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The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 32 | Sept. 16 - Sept. 19, 2010

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HURRICANE

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STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

COURTESY THE AGENCY GROUP

Back in the spotlight AQUATIC ATHLETES

Ms. Lauryn Hill to perform as Homecoming headliner

STUDENTS CONCEIVE NEW KITEBOARDING CLUB PAGE 2

BY CAMRON GHORBI | SENIOR EDGE WRITER

WHY THEY CHOSE THE U SEE WHY INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS DECIDED TO ATTEND MIAMI PAGE 5

HOW TO SAVE A LIFE FOOTBALL COACH RECOVERS AFTER TRIPLE BYPASS SURGERY PAGE 9

After nearly a 10-year hiatus from the spotlight of popular music, Ms. Lauryn Hill, with the help of Hurricane Productions, will commence her return to the forefront of hip-hop culture with a headlining performance at the Homecoming concert Nov. 5 on the university green. Ms. Hill, who released her widely-acclaimed solo album “The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill” in 1998, rose to fame after success with the hip-hop

trio Fugees in the early 90s. After splitting ways with fellow artists Wyclef Jean and Pras Michael, Ms. Hill released her solo album, which went on to win five Grammy Awards. However, after the success of “Miseducation,” Ms. Hill disappeared from the limelight for nearly a decade. Last spring, senior Max Winik, the large concert venue chair for Hurricane Productions large, realized that a collaboration with the multi-platinum artist had the potential to be special. SEE HOMECOMING, PAGE 8


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Students take club to new heights Kiteboarders get COSO approval

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY NICOLETTE ROQUE ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Driven by a shared passion for kiteboarding, a diverse group of kiteboard athletes is working together to make the extreme sport accessible to University of Miami students and faculty. Consisting of alumni and undergraduates, the soon-to-be COSO-recognized organization aims to provide a safe avenue for learning and practicing kiteboarding, as well as organizing social events to build a community of athletes. The sport has a considerable following on campus, but no formal organization exists. The founders of the new clubTom Fields, Ian McKeown, Ivan Zorn and Nico Cuetara- met while kiteboarding and soon synthesized ideas to form a club for the sport they love. “There are many people on campus who I know would love to learn,” said Cuetara, a UM law student and kiteboarder. “The biggest issue is the cost to take lessons.” The aim of the organization is to make kiteboarding an accessible sport for UM students who may not necessarily be able to afford lessons and equipment for a new hobby. “We’re working with local schools to provide discounted lessons for students,” said sophomore Fields, a professional kiteboarder. Fields’ passion and skill for kiteboarding has earned him several prestigious awards, such as first place in the nation’s most prestigious amateur kiteboarding tournament. By creating this organization, students interested in kiteboarding can take discounted lessons and practice alongside experienced boarders. One of the group’s main objectives is to embrace the kiteboarding culture in South Florida. “We intend to have barbecues and social events to get the sport out,” said McKeown, a UM graduate student and professional kite board athlete. “We 2

NEWS

The racquetball team held a tournament with profits going to the Children’s Miracle Network. Rosa Orihuela covered the event. Laura Edwins got the scoop on the HurryCane shuttle crash Tuesday. The law school is putting on a series of documentaries on important issues. Maleana Davis has more. Actress Anna Deavere Smith spoke to the College of Arts and Sciences. Sarah B. Pilchick reports. COURTESY HENRY RICO

UP, UP AND AWAY: UM sophomore and founder of the kiteboarding club, Tom Fields, executes a trick at the Matheson Hammock beach in Coral Gables, the athletes’ location of choice. always meet other kiteboarders on the beach, but we want to create an organized network.” Luckily for UM kiteboarders, the little-known Matheson Hammock beach in Coral Gables is only eight minutes from campus and provides the wind and water necessary for the extreme sport. “You can ride and shower and be back in class in two hours,” Cuetara said. “You might smell a little but it’s possible.” But aside from the sport’s cost, the issue of safety is another incentive for creating the organization.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

“Kiteboarding is a very safe sport- when you know how to do it,” McKeown said. The guys say that the sport is entirely girl-friendly and encourage female athletes to consider joining the club when it completes the new organization registration process within the next month. “In my experience, women are actually better at kiteboarding at first because it takes finesse and agility to f ly the kite,” McKeown said. “The industry has gear especially for women according to size. There’s no reason why a woman couldn’t get into it.”

