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The Miami

Vol. 87, Issue 1 | Aug. 24 - Aug. 26, 2009

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

CAUSE TO CELEBRATE GEORGE WILL RETURNS

UM rises to top-50 ranking, most diverse student body

THE RENOWNED COLUMNIST IS BACK FOR A SECOND YEAR PAGE 4

NEWS page 3

‘ADAM’ AN ADVANCE LOOK AT THE UPCOMING FILM PAGE 14 BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

August 24 - August 26, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

Check out whatÕs exclusively available at

 Interested in a UM-themed scooter? Get the scoop from Ed S. Fishman.

TheMiamiHurricane.com

 Examine why the student activity center is delayed with Christina De Nicola.

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

Megan Terilli looks at the protest by a controversial church picket UM Law School’s graduation ceremony.

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash ART DIRECTOR Shayna Blumenthal

BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick MANAGING EDITOR Christina De Nicola

NEWS EDITOR Ed S. Fishman

SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

OPINION EDITOR Danielle Kaslow

EDGE EDITOR Hilary Saunders

WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky PHOTO EDITOR Brittney Bomnin COPY CHIEF Sarah B. Pilchick ASST. NEWS EDITOR Megin Terilli Lila Albizu

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Matt Wallach Lauren Whiddon ADVERTISING EDITOR Emma CasonPratt

DESIGNERS Kenneth Garcia

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Ramon Galiana

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Tanya Thompson

ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

ASST. WEBMASTER Shayna Blumenthal

PUBLICIST Jacob Crows

COPY EDITOR Katey Ceccarelli FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

ACCOUNT REPS Carolyn Babbit Shoshana Gottesman Misha Mayeur Katie Norwood Brian Schuman Jack Whaley

©2009 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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NEWS

The Stamps family will fund a new scholarship for incoming freshmen in Frost Music School, according to an article by Lila Albizu. Elena Martcheva covers UM’s win in the Budgetball tournament in DC. Sign up for our email edition at TheMiamiHurricane.com

Venjah Hunte will testify in Sean Taylor’s murder Venjah Hunte, one of the five suspects in the murder of former UM safety Sean Taylor, is set to testify against the other suspects after deciding not to withdraw his TAYLOR guilty plea. Hunte, 21, was arrested last year in connection to Taylor’s murder.

Hunte, along with Timmy Lee Brown, 18, Eric Rivera,19, Charles Wardlow, 20, and Jason Scott Mitchell, 21, allegedly drove to Taylor’s house in Cutler Bay on Nov. 26, 2007 intending to rob it. They were surprised to find Taylor and his girlfriend at home. Taylor was shot in the leg and died the next day from blood loss. Hunte pleaded guilty to second-degree manslaughter and armed burglary after being arrested. In return for his testimony against the four other suspects, he would get 29 years in prison instead of a life sentence.

In a hearing in Miami on Friday, Aug. 7, Hunte was supposed to withdraw from his plea deal but ended up not doing so. Michael Hornung withdrew from the case citing irreconcilable differences in April. Hunte has since hired Reginald Mathis as his lawyer. As part of his plea deal he is set to testify against the four remaining suspects, amongst which is Eric Rivera, the alleged gunman. - Lila Albizu

Vincent Cardinal resigns Vincent Cardinal, former chairman of the theatre arts and producing artistic director of the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre, has resigned from his post. He is moving to Garden City, N.Y., where he accepted a position as associate dean of performing arts and director of a new performing arts center at Adelphi University. CARDINAL “It is a wonderful opportunity to take a step up on the academic ladder; it is a very good university with exciting aspirations,” said Cardinal in an e-mail to The Miami Hurricane. Cardinal was also a resident faculty master for Hecht Residential College and Associate Master for Mahoney in his eight years at UM. “With an extraordinarily supportive president, world class theatre faculty and staff, and amazingly talented students - it has been a great pleasure to work at UM,” Cardinal said. While serving as Producing Artistic Director of the Ring Theatre, Cardinal produced 46 co-curricular main stage productions and about 100 productions in the Hecht Studio Theatre. “I am gratified that the theatre is well supported by both the campus community and the Coral Gables community,” Cardinal said.“Many of our shows sell out completely, which is a tribute to the value of watching talented young people who are learning through production.” - Lila Albizu

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

August 24 - August 26, 2009

ON THE COVER WELCOME ALL: President Shalala and Sebastian the Ibis greet new students at the annual picnic at her home.

