blocks of seats. But regardless of the low vol-

ume of seats available, fans are going to any extent to make sure they have seats come 8 p.m. Saturday night. “I’m totally psyched. This is a big-time game,” said Stuart Bryson, a die-hard fan from Pompano Beach who bought tickets this past week. “We need it; the Canes deserve it. They deserve a better turn out and a packed house.” UM is going to get it. Miami is expecting the entire crowd to be orange, not because of the vacant orange seats, but with rowdy fans showing off their school spirit. “[It’s surprising] how fast the bandwagon has filled up… People should have bought season tickets from the beginning,” Martinez said. Michael Matthiesen may be contacted at mmatthiesen@themiamihurricane. com.

SPORTS BRIEFS VOLLEYBALL

SOCCER

Upcoming

Goalie rewarded

The University of Miami volleyball team (8-5, 2-1) battles ACC foe Clemson at 7 p.m. Friday night. It also plays Georgia Tech at 1 p.m. on Sunday. Both matches take place at the Knight Sports Complex and can be heard on 90.5 FM WVUM.

Sophomore goalie Vikki Alonzo was named Muscle Milk Student-Athlete of the Week. She recorded her 15th career shutout Sunday against No. 9 Maryland. She broke Lauren McAdam’s record for most shutouts in a UM career. Florida State host the Canes at 1 p.m. on Sunday.

Information compiled by Justin Antweil from hurricanesports. com.

WANT TO CATCH UP ON THE LATEST HURRICANES SPORTS NEWS? FOLLOW TMH_SPORTS ON TWITTER!

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Dear V: I think I’m the last straight person on campus... Dear Straight, , Dear V, After reading countless Dear V articles as I sit bored in different classes, I have come to one conclusion. The entire student body, both men and women, must be gay. I forget the last time I actually read a Dear V article and it had some meaning for the straight student body that walks on this campus everyday. Basically every single question you receive and every answer you respond with is about being or trying homosexuality. So I’m just curious to ask - is it just me, or are my friends I have discussed this with and I the only straight students at UM? Sincerely, Annoyed by Being Straight at UM

I am delighted that you would be so bold as to ask me this question. It opens the floor for much needed discussion about sexuality in college (and let’s face it, that’s what I’m all about). When people joke about “experimenting” in college, there really is some truth to it. College is a time during which a lot of people learn what makes them tick. Or experience things they might never want anything to do with ever again. Whether you lost your virginity in high school, waited until college or are still a virgin, I guarantee that college provides a wealth of firsts for everyone. That being said, sexual orientation is a prevalent subject matter. Whether you’ve known that you’re gay all along and are coming out, have always been out and want

dear ...

to feel more comfortable in a welcoming environment or have been questioning your sexuality and need to decide what works best for you, college is often a great opportunity to explore your options. UM definitely boasts a diverse, tolerant student body with a strong gay community. That’s not to say that everyone is hitting for the other team, but with groups like SpectrUM on campus, it shows that there is no shortage of UM students who are at least rooting for them. Now, I like to keep an open mind. When somebody writes me a letter, they usually don’t include things along the lines o, “I’m a lesbian” or “I’m a straight male.” The truth is that love is love. Sex is sex. Issues are issues. It is not my place to assign genders and sexual orientations to people who ask for my help. No matter how embarrassing or ob-

scure the issue, it can expand to a broader issue at hand, from which most of us can take a lesson. Be it broadening one’s horizons, trust, faith - what have you - we all become romantically impaired at one point or another. And now is a great time to learn how to handle these problems before entering the “real world.” But I suppose you forgot to pick up a copy of The Miami Hurricane the time I addressed the young man who was concerned about his penis being too big for his girlfriend’s vagina. Best! V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@ themiamihurricane.com.

BARTENDERS WANTED! UP TO $250 A DAY NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Training Provided. Age 18+ OK 800-965-6520 ext 166 October 1 - October 4, 2009

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