September 16 - September 19, 2010

The organization, which is due for approval before COSO chair members this month, should be functioning by November. “The constitution has been written, registration forms submitted. We just need to go before the presidents of other organizations to receive approval,” said sophomore Zorn, a mechanical engineering major. “Our Facebook group is active and we can always be contacted through there for updates.” Nicolette Roque may be contacted at nroque@themiamihurricane. com.

Get a taste of the international flavor at UM. Stephanie Parra captured a video Speak Up. Read President Barack Obama’s national op-ed piece about the future of higher education. Ernesto Suarez summarized all this week’s major sports happenings in his sports briefs. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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Academic Fellows walk the walk for freshmen Fashion show illustrates campus do’s and don’ts BY BOLTON LANCASTER CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

As the models line up just minutes before the show, their jokes and smiles show a level of comfort that some professionals take years to develop. Perhaps their confidence is due to the fact that these models were preparing to walk down a red paper runway with hip-hop beats serving as background music. The annual Academic Fellow (AF) Fashion Show took place on the HechtStanford Bridge Tuesday evening, with each Academic Fellow from Hecht and Stanford Residential Colleges dressed in a different outfit in order to demonstrate to freshmen the “right” and “wrong” ways to dress for certain events, from business professional to a spirited Cane's game day gear. As the models walked along the runway, an active crowd of about 50 students whis-

tled, clapped and yelled their approval for the different outfits. “The idea behind it is to showcase what is appropriate and inappropriate for students to wear, knowing that what students wear to class is really the first thing they say about themselves,” said V. Chunoo, the academic and career advisor for Hecht. In the event’s third year, an additional part was added on to the show: short video clips between the models’ runway walks that teach freshman some basic mistakes to avoid, such as not using cell phones during class and not leaving the classroom early. The fashion show is just one way that the school looks to help freshmen transition into a college lifestyle. “All the people here that work at Hecht always like to be friendly and there’s a lot of programs to help you get involved,” freshman Kaitlyn Rancour said. Bolton Lancaster may be contacted at blancaster@ themiamihurricane.com

WHAT ARE ACADEMIC FELLOWS? Undergraduate student staff members who live in the residential colleges. They offer academic guidance as well as act as support systems to first-year students. To learn more on how to become an Academic Fellow, visit the Office of Academic Enhancement or miami.edu/provost/oae.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Art Director

WORK IT: Sophomore Pierre-Richard Gautier walks the runway during the AF Fashion Show held on the Hecht-Stanford Bridge Tuesday night.

Global awareness ‘igKnited’ on campus Student group works to end extreme poverty BY CAROLINE HELMERS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Student advocacy organizations will gather this Friday with one mission in mind: to eradicate global poverty. IgKnite, a student media organization that focuses on sharing issues of global significance through different multimedia platforms, will be partnering with ONE, the non-profit organization dedicated to fighting AIDS and world poverty, to host a "Stand Up Against Poverty" event on the University Center Patio.

The groups hope to raise awareness for poverty around the world and bring attention to preventable diseases that have taken the lives of millions of people all over the world. Not just limited to the University of Miami campus, Stand Up and Take Action is a global movement that strives to raise awareness of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs). The goals aim to end extreme poverty and its root causes by the year 2015. This year’s event serves as a reminder to people everywhere about the realities of poverty and hunger worldwide. “This is a key opportunity for us to remind our elected leaders that we are committed to achieving the MDGs,” ONE field organizer Sara Paterni said.