Cox addition possible with stimulus funds The University of Miami has drawn a proposal to expand the Cox Science Building that would take advantage of the funds available in President Barack Obama’s stimulus package. This application is due Monday and the rewarding of funds will not be determined until six to eight months later. If the funds are approved then the building will begin immediately. “When you accept stimulus funds they keep you to the deadline,” Kathryn Tosney, the biology chair, said. The project calls for $18 million from the stimulus package and an additional $5

million from the provost’s office. The new building will be located behind the Cox building which is currently occupied by a small lake. This building will be different than the Cox building. It will not have people’s names on the labs but instead will be labeled for the type of research being done in them. Therefore, multiple people will be able to do their research in the same lab. These plans were designed to make this building a center for interdisciplinary work in the sciences. - Ed S. Fishman


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Crunching the numbers: UM rises in rank UM’s diversity could negatively affect US News rankings BY ED S. FISHMAN NEWS EDITOR

The University of Miami’s spot at No. 50 on the US News and World Report’s annual ranking of the best colleges might not be an accurate assessment of the school for potential students. “What is ranked as the number one school on this list might be a disaster for some students,” Mary

Sapp, the assistant vice-president of planning and institutional research at UM, said. “Different schools emphasize different things.” Sapp continued to say that if a student wanted diversity, then UM would probably be on the top of their list. However, UM’s diverse student body, rated no. 1 by the Princeton Review for race and class interaction, had a detrimental effect on the school’s spot on these rankings conducted by US News and World Report. The foreign members of the student body that speak English as a second language are going to be at a disadvantage when taking the SAT or ACT, according to Sapp. These test results account for 7.5

percent of the university’s score on the US News and World Report’s ranking. Also, UM accepts more finically disadvantaged students than private schools ranked better on the list. Sapp said this lack of finacial resources is detrimental to the university’s graduation rate as many students simply run out of money for their education. Graduation rates account for five percent of the score. US News acknowledges the amount of students that accept Pell Grants, a need-based aid, as having an effect on the predicted graduation rate, but Sapp said there is no correction factor to account for the resulting lower score.

Racial/Ethnic Distribution - Fall 2008 Student Enrollment UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS Total = 10,4222

Hispanic

NEW FRESHMEN

28%

Total = 2,010

White, non-hispanic

55% Hispanic

22% Asian/Pacific Islander

White, non-hispanic

7%

57%

Black, non-hispanic

10%

“It would be too complicated to do so,” she said. UM moved up a spot despite losing points in the Peer Assessment Survey, which is given to hundreds of colleges’ presidents, provosts, and deans of admission. These administrators are asked to rank the academic quality of other undergraduate institutions. Sapp said the results can carry bias. In a presentation this summer at the annual forum of the Association for Institutional Research in Atlanta, Catherine Watt, a director of a research center at Clemson, explained that Clemson officials gave schools they competed against a below average ranking in these surveys. Clemson has denied these charges. However, Sapp did say that these rankings were useful to reference if a student agrees on the criteria that these schools are being graded on and compared schools on this list in clusters. The difference in scores between schools ranked close together is too small to show real difference. UM ranked two points behind Florida, which was in a three way tie at 47. “The top 10 schools are better than the schools ranked 40 to 50,” Sapp said. “And the schools in the 40s and 50s are better than the schools in the 70s.” UM’s No. 1 ranking in the Princeton Review’s “Best 371 Colleges,” for race and class interaction is a natural part of the university. “The university has always

been interested in diversity,” Edward Gills, the assistant vice president for enrollment management and executive director of admission, said. “It defines us and we celebrate it.” This ranking was determined by surveying about 325 students from all colleges listed in the book. These individuals were asked to rate their college on several topics including the race and class interaction. “The local surroundings are very diverse. People that want diversity see that and come here and it starts to feed on itself,” Gills said. Ed S. Fishman may be contacted at efishman@themiamihurricane.com.

For the full version of the article and the US News and Princeton Review reports cited in the article, visit themiamihurricane. com

Asian/Pacific Islander

10%

UM Ranking in US News & World Report

Black, non-hispanic

11%

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Year * University of Miami

Total = 4,901

Hispanic

22% White, non-hispanic

57%

Asian/Pacific Islander

13%

Black, non-hispanic

7%

University of Florida

Florida State University

2003

60

48

112

2004

58

50

111

2005

55

50

109

2006

54

47

110

2007

52

49

112

2008

51

49

102

2009

50

47

102

* Year of the U.S. News & World Report Ranking published. Data based on the Fall of previous year. Source: U.S. News & World Report

August 24 - August 26, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Help wanted Jobs still exist for college graduates BY ELENA SCHMIDT CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Toppel’s resume guide being sponsored by Lehman Brothers, a global financial firm that declared bankruptcy in 2008, does not inspire confidence in the job market for recent graduates. Employers hired slightly fewer 2009 graduates who applied for jobs than in 2008 and significantly less than in 2007, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers. Toppel’s Graduation Survey, given to University of Miami winter and spring graduates, says that post-graduate plans for the University of Miami 2009 graduates did not change drastically from 2008. In both years, graduates said they either planned to work or go to graduate school. “The same number of students were placed [in jobs] as well,” said Frits Bigham, assistant director for career development at Toppel Career Center. Though the placement rate is steady, evidence of our economic slump is apparent in the decline of graduates placed in full time positions and increase of those placed in part time positions. The economic downturn should not signal hopelessness for most of UM seniors. According to Megan Garber, assistant director for career development and outreach at Toppel, job prospects for accounting and engineering remain strong. However, government jobs may have the strongest prospects. “The government is spending more money and its current workforce is retiring, so the government is projected to increase in hiring.” Average entry salaries for UM students have also remained constant from 2008 to 2009, at an average of $46,200 and $53,000 for accounting jobs according to Bigham.

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NEWS

The majority of students who accepted positions had an internship throughout their college career, according to the Graduation Survey. “Students who have not interned or started looking for a job are those who are really going to suffer,” said Bigham. Samantha Ku, a senior who is majoring in marketing and finance, is enrolled in her third internship at United Way. As an incoming senior, Ku already has a pending offer for an entry-level position. Toppel hosts the Career Kickoff in the fall, and Job Search week in the spring, providing important seminars on how to tackle the job market. Toppel also helps facilitate meaningful internships through the Toppel Internship Program.

George Will returns to UM for convocation

Elena Schmidt may be contacted at eschmidt@themiamihurricane.com.

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

GUESS WHO’S BACK, BACK AGAIN: George Will presented his speech, entitled“Liberals, Conservatives, and Hurricanes,” last Friday to the freshman class.

TOPPEL’S GRADUATION SURVEY EMPLOYMENT Placed in Job: 39% (of all those who planned on employment) Searching [Currently]: 36% Looking after Graduation: 25% GRADUATE SCHOOL Those who planned on Graduate School Spring Survey ’08: 29% Spring ’09 Survey: 27% Accepted into Grad School Spring ‘09 59% (of the 29% who applied) Spring 08 50 %

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Right-wing columnist speaks against the left BY MARK L. DANIELS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Pulitzer Prize winning columnist George Will returned to the BankUnited Center at the University of Miami last Friday to deliver the New Student Convocation address to the incoming freshman class. Last year, Will delivered a lecture entitled “The Political Argument Today,” where he argued that the nation had become a welfare state that redistributed capital from the working young to the retired and dispossessed. This year, Will re-emphasized the danger posed by entitlement programs, discussing the problem in the context of national

August 24 - August 26, 2009

health reform. “Obama is determined to expand the government’s role in the marketplace,” he said. “He wants to bring equality to the system by circumscribing free action.” Will argued that government programs addressing inequality result in unintended consequences that are often disastrous. He referenced Cash for Clunkers, the government program offering Americans money towards fuel-efficient cars when trading in vehicles that get less than 18 miles per gallon. “But the program hurts the charities that receive these cars as donations,” countered Will. Adriyan Rotati, a freshman political science major, asked Will if the coverage of 46 million uninsured Americans was a moral or fiscal issue. Will said it was both. “Spending other people’s money for a program they would not spend money on is a moral hazard,” he said. The focal point of Will’s lecture was the importance of thoughtful discourse and the danger of reliance on the government

for solutions. “Anyone can be a Republican or a Democrat but not everyone can be a Hurricane,” said Will. “You have to be able to think.” Will referenced several other examples of ineffective government programs such as subsidizing ethanol production, which led to corn riots in Mexico. He did not endorse any of the proposed health care or climate legislation. At the end of his lecture, he said students should relish in the widening income gap between America’s poorest and richest, as it validated the worth of their degrees. Quoting the poet Robert Frost, Will said he did not want to live in a society where everyone is on equal footing. “You are here to rise. You are here to join the elite.” Mark L. Daniels may be contacted at mdaniels@themiamihurricane.com.


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August 24 - August 26, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Grove shuttles to return within month Revamped Ibis Ride to resume September 24 BY RAMON GALIANA OF THE STAFF

Last semester, the controversial decision to cancel the Ibis Ride left students without a way to get to Coconut Grove. The Ibis Ride will not immediately be reinstalled, but the Dean of Students Office, DOSO, has formulated plans for its return. The popular Ibis Ride Shuttle will commence again this semester with a proposed start date of September 24- this time, however, with stricter rules on student conduct. According to Assistant Dean of Student Nanette Vega, the reason behind the delayed start date is to give students the chance to adjust to campus life without the shuttle service. The program was cancelled on April 7 because of recurring incidents of violence in addition to frequent incidents of inappropriate behavior related to alcohol. Though a student government campaign to “Save the Ibis Ride” did have a small impact on behavior in the shuttles, it was not enough for DOSO to allow the program’s

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NEWS

continuation. “The university has no desire to annually threaten cancellation of the Ibis Ride Shuttle,” wrote Ricardo Hall, Dean of Students, in an email to The Miami Hurricane. On Sept. 24, the shuttle will run Thursdays through Saturdays, 9 p.m. - 2 a.m., with pickup points at Stanford Circle and the apartment area. Students will be required to present their CaneCard to be allowed on the shuttle. According to Vega, violators of university regulations will be banned from the service. “We cannot ignore behavior that places our students and the drivers at risk while promoting a negative image of our students and the university,” said Hall. “I am very appreciative that the administration kept Student Government involved and in the loop for all of the Ibis Ride discussions,” said Lionel Moise, the student government president. “They were very receptive to the opinions of students in regards to bringing the Ibis Ride back and I am very excited that it will be running this fall.” There will be no Ibis Ride Shuttle for Halloween this year, according to Vega. Ramon Galiana may be contacted at rgaliana@ themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