Originally pitched in 2007, Stand Up and Take Action events have been happening all around the world. Just last year, 173 million people joined in to take a stand against poverty. This is the second year that ONE teams up with igKnite at the University of Miami. Students, such as igKnite member Eric Hurley, have been working with ONE to plan this year's event. “Our common interest in the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals has fostered an active partnership and we are happy to be hosting this again,” Hurley said. With Hurley, igKnite and ONE working together, they came up with the plan for a two-hour event featuring different booths representing local organiSeptember 16 - September 19, 2010

zations, as well as student organizations such as Amnesty International, Students for a New Democracy, ONE, CARE and RESULTS who will be giving students information about volunteering and local advocacy. “We hope to increase awareness about the MDGs on campus and in the Miami community and show our elected leaders that there is strong support in South Florida for achieving the MDGs,” Paterni said. “We will also encourage attendees to get involved in upcoming ONE advocacy and awareness activities.” The free event will start at 1 p.m. on Friday and is open to the public. Caroline Helmers may be contacted at chelmers@themiamihurricane.com. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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University experts discuss effects of oil spill Panel analyzes situation in the Gulf BY STEPHANIE PARRA CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Three experts gathered Tuesday from 7-8:30 p.m. in the School of Architecture’s Glasgow Hall to discuss the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The panel discussion was led by UM’s sustainability coordinator Ian McKeown. McKeown posed questions to the panel of experts, which came from the University of Miami, Florida International

University and Miami-Dade College.After the panelists answered the questions, McKeown opened the f loor for questions from the audience. The panelists each spoke brief ly about the magnitude of the spill, which totaled about 200 million gallons. “We needed to be prepared. We were very nervous. In the future, we need to work out how fast companies will get there,” said Carlos Espinosa, director of the Department of Environmental Resources Management. In order to alleviate the negative effects of the spill, a detergent which mixed the oil

with the water was also dumped into the water. Experts commented that about 30 percent of the oil consequently evaporated and, although not much is known, they believe that the rest is either below the water or was biologically degraded. About a total of 10 percent of the oil, however, was recovered by BP. “BP did not act very fast, and it became a problem for local beaches,” Espinosa said. Many areas under water have formed tar mats or tar balls and are believed to last for decades underwater or wash up on the shore. The spill affected populations of plankton, sea

NEWS BRIEFS UM DEVELOPMENT UPDATE

DALAI LAMA TICKET TO GO ON SALE

The University of Miami master plan passed unanimously with a 5-0 vote from the Coral Gables commissioners. President Donna E. Shalala, deans from the School of Architecture,the School of Education and the School of Communication, as well as both men’s and women’s basketball coaches, were present to support the passing of the document that will be a roadmap for UM and the city to work together for the next 20 years.

UM will host a return visit of the Dalai Lama who will speak on “The Quest for Happiness in Challenging Times” at the BankUnited Center at 1:30 p.m. on Oct. 26. The event is open to UM students, faculty, staff and invited guests.

Major changes approved include the addition of 1,830 seats and the sale of alcohol at the BankUnited Center, the re-zoning of the area in front of the BUC and a five-year postponement of the controversial internal road that originally planned to cut through the Gifford Arboretum.

IBIS RIDE RETURNS The first Ibis Ride of the year will be Thursday from 9:30-11:30 p.m. Grove goers can get free pizza and hear music at Stanford Circle, where the shuttle picks up. The Ibis Ride will resume its regular schedule for the semester. The shuttle picks up students going to the Grove Thursdays and Fridays between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., and drops off in front of CocoWalk.

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Tickets will be distributed Oct. 4 and 5 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and are available on a first come, first serve basis. A valid Cane Card is required. For distribution locations, visit miami.edu/dalailama.

FUNDRAISER BRINGS “HOPE” The HOPE Public Interest Resource Center is hosting a fundraiser Thursday at the California Pizza Kitchen on Miracle Mile. Donations, made up of 20 percent of each order, will help fund public interest fellowship opportunities for Univeristy of Miami law students. To participate in the fundraiser, students must bring the event’s flyer, which is available at www. themiamihurricane.com by searching “HOPE.” Compiled by Parker Davis who may be contacted at pdavis@ themiamihurricane.com and Kylie Banks who may be contacted at kbanks@themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

September 16 - September 19, 2010

turtles and blue fin tuna. According to the experts, however, time will be a better indicator of how the spill affected these populations. “We know [oil spills] will occur, and although there are low probabilities there are very high consequences. We can’t tell you when or how the next one will occur; hopefully it won’t happen soon,” UM expert Dr. James Englehardt said. The spill, although massive, will not directly affect edible seafood. It will, however, be ref lected on its price. The experts all agreed that seafood prices will experience generous

raises. In order to reverse consequences from the oil spill and promote a greener U, a sustainability coordinator position has been created on campus. “Five years ago, there was no such thing as sustainability coordinating; I’m the first person to have this job. The industry is becoming popular in higher education and in businesses. There are great ways to get involved on campus and in the local government.” McKeown said. Stephanie Parra may be contacted at sparra@themiamihurricane.com.