August 24 - August 26, 2009

IBIS RIDE TIMELINE 2002

Michael Johnston, SG president, proposes the Ibis Ride

April 3, 2009

The Hurricane reports that the Ibis Ride may been suspected because of more than 10 incidents of vomiting, alcohol violations, and more

April 7, 2009

Ibis Ride to the Grove cancelled

April 15 - 28

The Ibis Ride Committee met three times between April 15 and 28. It met with student organizations and residential college and held the forum.

April 27, 2009

Dean of Students and SG hold open student forum to hear student opinions about the Ibis Ride

September 24, 2009

Ibis Ride scheduled to resume


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Law school overadmits students Applicants offered tuition remission to delay entry BY NINA RUGGIERO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The verdict is in—the University of Miami School of Law is on the rise. This year it received 4,700 applications, a 10 percent increase from last year, and the number of students who sent in the deposit indicating they planned to attend rose eight percent. “This didn’t happen anywhere else,” Dean Trish White said. “People are excited

about Miami. For us this is very good news.” The numbers were so high that White sent out 700 letters to the students that sent in deposits asking them to make sure they were serious about law school. This letter offered students a $5,000 scholarship if they delayed entry into the law school by one year and performed 120 hours of community service. “I was afraid that so many people wanted to study law this year because they saw it as a safe field in the economic crisis,” White said. “I wanted them to know that the future of the legal profession is very uncertain right now.” Thirty students accepted White’s offer. The school used the same formula as in previous years to decide the number of stu-

dents to accept in order to end up with about 420 students. The average law student applies to about 12 universities, so law schools commonly accept substantially more students than they plan on hosting. The semester began with 530 students and Dean White said the school is running smoothly. Extra professors, space, and student service employees have greatly enhanced the learning experience. The law school is using a 170 person classroom in the Learning Center as well as space in the Dooly Memorial building for evening classes. Nina Ruggiero may be contacted at nruggiero@ themiamihurricane.com.

August 24 - August 26, 2009

ENTERING CLASS SIZE 2007: 489 2008: 377 2009: 530 AVERAGE LSAT 2007: 157 2008:157 2009: 157 AVERAGE GPA 2007: 3.414 2008: 3.384 2009: 3.443 STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO 2007: 19.2 to 1 2008: 16.6 to 1 2009: Not computed until October

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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OPINION speak

UP!

“What was your craziest summer night?”

MARTA M. TOBEÑAS Senior

“A Christmas in July party.”

MARISSA ZERBO Junior

“A midnight swim with my summer lover.”

As a freshman, I wish I had understood that college students’ lives revolve around sex. -JENNY HAMILTON Contributing columnist

The freshman’s guide to hook ups

A

s a freshman, I wish I had understood that college students’ lives revolve around sex. I grew up in a conservative Texas town and attended a private Christian school for 14 years. Needless to say, I viewed the world in JENNY HAMILTON CONTRIBUTING accordance with my upCOLUMNIST bringing, and experienced some rude awakenings and awkward situations in college. From my experience, here is some needed information that will assist surviving a horny roommate or friend throughout your first year. Even though you may think it will never happen to you, walking in on a hook-up or overhearing sex will happen. You may even be a part of the sex scene yourself. The best thing to do is face the embarrassing situation, move on, and laugh it off. One of the most essential lessons to learn is that nothing is secret when living in a dorm. Cheating on your significant other, sneaking in a quick hook up, or vomiting in the bathroom due to too much of a good time will inevitably be discovered. I remember sitting in a friend’s dorm room and all of a sudden hearing a rhythmic drumming from

next door. It did not take long to realize the source of the noise. It wasn’t much longer before most of the girls on our hall knew that our neighbor had a new man in her life, and they were continually “playing the drums.” Also, do not forget that you are living with another person. Other people do not want to be woken up by moaning or shaking from a one-night stand or relationship. Roommate boundaries must be set whether the two of you like it or not. Bringing home a different babe every night might earn you “man points,” but it will not earn respect from your roommate. Living with someone can be hell. I suggest trying to not make it worse. Overall, if a sex-driven lifestyle is your choice, be aware of the risks. Get tested every now and then, and learn to respect the people you are living with. Have fun within your limits, but be prepared for those embarrassing moments, whether it’s accidentally interrupting a hook-up or the infamous Saturday morning walk of shame. Jenny Hamilton is a sophomore majoring in broadcast journalism. She may be contacted at jhamilton@ themiamihurricane.com.