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OPINION “Why did you choose UM?”

ISKANDER KARIMOV RUSSIA Freshman “Because it’s one of the most diverse universities in the whole nation.”

MARIELLA MOLESTINA ECUADOR Freshman “My brother made me!”

“The school has a good reputation back in Sweden.”

JENNY LI CHINA Freshman “Because it’s a paradise for living and studying.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themaimihurricane.com. compiled by

Stephanie Parra

Last Thursday, U.S District Court Judge Virginia Phillips ruled that the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy toward gay members of the military is unconstitutional. The policy was signed into law as a compromise measure in 1993. The rule allows gay men and lesbians to serve as long as they don’t reveal their orientation or engage in homosexual acts. The decision by Phillips has reversed the focal point of the issue to Congress, where the House has passed its own version of a repeal measure scheduled to go before the Senate next week. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 14,000 service members have been driven out of the military under “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

This cruel policy is just as wrong today as it has been since its origin. These are patriotic citizens who have volunteered to serve our country. Shouldn’t we be thanking them? Who has the right to tell someone he is unqualified for honorable service due to his or her sexual orientation? The military should be more focused on ensuring discipline, defense of the Constitution and unit cohesion. There is no evidence that says gay soldiers perform poorly and undermine military discipline. Other countries have removed bans on homosexuals serving openly with no unfavorable effects on military performance. Additionally, the military

is wasting a lot of money just to make sure that gay soldiers are discharged. In a report by the Government Accountability Office, $190 million has been spent on recruiting and training replacements for gay service members who were discharged in the past 10 years. This has gone on for too long and needs to end. Even pop singer Lady Gaga, a gay rights activist, made a statement at the VMAs when she showed up with servicemen and women who have been discharged from the military due to this law. Take Gaga’s task at hand and tell our senators to repeal this policy. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Postpone relationships to make friendships

JENNY HAMILTON CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

y pic a lly, I am cynical of long distant relationships, especially for new college students. In fact, the first two years of college, I stayed out of a serious rela-

tionship. Honestly, relationships hold you back, especially long-distance ones. Now, I am not telling you to immediately break up with your significant other upon reading this. By no means should that be done unless you have good reason. Yes, I understand girlfriends

and boyfriends are comforting and reliable. However, you miss great opportunities by tying yourself to someone right off the bat. For example, say you are out at a party or a bar and someone asks for your number. If you are in a relationship, you know the obligation of saying, “No thanks… taken.” For fear of unfaithfulness, you may become terrified of the opposite sex. Trust me. I have been there. Therefore, here is my solution: Do not be hasty to jump into a relationship. First, focus on the relationships around you. If you jump into a relationship and make no other friends, who will be there to pick up the pieces if a nasty break-up happens? I know it is cliché, but the friends you make in college will become your best

friends and some will be as close as family, so you should probably take the time to meet them. Also, to keep yourself out of trouble (if you are living in the dorms), make nice with your RA. They are there to help and can get you out of sticky situations such as a psycho roommate, a broken AC or, god forbid, a break-up. Do not be afraid to branch out. Embrace a new culture. Welcome to college, the unsupervised life. It’s a wild world, but do not let anyone hold you back. This is your time. Jenny Hamilton is a junior majoring in broadcast journalism and sports administration. She may be contacted at jhamilton@themiamihurricane. com.

POLL RESULTS: Would you pay an extra $1 so SG could do more? Maybe, if I knew Yes, I love SG! No, it doesn’t affect me. more specifics. 17% 44%

39%

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Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ challenged

T

ANNA QUARNSTROM SWEDEN Senior

Jenny Hamilton, Contributing Columnist

The Miami

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

UP!

Therefore, here is my solution: Do not be hasty to jump into a relationship.

com

Total Voters: 83

DO YOU THINK THE IBIS RIDE WILL LAST THIS YEAR? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

September 16 - September 19, 2010

EDITOR IN CHIEF Christina De Nicola

BUSINESS MANAGER Jacob Crows

MANAGING EDITOR Laura Edwins

PRODUCTION MANAGER Brian Schuman

ART DIRECTOR Brittney Bomnin

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

NEWS EDITOR Alexandra Leon

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers

PHOTO EDITOR Lindsay Brown

ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

ACCOUNT REPS Isabel Gonzalez Shoshana Gottesman MIsha Mayeur Jack Whaley

EDGE EDITOR Danielle Kaslow OPINION EDITOR Kyli Singh COPY CHIEF Alexa Lopez

WEBMASTER Ivan Rocha Nicole Collazo

ONLINE EDITOR Steve Pierre ASST. NEWS EDITORS Parker Davis Nicolette Roque ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Adrianne D’Angelo DESIGNERS Allison Goodman Felipe Lobon Demi Rafuls

GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz COPY EDITORS Amanda Gomez Stephanie Parra Sagette Van Embden

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Got a craving for cooking? Take a lifestyles cooking class on Thursday at the Coral Gables Whole Foods Market. For more information and to register, call 305-421-9421.

CollegeFashion

ista.com interactive than any other type of writing; it’s easy and fun to read,” said sophomore Christine Freeman, who also blogs for the site. In the last decade, fashion has tranThe site’s creator, Amy Levin, has been sitioned from print to online. With a new a crusader for college fashion since her years generation of writers who show off their at Indiana University. She saw an untapped sartorial tastes in blogs and fully integrated niche in college fashion writing. Web magazines, fashion can be at anyone’s “As a frequent magazine reader, I often fingertips. feel like the clothing One of these sites, being showcased is CollegeFashionista. highly unrealistic for com, is a college-kidsomeone who isn’t meets-“style guru” model thin and ready haven for the budREAD the fashion to shell out tons of ding fashionistas at money,” Levin said. reports of fellow students: universities across the “I saw first-hand at seniors MacKenzie nation. With over 75 Indiana University Green, Michelle Leibowitz schools participating, the love that students and Kelly Fitzpatrick, this site is the perfect have for fashion and junior Alyssa Brodie and mesh of personal style making it work withsophomore Ayram Edery. and campus trendin their budget.” spotting. Levin has used University of the media shift from ALSO, check out the Miami senior Kelly online to print to her UMiami style reports Fitzpatrick, has been full advantage, revelby logging onto interning with Colleging in the day-to-day, Collegefashionista.com, eFashionista since the hour-to-hour curand clicking on University start of the summer. rency that is provided of Miami from the “Select “I love that I can from online blogs. School” tab. work on my own time. “With magaIt gives you a lot of lezines or print media, verage to really find we have to wait each things you like,” Fitzmonth for the newpatrick said. est issue to come out, To Fitzpatrick, the appeal seems to be whereas with blogs the turnaround time on that the Web site brings fashion down to the information is much quicker,” she said. “Our level of typical college students, making it Style Gurus are always on the street taking something that is accessible for everyone. photographs that immediately go on the site, “A lot of designers still sell to the well- readers don’t have to wait weeks or a month off, white-collar adults, but I think they’re to see their photo appear.” starting to notice that our demographic is a For Levin, style is constant and evolvlot edgier; we’re more likely to take risks and ing all at once, which is why it is so fun to try new things, and that’s definitely some- document. thing that CollegeFashionista really tries to “My style is always changing,” she said. capture,” she said. “Ask me in a month and I’m sure I will be A single post usually includes a photo onto something else.” snapped of someone on campus whose outfit is unique, along with a write-up that explains Nicole Adlman may be contacted at nadlman@ how his or her style is à la mode. themiamihurricane.com. “Blogging is much more expressive and

BY NICOLE ADLMAN SENIOR EDGE WRITER

THE FASHION 411

COURTESY AMY LEVIN

PICTURE PERFECT: CollegeFashonista.com bloggers capture students modeling edgy and unique looks on campus. Blogging provides a new, dynamic forum that can showcase fashion quicker than other media.