A very literary summer JONATHAN YUNES Sophomore

“There was a mechanical bull and ass-less chaps.”

DOUG BENNETT Sophomore

“A photo-shoot with some friends and my car, an ‘05 Mustang.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. compiled by

ANNA IRANI

W

hile browsing a bookstore in my hometown, I noticed a nearby teenager donning a “Class of 2010” t-shirt. “What are you looking for?” I asked, prepared to show off. “To Kill a Mockingbird. SARAH HARTNIG Have you read it?” CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST I was appalled. Although I attended a prestigious private school I had never read the classic. It was not required, and I never thought to read the book on my own. “What else are you looking for?” I asked, hoping the next few novels would be more familiar. They weren’t. I left the literature section of the store and approached the “Summer Reading” table at the back, where I realized I had significant holes in my education.

I decided that over the summer, I would make time to read the classic novels that had eluded me. But the whole time I was reading, I couldn’t help asking myself how watching Monty Python and the Holy Grail in its entirety during high school English was more educational than Harper Lee’s classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. What else had my high school neglected to teach me? However, I later realized by reading these novels on my own, I was free to complete them at my own pace. There was not a single pop quiz. I could get more out of them and enjoy the overall process as a leisurely activity. I now appreciate how the holes in my lackluster summer reading lists of the past will continue to benefit my interesting summer reading in the future. Sarah Hartnig is a sophomore majoring in journalism. She may be contacted at shartnig@themiamihurricane. com.

August 24 - August 26, 2009

STAFF EDITORIAL

UMail decision hasty and unrealistic Thanks to a new university policy, logging into your Gmail account to find all your personal and school e-mails in one convenient place is to become a thing of the past. All new students at the University of Miami, including freshmen and graduate students, are now required to have a UMail account for all school e-mails. There is no longer the option to have e-mail forwarded through a UM alias to a third party provider of your choice, such as Gmail. The transition will officially take place on August 25, and accounts will be created automatically. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are currently not included in the new policy and subsequent switch to the UMail system. However, this is not to say the change will not happen in the future. According to the FAQ section of the UMail Web site, the university altered their policy in reaction to the spam filtering systems of e-mail providers. University e-mails were regularly blocked and students were not able to get necessary information. Furthermore, requiring students to use solely UMail for their school e-mails is unreasonable. The stresses of college life and hectic schedules do not allow students the luxury of time. Juggling multiple e-mail addresses, and having to be accountable for every single e-mail received on each account, is ridiculous. Ironically, transitioning new students to UMail will not solve the problem, since students probably won’t bother to check the separate account. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

OPINION

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Orientation Week on campus shows new students the ropes

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

ALL THEY WANT TO DO IS DANCE: The Hurricanettes perform at President Shalala’s home during her picnic yesterday.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

EAGER AND WILLING: A freshman volunteer jumped out of her seat when Bresadola said he was missing his rear end. 10

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

HYPNOTIZED: Rickey Pierre, a resident assistant at Mahoney Residential College, follows suggestions from his seat given by hypnotist Tom Bresadola.

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

GETTING TO KNOW YOU, GETTING TO KNOW ALL ABOUT YOU: New students mingle by the pool as a relief from the hot, Miami weather at President Shalala’s Picnic.

August 24 - August 26, 2009


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Check out www.TheMiamiHurricane.com for a slideshow for more photos from Orientation Week.

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

GET PUMPED: Sebastian and the cheerleaders pep up the crowd at ‘Cane KickOff 2009 on August 20 at the BankUnited Center.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

PEP IT UP: The Band of the Hour performs for freshmen at President Shalala’s Picnic on Sunday.

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

SPIRIT LESSONS: Head football coach Randy Shannon and women’s basketball coach Katie Meier shows the freshmen how to do the “U” at ‘Cane Kick-Off. August 24 - August 26, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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edge

WEDNESDAY 8/26 @ GUSMAN HALL 7 p.m.: Broken Lizard will screen their new film, “The Slammin’ Salmon,” with Q&A and comedy sketch

Fashion 4Word: Back to School Edition BY DANIELLE KASLOW OF THE STAFF

In Miami, fall semester doesn’t exactly evoke images of trees changing color or autumn air. The heat is here to stay, bringing to mind long sunny days in lieu of schoolwork. Not yet wanting to let go of summer, students channel laidback beach styles into smart, university-appropriate looks. It’s all in the accessories. EMBELLISHED FLIP-FLOPS Though sandals are a common occurrence in Miami classrooms and beaches, students still covet their favorite style of footwear.

RAY BANS S With on on-screen screen cameos in films and television shows like Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Miami Vice, Ray Ban’s Wayfarer sunglasses are an enduring style.

BEACH WRAPS As long as these are classy and stylish, there’s no reason you can’t wear a sarong to class.