September 16 - September 19, 2010

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HOMECOMING FROM PAGE 1

‘Easy A,’ witty and memorable BY SARAH B. PILCHICK SENIOR EDGE WRITER

Teen movies have a certain cachet. Some are established classics, think “Ferris Bueller” or anything from John Hughes’ filmography, and some, like “Mean Girls,” are newer. But the funny thing about the genre is that the truly great films become legends, while the mediocre are simply forgotten. “Easy A” may not be as memorable as “Sixteen Candles” or “The Breakfast Club,” but after “Mean Girls,” it’s the closest thing our generation has to offer. “Easy A” takes a familiar concept, a rumor becoming unmanageable, and makes it seem fresh while borrowing liberally from classic literature like “The Scarlet Letter,” newer films like “Saved!” and the aforementioned “Mean Girls.” Emma Stone, “Easy A’s” presumed adulteress, carries the film effortlessly; she is a deft comedian with impeccable timing. Stone more than holds her own against the fantastic cast: The always-wonderful Stanley Tucci and Patricia Clarkson are her parents, while her school’s faculty includes such luminaries as Malcolm McDowell, Thomas Haden Church and Lisa Kudrow. Amanda Bynes’ shrill Bible thumping pales in comparison to Mandy Moore’s character in “Saved!” and Penn Badgley will forever

COURTESY THE AGENCY GROUP

FEELING THE MUSIC: Singer Ms. Lauryn Hill will headline for the University of Miami’s Homecoming performance in November, marking her return to the stage after a 10-year hiatus. Ms. Hill has previously won five Grammy awards. “A talent like Ms. Lauryn Hill comes around once in a lifetime," Winik said. "Her art has touched the lives of millions." Despite a scattering of performances, including traveling with the hip-hop festival Rock The Bells this past summer, the 35 year old has spent the majority of the past decade at home with her five children. After recently returning to the studio, Ms. Hill’s concert on the green, free for all students, will mark a big stepping stone in her second coming to the popular music scene. Atlanta native and rising hip-hop star Donnis, who will also perform at the Homecoming Concert, expressed his excitement in opening for such a legendary act. “I really can’t believe it,” the 26-year-old rapper said. “It’s truly an honor to open this concert, it’s going to be a crazy night.” Ms. Hill, whose most famous vocal performance came on the Fugees track “Killing Me Softly,” won a Grammy for 8

EDGE

Album of the Year in 1999 for "Miseducation." She also won Grammys for Best New Artist, Best R&B Song and Best R&B Album the same year. Though previous acts, like last year’s set by hip-hop legend Common, have managed to impress, no artist performing at Homecoming has ever been as critically acclaimed as Ms. Hill. “We are thrilled that Ms. Hill has decided to join us at the University of Miami as she makes her highly anticipated return to the stage,” Winik said. Camron Ghorbi may be contacted at cghorbi@themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Post what you think about the headliner: The Miami Hurricane or @MiamiHurricane September 16 - September 19, 2010

“EASY A”

STARRING: Emma Stone DIRECTED BY: Will Gluck MPAA RATING: PG-13 play variations of his “Gossip Girl” character. If any part of the film rings false, it’s the (spoiler!) budding romance between Stone and Badgley’s characters, but the two do their best. “Easy A” is easily one of the best comedies in years. It’s fast-paced, extremely clever, incredibly funny, fairly surprising and full of impressive performances, including a starmaking turn from its leading lady. It may not be as instantly iconic as its 80s film counterparts, but it certainly has the potential to rise to the top of the class. “Easy A” may not define this generation on the same level that “Mean Girls” has, but it definitely deserves to be remembered. Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@themiamihurricane.com. FINISH READING AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM


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SPORTS

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the new ranking for the football team in the Associated Press poll

the number of tweets that will be posted by football players the rest of the season

FOOTBALL PROFILE

Football coach makes hearty comeback Stoutland recovers from surgery BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

Offensive line coach Jeff Stoutland doesn’t like to reminisce about the past. When he’s coaching his offensive linemen, he’s worried about improving and moving on to the next play, always looking ahead. So when he learned his family had a history of heart problems, he ignored them. But something finally changed. “I work out every morning and I just had different feelings in my neck and my chest,” the fourth-year assistant coach said. “I didn’t feel normal. For once in my life I was smart. I listened to my symptoms. I decided to clear my conscious and go get checked out. It turned out it wasn’t a waste of time.” Turns out, Stoutland needed to go through surgery. In mid-May, Stoutland, underwent triple bypass surgery. “I had a 99 percent blockage, which is severe. I was real close [to dying],” Stoutland said. “The doctor told me, ‘You’ve got a problem, be glad you didn’t waste your time.’ It all escaladed. I had a cathorization in my wrist, to them not being able to put stints in, to having to have open heart surgery. Then there was an issue with the [atrial fibrillation]. It was just unbelievable. It was a roller coaster, and it gets you to think twice about things.” He was in intensive care for a couple of days. Stoutland’s wife, a published children’s author, stood by him every step of the way during the procedure. But that wasn’t the only support he received. Stoutland’s entire offensive line made frequent visits to the hospital to support their mentor, while UM