SEA-INSPIRED JEWELRY Dreaming of days spent snorkeling? Coral-design earrings and pearl accents bring you back to your time in the cool blue sea. Danielle Kaslow may be contacted at dkaslow@ theiamihurricane.com. August 24 - August 26, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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MOVIE REVIEW

Adam

Adam: short, sweet and sad

Starring: Hugh Dancy, Rose Byrne Directed by: Max Mayer Rating: PG-13 for thematic material, sexual content and language.

BY SARAH B. PILCHICK OF THE STAFF

Adam’s trailer does the film a great disservice. It simplifies the film to an almost unforgivable degree: “look at these two star-crossed lovers! Aren’t they precious?” That’s why, upon actually seeing Adam, it is such a delight to see that the film is not as insufferable as previews would make it seem. In fact, Adam is quite sweet – a look at the romance between two New Yorkers, one of whom has Asperger’s Syndrome. The success of the movie is due in large part to its star, Hugh Dancy. While many actors play disabled characters with an Oscar in mind, no such motive is evident in his performance. His Adam – eccentric, towering, and tic-ridden – is a testament to his talent as an actor and proves that Dancy deserves to be known for more than trash like Evening and Confessions Of A Shopaholic. His foil is Rose Byrne, whose Beth is both bewildered and intrigued by the pros-

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pect of dating Adam. Byrne is competent enough in the role, though her wide-eyed take becomes grating by the end. Peter Gallagher and Amy Irving portray Beth’s parents, and their subplot, though seemingly disjointed at first, injects Adam with alternate hits of pathos and humor. Adam is short, sad, and engaging without being saccharine or a public service announcement about Asperger’s. It’s not as meaningful as it thinks it is, though it remains a surprisingly worthy film. Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@ themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

August 24 - August 26, 2009

Music therapist hits all of the right notes Program director inspires students and colleagues BY CRISTY VERDEJA CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

As a kid playing the clarinet and singing in the choir, Shannon de l’Etoile knew what she wanted to study in college. “I knew I definitely wanted to do something with music,’’ said de l’Etoile, SHANNON DE now an associate L’ETOILE PROGRAM professor and muDIRECTOR sic therapy program director at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami. Originally from Colorado, de l’Etoile got her bachelors and masters degrees from Colorado State University. She went on to get a doctorate in music education with an emphasis on music therapy from the University of Kansas. De l’Etoile is a “very accomplished music therapist,” said Patricia Chaviano, a senior majoring in music therapy and psychology and one of her students. Because of de l’Etoile’s varied experiences throughout the years, including research and clinical studies, she decided to conduct a study titled “Infants of Depressed and Non-Depressed Mothers: Responses to Infant-Directed Singing.” In this study, she takes a look at how infants respond to their mother singing to them, how those responses vary if the mother has depression or does not have depression, and what the mother’s voice (depressed or not) sounds like when singing. Before conducting her own original research project, de l’Etoile studied, researched, and helped many other people. One such person was a woman, about 80 years old, with Guion Beret Syndrome, a disease in which a patient experiences extreme weakness and amongst other things, can no longer walk. Her husband, a healthy man, went through rehab with her everyday. One day, recalled de l’Etoile, something profoundly changed. “I’m playing the autoharp and signing this nice waltz... so she’s standing and she’s just kind of shifting her weight from side to side and her husband was there and he was standing with her so they’re essentially dancing together and then they start crying, and I’m crying because she’s been so sick for so long that they haven’t been able

to do anything like that,” said de l’Etoile. Another case that affected de l’Etoile was that of 18-year-old Eliana. Eliana had an arteriovenus malformation, a spinal cord injury, at the age of 12. When de l’Etoile met Eliana, she was going to rehabilitation four times a week. “[Eliana] was getting ready to graduate from high school and she wanted to walk across the stage to get her diploma.” She was able to do that thanks to rhythmic auditory stimulation, said de l’Etoile. De l’Etoile went on to do clinical work about mothers with mental illnesses and their children that lead to her current study. One of the mothers was a 21-year-old with five children. “She basically had five children under the age of five,” said de l’Etoile. While she was helping this mother get some services, one of her daughters looked at de l’Etoile and asked her what was wrong with her face. De l’Etoile said she thought, “oh wow... she looks at me and I look abnormal because she’s not used to seeing typical [facial] expressions.” That’s when she wondered what the connection between a mother’s mental illness and her infant was. Perhaps experiences like these are why her students admire her. “Dr. de l’Etoile, was one of the deciding factors for me coming here [to UM],” said Natasha Babwah, a junior music therapy major. “[De l’Etoile] has a very bubbly and bright personality... I had her for one class... and I always say that if I did not have her I may not have worked as hard at the class because she has the ability to make you work.” Babwah said, “she’s always there for us if we need somebody to speak to about any problems that we are having or any advice or any help we need.” Chaviano agrees. She too attributes one of the reasons of coming to UM to de l’Etoile. “Because [de l’Etoile] is very passionate and loves what she does, it makes us [as students] want to be better musicians and music therapists,” said Chaviano. “I’m not saving the world, but I’m definitely trying to answer some questions,” de l’Etoile said. Cristy Verdeja may be contacted at cverdeja@ theiamihurricane.com.


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46

the number of votes the UM football team received in the USA Today Top 25 Coaches’ Poll

An ACC and a national championship, that’s what we play for. Anything less is frowned upon. - COLIN MCCARTHY, linebacker

FOOTBALL

Brutal schedule a tough test for football team BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

PLAYING WITH PIGSKIN: Senior running back Javarris James carries the football during practice drills last Monday afternoon at the GreenTree Practice Fields.

Canes plan to step it up a gear BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

No more cupcake games like Marshall and Charleston Southern to open the season. The Canes will have no room for early error as they open their 2009 campaign facing four straight top 25 teams, arguably the tough-

est schedule amongst any of the 120 Division I college football programs. The Hurricanes also have been picked to finish fourth in the ACC Coastal Division behind Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech and North Carolina respectively. But none of that matters to the Miami players as they are set out to prove the nation wrong. “I don’t really pay attention to that,” sophomore linebacker Sean Spence said. “People are going to predict what they want to predict,

but when two teams get on the field, that’s when it’s settled to me.” The Hurricanes do not mind having their opponents being the favorites against them. “It’s all about motivation,” sophomore wide receiver LaRon Byrd said. “It always starts with the underdog. The underdog always wants to be on top. I feel that’s going to drive our players more and more. They’re disrespecting Miami, so after this season they better respect Miami.”

For the first time in three years, the Hurricanes will open the season on the road in Tallahassee against nemesis Florida State. Last year, the Seminoles defeated the Canes in soggy conditions, 41- 39, at the old Dolphin Stadium. Miami then plays ACC foes Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech. Miami gave up an embarrassing 472 rushing yards against the Yellow Jackets last season while Virginia Tech is the two time reigning ACC Champion.

In their fourth game, the Canes will host Oklahoma, which returns to Land Shark Stadium after losing to Florida in the BCS National Championship game. Two years ago Oklahoma throttled Miami, 5113 in Heisman winner Sam Bradford’s second collegiate game. “They’re all going to be tough,” senior safety Randy Phillips said, who only played two games last year due to a left knee injury. “Those teams made noise last year.

SEE SCHEDULE, PAGE 18 August 24 - August 26, 2009

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VOLLEYBALL

SOCCER

New season for volleyball hopes to yield big changes

Record crowd at Cobb Stadium not enough for a Hurricane victory

Team dubbed No. 3 in conference BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

The University of Miami Volleyball team finally received the recognition that they deserved. After being predicted to finish ninth in the ACC Preseason Polls last year, Miami has been tabbed the No. 3 team in the ACC this year. Three Canes were also selected to the Preseason All-ACC Team. Senior outside hitter Genny Mayhew makes the team for the second consecutive year while senior libero Cassie Loessberg and

sophomore outside hitter Lane Carico receive preseason accolades for the first time. “It’s great to see our three players recognized,” ninth year Head Coach Nicole Lantagne Welch said. “I know how much they have done. We have a lot of the core of the team back which is critical for success and we have veteran experience. We also have a lot of young players that are also willing to step up so it’s a great mix all the way.” While Mayhew and Carico are a dynamic duo, Loessberg is the unsung hero and the defensive specialist. She is known for her tremendous hustle and determination to prolong plays. Loessberg needs just 189 digs to eclipse to all-

time record at UM for most digs in a career. “The award is on my mine but team success is more important,” the Sacramento native said. “As long as I am doing my job and the team is winning, everything will take care of itself.” The Hurricanes biggest asset is team chemistry and with the nucleus of the team returning, the strong cohesive bond should propel the Canes to numerous victories. “We have a special group,” Lantagne Welch said. “We have a strong culture and great team chemistry. The conference is going to be very strong with a lot of great teams. It’s going to come down to the final few games at the end of the season.” Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

BATTLE FOR THE BALL: Lindsay Thompson and Brittney Macdonald fight for a loose ball in the remaining minutes of the season-opening match against the Gators last Friday night.

FIVE CAN’T MISS MATCHES

TANYA THOMPSON // The Miami Hurricane

SMELLS LIKE TEAM SPIRIT: Ali Becker, Christine Williamson and Nrithya Sundararaman huddle up at volleyball practice.