Triple Bypass Surgery  A surgeon removes a vein or artery from another part of the body and attaches it to the blocked artery that leads into the heart. The surgeon bypasses the blockage, which supplies the heart with the oxygen it needs.

 When an artery to the heart becomes blocked, the heart does not receive enough oxygen, which results in chest pain or heart attacks.

GRAPHIC BY FELIPE LOBON STEVEN STUTS // The Miami Hurricane

A CHANGE OF HEART: Offensive line coach Jeff Stoutland directs University of Miami football players during practice. President Donna E. Shalala and head coach Randy Shannon visited him as well. “When I found out I was like, ‘Holy cow,’” redshirt junior center Tyler Horn said. “This all happened so fast. We all went up there to visit him. Stoutland was trying to push his limits but the doctor told him to calm down. That’s just his mentality to push it to the limit.” Horn was one of the first players Stoutland recruited. “He became the o-line coach only around two weeks before

signing day,” Horn said. “He actually came to my school in Memphis. He was talking to me and finally I said, ‘Coach, are you going to offer me a scholarship or not?’ I feel like he hand-picked me because I wasn’t recruited heavily at all. The fact that he thought I was good enough to play here tells you that it’s a special relationship.” There was an arduous rehab process over the summer. Stoutland lost 20 to 25 pounds, but he managed to never miss a practice or a meeting.

He claims he has more energy post surgery than he had before. “The doctor told [the offensive linemen] that he fixed me up to the point where I was 18 again,” Stoutland said. “He didn’t know what I was like before but he told me I was going to be a lot more energetic.” He used the newfound youth to reel in the biggest offensive line prospect in the country. Stoutland brought in a number of highly regarded offensive linemen, none bigger than the No. 1-rated Seantrel

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Henderson. Henderson committed to Miami in July, after being released on his scholarship at USC because the Trojans committed NCAA violations. Stoutland has a message for people suffering from chest pains. “I encourage everyone out there who has a history of that in your family to go get a stress test,” he said. “Get checked out. It saved my life.” Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.

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The scoop on the team Ultimate frisbee

gets competitive Team increases its participation BY PATRICK RILEY CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION: “Voice of the Hurricanes” Joe Zagacki prepares to tape an installment of Hurricane Gameday, a new UMTV production that focuses on Hurricane football.

Show gives inside look on players BY RICO DOMINGUEZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

How many shows that are broadcast all over the state of Florida are getting unrestricted access to your favorite football team? Only one. “Hurricane Gameday” has found its new permanent home here at the School of Communication. Emmy Award-winning sports producer and editor Nelson Martel was brought in to help with UMTV’s “Hurricane Gameday” by mentoring the students. But the backbone of the show is comprised of students who work as the crew and handle all the filming. The opportunity gives communication students handson experience in producing a show that reaches 6.4 million homes in Florida on the Comcast CSS network. 10

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“It’s [in] Studio C which is part of the cable studios that are through the School of Communication,” Broadcast Operations Director Natalia Crujeires said. “What we have is a new set element within that studio; it has been specifically designed for [Hurricane Gameday].” Since “Hurricane Gameday” is now on campus and filmed by students, it can now provide unlimited access to fans of UM athletics. So far this season, “Hurricane Gameday” has provided its wide array of viewers access to Randy Shannon during a pre-season scrimmage, as well as giving viewers a glimpse the football team on a trip to the movies during their leisure time. For future shows, “Hurricane Gameday” will provide weight room footage, access to the locker room on game days and more time with the team to and from the away games. The show will not just

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cover football, but will also get up close and personal with both men’s and women’s basketball and baseball later this year. The contract with CSS runs during the academic school year. “The pressure is on,” Crujeires said. “This particular show [differs from] other shows in that it is put on for a network on CSS which brings a whole new dimension and expectation of course.” Rico Dominguez may be contacted at rdominguez@themiamihurricane. com.