Friday August 28th at 6:00 p.m. vs. Florida Gulf Coast (Home Opener) Friday September 18th at 6:00 p.m. at Florida State (First ACC Match) Friday October 23rd at 7:00 p.m. vs. North Carolina (Reigning CoChampions of ACC) Sunday November 8th at 1:00 p.m. vs. Duke (Preseason No. 1 in ACC) Wednesday November 25th at1:00 p.m. vs. Florida State (Last Regular Season Match)

Valiant effort proves futile BY DEBORA RUBI CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

The Miami Hurricanes soccer team kicked off their 2009 season with a 1-0 loss to instate rival No. 8 Florida Gators in front of a record breaking crowd of 2,777 at Cobb Stadium on Friday night. Fans unable to enter the stadium lined the fences along San Amaro Drive to see glimpses of the action. The electric atmosphere was not enough to propel the Canes past the reigning SEC Champions. The Hurricanes were unable to get revenge on the Gators since their last meeting when UF eliminated the Canes in the first round of the 2007 NCAA Tournament. The lone goal occurred in the opening minutes of the secAugust 24 - August 26, 2009

ond half when UF senior Ashlee Elliott headed the ball over the hands of sophomore goalie Vikki Alonzo from a perfectly placed cross by fellow senior Tricia Townsend. “I thought we did everything we possibly could except score the goals,” said eight year Head Coach Tricia Taliaferro. “We got to work on finishing under pressure.” The match was very competitive as each finished with the same number of fouls (nine) and corner kicks (six) while UM slightly outshot UF 15 to 13. The Hurricanes had several opportunities throughout but were unable to capitalize. “The Florida game is a great way to prepare,” Taliaferro said. “We’re in one of the best conferences in the country and you really try and get experience where you look for it.” Debora Rubi may be contacted at drubi@themiamihurricane.com.

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Team has high hopes FROM SCHEDULE, PAGE 15 It’s a great opportunity for me to show what I got, and every defensive guy on our team is thinking like that.” Now, Miami is lead by sophomore quarterback Jacory Harris and head coach Randy Shannon is in his third season. “It’s time for us to win the ACC,” Harris said. The Canes will welcome back three former starters. Phillips will return to safety, senior Eric Moncur will slide back into rotation at defensive end, and linebacker Colin McCarthy will be back in the heart of the defense.

If all three stay healthy, each of them will see signifcant time on the field. “Everyone is working hard and we’re just excited,” McCarthy said. “An ACC and a national championship, that’s what we play for. Anything less is frowned upon.” Byrd echoed the same sentiments. “We feel good about ourselves. This is definitely the year we have to make a point that says ‘Hey, Miami’s back.” Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@ themiamihurricane.com.

2009 MIAMI FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

August 24 - August 26, 2009

OPPONENT

LOCATION

STADIUM

DATE

No. 19 Florida State

Tallahassee, Fla.

Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium

Monday, Sept. 7th, 8:00 p.m.

No. 15 Georgia Tech

Miami Gardens, Fla

Land Shark Stadium

Thursday, Sept. 17th, 7:30 p.m.

No. 7 Virginia Tech

Blacksburg, Va.

Lane Stadium

Saturday, Sept. 26th, TBA

No. 3 Oklahoma

Miami Gardens, Fla.

Land Shark Stadium

Saturday, Oct. 3rd, TBA


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After three years of cyber bliss, I’m left in the real world friendless! Dear Sad,

, I was in a 3-year online relationship with someone that basically sucked my social life dry. She and I were so desperate to be together that we pretty much got to the point where nothing else was important and we ended up driving all our actual friends away. After a while this started to strain our relationship and we broke up, and now I feel all alone and don’t know what to do. I tried going back to my old friends, but many of them have moved on and with good reason. After these three years I have decided to go back to school and enrolled at UM this semester, but it’s been so long that I have been social (outside of the internet) that I don’t know where to start. Any suggestions? Sincerely, Sad in Cyberspace

Oh, to be young and in love! Candle lit dinners, tickle fights, and of course: the nooky. The loving bonds that shape relationships are formed through shared experiences. And it is impossible to partake in these experiences online. You can’t bore your mutual friends with photos from your road trip down the information superhighway. Granted, online dating is becoming increasingly common and can be a great way for people to find love. But for any relationship to succeed, things should move along—progress, if you will. You can’t share your first kiss via e-mail. You can’t have a date on AIM. And you can’t [use your imagination here], even with the best of webcams. It is understandable that you man-

dear ...

aged to find such comfort in someone so accepting of you, even if that someone was only accessible from a wireless hotspot. And now, you’ve realized the importance of a life away from the computer. And now, it’s time for a cliché: Pick your self up, dust your self off, and start all over again. Fortunately, UM offers a lot of ways to meet people. Join a club. Get involved working in the community. You could even talk to people in class. People are much less cold and scary than you have them out to be. Don’t be afraid to be outgoing and kind to peers. Keep up a confident smile, and people will be more drawn to you. It’s hard to diss a friendly face. The trickiest part of breakup aftershock is rebuilding your schedule. As soon as you find a [constructive] way to keep yourself occupied during all the time

you would have spent chatting with cyber-chick, you’ll find yourself feeling a lot more confident, and a lot less down in the dumps. Best of luck! V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@ themiamihurricane.com.

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BARTENDERS WANTED! UP TO $250 A DAY NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Training Provided. Age 18+ OK 800-965-6520 ext 166 August 24 - August 26, 2009

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The Miami Hurricane - Aug. 24, 2009