CATCH “HURRICANE GAMEDAY” THURSDAYS at 5:30 p.m. SATURDAY MORNINGS at 10:30 a.m. It can be seen in the dorms on campus on channel 63.

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“Fun. Fast. Intense.” That is how junior Diego Donna, the men’s ultimate frisbee club president at UM, describes his sport. This Miami local fell in love with the fast-paced game in high school when he started to play with some friends. Now he is the president of a promising and highly-motivated club team, the “Miami Vice,” playing off the 80s hit TV series. The six-year old program at UM has ambitious goals for the upcoming season. “We want to make it out of the sectionals and advance to the regionals,” said senior Ari Schiftan, the captain and vocal leader of the team. It is not like the team hasn’t had success before; they won the Heat of the Huck (a deep pass in Frisbee jargon) tournament in Valdosta, Ga. three years ago and the FIT in Melbourne, Fla. last year. But the consensus within the team is that this year’s group has the tools to take the next step. The first test will come mid-November when they will compete in Orlando in the sixth annual Kennel Kickoff followed by the Janus and Warm-up tournaments in January and the famous Trouble in Vegas tournament in February.

“We’re planning on mixing and matching to field an A and B team,” Donna said. They can afford this team reorganization because the interest in ultimate frisbee has been steadily rising over the past years, causing player participation to increase. According to Donna, the club had 32 members last year and is now at 40. The number keeps fluctuating though because new players can show up to practice at any time before tournament season and participate right away. Although official tryouts aren’t required, the team is not short on competitive spirit. As soon as their practice begins, the intensity of the sport is evident. It is like watching a mixture of football and basketball. Offensive plays are called out, players jump to the sky to snag the flying disc and dive on the ground to make improbable catches. Participants battle the hot August sun and some are even close to getting sick on the field. Nevertheless, the whole group is still involved and animated. Even the players on the sideline bark out encouragement and instructions to their teammates. This team chemistry and steady influx of young talent has everybody excited about the upcoming season. Patrick Riley may be contacted at priley@themiamihurricane.com.

IF YOU GO WHERE: IM fields WHEN: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 5-7:30 p.m. CONTACT: Register at miami.edu/leadandserve.

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dear ...

Dear V: Am I a sexual predator? Dear Sexual Predator, , A few nights ago, I got drunk, knocked on my roommate’s door and confessed my attraction to him while he was lying in bed in nothing more than his skivvies. And then I asked him if I could sleep in his room because our other roommate was having sex so loudly that I couldn’t sleep. I feel pathetic and embarrassed for having thrown myself at my roommate and completely freaked out that I got wasted enough to do something I have daydreamed about but wouldn’t do sober. I am a girl, and if the situation were reversed, I would commit a huge double standard because I would back any woman who did not feel safe continuing to live with a dude who did what I did. I feel like I should be held accountable and move out immediately, though my housemate has told me he doesn’t feel threatened and that I should stay. I can’t stop wondering... am I A Sexual Predator?

You are not a sexual predator. Calm the hell down and relax. You are by far not the first person who has done this, and I’ve never heard of anyone else referring to themselves like a rapist. Did he force you out of the room and say he was uncomfortable? Did you take advantage of him? No. All you are guilty of is making a pass at someone while tipsy and this is certainly not a crime. Not to mention, he told you that everything was fine and he didn’t mind you staying. If he really felt weird, he wouldn’t have said anything and would have just let you move out. Stuff happens, we’re all human, and I’m sure this will blow over. A month from now, I doubt you’ll even be thinking about it anymore. You may want to think about that double standard the next time someone makes a pass at you. Yes, men are known to be more sexually violent but that

obviously doesn’t mean they all are. You weren’t trying to be creepy or pushy: you were drunk. Remember this the next time a guy makes a sloppy move on you in the Grove and you assume he’s a “predator.” Unless he’s really taking it too far or getting aggressive, cut him some slack. Give yourself a break, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane.com or send your tweets to @Dear_V.

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